Page 1

Voter turnout could be affected by gubernatorial attack ads PAGE 25

PAGE 13 Volume 53, Issue 19

February 12, 2018

ColumbiaChronicle.com

Chicago Black Restaurant Week boosts black businesses

KIM:

We have to rethink this together SEE PAGES 6 & 7 » ARIANA PORTALATIN & CONNOR CARYNSKI MANAGING EDITOR & CAMPUS EDITOR

» KEVIN TIONGSON/CHRONICLE


editor’s note

How much snow would it take for Columbia to cancel class?

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» ZOË EITEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

2 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018

CAMPUS Tessa Brubaker Olivia Deloian Molly Walsh

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ARTS & CULTURE REPORTERS

Mayan Darbyshire Alexy Erouart Miranda Manier

METRO

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and posted tweets letting everyone know that, like UIC, all classes before 10 a.m. would be cancelled and buildings closed, OPINIONS EDITOR but classes for the rest of the day would continue as usual. For those of us who were around during COPY CHIEF the Spring 2015 Semester, this isn’t sur COPY EDITORS prising. Almost exactly three years ago on Feb. 2, Chicago saw its fifth worst winter storm in history with more than 19 inches of snow recorded at O’Hare International GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Airport, but Columbia made the same move it did this year and only cancelled ADVERTISING DESIGNER classes before 10 a.m., as discussed Feb. 9, 2015, by The Chronicle’s Editorial Board. What The Chronicle’s former Editorial SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS Board failed to note in its scathing view of Columbia students, staff and faculty STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS who “whine and complain about having to make a little more effort than usual to go into the Loop” during snowstorms is how MULTIMEDIA EDITOR dangerous travelling can be. MULTIMEDIA REPORTERS A person was killed in Iowa in a 50–70 car pileup on Feb. 5, and a crash involving six vehicles killed one person Friday in Michigan, and this is just as of press MEDIA SALES REPS time. So as snow and slush accumulated on streets, CTA buses skidded down the to their MARKETING ASSISTANT streets and students trudged 10:30 a.m. courses from homes through out the city and surrounding suburbs— not just on campus—trying WEBMASTER not to get hit ONLINE CONTENT PRODUCER by cars sliding around, but at least those with 9 a.m. classes didn’t have to worry. And while students were expected to OFFICE ASSISTANT still attend classes after 10 a.m., the first scheduled meeting of the semester for Faculty Senate was supposed GENERAL MANAGER to happen Friday at 12:30 p.m. but was FACULTY ADVISER cancelled that morning. ASSISTANT FACULTY ADVISER Colleges in the area need to think more about the safety of their students who live off campus when bad weather like this happens and not be stingy with cancelling classes. zeitel@columbiachronicle.com

C

hicago lived up to its reputation as one of the coldest and snowiest places outside of the Antarctic during the week of Feb. 5 when temperatures fell into the negatives. As the snow started falling due to Winter Storm Mateo, Cook County was expected to see 10 to 20 inches before the weather warning was to end Sunday evening. I’m writing this on Friday—Feb. 9—so I cannot predict what will happen over the weekend, but with the amount of snow accumulating outside The Chronicle office, it doesn’t look like we’re going to see clear skies or roads for a while. Chicago deployed 211 snow trucks to plow and salt streets on Friday, but some Loop streets were still mostly or partially covered with inches of snow into the late afternoon, such as Wabash Avenue, which became one lane rather than two. No, my Editor’s Note has not turned into a weather forecast, but everyone who has spent even a day in school in the Midwest knows how important winter weather becomes to students. Any time even a couple inches of snow are forecast, seemingly every conversation ends up centered around what is going to get shut down by the piles of snow, freezing temperatures and dangerous roads. This week was no different. As soon as the forecast was out, school closings abounded. Chicago Public Schools cancelled all school on Friday, the majority of—if not all—suburb schools and daycares shut down, and City Colleges of Chicago followed suit. Out of the four-year universities in the area, only Roosevelt University publicly stated its closure for Feb. 9 via Twitter. Robert Morris University cancelled classes that took place before 6 p.m. on Feb. 7, and it is unclear whether RMU took any action on Friday as well. University of Illinois at Chicago cancelled any classes scheduled before 10 a.m. on Friday while Loyola University continued all scheduled classes for the day. As the weather worsened on Thursday, Columbia students debated what would happen to their classes. Around 8 p.m. on Feb. 8, Columbia sent out automated phone calls and emails to all students

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campus

Swastikas drawn in The Dwight graffiti room were discovered Feb. 1 and most were covered with blue paint by the next morning. The graffiti room was scheduled for routine repainting the weekend after the discovery, which Dean of Students John Pelrine said was a coincidence,

WHILE ON A nightly walk in The Dwight Lofts graffiti room Feb. 1, Walter Sorel noticed a series of swastikas, the infamous symbol of the Nazi Third Reich, drawn on the floor. Sorel, a Jewish sophomore cinema and television arts major, was taken aback by the hateful symbol he witnessed in the room. The graffiti room, located on the 12th floor of The Dwight Lofts, 624 S. Clark St., was created to provide Columbia students the opportunity for artistic expression. Sorel said he immediately emailed his resident assistant, but after realizing the urgency of the situation, knocked on her door. Another RA was in and documented the swastikas immediately, planning to cover them up as soon as possible. “My biggest concern was that this was going to be unnoticed, and just painted over and not talked about,” Sorel said. “The idea that someone would spew this kind of hate speech is rather disturbing living in the same building as that.” Although he was impressed with the RA’s response and blue paint was covering the swastikas by morning on Feb. 2, Sorel said he still felt he needed to do more. His parents encouraged him to take the incident to the President’s Office. After speaking with Executive Assistant

to the President Yvonne Sode, Sorel said Sode’s compassion regarding the incident led him to speak with Dean of Students John Pelrine. Pelrine said after hearing from Sorel, he instantly alerted Vice President of Student Affairs Sharon Wilson-Taylor and Director of Residence Life Mary Oakes. “I asked [Oakes] to get someone over to The Dwight right away to check it out because we needed to see it. We also like to document this stuff to keep a record of it,” Pelrine said. The Dwight Management Office and Residence Life directed requests for comment to Oakes, who then directed all requests to Pelrine. Although coincidental, Pelrine said the graffiti room is scheduled to be painted white each semester and was scheduled by Dwight management to be painted the weekend after the discovery. “It’s unfortunately fairly common, so that’s why it’s important for Columbia and any other institution to push back,” Pelrine said. “Make it very clear that this is not acceptable. We’re not going to say this is normal because we don’t think it is.” According to the FBI’s latest hate crime statistics report, the number of hate crimes committed on college campuses have spiked between the years of 2015 and

2016—8.3 percent of total crimes in 2015 to 9.9 percent in 2016. Sorel said after speaking with Pelrine, they agreed a mass email should be sent out to Dwight residents in order to inform them of the swastikas, which was then sent Feb. 7. However, after receiving the email, Sorel was disappointed with the vague language the email used when describing “offensive graffiti” instead of specifying that swastikas were what was discovered. “What this email insinuates is that there was offensive content in the graffiti room, which there’s a lot of offensive content on the graffiti room, that’s all the room is,” Sorel said. “Considering that I had such great talks with the President’s Office and [Pelrine], I’m very disappointed. But I’m optimistic that we’ll get to the bottom of it. I don’t want to throw [Pelrine] under the bus because it’s a very difficult thing that he has to do and I want to make that clear too.” Monica Hirsch, senior cinema and television arts major and president of Hillel,an international Jewish student organization, said it is an extremely upsetting situation to hear of this happening at Columbia. Hirsch added that she felt the email informing residents was poorly handled. “It’s fair to say this is anti-Semitic

chronicle.colum.edu

» TESSA BRUBAKER & OLIVIA DELOIAN CAMPUS REPORTERS

Swastikas found in Dwight graffiti room

rhetoric and this is what’s wrong about it. Offensive graffiti anyone could have assumed anything,” Hillel said. “It’s misrepresenting the story to not say they were drawing swastikas and it feels like it’s another way to minimize anti-Semitism.” Shira Cortez, a freshman theatre major, and Dwight resident and said she had hung a Hanukkah sign on the outside of her door to commemorate the holiday during the fall semester. Cortez said her roommate found the sign broken into several pieces when she came home one day. While it is possible the sign could have fallen and gotten stepped on, Cortez said the possibility of it being a hate crime has crossed her mind. “Growing up, I was confronted with a lot of anti-Semitism in casual ways and people would joke and draw swastikas,” Cortez said. “It’s obviously not funny and it’s not a joke. It just made me sad that this was continuing in Chicago, but then again we live in a time of hatred and it’s scary if you think about it.” Hirsch said people need to be better educated about anti-Semitism and recognize it is still happening today. Sorel added that although what happened does make him uneasy, he is not going to change his actions or live in fear. “It makes me prouder of my identity and prouder of where I come from and prouder of my ancestors and my culture,” Sorel said. “Ultimately, we live in a world of hate and we need to be more conscious of that and be more appreciative of the people around us that love.”

FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 3


» TESSA BRUBAKER & OLIVIA DELOIAN CAMPUS REPORTERS

» ZACHARY KELTNER/CHRONICLE

SUDDEN CHANGES IN the LAS Core curriculum in addition to a new graduate degree in civic media were announced at several recent Town Hall meetings.

Two town halls, held by the Student Government Association, were held in early February to familiarize students with some of the schools deans and create a better understanding of upcoming changes and updates happening in several departments.

