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THE CLIMATE ISSUE SEPTEMBER 2020 | Â ISSUE 2

ECO TOP TIPS

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DIGITAL MAGAZINE

ECO SWAPS

ECO BRANDS

SUSTAINABLE SWIMWEAR BRANDS

THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT ALMOST 5 YEARS ON

CITIES FOR THE FUTURE @theclimateissue


"We don’t have time to sit on our hands as our planet burns" WEBSITE

ALEXANDRIA OCASIO-CORTEZ

THECLIMATEISSUE.COM

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ARE YOU A WRITER? If you are a writer with a passion for the environment and would like to contribute to The Climate Issue, please send an email to theclimateissue@gmail.com stating your experience and areas of interest.


IN THIS ISSUE EDITOR'S NOTE I proudly present the second issue of my new magazine The Climate Issue! By way of introduction, my name is Sophia-Harri and for the past 5 years I have been writing articles about the impacts of climate change. From writing for my own blog, a conservation NGO and the UNICEF Youth platform, I am eager to share my views on environmental issues. Greta Thunberg once told us to panic as though our house is on fire and I really liked that analogy. Throughout our lives we are always told not to panic and stay calm in stressful situations. The truth is that there is nothing calm about climate change. Greta is right... I think we should respond to climate change with drive and urgency. After all, Planet Earth is in flames. I believe solving or addressing the climate issue is something every single person has to get on board with at some point in their lives. Climate action is not targeted at the rich, the poor, adults, those who like nature, or have a geography degree. There are no borders or barriers...it is a mutual issue. I stand by the fact that we can manage the effects through both adaptation and mitigation. The transition to an eco-friendly lifestyle is so simple and effective and this is something I want to emphasise in this magazine. As you flip through the pages of this issue you will come across various articles covering interesting environmental themes. It has been almost 5 years since the Paris Climate Agreement was signed and I will explore our progress in achieving the target. Guest writers will cover two very important themes: Cities for the future and a how Bhutan has maintained its carbon negative status. You will find top tips and swaps which encapsulate how easy it is to become eco friendly at home. Amongst the top tips, I will share with you my favourite sustainable swimwear brands. I want my readers to learn something when they finish reading each issue and endeavour to try something new as a result.  I really hope you enjoy reading this issue with optimism and inspiration in mind. Please stay safe!

S.Nicholaou

THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMNT: ALMOST 5 YEARS ON

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5 SUSTAINABLE SWIMWEAR BRANDS

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BHUTAN - CARBON NEGATIVE COUNTRY

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SUSTAINABLE BUILDING RULES

15

CITIES FOR THE FUTURE

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REGULARS Eco Top Tips + ECO SWAPS

13

ECO Brands

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which country?

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recipes

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SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT: ALMOST 5 YEARS ON By Sophia-Harri

It is now almost 5 years on- but what progress has been achieved? It is hard to ignore the fact that since the Paris Climate Agreement was ratified, we have entered a global climate emergency and the United States announced their withdrawal in 2017, which will not take effect until November 2020. To start on a positive note, it is safe to say that people know what climate change is now. 2019 certainly was the year of global #climatestrikes and despite the Covid-19 pandemic, the strikes continue in a new way, on social media. September 2019 saw a record of over 7.6 million people protest on the streets of towns and cities around the world and strike for climate actionthis was the biggest climate mobilisation in history. The global climate strikes emphasise the power of people and the determination to solve the climate crisis today, together fighting for an era of reduced fossil fuels and sustainability. I believe the climate strikes are a preparatory step in solving the climate issue; once people are aware of the impacts, the next step is the most significant and difficult- it is changing societal ways, strengthening environmental policy, improving technological innovation and investing in zero carbon infrastructure. Unfortunately, when it comes to monitoring the actual progress of the Paris Climate Agreement, almost all counties have fallen short on their climate change commitments. Only two counties are actually on track and have policies in place to limit the 1.5°C increase; lets praise Morocco and The Gambia for being our unlikely global climate leaders.