One was held Feb. 7 with Steven Corey, dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at 623 S. Wabash Ave. Corey discussed the college’s transition from the LAS core curriculum to the Columbia College Chicago core curriculum. Corey said the college will be working hard to implement the curriculum’s new classes. Only incoming students starting fall 2019 will use the new curriculum.

Eric Freedman, dean of the School of Media Arts, spoke with Student government Association members Feb. 5 about the upcoming graduate degree in Civic Media during the first of several Town Hall meetings.

Several students attended the Feb. 7 town hall meeting at 623 S. Wabash Ave. to learn about the new Columbia College Chicago core curriculum.

Corey said the new curriculum will be expanding on classes like the “Big Chicago” courses and introducing new classes for sophomores called “Creative World.” Juniors will then be required to take business communications and technology courses regardless of what their major is so they can be well rounded. “What we are doing is transforming the core to being an experience that is not just about taking classes in the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, but also through what we’re calling ‘the experience’ as well,” Corey said.

Veronique Hall, a sophomore public relations major and executive vice president of communications in SGA, said the series of weekly town halls held last semester influenced the current schedule of events. Students can now meet with their deans and learn more about their own departments. “I know with anyone’s experience at Columbia, they might have a burning question or they feel that somethings not fair within their department,” Hall said. “With these types of spaces, they’ll be able to get those questions answered.”

SEE TOWN HALL, PAGE 7

Town Halls reveal curriculum changes, degree additions

» ERIN DICKSON/CHRONICLE

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4 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018

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campus very intentional about which students we’re trying to recruit and why we’re not going to change the enrollment situation,” Kim said. Kim added that the college’s enrollment declines are not the problem, but a symptom of Columbia not clearly stating the value of its education. “All the work that all of you are doing is, in fact, geared toward getting clarity about that value,” Kim said. “We have to rethink this together because we’re not moving quickly enough. The model of change we are currently trying to implement has too many strands, too many pieces that don’t feel connected, too bound by the way we think about ourselves as an institution of higher education and as a result, we’re not keeping pace.” Kim also proposed the idea of a faculty space for collaboration, interdisciplinary work and imagining future work, which he said is not possible if the college continues traditional ways of thinking. “This is about excellence, innovation [and] true entrepreneurship, which moves fast, as opposed to

how we like to move, which is very deliberately,” Kim said. “It’s got to be a space where at least as many mistakes are made as successes developed.” In response to this proposal, Eric May, associate professor in the English and Creative Writing Department, said faculty need more time to properly collaborate, with which Kim agreed. May added that whenever faculty asks for extra time during the

academic year to work together, they are turned down. “We have to remember one of the most important resources is time,” May said. “We’re not going to get where we need to be in an interdisciplinary way if the college will not give us the time, but that’s probably the most important commodity.” Senior interactive arts and media major Dane Wheaton stood out from faculty during the

» KEVIN TIONGSON/CHRONICLE

IN A PACKED room filled with faculty, staff and administration, President and CEO Kwang-Wu Kim detailed his vision for the college’s future, addressed ongoing concerns and gave updates on the college’s progress on Strategic Plan implementation. Kim began the event, held Feb. 7 at 1104 S. Wabash Ave., by acknowledging that he has not been as present at the college recently, but he thought it was time to engage faculty and staff about the college’s current standing. “I believe we’re all here, not just in this room, but in this institution because we share a common belief in the value and importance of Columbia College Chicago,” Kim said during the event. While discussing the college’s changes in enrollment between its historically low current numbers and its 2008 peak, Kim said the college would not benefit from returning to its past ways of thinking, including open enrollment. Despite the popularity of open

enrollment among college faculty, Kim said it previously put the college at a disadvantage because admitted students included those who would not succeed. “We would bring in students regardless of their ability to pay or succeed, and when they inevitably failed, there was always a new student to take their place,” Kim said. “I would question all of us, starting with myself, is that a model that we would want to be proud of or want to return to? Knowing this college the way I do, I’m willing to say, ‘No chance.’ No chance would we want to stake our claim as an institution on what is essentially a practice which is questionable from an ethical and moral perspective.” Kim added that data unfortunately predicts a continuous nationwide enrollment decline for the next 15–20 years, but Senior Vice President and Provost Stan Wearden is analyzing data and communicating with faculty to determine the best students to admit to help stabilize enrollment. “This is something we needed for a long time because, unless we’re

SEE KIM PAGE 7

KIM, FROM FRONT

Senior interactive arts and media major Dane Wheaton discussed departmental authority during the Feb. 7 Presidential Update at which President and CEO Kwang-Wu Kim talked about future goals for the college.

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event to advocate for more departmental authority and less at the dean level from a student perspective, describing the current circumstances as an “administrative stranglehold.” “Centralizing the decisions may be hurting more than it’s helping,” Wheaton said. “We find ourselves going on wild goose chases whenever we’re looking for information. We’re bearing a disproportionate amount of the financial impositions and curricular changes I don’t think are necessary. We can do a whole lot better if the departments themselves are given a lot more freedom.” Kim agreed with Wheaton, echoing his earlier statements on the importance of rethinking the college’s processes to be more effective. “We haven’t come to a determination of what that adjustment means but you’re right,” Kim said. “We’re exactly at the moment when we have to rethink.”

Steven Corey, dean of the School of Liberal Arts, explained the college’s new core curriculum that will take effect in 2019. TOWN HALL, FROM PAGE 4

Jazmin Bryant, a sophomore cinema and television arts major and executive vice president of SGA, said a SGA goal for the year was to help bridge the gap and connect the student body to the whole Columbia community. Corey said he thought the Town Hall meeting was successful, adding that these meetings are a great way to connect with students.

“I very much want to hear from students. I want to know about students’ concerns and not really their concerns but what they’re interested in and questions they have about how the institution is running and their roles in the institution,” Corey said. Eric Freedman, dean of the School of Media Arts, spoke to SGA members Bryant and Hall

about the new graduate degree in Civic Media during the Feb. 5 Town Hall at the 33 E. Congress Parkway Building. During the Feb. 5 Town Hall only one faculty member attended and no students arrived, leaving it up to SGA to ask Freedman questions. The civic media master’s degree will take about three semesters to complete and will allow students with a wide range of undergraduate degrees to apply for the program, Freedman said. He added they will also be fine tuning other degrees. Freedman said he hopes students can better understand their departments and programs from these Town Halls, despite the lack of participants at his own. “[I want] to engage in more open dialogue and answer any questions [students] may have about the year ahead [in] an open forum, an open conversation,” he said. Kyle Heger, a senior cultural studies major and SGA senator, said these meetings are important so students can stay connected to what is happening at the college.

Jazmin Bryant, sophomore cinema and television arts major, said she wants to engage more students through town hall meetings.

“It’s still my department and I need to be a voice for students. Within Student Government, it is my job to be here. It’s my job to facilitate people to ask questions or to answer questions towards me,” Heger said. “Student voices are what I’m here for, but it’s also the engagement with faculty, with different alumni if they were to come if they knew this was going on and/or other students who want their voices heard too.”

chronicle@colun.edu

KIM, FROM PAGE 6

» ZACHARY KELTNER/CHRONICLE

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Celebrities should be allowed to have a life outside of fame » ColumbiaChronicle.com

Enter Through The Laundry » ALEXY EROUART ARTS & CULTURE REPORTER

The Magic Lounge will enertain guests at the Harry Blackstone Theatre, 5050 N. Clark St., seating up to 120 guests.

GONE ARE THE days of pulling rabbits out of a hat, but deft, intricate sleights of hands have made a comeback, according to Jeff Bibik, resident bar performer at The Chicago Magic Lounge. The Ravenswood-based lounge will be the city’s largest home for magic performance and will have its grand opening Feb. 22 with Max Maven headlining. The performance will also feature Kayla Drescher, a Los Angeles-based magician, and a host of house magicians performing sophisticated routines including hypnotism and mentalism, according to Bibik. “There’s nothing like [Chicago Magic Lounge],” Bibik said. “There’s a market out there for people who want to see good magic performed.” The lounge, 5050 N. Clark St., is unique because most other similar venues are private, Bibik said. It features a large 120-seat theater, the Harry Blackstone Cabaret, named after the famous Chicago magician and several smaller ones including the 654 Club, which seats 44 people. Chicago has a rich history of magic, according to Bibik, and the venue mimics the atmosphere of a Chicago speakeasy. The outside looks like the previous tenant, a former laundromat, never left, but on the inside, secret entrances allow visitors to feel like they are traveling back in time.

Jonathan Kamm, a resident magician at the bar, said the inspiration for the bar came from co-owner Joey Cranford’s passion for Chicago’s history of magic during the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s. Kamm said the magicians’ inspiration for their tricks and routines comes from their lives, but it takes a great deal of time to perfect these complicated maneuvers. Magicians are like artists because of the high degree of ingenuity needed for the position, he added. “I’ve always thought we are artists. It certainly takes skill to do what we do. It’s very creative. We have to come up with our own [tricks and routines], with a lot of acting involved,” Kamm said. Bill Weimer, resident bar performer and author of a book on Chicago magic titled “Now You See Them, Now You Don’t,” said the appeal of live magic is that it is “fun and engaging.” Weimer said he likes using friendly conversation at the bar to weave the audience members into his routine. After all, people want to be entranced and entertained, literally and figuratively. “I’m geared more for the entertainment. You’ve got to have fun. New York Lounge had this sign [that read] ‘It’s fun to be fooled,’ and the keyword there is not fooled, but fun. The bar is going to be fun, interactive and improvisational,” Weimer said. aerouart@columbiachronicle.com

» PHOTOS COURTESY CHICAGO MAGIC LOUNGE

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FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 9


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fter a group of New York high school students protested the casting of a white student for the role of Esmeralda in Ithaca High School’s musical production of Disney’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” the students began getting harassed with racist and offensive comments. With the response these students got for advocating for something positive, the need to support diversity in casting has proven to be more important than ever. The situation began last month when student activists objected to the casting by forming the Students United Ithaca group, which wrote letters and organized a campaign against the musical direction to advocate for a student of color to play the leading role instead of a white student, according to a Feb. 8 New York Times article. The musical, based on the 1831 novel by Victor Hugo and the 1996 Disney animated film, tells the story of an outcast bellringer who sets out to help Esmeralda, a dancer who is framed for murder. In Hugo’s book, it is unclear whether both Esmeralda’s parents are Roma, but Disney’s film shows the character with a dark complexion, and that is the version Ithaca’s students grew up watching, according to the NYT article. Roma people are descendants of migrants who arrived in Europe from India more than a millennium ago. Considering that students of color make up 34 percent of the high school’s student body, students were right to want that demographic represented in the production, which is especially important when it comes to a minority character. Instead of casting a student of color for the role, the high school eventually decided to cancel the production after a community meeting was held to discuss the casting concerns. Not long after, the local debate expanded nationwide when it was picked up by multiple right-wing publications, including Breitbart and neo-Nazi site The Daily Stormer. The criticism was offensive, to say the least. Students soon saw pictures of themselves on social media with swastikas over

their faces and received racist comments and messages. One parent received an email accusing her of embracing “antiwhite racism,” saying, “I feel bad for your brainwashed child.” Supporting an accurate representation of a diverse student body is not racist and it is not “anti-white.” It is the exact opposite. Let’s not forget that productions, films and other artistic expressions are used as a way to tell stories, which brings with it a responsibility to tell those stories as accurately as possible. This means casting multicultural characters with diverse participants to match. Disney has come under fire numerous times in the past for whitewashing its multicultural characters in their films, including live action remakes of their “Mulan” and “Aladdin” movies. This one should not be excluded just because it’s not exclusively a Disney production and because the issue lies on a smaller scale with a high school production. These issues reflect a much larger problem during politically-charged times under the current White House administration. Not only is it important to support diverse casting, but it’s imperative to do so not just in huge Hollywood productions with adults, but with those that are small-scale and include all ages. Then, multiculturalism is supported from a young age when people are more impressionable and able to accurately see the reality of the increasingly diverse population they live in. Whether it is in Hollywood or a high school, accurate representation matters. aportalatin@columbiachronicle.com

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Chicago Black Restaurant Week brings bucks to Many of my restaurants came from no black businesses every restaurant. We appreciate the momentum.” Smith said the event helps lesser-known establishments

loans [and] from hard earned money and taking chances.

ERIK NANCE

gain recognition and could also promote spending within their communities. “Some of the newer restaurants that have just opened up, or some of the young and budding restaurants that have only been in business for a small time, don’t necessarily get a lot of business,” Smith said. “They really don’t have a lot of revenue to play around with. They may or may not be able to afford the registration fee for the regular [Chicago] Restaurant Week.” The exposure Chicago Black Restaurant Week gives to smaller businesses has attracted people like Tamara Brown, owner of Nadia’s Gourmet Grapes in Evergreen Park, who said

who started Nadia’s Gourmet Grapes out of her event-planning business, said the attention is well worth it, and is confident in her ability to use that attention well. CBRW restaurants served more than 900 dinners in 2017 and generated more than $12,000 in revenue, according to their website. The support from the public was also growing, and public opinion was positive, Smith added. “People are finding out about food that they would travel all the way up north, or all the way out west [for].” Smith said “Now they can get that cuisine right in their neighborhood.”

» SAMANTHA CONRAD/CHRONICLE

BLACK RESTAURANT OWNERS are gearing up for the third annual Chicago Black Restaurant Week, a celebration of blackowned restaurants. The celebration runs Feb. 11–18— the second week of Black History Month—and features 26 blackowned restaurants across the city. The event week falls on what was once known as “Negro History Week” founded by Dr. Carter G. Woodson in 1936, according to CBRW’s website. Lauran Smith, CBRW’s designer and creative director, said she wanted to promote AfricanAmerican food and drink businesses and provide a week to encourage people to support them.

“The goal is to increase revenue in the African-American community, to make sure these businesses are able to stay open, that people will patronize them even after the week is over,” Smith said. “I’ve even had businesses say to me that they’ve had to hire additional employees due to the influx of business coming in from the week.” Each of the 26 restaurants partnered with CBRW will be offering exclusive deals for that week including discounts on specific food or drink Items. “It sounded like music to my ears,” said Erik Nance, owner of Mikkey’s Retro Grill in Hyde Park, a CBRW participant. “Many of my restaurants came from no loans [and] from hard-earned money and taking chances. Every dollar really counts; it counts in

mdarbyshire@columbiachronicle.com

» MAYAN DARBYSHIRE ARTS & CULTURE REPORTER

she has seen a noticeable spike in traffic. This will be its second year participating in the event and Brown,

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FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 13


arts & culture

students.colum.edu/ComputerStore

Welcome Back to Your Student Technology Center. đ&#x;“ąđ&#x;“ą (312) 369-8622 đ&#x;’Œđ&#x;’Œ COMPUTERSTORE@COLUM.EDU

� OPEN WEEKDAYS 11:00AM – 6:00PM

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đ&#x;¤‘đ&#x;¤‘ A+ EDUCATIONAL DISCOUNTS Our educational discounts on Mac, iPad and tech accessories give you the best bang for your buck. We also accept payments with the BookCharge through Student Financial Services and have a Trade-in, Trade-up program that makes upgrading your devices more affordable than ever.

đ&#x;˜ąđ&#x;˜ą FREE SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS

Your one stop for technology savings & support on campus, from the people who know Columbia best. Whether you're looking for complimentary appointment-free support, repairs, technical troubleshooting, or just want to find the best device for you, we recommend having a chat with some of your local tech nerds experts - that's us. To get a personal computer recommendation contact us via phone, email, or checkout our website for a department-based equipment guide! EQUIPMENT GUIDE ‘17

EQUIPMENT GUIDE ‘17

students.colum.edu/ComputerStore

Welcome to Your Student Technology Center. " (312) 369-8622 # COMPUTERSTORE@COLUM.EDU

� OPEN WEEKDAYS 11:00AM – 6:00PM

% 33 E. CONGRESS PARKWAY

On the front page you will find all of the benefits and details of shopping here at Columbia - on the back page you can check your department’s equipment recommendation, our favorite applications for your major and some helpful tips!

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* FREE OFFICE 365

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" (312) 369-8622 # COMPUTERSTORE@COLUM.EDU

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% 33 E. CONGRESS PARKWAY

students.colum.edu/ComputerStore

Welcome to Your Student Technology Center. " (312) 369-8622 # COMPUTERSTORE@COLUM.EDU

� OPEN WEEKDAYS 11:00AM – 6:00PM

% 33 E. CONGRESS PARKWAY

&

&

&

A+ EDUCATIONAL DISCOUNTS

A+ EDUCATIONAL DISCOUNTS

Our educational discounts on Mac, iPad and tech accessories give you the best bang for your buck. We also accept payments with the BookCharge through Student Financial Services and have a Trade-in, Tradeup program that makes upgrading your devices more affordable than ever.

Our educational discounts on Mac, iPad and tech accessories give you the best bang for your buck. We also accept payments with the BookCharge through Student Financial Services and have a Trade-in, Tradeup program that makes upgrading your devices more affordable than ever.

Our educational discounts on Mac, iPad and tech accessories give you the best bang for your buck. We also accept payments with the BookCharge through Student Financial Services and have a Trade-in, Tradeup program that makes upgrading your devices more affordable than ever.

FREE SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS

Owned and operated by Columbia, we are your technology center on campus to find the best deals on technology, software, accessories and equipment for class.

Welcome to Your Student Technology Center.

A+ EDUCATIONAL DISCOUNTS

'

RADIO TUNE-IN TO THE SOUND OF YOU.

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We offer complimentary and appointment-free troubleshooting for all of your devices, general help and One-on-One sessions, hardware & software diagnostics, virus removal, repairs for Mac and more!

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'

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YOUR STORY WILL MAKE HEADLINES. Owned and operated by Columbia, we are your technology center on campus to find the best deals on technology, software, accessories and equipment for class. On the front page you will find all of the benefits and details of shopping here at Columbia - on the back page you can check your department’s equipment recommendation, our favorite applications for your major and some helpful tips!

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* FREE OFFICE 365

VISIT US TO DOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERION OF MICROSOFT OFFICE FOR FREE. THE LICENSE WILL LAST YOUR ENTIRE STAY AT COLUMBIA AND WORKS ON MAC & PC!

+

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WE OFFER THE SAME SUPPORT AS APPLE WITH NONE OF THE WAIT. OUR SUPPORT IS FREE AND OUR REPAIRS ARE LESS EXPENSIVE AND APPLE CERTIFIED.

" (312) 369-8622 # COMPUTERSTORE@COLUM.EDU

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BUYING THE EQUIPMENT YOU NEED DOESN’T NEED TO BREAK THE BANK - UTILIZE THE BOOK CHARGE VIA SFS OR TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR TRADE-IN PROGRAM!