The unlikely global climate leaders The Gambia and Morocco sustain a lower degree of greenhouse gas emissions compared to the worlds most developed countries, but their efforts and commitment to the target has stood out- above all their prioritisation of renewable energy. Morocco’s government created the National Energy Strategy, which aims to have 42 percent of its power generated by renewable energy by 2020, increasing this to 52 percent by 2030. The country’s solar energy comes from the Noor solar plants, one of the sunniest parts of the world, anticipated to produce enough energy to support the electricity needs of 1 million people. Similarly, The Gambia has passed laws that prioritise green energy. In 2013, the parliament passed the New Renewable Energy Law, which set aside funding for renewable infrastructure, research and development. The Gambia has also shown large scale land-use changes, particularly reforestation projects; it pledged to restore 10,000 hectares of forests, mangroves, and savannas. Financial obstacles are no secret for both these developing countries, but they have still maintained top tier investments and continue to strive for a greener future. These countries highlight how simple it is for wealthier countries to make large investments necessary to create impactful change against the current global emissions targets. Prioritising green energy goes a long way in combating the climate crisis. Whether or not both countries will be able to continue long term investment in renewable energy until 2030 is dependent upon their financial status and international co-operation. THE REST OF THE WORLD- WHAT TARGET? Another five countries are on track, but heading towards the limit of 2 degrees Celsius.

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The Paris Climate Agreement was drafted in 2015 and later signed in April 2016 by 197 countries. The aim of the agreement is to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change by keeping a global temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius this century and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius.


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2 These include Bhutan, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, India and the Philippines. You will be aware that most of these countries are transitioning to renewable energy too, but whether or not they can limit the temperature increase by 2030 is the big question. It is interesting to see no developed countries on this list. Could it be because their greenhouse gas emissions are too high to achieve the target? Or is the transition to renewable energy not economically viable? We've seen from our global climate leaders that investment in renewable energy is feasible, so why are some of the most advanced countries not making the green energy transition yet? India is one of the most greenhouse emitting countries, yet has still managed to stay on track. They are now a top investor in renewable energy which has been driven by strong policy changes. China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia are amongst the worst-prepared countries when it comes to climate action. Their actions are nowhere near in line with the central objective to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. China and Russia are deeply dependent on coal power, Russia has a significant fossil fuel sector, and Saudi Arabia is the world’s largest fossil fuel producer with an abundance of oil. Unfortunately, these countries are unwilling to make radical changes to their economic systems and most likely never achieve the Paris Climate Agreements target. The future Achieving the Paris Climate Agreement requires an immense increase in the scale of emission reductions; policymakers need to make dramatic improvements in their climate action plans and the public need to become more politically involved.

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The bottom line is that the main carbon emitters must do more. Without full engagement from the biggest emitters, all global efforts will be completely undermined. It is anticipated that each country should present a carbon neutrality strategy for 2050 by 2020 in order to embark on decarbonisation of key sectors such as energy, transport and industry. But due to the Covid-19 pandemic, this will no doubt be delayed- as expected. The transition to carbon-neutral is challenging and needs multilateral cooperation, in the spirit of justice and solidarity.


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SUSTAINABLE SWIMWEAR BRANDS

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AS SEEN ON INSTAGRAM


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

Every summer we have a tendency to buy new swimwear before we go on holiday, but do we really know what our swimwear is made of and the journey it has been on? Probably not. Emerging brands are finding new and innovative ways to create stylish bikinis and swimsuits that are kinder to the environment and amazingly often made from ocean waste or plastic that is being repurposed. Whether they are handmade or made in small factories, these brands are ethical and are taking over social media, each unique to giving back to the environment in their own way. Here are some great sustainable swimwear brands from around the world that have caught my eye and will hopefully encourage you to invest in sustinable swimwear in the future.

TIDE + SEEK Tide + Seek makes all of its swimwear from REPREVE® which is a polyester fibre made from 100% recycled plastic (comprised mostly of plastic bottles). The process also cuts the use of new petroleum, meaning fewer greenhouse gas emissions. The REPREVE® fabric is chlorine resistant with a UV protection of factor 50. This brand has beautiful swimsuits and bikinis with colourful patterns- perfect for beach holidays!

@TIDE.AND.SEEK

WWW.TIDEANDSEEK.COM

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*Worldwide shipping available. See website for shipping fees.


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

VITAMIN A Vitamin A created EcoLux™, the first premium swim fabric made from recycled nylon fibres. It is a superfine matte jersey with a nearly weightless, silken texture that erases flaws and fits like a second skin. So instead of sending nylon to the landfill, Vitamin A turns it into something beautiful. Vitamin A provides free shipping on all US orders.

@VITAMINASWIM

*Made in California, free US shipping, international shipping available (fees apply- see website)

WWW.VITAMINASWIM.COM

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Each of the garments come in a flap and seal bag that’s 100% biodegradable, recyclable, and compostable.


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

AWAI SWIM

@AWAISWIM

*Currently only ships to USA and Canada

WWW.AWAISWIM.COM

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Each piece of swimwear at Awai Swim is perfectly handmade. They use eco friendly fabrics made from ECONYL regenerated nylon. ECONYL takes pre and post consumer plastics, abandoned fishing nets and other plastics found in our oceans - it is then recycled into beautiful eco friendly swimwear material. Awai Swim uses 100% biodegradable shipping bags - making the brand virtually plastic free!


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

AMELIA MUTLI WAY BIKINI

MITRA THE LABEL Mitra the Label use ECONYL® regenerated nylon. The ECONYL® is created from recycling unwanted waste from around the world, such as fishing nets pulled from the ocean, industrial plastic and fabric scraps. Features of  ECONYL® include suncream and oil resistant, excellent UV protection and ultra chlorine resistant.

@MITRATHELABEL

*Free shipping for UK orders over £80. Worldwide shipping available (see website)

WWW.MITRATHELABEL.COM

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The swimwear is handmade in Bristol, UK and uses biodegradable and eco-friendly packaging. This brand embraces the slow fashion movement by creating pieces that focus on quality and not quantity.


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

NATURAL SWIM

The swimwear is made from recycled fishing nets found in the ocean and then turned into high-quality sustainable Italian Lyrca. The fabric is UV resistant, oil resistant, and double lined for added support.

@THENATURALSWIM

WWW.THENATURALSWIM.COM

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Natural Swim is a sister run business. The sisters came together 2019 to bring their vision of a swimwear brand with “coverage options for all” to life. After researching the fabrics and the process of swim production, the sisters realized how harmful traditional swimwear production is on the environment. This inspired the idea of creating the Natural Swim as a fully sustainable swimwear line designed in the United States but made ethically in Bali, Indonesia.


BY HANNA-JOHARA DOKAL Bhutan is a small country, drenched in rich history and stunning architecture. It is landlocked in the eastern Himalayas between India and China. The South Asian nation notably pioneered the policy of Gross National Happiness, through which the country’s well-being is measured by the contentment of its people, rather than its financial wealth. There is a huge emphasis on the preservation of the country’s lifestyle — heavily influenced by Bhuddist traditions and beliefs — which is how Bhutan has become the only carbon negative country in the world.  The intricate temples, food, culture and interesting mountainous landscape have made it a popular destination for tourists. The country didn't open to tourism until 1974, and even now, booking a trip to Bhutan isn’t as straightforward as it is to many other destinations. If you’re looking for a holiday to Italy for example, you are only required to use a search engine to book the best deal online, and maybe sort a visa out the same way if necessary. Travelling to Bhutan, however, entails strict rules. These rules can teach the rest of the world a lot about sustainability, preservation, conservation and ecotourism as we witness the devastating effects of climate change globally. So, how has the government ensured such an environmentally friendly way of life, even with tourists arriving? The key regulation is having to book via a licensed Bhutanese tour operator or one of their international partners. If you are not a citizen of India, Bangladesh or the Maldives, then the process includes a pre-arranged visa, approved by the tour operator, and a £150-£200 per day package deal.