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We offer complimentary and appointment-free troubleshooting for all of your devices, general help and One-on-One sessions, hardware & software diagnostics, virus removal, repairs for Mac and more!

(  CERTIFIED GENIUSES

In addition to being an Apple Authorized Campus Store, we also have a Certified Mac Technician on staff to offer you the same troubleshooting experience and in-warranty (AppleCare) / out-ofwarranty repairs that you would get from Apple.

✌ ALWAYS HERE TO HELP Our support isn’t just Monday – Friday, it’s lifelong. We’re here on campus to support your technology needs during your stay here and after you graduate - guaranteed. % 33 E. CONGRESS PARKWAY ENTRANCE ON WABASH AVE.

'

PHOTOGRAPHY

FREE SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS

CAPTURE YOUR IMAGINATION. Owned and operated by Columbia, we are your technology center on campus to find the best deals on technology, software, accessories and equipment for class. On the front page you will find all of the benefits and details of shopping here at Columbia - on the back page you can check your department’s equipment recommendation, our favorite applications for your major and some helpful tips!

Check out the back page to learn more! ↊

* FREE OFFICE 365

VISIT US TO DOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERION OF MICROSOFT OFFICE FOR FREE. THE LICENSE WILL LAST YOUR ENTIRE STAY AT COLUMBIA AND WORKS ON MAC & PC!

+

,

FREE SUPPORT

WE OFFER THE SAME SUPPORT AS APPLE WITH NONE OF THE WAIT. OUR SUPPORT IS FREE AND OUR REPAIRS ARE LESS EXPENSIVE AND APPLE CERTIFIED.

" (312) 369-8622 # COMPUTERSTORE@COLUM.EDU

SAVE MONEY

BUYING THE EQUIPMENT YOU NEED DOESN’T NEED TO BREAK THE BANK - UTILIZE THE BOOK CHARGE VIA SFS OR TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR TRADE-IN PROGRAM!

� OPEN WEEKDAYS 11:00AM – 6:00PM

We offer complimentary and appointment-free troubleshooting for all of your devices, general help and One-on-One sessions, hardware & software diagnostics, virus removal, repairs for Mac and more!

We always offer complimentary and appointment-free troubleshooting for all of your devices, general help and One-on-One sessions, hardware & software diagnostics, virus removal, repairs for Mac computers and more!

đ&#x;¤”đ&#x;¤”  CERTIFIED GENIUSES

In addition to being an Apple Authorized Campus Store, we also have a Certified Mac Technician on staff to offer you the same help with troubleshooting experiences and in-warranty (AppleCare) / out-ofwarranty repairs that you would expect from an Apple Store.

(  CERTIFIED GENIUSES

In addition to being an Apple Authorized Campus Store, we also have a Certified Mac Technician on staff to offer you the same troubleshooting experience and in-warranty (AppleCare) / out-ofwarranty repairs that you would get from Apple.

✌ ALWAYS HERE TO HELP Our support isn’t just Monday – Friday, it’s lifelong. We’re here on campus to support your technology needs during your stay here and after you graduate - guaranteed. % 33 E. CONGRESS PARKWAY ENTRANCE ON WABASH AVE.

THE BEST SAVINGS & SERVICE FOR STUDENTS.

Must be a current student, staff, or faculty member of Columbia College Chicago to shop at the Computer Store. All offers valid while supplies last. No rain checks or special orders. All sales final. ™ and Š 2016 Apple Inc.  All rights reserved.

14 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018


arts & culture

Musa Reems is still ‘Sol Searching’ first [song on] Lately I’ve Been Sol Searching, my aunty had just passed so I was trying to find my focus and get to a certain point in my life where I know who I am. With that being said, I laid down that first [track] and then that second one was diving even deeper into that [idea of] what Chicago is to me.

M

my own production to have to rap over, so me and my homies would make beats on FL Studio. What would be the soundtrack to growing up on the West Side? I grew up with Do Or Die, Twista, Lupe [Fiasco], [and] I’m definitely a big fan of Common. “Be” is a perfect album to me. I love that album, of all the albums I listen to, with [Kanye West’s] production on that plus [Common’s] rhymes puts me into a different state of mind. Chicago is so rich—it’s an amazing music scene.

» COURTESY MUSA REEMS

when I was in high school, I was always pretty quiet. I was the shy kid, but when I got to high school, I got culture shock. alik Muhammad, also known as Chicago is very segregated, so when I was Musa Reems, is a senior business growing up, it was predominantly black and entrepreneurship major and and Hispanic kids. So when I got to high rapper from Austin. In 2017, he signed to school, it was more of a mixture and I ended Columbia’s AEMMP Hip-Hop Record up going to Pitchfork in 2012. In eighth Label practicum course. Now, Reems is How has working with AEMMP grade, I was also introduced to MF Doom preparing to unveil his second project Hip-Hop affected your career? so I would freestyle over Special Herbs. on the AEMMP label and released a new It’s been dope. It’s been great to work with When I got to high school, I kept that paspromotional single Feb. 7. His next project, the students. I’ve got a lot of new friends sion, and when I went to Pitchfork, I saw Lately I’ve been Sol Searching 2, will be like my manager, Justin Thomas. Working A$AP Rocky perform and that gave me released in March. with a lot of people like Dominique Jones the confidence to do it myself. I started Reems detailed his inspiration for the who was my events coordinator last semes- working on beats first because I wanted new project, spoke about life after signing ter—this semester she’s in marketing—and to AEMMP, his passion for rhyming and then working with RTC, Alex Fruchter, [lecmore in an interview with The Chronicle. turer in the Business and Entrepreneurship Department and professor of the AEMMP THE CHRONICLE: What was the Hip-Hop practicum] learning from him. inspiration behind your latest project? The best thing I ever learned in life is that MUSA REEMS: I was working on this you don’t know everything, but you have to project called “Where The Sun Never Rises” invest in yourself. I was always focused on already, so to tie in Lately I’ve Been Sol investing in myself and having someone Searching, I spelled “soul” instead of S-O- with the [other] roles is always dope to be U-L, S-O-L, which is sun in Latin, just to tie around and get some insight from.. everything together to make it a three-part series. It’s on the theme of how Chicago is What inspired your love for rhymes? Musa Reems will be releasing his second clouded in negativity and [shows] how it can I want to rhyme as much as I want to breathe project, Lately I’ve Been Sol Seaching 2 this March. be much more than that. When I wrote the to be honest. Rhyming is life. I remember » ALEXY EROUART ARTS & CULTURE REPORTER

aerouart@columbiachronicle.com

audiofile

NOW PLAYING Songs for slow dancing

Love songs for gently swaying

Listen to all the tracks at http://open.spotify.com/user/thecolumbiachronicle

» HAWK THOTTUPURAM

» TESSA BRUBAKER

MULTIMEDIA REPORTER “Unchained Melody”

The Righteous Brothers

“Can’t Help Falling in Love” “Faithfully” “Stand By Me” “I Want To Know What Love Is”

Elvis Presley

“Bluegrass”

“Naked as We Came”

Birdy & Rhodes Iron & Wine

“Slow Dancing in a Burning Room” “Hold You in My Arms”

“Liability”

Lorde

Ben E. King

“Samson”

Regina Spektor

“Let It Be Me”

“To Be Alone With You”

Sufjan Stevens

“Won’t Let Me Go”

Foreigner

» OLIVIA DELOIAN

MEDIA SALES REP

“Like Real People Do”

“Let It All Go”

MULTIMEDIA REPORTER

Journey

» GRACE SENIOR

“Georgia”

» SAWYER GAUNT

CAMPUS REPORTER

Hozier Matt Phillips

“Thank You” “Harvest Moon” “Get You”

“First Day of My Life”

Bright Eyes

“Wonderful Tonight”

“Autumn Leaves”

Ed Sheeran

“Cigarette Daydreams”

Ray LaMontagne

“Finally”

Trevor Wesley Roy LaMontagne Amos Lee

» MICHA THURSTON

CAMPUS REPORTER Vance Joy

John Mayer

AD & BUSINESS MANAGER Led Zeppelin Neil Young Daniel Caesar Eric Clapton Cage the Elephant

“Be My Baby”

The Ronettes

“I’ll Be Seeing You”

Billie Holiday

“You and Me” “Then He Kissed Me”

Penny & The Quarters The Crystals

“Anyone Who Knows What Love Is” Irma Thomas

FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 15


arts & culture

SEX LOVERS CAN stand proud, for over that oddly asymmetrical horizon rides the 13th annual Hump! Film Festival. The festival will take place Feb. 16–17 at Chicago’s Music Box Theatre, 3733 N. Southport Ave., and feature 21 short films, each less than five minutes, of varying sexual content made by amateurs, according to the festival’s website. “I like to call it exploratory porn,” said Robert Crocker, executive producer of Hump! Film Festival who has been heading the event since 2008. Crocker said the festival’s mission is to represent various sexualities, which led to the festival’s success. Hump! started in 2005 when Hump!’s curator, Dan Savage, a columnist and popular host of the “Savage Lovecast,” a prominent

sex-advice podcast, thought it would be insightful to ask readers to send in homemade porn. Crocker said it was a throwback to the ‘70s, when people watched porn in movie theaters before the advent of VHS. Hump! has worked with the Music Box for about 10 years and those attending make for great audiences, said Ryan Oestreich, the theater’s general manager. “It’s electric,” Oestreich said, “Everybody’s into it. Everybody was really open to the things they see on screen and letting the short films do their thing and sort of tell their stories or kind of creatively show sexual acts and different sexual kinks.” Crocker said while the show focuses on a range of sexualities and genders, it also varies tonally, with some of this year’s entries including Pizza Roles, Bum Appetit and Dildrone—in

Hump! Film Festival features 21 curated sex flicks made by amateurs, coming to Chicago Feb. 16–17 at the Music Box Theatre, 3733 N. Southport Ave.

which characters attach a dildo to a drone. Hump! received about 120 submissions last year, according to Crocker, which the team of four

and a few others watch and curate into a fitting festival lineup. “We call it the Hump Jury,” said Tracey Cataldo, director of operations of the Hump! Film Festival.

Cataldo said the process can take one to two days, and they all pile into a room and watch the films. “We try to pick a good balance of everything. We don’t just pick the best produced, best directed, sharpest looking, best technically put together films,” Cataldo said. “We have to pick a lot of films that are representing as broad a spectrum as we can.” Cataldo said the touring festival started in 2014 with 16 locations— a far cry from the nearly 40 cities on the lineup this year. Thanks to word of mouth and social media, venues began reaching out to them and the festival grew from there, she added. Cataldo said people attending Hump! for the first time may be taken aback by the event, and said she does her best to inform them of the festival’s mission. “You’ve got to be open minded,” Cataldo said, “we’re all over the map. I say that we’re gay, straight, trans, bi, big, white, black, small and purple.”

FRESHER

FASTER IT’S JUST THE WAY I ROLL

WE DELIVER! VISIT JIMMYJOHNS.COM TO FIND A LOCATION NEAR YOU 16 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018

mdarbyshire@columbiachronicle.com

» MAYAN DARBYSHIRE ARTS & CULTURE REPORTER

»COURTESY HUMP! FEST

Hump! Film Festival rides raw into Chicago’s Music Box


arts & culture

3730 N. CLARK ST METROCHICAGO.COM @ METROCHICAGO

FEB 18 / 7PM / ALL AGES

MAR 1 / 7:30PM / ALL AGES

MAR 10 / 8:30PM / 18+

MAR 24 / 7PM / ALL AGES

APR 6 / 7:30PM / ALL AGES

APRIL 14 / 8:30 / ALL AGES

FRI FEB 23 / 7PM / 18+ The Decibel Tour 2018 with

ENSLAVED

WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM MYRKUR / KHEMMIS WED FEB 28 / 8PM / 18+ Metro & smartbar present

JEFF MILLS & TONY ALLEN RON TRENT

FRI MAR 2 / 7PM / 18+ Empire Productions & Metal Threat welcome

WATAIN DESTROYER 666 ARES KINGDOM

SAT MAR 3 / 8PM / 18+

PROPAGANDHI IRON CHIC / LA ARMADA

TUE MAR 13 / 9PM / 18+ A Metro 35th Anniversary Celebration with

NADA SURF

CELEBRATING THE 15TH ANNIVERSARY OF LET GO SAT MAR 17 / 9PM / 18+ A St. Patrick's Day Celebration with

THE TOSSERS

JOSEPH HUBER THE AVONDALE RAMBLERS

SUN MAR 18 + MON MAR 19 / 8pm / 18+ A Metro 35th Anniversary Celebration with

GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR

18TH: KGD 18TH: LIBERTY / TASHI DORJI DUO WOLF ALICE URBANITE XXI THE LAWRENCE ARMS FRONT 242 WYCLEF JEAN TOM MISCH BIG K.R.I.T PETER HOOK & THE LIGHT THE FRATELLIS

MARCH 30 APRIL 7 APRIL 12 APRIL 13 APRIL 15 APRIL 26 APRIL 28 MAY 4 MAY 11

FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 17


arts & culture » SAMANTHA CONRAD & KEVIN TIONGSON/CHRONICLE

RECIPE

DIRECTIONS: 1. Soak noodles in warm water, covered, for 30 minutes. 2. Mix fish sauce, oyster sauce, sriracha, and the juice of a lime. 3. Mince garlic and thinly slice bell pepper and onion

zkeltner@columbiachronicle.com

4. Add vegetable oil to a large frying pan, then add minced garlic and ground pork. Cook until pork is cooked through.

Pork Pad Thai » ZACHARY KELTNER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

You can’t go wrong with a warm bowl of noodles after a long day at school or work. Add in some savory-yet-spicy sauce along with pork and veggies, and you’ve got yourself a meal so action-packed, Liam Neeson wouldn’t even want to make a part two. Cheap and relatively easy to cook but with incredible taste, pork pad thai is the perfect dish for home cooking on a budget.

INGREDIENTS: 8 ounces flat rice noodles 1/4 cup oyster sauce 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha 1 medium lime 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 cloves garlic 1/2 pound ground pork 2 eggs 1 onion 1 bell pepper 1/2 bunch cilantro

5. Push the pork to the outer walls of the pan, then crack two eggs in the center. Scramble eggs until set, then mix with the pork. 6. Add the sliced onion and bell pepper to the pan and cook until they begin to soften. 7. Drain the noodles, then add to pan along with the sauce. Stir until the noodles have fully softened and the sauce has coated the contents. 8. Top with chopped cilantro and serve.

$5 OF F A DM IS SI O N w it h th is AD

18 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018


arts & culture

$3 OFF

OUR SIGNATURE FOOTLONG GRILLED CHEESE WITH COLUMBIA STUDENT ID M O N DAY-F R I DAY 3 P M-7 P M

W W W. T H E S C O U T C H I C A G O . C O M - ( 3 1 2 ) 7 0 5 - 0 5 9 5 - 1 3 0 1 S . WA B A S H AV E . C H I C A G O , I L FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 19


top

arts & culture

our staff’s top 5 picks:

‘PORTLANDIA’ SKETCHES

Recommendation: ‘Gone Girl’ is the thriller novel you need » TESSA BRUBAKER CAMPUS REPORTER

I

tbrubaker@columbiachronicle.com

t was a hot mid-July afternoon when I was scanning the shelves at Robert Beverly Hale Library in South Kingstown, Rhode Island. I had a couple days off from my summer job working at a grocery store and was looking for an easy read to crack open on the beach. That’s when I came across “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn. The only thing I knew about it was the movie that came out in 2014 that everyone talked about, so I decided to check it out. “Gone Girl” turned out to be my favorite book I read that summer, and that’s saying something since I read so much. It’s a thrilling story about a marriage gone horribly wrong. The plot begins with Nick Dunne waking up on his fifth wedding anniversary with his wife, Amy. But Amy is missing and law enforcement tagged Nick as their number one suspect in her disappearance. I don’t normally like thriller novels, but this changed my mind and now they are all I want to read. This story will take you on a journey with a ton of suspense and surprises on every page. You never really know what’s going to happen in this roller coaster of a book. If you’re feeling stressed from college life, pick up a copy and visit your favorite coffee shop on a Saturday afternoon. Reading is the perfect way to escape from everyday stressful life, and “Gone Girl” is a fantastic novel to accompany you.

STRANGE INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

SONGS ON ‘MAN OF THE WOODS’

» ERIN DICKSON STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

» ZACHARY KELTNER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

» MACKENZIE CROSSON SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR

A-O River!:

Calcio Fiorentino (Italy):

“Sauce”:

This is the most recognizable moment from the show’s two arguably funniest characters, Kath and Dave. The two comedians’ interactions are hilarious. Carrie Brownstein coined the phrase “A-O River” randomly while filming, which makes it even better.

This game is played on a 260-by-130foot sand field with nets on both sides. To score, the ball has to be thrown or placed in the other team’s net. However, this sport is certainly not for the faint of heart. Punching, kicking, tackling and even choking are all permitted.

If you’re looking for more classic, feelgood Justin Timberlake, this song may be your go-to. Though it doesn’t quite represent his sound like “SexyBack” or “Cry Me a River,” it’ll definitely sauce you up—whatever that means.

Banana Daiquiri:

Bo-Taoshi (Japan):

After Nance’s husband Peter leaves to tour with his band, she has to resort to singing to get him back. The way the sketch was edited is funny by itself: Picture an ‘80s beach film. The song is always stuck in my head. Sorry in advance if you hear me humming it.

The sport itself is simple: There are 75 people per team, with a defending side and an attacking side. It is the defenders’ job to protect and support a pole as one well-balanced member stands on it. The attackers’ job is to try to topple the pole and the person on it, no matter what the defender throws their way. This results in massive, intense dog piles.

Around the World in 80 Plates: This is one of Kumail Nanjiani’s most hilarious roles as an over-eager chain restaurant waiter. The dialogue between him, Fred and Carrie is hysterical, and the timing of all the jokes is so spot on. You Can Call Me Al: After being invited to a karaoke party, Kath and Dave hire a voice coach, played by Jeff Goldblum, and start practicing. Between a Paul Simon guest appearance and Fred Armisen’s rendition of “The National Anthem,” this storyline is too good to miss. Portland Anthem: I feel like I keep repeating myself, but seriously, this sketch is so funny. Kyle MacLachlan, who plays the mayor of Portland, sings in homage to the city and the fact that it’s entirely improvised only adds to the hilarity. I don’t understand how everyone on set kept a straight face while he was belting.