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The total fee to holiday there may seem extreme, but the fee covers three-star accommodation, a guide, transport and everyday necessities, including food, instead of you having to take spending money. Approximately £50 of that daily amount is a ‘Sustainable Development Fee that goes towards free education, free healthcare and poverty alleviation’, according to the Bhutanese government. It is a key way in which the country regulates its environment. It means it can manage the level of use of transportation and tourists are supervised by their guides, which reduces mistreatment of tourist spots. The fee is also intended to be a deterrent of sorts, because the country has no limit on the number of tourists per year. Instead, Bhutan’s official tourist site states that in order to protect its culture, traditions and natural environment, the government ‘has adopted a unique policy of ‘High Value, Low Impact’. This policy is aimed at attracting discerning tourists that will respect the unique culture and values’. Whilst the meaning of this is vague, the cost of going to the country is not accessible to many people, resulting in lower tourist rates in comparison to its neighbouring countries, such as Nepal and India. Just over 200,000 people visited Bhutan in 2019, yet 10 million people travelled to India in the same year. Only those truly interested in visiting will save up and book, or so the strategy implies. According to a CNN report, ‘environmental protection is enshrined in the constitution, which states that a minimum of 60% of Bhutan's total land should be maintained under forest cover for all time. The country even banned logging exports in 1999’. It has also embraced renewable energy, with hydroelectricity powering almost the entire country. It ‘produces so much hydropower that it sells it to neighboring countries, which Bhutan claims offsets another 4.4 million tons of annual CO2 emissions’, and it intends to increase that offset figure to 22.4 million tonnes of CO2 per year by 2025.

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BHUTAN HOW HAS A WHOLE COUNTRY BECOME CARBON NEGATIVE?

SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

Still, like much of the Global South, Bhutan is very vulnerable to the effects of climate change. It is experiencing increased flooding and landslides despite its efforts to curb environmental damage, and the rise in natural disasters threatens its renewable energy infrastructure. Its reliance on hydropower produced by the Himalayas, in which the glaciers are now melting, puts it at risk of losing power. In light of this, the country has pledged to also become waste free and 100% organic in its agriculture sector. Even if its carbon levels doubled in the next 20 years, as long as the forest cover is maintained at its current level (or increases), then Bhutan will remain a carbon negative country. It has broken tree-planting records as it works towards keeping forest cover rates stable. The final strategic approach to putting the environment first is being one of the hardest countries to gain citizenship in. Presently, Bhutan has a similar land mass to Switzerland, but only one tenth of the population. Low population levels means less emissions.  Two people must be Bhutanese for their children to also gain citizenship. If only one parent is Bhutanese, then the children will have to live there for 15 years before applying for naturalized citizenship. If you have non-Bhutanese parents who don't work for the government, you may apply after living in the country for 20 years, however the country reserves the right to reject your application on any (or no) grounds. 

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This combination of rules and regulations is how Bhutan has maintained its natural beauty and has contributed positively to the welfare of our planet. Since climate change is a manmade problem, we must also be the ones to offer solutions, just as Bhutan is doing.


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

ECO TOP TIPS

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+ ECO SWAPS


EASY FRUIT PEEL FACE MASKS

Continuous investment in new skincare products can be expensive and expose our skin to unnecessary chemicals, as well as harm the environment. Instead, we should support natural alternatives. Did you know that fruit contains a lot of essential vitamins which can do wonders for our skin? Instead of throwing fruit peels away, why not first use them to transform your skin!