20 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018

Cheese Rolling (England): If you’ve ever had the urge to chase a 10-pound wheel of cheese down a steep, grassy hill, then perhaps this is the athletic pastime for you. Don’t think for a second that this is a safe, harmonious event, though, as many injuries result from the downhill bash each year. Professional MiniGolf (U.S.): Yes, you read this correctly. Putt-putt might be a relaxing outing, but to those who take it to the next level, it is more serious than life itself. Jomswikinger (Scandinavia): In this sport, two players are blindfolded and leave one hand on a large chest. The way you win is by hitting your opponent with a straw–filled bag before they hit you. From the videos, it looks like a fun time and less harmful than those previously listed.

“Morning Light”: Featuring vocals by Alicia Keys, this track has a slow, smooth vibe that will get you grooving. While maintaining elements of the classic Timberlake sound, it also hints at the folky tones throughout the album. “Montana”: With a home in Montana, Timberlake uses songs like this to connect the album with his geographical roots. Deep bass lines and electronic elements take the listener back to sounds reminiscent of the ‘80s, adding another unique touch to this diverse album. “Breeze Off the Pond”: Not necessarily acting as a testament to Timberlake’s home roots, “Breeze Off the Pond” brings in elements of nature. With acoustic guitar mixed with Timberlake’s signature pop sound, this song ties together the folk and pop components that are emblematic of “Man of the Woods” and its ending transitions nicely into the following track. “Young Man”: Before the album’s release, Timberlake said the project was inspired by his family. In “Young Man,” we hear recordings of his wife, Jessica Biel, and son, Silas, that perfectly tie up the album’s concepts and ends on a personal note.


arts & culture

SCALE

MUSIC

VIDEO

VIRAL

RANDOM

CAPITAL SOIRÉE’S ‘WAVES OF CHANGE’ EP

‘BROAD CITY’ SEASON 4 HULU RELEASE

FALCON HEAVY SPACESHIP LAUNCH

VALENTINE’S DAY

» SAMANTHA CONRAD GRAPHIC DESIGNER

» LAUREN CARLTON COPY CHIEF

» KEVIN TIONGSON SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR

» GRACE SENIOR MEDIA SALES REP

Columbia band Capital Soirée released a brand new EP Feb. 7, and it’s totally dreamy. With vocals sung by all members of the band, some are perfect for dancing, while others are tear-jerkers. The only criticism I have about the EP is that I wish there were more songs. Capital Soirée always delivers a fresh sound from the lyrics to the smooth production style of the songs. Hearing the band grow has been inspiring.

Season 4 of Broad City was finally uploaded to Hulu Feb. 4, and I’m here for it. I watched Seasons 1–3 in just seven days after I discovered this show thanks to a friend. As soon as I finished Season 3, I couldn’t wait for the next. However, I thought I would have to wait much longer for the upload. While some may find the show a bit silly sometimes, you can’t deny that at some point we have all been Abbi or Ilana.

Elon Musk launched the most powerful spaceship ever, Falcon Heavy, from his company SpaceX, Feb. 6. This launch was set to prove that launching into space could be done more efficiently, and two of the three attached rockets safely landed back at the launching point. “Starman,” a dummy dressed in a spacesuit, steered while David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” played on a loop, showing a bit of humor from Musk.

Valentine’s Day makes you aware that work and school are your life and you’re destined to be alone, drinking soup straight from the can while watching reruns of “Vampire Diaries” and crying into an old sock because Elena should have chosen Stefan. Embrace the vampire and soup combo. To those in relationships: Have fun getting the wrong gift and paying more than $150 on dinner for two. Maybe it’ll be fun this year.

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Ozuna released a remix of his song “El Farsante” featuring the king of bachata, Romeo Santos, Jan. 30. This is not the first time, and hopefully not the last, they’ve collaborated. They are both known for their unique voices, and complement each other perfectly. All bachata and reggaeton fans are thrilled to have these two amazing, beautiful artists working together. If anyone is ever lucky enough to have an Aventura CD made for them, I just hope it’s me.

This Showtime cartoon, led by Stephen Colbert of “The Late Show,” premiered Feb. 11 and animates President Donald Trump, his family, cabinet and “Fox and Friends” hosts. While the trailer made me chuckle, it also makes me nervous that it wants us to laugh at the president’s actions while he is still enacting controversial policies. There’s plenty to laugh at, but we have to make sure that shows like these don’t lead us to forget that not everything Trump does is funny.

Nothing represents the stereotypes of younger generations better than a kid staring down at his phone while Justin Timberlake performs literally right next to him. It makes for hilarious memes, but I would give my first-born child to be even half as close to Timberlake in the flesh. His instincts are impressive if he was able to pull out his phone in such a shocking, paralyzing moment, but it’s a good thing he got that selfie. It’s not like there were already several cameras recording him.

As a full-time student, part-time worker and someone who is occupied practically every hour, I’m here to tell you that healthy eating has an immense impact on your day. Being able to concentrate better, feel more energized, full and all around better about yourself brings no harm. It’s time to erase the misconceptions you have about having to eating salads 24/7 to be healthy and start learning about which foods will benefit you most. I promise it’s worth it.

FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 21


opinions

Students need to know about, learn from hate on campus

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n The Dwight student residence, free expression is championed in a graffiti room where students can freely draw on the walls without restriction. That free expression was used for hate imagery, however, when students found multiple swastikas drawn on the floor, as reported on Page 3. After the discovery, Dwight residents were notified Feb. 2 via email that the graffiti room would be closed for repainting without further explanation. Dean of Students John Pelrine released a statement to residents Feb. 7 acknowledging there was offensive graffiti and emphasized that the college found the imagery unacceptable, but the statement failed to specify that the symbols found were swastikas. Omitting that key detail is concerning when specific groups of people are targeted by Nazi symbolism and rhetoric, and the statement by the college made no act to show support for students who are directly affected by such hateful imagery.

Considering the student who found the swastikas was Jewish, it is especially worrisome that the administration has not reached out to show solidarity with students and could only muster a vague email to residents. The college must be fully transparent when acts that make light of or support hateful ideology appear on campus. Otherwise, students who

T

The memo is being heavily criticized by Democrats for omitting important information that would dispute Republicans’ accusations of a biased investigation and the president has been slow to release their rebuttal memo on security grounds. Russian interference became a grave problem months before Trump’s election. In July 2016, the FBI announced it was launching an investigation after Russian users hacked into the Democratic National Committee’s computers and found access to Hillary Clinton’s campaign staffers’ emails. Yet, it wasn’t revealed until much later that fake Russian social media accounts attempted to influence the election by garnering support for Trump with posts and hashtags backing him. If there is one key point that is vital to understanding this investigation, it is this: Trump’s team is desperately trying to deflect mountains of serious

EDITORIAL evidence that lead to what may be a complete breach of the Constitution in order for power-hungry figures to wield their influence over constituents. In true dictatorial fashion, the administration has attempted to distort reality with the memo’s accusations by casting Trump and his associates as victims rather than possible criminals. They have turned to sabotaging committed members of their own party like Mueller, who is a Republican, former FBI director and Bronze star medal recipient for heroism while in Vietnam. After months of increasingly worrying revelations on the administration’s involvement with Russia, the public must prepare its response to what may be one of the most egregious abuses of power. Before the nation sinks too deep into an endless tangle of lies and conspiracy, we must rise up to seek—and fight for—the truth.

incoming freshmen are told Columbia is a haven for diversity as they are encouraged to use their preferred pronouns on name tags. And at 2017’s New Student Convocation, President and CEO Kwang-Wu Kim said that hatred “is not tolerated” at Columbia. This message is continually promoted, as shown through the creation of the Student Diversity and Inclusion Office. But Columbia is not as diverse as it claims to be. For years, the majority of incoming freshmen and transfer students each fall term have been white. Based on the college’s New Student Profile reports published by the Institutional

The college must be fully transparent when acts that make light of or support hateful ideology appear on campus. have the privilege of not being hurt by hate symbols will continue to live in ignorance of what those targeted face. The college says it encourages an inclusive, safe environment for students. Beginning with new student orientation,

Public needs to understand Russia investigation to act he American public is watching as significant developments are aired in the ongoing investigation into the White House administration’s relationship with Russia, but is the public— and college students in particular—able to understand this complex scenario? Will they be able to react if Special Counsel Robert Mueller is fired or even gauge the significance of what is happening? The confusion is understandable but the stakes are too high to ignore this story, as attempts to derail the investigation are accelerating. The latest development began Feb. 2 after the House Intelligence Committee publicly released a controversial memo

Effectiveness Office, the percentage of white students enrolled in Columbia since Fall 2013 has remained at more than 50 percent of the total. The college continues a façade of diversity that is perpetuated not just by

EDITORIAL the administration or faculty but by students as well. Many claim to be socially aware—yet ignore the reality that they hold privilege over many of their classmates. Because of this, students must know when self expression encouraged by the school is corrupted by hate speech. Otherwise, students become complacent and fail to support their peers who are directly threatened by an act like swastikas brazenly drawn in a public space. In searching for answers, some have wondered whether the perpetrator had a benign motive, such as testing the school’s ability to respond to offensive conduct. Speculating on the intent of the person who drew the swastikas is useless because it shifts the focus off helping the victims and onto justifying the victimizer. Others will say this conduct is the price of free speech and part of the assumed risk of having a graffiti wall. This amounts to excusing the conduct and failing to address why it was found at Columbia. Along with repainting the graffiti room and notifying students what occurred, the college must stand in the shoes of those being threatened whenever such hate appears on campus. To do otherwise is an implicit invitation for similar acts to occur.

accusing the FBI and Department of Justice of abusing surveillance powers to spy on President Donald Trump’s former campaign adviser, Carter Page, who has been suspected as a Russian agent by the FBI since 2013. The memo—which was drafted by the Committee’s Republican chair, Devin Nunes—is the latest and most significant attempt to discredit Mueller’s investigation. The Trump administration has realized that simply denying collusion with the Russian government isn’t enough to put the issue to rest. Instead, they want us to believe abuse of power by the FBI and Justice Department in a so-called “witch hunt” is the real problem.