Gently massage the inner part of the fruit peel onto your face for 2 minutes where it will naturally exfoliate your skin. Leave on for 5 minutes before rinsing off with water.

BANANA PEEL Rich with antioxidants, minerals and vitamins, which encourage cellregeneration, making the peel perfect for treating acne, brightening and hydrating the skin. Say goodbye to dull, dry skin.

WATERMELON PEEL watermelon is full of vitamin C which deep cleanses your face and gives you a fresh look.. The antioxidants will boost the moisture in your skin, making your skin glow. You can use it to soothe inflammation and minor sunburns, reducing redness.

ORGANGE PEEL As we know, Orange is high in Vitamin C, so enriches your skin with natural vitamins. The peel has antibacterial and anti-microbial properties which make it great for treating acne and oily skin.

SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

ECO SWAPS REUSABLE BOTTLE VS PLASTIC BOTTLE For convenience, many people depend on disposable plastic water bottles. In fact, 1,500 disposable water bottles are consumed every second! We are now faced with the truth that these plastic bottles are a hazard to our oceans, land and health. People aren't recycling water bottles properly, and as a result, they're piling up at landfills. A reusable water bottle is part of the solution towards a greener world. Did you know that if one person switches to a reusable water bottle, over 200 plastic bottles will be saved from going to landfill?

TEA STRAINERS VS TEA BAGS We all love tea, but would we love tea as much if we knew that most tea bags contain plastic? A plastic polymer, named polypropylene is added to tea bags so it can withstand boiling water. Even though the amounts of plastic found in tea bags is minimal and varies between manufacturers, it adds up when you look at the bigger picture. Due to the plastic content, conventional tea bags cannot completely decompose; this makes them a bad option for the environment. You can switch to the loose leaf tea to minimise pollution and enhance flavours. You can prepare your loose leaf tea easily by using a stainless steel strainer.

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SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

Sustainable building rules

Rule 01

In the developed regions of the world, we spend around 90% of our time inside buildings. To maintain comfortable conditions within our buildings, we use fossil fuel derived energy. This production of energy results in an increase in CO² emissions. This greenhouse gas is linked with global warming and climate change. Interestingly, the Covid-19 pandemic has encouraged outdoor interaction. An increase in time spent outdoors, has meant less production of energy inside buildings. By reverting to a mainly outdoor species, we are in turn reducing our energy use.

Rule 02

When designing a building, the location of the spaces should be considered with regard to the buildings orientation. Rooms that require little heating or are occupied the least should be located to the North. These include bathrooms, stores and rooms that generate their own heat such as kitchens. Warm rooms such as living spaces should face the sun. This concept allows for occupied spaces to be naturally heated by the sun, preventing the use of excessive heating and use of energy.

Rule 03

In winter, the sun is low in the sky so can penetrate deep into a space. Use the suns free source of heat to warm up spaces, reducing the amount of gas/electric heating.In summer, you do not want heat inside. Preventing direct sunlight from entering  the building will prevent overheating. Once direct sunlight has entered a building, it is too late to stop it becoming heat. Stop direct sunlight by use of canopies, blinds, shutters and pergolas; to minimise overheating and in turn minimise the use of fans and air-conditioning units. 15 |  THE CLIMATE ISSUE


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

Rule 04

To get the right amount of daylight in a space, you need to have the right size window. When windows are positioned to one side of a room, they need to comprise of around 20% of the wall area. This applies to room which are up to 7m in depth. For deeper spaces, the window should be 35% of the wall area. Large spaces are more efficiently lit with roof lights.

Rule 05

The presence of water is a free source of cooling. In the summer, the water will cool the breeze as it passes over it during hot days. Trees to the north act as a wind break during those windy days. Trees not only divert the path of the wind, but can also assist in cooling breezes during warmer days. They provide shade, cooling the breeze that passes over shaded ground. These elements control the micro-climate outside of the building.