Editorial Board Members Brooke Pawling Stennett Digital Managing Editor Tyra Bosnic Opinions Editor Jay Berghuis Copy Editor Mayan Darbyshire Arts & Culture Reporter Zack Jackson Graphic Designer

Hawk Thottupuram Multimedia Reporter Erin Dickson Staff Photographer Eric Eldridge Webmaster Kendrah Villiesse Online Content Producer

22 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018

Did you catch a mistake, think we could have covered a story better or have strong beliefs about an issue that faces all of us here at Columbia? Why not write a letter to the editor? At the bottom of Page 2, you’ll find a set of guidelines on how to do this. Let us hear from you. —The Columbia Chronicle Editorial Board


opinions women last year that had no difference from its other pens—except for being pink. Women are not strangers to the “pink tax,â€? which refers to the extra amount women are charged for certain products or services. Everything from razors and deodorant to birthday cards and hand tools often cost more for no reason other than that they are marketed to women. In 2010, Consumer Reports found that products directed at women—via name, description or packaging—cost up to 50 percent more than similar, COMMENTARY sometimes nearly identical, products for men. An additional study estimated that women spend an average of $1,351 every year in extra cost. Lady Doritos, though hypothetical, is just another example of gender coding in advertising, and while the notion is ridiculous, the issue should be taken seriously. This kind of product highlights longstanding gender norms that need to be eliminated, such as the Âť SAVANNAH EADENS expectation that women should be prim METRO REPORTER and proper—even when eating chips. Washington Post writer Heidi Moore wrote Feb. 7 that if companies want omen are asking for equal pay, to make products women really want, reproductive freedom and an “women should be well-represented in creend to workplace discrimiative and product decision-making—not nation and harassment. The world is only in financial or management choices.â€? hearing these requests, but “Lady Doritosâ€? A fair mix of men and women in deciand other ridiculous gender-specific sion-making roles earns companies 15 products are not the response wanted. percent more revenue than their rivals In a Jan. 31 episode of the because the more diverse a company, “Freakonomics Radioâ€? podcast, Indra the more varying views it tends to have, Nooyi, CEO of PepsiCo, commented according to a 2015 report from a U.K. on the gender differences in snack research center titled “Why diversity products and suggested Doritos for matters.â€? The study concluded that more women, saying, “Women don’t like to diverse companies and institutions are

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Gendering products affects more than just women. achieving better performance. With more diverse employees in marketing positions, companies might be better equipped to create products their customer base actually wants. Gendering products affects more than just women. Gendered products often affirm the gender binary and can inherently and continuously create inequality. Products that are specifically targeted for men or women are a big problem for nonbinary people who don’t identify as either. Gendered products also reinforce negative stereotypes that often imply women are lesser than men. The outcry from the public about Lady Doritos evoked a conversation about gendered products that needs to continue because we are indirectly and directly affected by social perceptions in the advertisements around us.

seadens@columbiachronicle.com

crunch too loudly in public. And they don’t lick their fingers generously and they don’t like to pour the little broken pieces and the flavor into their mouth.� The internet quickly expressed its distaste for such a product, and the phrase even trended on Twitter. PepsiCo released a Feb. 5 statement saying: “We already have Doritos for women—they’re called Doritos.� The story was reported incorrectly by a U.K. news outlet and was quickly picked up by other big publications. PepsiCo has no actual plans of releasing Lady Doritos, but the immediate negative backlash proves that women are not going to keep putting up with gendered products. Doritos would not have been the first brand to market products tailored to what researchers seem to think women want and need. BIC released pens for

FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 23


opinions

24 THE CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 12, 2018


Illinois gubernatorial candidates (clockwise) Bruce Rauner, J.B. Pritzker and Jeanne Ives have hit the campaign trail across Chicago in anticipation of the 2018 election.

is “one of the most unpopular governors in the country,” Mooney said. Other factors include self-financing candidates, such WITH EIGHT REGISTERED candidates vying as Democratic candidates J.B. Pritzker for Illinois governor in the March 20 pri- and Chris Kennedy, and a potential shift mary, a plethora of attack ads have flooded in party power, he noted. the state’s media, which may leave a sour The attack ads in the 2018 election have taste in voters and steer them away from been unique in their early use, Mooney said. the polls, according to political scientists Candidates have historically gone after and marketing researchers. their opponents shortly before an election Attack ads are nothing new in the Illinois to prevent a “boomerang effect,” which political landscape, said Chris Mooney, a makes voters dislike candidates who are political science professor at the University only sending negative messages, he added. of Illinois at Chicago. The volume of “All those things lead to more competipolitical attack ads in elections normally tion, spending and earlier pulling out all the increases when an incumbent seems vul- guns,” Mooney said. “The negative stuff is a nerable, and Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner sign not of desperation, but to show they’re going for it because everyone thinks they can win.” Fifty-eight percent of Illinois voters disapprove of Rauner’s job performance compared to fewer than 36 percent who approve, according to a March 2017 Paul Simon Public Policy Institute poll. In an attempt to capitalize on Rauner’s low approval rating, his primary opponent, state Rep. Jeanne Ives of Wheaton, Illinois, launched a controversial attack ad Feb. 2, titled “Thank you, Bruce Rauner,” which was met with criticism from activist groups, newspaper editorial boards and even members of her own Republican party. “[Attack ads] can have a beneficial or a negative impact,” said Jim Allen, spokesman at the Chicago Board of Elections. “A certain amount of conflict is good.” It is “par for the course” to attack an incumbent with negative commercials, Mooney said, and Ives’ “Thank you, Bruce Rauner” ad is trying to appeal to President Democratic Sen., and gubernatorial candidate, Daniel Donald Trump’s voter base. Though Trump Biss supported Columbia’s Part-Time Faculty Union lost Illinois in the 2016 presidential election, during the Nov. 30 strike.

» KEVIN TIONGSON/CHRONICLE

Attack ads may hinder voter turnout

» ERIC BRADACH & BLAISE MESA

» MACKENZIE CROSSON/CHRONICLE

MANAGING EDITOR & METRO REPORTER

he did resonate with many downstate Republican voters, and Ives is trying to galvanize those voters, he added. However, Ives’ negative ads are so politically incorrect that they could mobilize voters to check Rauner’s name on the ballot in protest against her candidacy, according to Mooney. Historically, far-right conservatives in statewide Illinois primaries only account for anywhere between 25–30 percent of the vote, and the majority tend to be socially moderate, he added. Other harsh attack ads have accused Pritzker and Kennedy of “scamming the system” for tax breaks, harsh criticism on the way Rauner handled a 2016 legionnaires outbreak at the Quincy Veterans Home, and associating Pritzker with former Gov. Rob Blagojevich. Several Rauner campaign ads have segments of taped conversations between the two during an FBI investigation when Blagojevich was searching for a replacement for Barack Obama’s vacated U.S. Senate seat. “At a certain point...people start feeling this aerial bombardment [and] some people start tuning [the race] out,” Allen said. The election has yet to reach an over-saturation point, but the ads will pick up for the general election in November, he added. Spending campaigns for the 2014 governor’s race reached an unprecedented $100 million, and that same year, come election day, 50 percent of eligible voters showed up to the polls, according to a January 2015 Paul Simon Public Policy Institute report.

Before the March 20 primary, approximately $120 million has been raised just by two candidates. Rauner has raised more than $70 million and Pritzker alone has invested nearly $50 million into his campaign, according to Illinois State Board of Elections records. Mooney said the one advantage Rauner has had in his political career is unlimited money, which makes Pritzker, a billionaire venture capitalist and heir to the Hyatt Hotels fortune, a threat and gives motivation to attack him early. It is unclear if attack ads affect voter turnout, but it comes down to the individual voter and whether they are motivated or deterred by the rhetoric, according to Amber Wichowsky, associate political science professor at Marquette University who researches voter turnout. “Many folks say [attack ads] degrade our politics. We [may not be] getting any dialogue or discussion on what issues are,” Wichowsky said. “[However], you hear that attack ad and you might be even more mobilized to turnout on their behalf. You are reminded of the issues.” Despite voters receiving information from political attack ads, Mooney said the ads have a negative connotation and the candidate’s ultimate goal is to drive down their opponent’s voter turnout. “A person that would have voted for your opponent, but then you convince them not to, that’s half as good as getting them to vote for you,” Mooney said. chronicle@colum.edu

» FILE PHOTO

The millennial struggle to become homeowners » Page 28 » MACKENZIE CROSSON/CHRONICLE

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FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 25


Chicago has appetite for food halls » SAVANNAH EADENS METRO REPORTER

PEOPLE HAVE GATHERED in markets for a communal experience with food for centuries, and the national trend of food halls is just another step in the evolution. Victor Alvarez, a founding partner of Alvarez & Marsal Property

Investments, saw the growing demand for food halls in New York City, where they were once a mere collection of food-related retailers in a tourist hotspot but are now a cultural experience—particularly among millennials. “Everything with food retail now is experiential,” Alvarez said. “New York didn’t change

Kelly Shingleton, 29, enjoyed her meal at the Chicago French Market, 131 N. Clinton St., Feb. 8. The French Market is one of five popular food halls in Chicago.

the market, but we drove it, and it became a competitive landscape where a lot of food halls starting popping up.” Alvarez’s company has invested in a food hall space in Chicago that will be called the Wells St. Market, scheduled to open this spring at 205 W. Wacker Drive across the river from Merchandise Mart. Chef Jimmy Bannos, Jr.— along with Takashi Yagihashi of Slurping Turtle, Shin Thompson of Furious Spoon and Jeff Mauro of Pork & Mindy’s—will be a part of the venture with his new restaurant “Piggie Smalls.” It is a spin-off of his original mediterranean-themed location “The Purple Pig” at 500 N. Michigan Ave. Piggie Smalls will focus on Greek street food and classic gyros while combining Bannos’ passion for quality products from sustainable, local farms and keeping the food affordable, he said. “I know that this is different and doesn’t exist anywhere else, which is important,” Bannos said. “We try not to follow trends, and do things our own way. But how

» PHOTOS MACKENZIE CROSSON/CHRONICLE

Chicago French Market was the first food hall in Chicago. Located near Ogilvie Station in the West Loop, the hall attracts many Chicagoans.

people are eating now, especially for lunch, is totally different.” People want to feel good after they are done eating, Bannos said, and he would like Piggie Smalls to be a place where all demographics regularly grab lunch. Alvarez said Wells St. Market will include a mix of local chefs and startups, and the food will be quick, fast and accessible so it will not feel like a mall food court. According to a 2016 study of American food halls by Cushman

& Wakefield—a global real estate service—no other U.S. retail category has generated as much growth in the past few years as food-related retail. In 2016, there were about 150 food halls in the U.S., and researchers anticipated as many 200 major projects throughout the country by 2019. Food halls have been in Chicago since 2009 when the Chicago French Market opened in the West Loop.

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uncomfortable transition,” ScottClayton said. “But in terms of the consequences for life outcomes, the tragedies are concentrated not among college graduates with tens of thousands of dollars in debt, [but] among college dropouts.” Scott-Clayton said there are misconceptions surrounding the cost of college in older generations’ eyes, noting that current students

cannot simply pay off their tuition with part-time jobs as they did in previous decades. College dropouts also might not be as integrated with the financial support services at an educational institution and may not be as well prepared for either the out-of-school transition or the debt burden they are carrying, Scott-Clayton said.

» JOCELYN MORENO/CHRONICLE

THE NATION’S $1.4 trillion student loan debt significantly affects millennials financially, and a recent study highlights how home ownership has become an even more distant dream for the nation’s largest generation. The average cost of an undergraduate degree and the price of owning a home have greatly exceeded the median income since 1980. While income has only risen 25 percent, the median home price has increased 60 percent and undergraduate tuition has skyrocketed 160 percent, according to a Jan. 19 study by Apartment List, an online apartment finder. While the findings in this study were no surprise, Chris Salviati, a housing economist and author of the study, said the savings

disparity between college graduates with and without student debt was striking. The statistics speak for themselves, Salviati said, and the reality forces millennials to save more money for a down payment while still paying more for apartments in the interim. “The magnitude of that difference between the three groups [was surprising],” Salviati said. “But also college graduates without debt are still not in great shape to achieving homeownership.” For millennials in Chicago, the burden of student loan debt cuts the savings for a down payment on a house by two-thirds. College graduates without student loan debt have an average of $18,680 saved, while college graduates with debt have only $6,310. Meanwhile, millennials who lack a college degree are still at a financial disadvantage with only an average of $2,330 saved

for a down payment, according to the study. For most American families, Salviati said a house is their greatest asset and the primary wealth creator. Should these trends continue and fewer millennials become homeowners, it could contribute to even greater wealth inequality and questionable retirement security in the future, Salviati noted. Judith Scott-Clayton, an economics and education associate professor at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City, echoed Salviati’s worries about student debt. She added that the college students who default because of loan debt are those unable to graduate. “Students across the board—low income, middle income, high income—are taking on way more debt then they did in the past, [and] that’s an

SEE MILLENNIALS, PAGE 31

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» BLAISE MESA METRO REPORTER TO ADDRESS PROBLEMS facing Chicago’s youth, the city has teamed up with the private sector to create a youth quality-of-life index and scorecard. The coalition consists of organizations such as the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago, Chicago Urban League and Thrive Chicago, and city departments such as the Department of Public Health, Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Housing Authority, according to a Jan. 29 mayoral press release. The coalition will conduct research into city policies and programs involved with children’s development to determine the impact they have on their lives from birth until 24, according to the release. “[The project] can improve for whom services are being targeted, who is the most in need or

[in a] vulnerable population,” said Matt Wilson, economic development planner at the Great Cities Institute—a group involved in the project. “You can have a better idea who could benefit from services and [will allow the city to] provide efficient [services].”

The study will focus on four major areas: social, emotional and physical health; education and skill development; safety; and access to necessities such as housing and food. “Chicago is like every other major metropolitan area where it

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has a number of complex and sometimes contradictory variables that you have to work through,” said Jaleel Abdul-Adil, associate professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and co-director of the Urban Youth Trauma Center. Chicago has recently taken steps to increase the quality of life for youth who have had to deal with high homicide rates and school closings, as reported Oct. 9, 2017, by The Chronicle. Since 2011, Chicago’s investment in youth services has tripled, with more than $75 million distributed to job initiatives such as youth violence and mentoring; health and homelessness; and the arts, including media, library and parks services, according to the press release. “We do not expect [the quality of life scorecard] to tell a completely positive story,” said Chris Wheat, senior policy adviser in the mayor’s office. “But it holds the mayor and other city council officials accountable to make sure we are not backsliding in the investments we are making.”

The youth scorecard can also set a benchmark, which can be looked at to track progress and ensure progress is being made, and that quality of life problems are not being neglected, he added. While the project looks good on paper and could be a success, Abdul-Adil said more community groups should be involved to increase its effectiveness. “Chicago is a city of neighborhoods,” Abdul-Adil said. “I might tailor it different [depending on which neighborhood I’m in]. Cookie cutter doesn’t work.” The information is expected to be released this summer and will be used for the city’s 2019 budget, according to the release. “Any time you can conduct research or provide some evaluation on how cities are spending their budgets, that is tremendously valuable,” Wilson said. “It can assure taxpayer money is being well spent, and the appropriations are large enough to make an impact [and] that they are targeted [properly].” bmesa@columbiachronicle.com

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Revival Food Hall at 125 S. Clark St. has vendors serving various selections ranging from ramen to barbeque and gelato.

Time Out—originally a British travel magazine that is now an international publication covering city entertainment, tourism and restaurant scenes—also has plans to open its own food hall in 2019, Alexandra Rieck, the head of Public Relations and Communications for Time Out

Group, told the Chronicle in a Feb. 7 email. “Chicagoans have an appetite for unique culinary experiences,” Rieck said. “Chicago is home to established, amazing restaurants that thrive, but it’s also a launching pad for new chefs who want to experiment.”

MILLENNIAL, FROM PAGE 28

“People enter into this world where one mistake is made [and] it gets that much harder to get out of it,” Scott-Clayton said. Although there are generational divides in understanding financial burdens, there could also be generational gaps for home ownership desires, said Alex Murfey, a 22-year-old 2016 cinema art and science alumnus who currently works as a Starbucks barista in Kansas City, Missouri. Despite the financial benefits of home ownership, he said it is not a top priority for him. “I’m indifferent to home ownership,” Murfey said. “Somewhere down the line in the future if I’m a homeowner, that sounds great, but it’s not something I aspire to. It’s not something that I worry [or] care about.” However, a majority of millennials, 68 percent, say their current residence is a “stepping stone” toward their home ownership goals. Meanwhile, 40 percent of those ages 25–34 have already

planned a down payment for a house mortgage, according to a Bank of America survey conducted between January and February of 2017. Murfey, who took out $22,000 in federal student loans, said most millennials—Columbia students in particular—seem to value personal experiences more than owning property. Murfey added that while his parents viewed home ownership as a necessity, millennials in artistic careers perceive it as an unrealistic financial goal. “It’s kind of uncertain times now politically and you can’t tell how that’s going to affect markets,” Murfey said. “[When] the U.S. dollar plummeted because [Secretary of Treasury Steve Mnuchin] made an off-thecuff comment about the dollar, when something like that can make such a big difference just in the value of a [single] dollar, to me, the country doesn’t seem stable enough for me to even think about trying to get in on [the housing] market.” ebradach@columbiachronicle.com

Kelly Shingleton, a 29-year-old accountant who lives near the French Market, said it is a convenient and quality place to eat with a lot of options. “Everyone just likes the variety because we all have [a friend or group for which] nobody makes decisions anymore about what they want,” Shingleton said. “It’s quick and easy, like Amazon.” Communal dining has a social atmosphere, and diners often have conversations about their food, said Kevin Arnold, the director of Training and Development at Gibsons Restaurant Group and an adjunct professor at DePaul University. “I can see this becoming more than just people getting something quick to eat and actually becoming a place where you can meet and talk with other people,” he said. “The more community driven it is, the more you will see those kind of restaurants pop up.” Currently, there are five different food halls in Chicago.

seadens@columbiachronicle.com

» KEVIN TIONGSON/CHRONICLE

FOOD, FROM PAGE 26

FEBRUARY 12, 2018 THE CHRONICLE 31


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The Columbia Chronicle, February 12, 2018  
The Columbia Chronicle, February 12, 2018