@olympiand_design

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Drawings created by O N D Design


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

CITIES FOR THE FUTURE Flying cars? Sky-high apartments? Mass mega- energy challenge involves millions of solar cities, millions strong? This is how our cities panels. Through harvesting the sun’s solar might look. radiation, urban planning firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrills predict that solarToday, 55% of people live in urban areas capturing technology may be incorporated globally. But by 2050, this number is expected into the roofs, wall and even windows of to rise to 68% of the global population. And new-builds, or we may even see the usage this isn’t just a case of migration from rural of bladeless wind turbines fitted to areas to the lights of the big city. It is rooftops. This sounds like a great solution estimated that an unsurmountable 9.8 billion to the otherwise catastrophic situation we people are expected to inhabit the Earth by may have found ourselves in, but what the same year. Given the growing global crises about the cities of the present? How will of climate change, food and water shortages, cities like London, New York or Tokyo be and environmental degradation and powered in a densely populated world?  destruction (a fact made starker with the reality that we are faced with just 60 harvests Professional services firm Deloitte have left), future cities need a drastic overhaul to identified several key areas where be both sustainable and liveable.  improvements can be made to existing infrastructure, with such improvements No one can predict for sure what our cities including retrofitting buildings with green will look like definitively, but they will almost technology and incorporating heating certainly be green. And not in the décor sense control systems. And these kinds of green of the word. Yes, that’s right. Cities of the energy improvements are happening right future will likely be the environmentally now. conscious eco havens that many people dream of. And they could reform the way we produce More than 3500 homes in Zaragoza, Spain, energy, grow food and conserve our wildlife. that are more than 40 years old are to be refurbished with a focus on energy, whilst Decarbonisation across the Nation 10,000 new homes in the Valdespartera ecocity have been built that save up to 90% With an unprecedented boom in human energy compared to its non-eco cousins. population, and more of these people living in And is these kinds of improvements we urban areas, the cities of the future will need could expect to see in cities all over the to be powered – and powered heavily - so a world in a matter of a few decades. But in sustainable use of energy is fundamental to order to meet the energy demands, our future cities. One solution of this decentralisation of the power supply is required – meaning more domestic solar and wind generation.

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By Rhys Morgan


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

People AND Planet, not People vs Planet It is not just energy demands that need to be met in our future cities. In a world where habitats for wildlife have been destroyed on an unprecedented scale, our future urban space needs to work with nature, and not against it. As a result we can reasonably assume to see a lot more green spaces, trees, planets and animals in our cities. Nature in cities has the potential to improve our mental wellbeing and give us a boost to our overall health, according to Aecom. Urban nature can help protect us from environmental threats and protect the economy from financial damage. And according to Conservation Magazine, nature in cities could make it a cooler place to live with a saving of 4.1 degrees lower than surrounding temperatures. This level of temperature control could reduce energy consumption on a global scale, whilst saving the individual person like me and you some hard earned money in the long run. But with geographical space at a premium, there may be a trade off between wanting the benefits of nature and having actual nature. Greencity Solutions have created CityTrees“the world’s first biotech pollution filter.” They have already been deployed in Cambridge, UK, and are said to be able to filter breathing air for up to 7,000 people every hour. This is equivalent to planting 275 urban trees where 250 grams of particulate matter can be removed each day by using a fraction of the space. 

This technological breakthrough, although not supporting wildlife like its real-tree alternative, has the potential to slash air pollution in our cities and save millions from a premature death. In fact, 7 million people die each year from poor air quality, and it is estimated that 1 in 10 will die in the future if the problem is not addressed.These CityTrees could be the answer to this public health emergency. The Future and Beyond There are some sure hints as to what our cities could look like. With energy almost certainly a focal point in our cities of the future, and fossil-free fuel looking increasingly likely, the way we power our homes, schools and hospitals will be one of the first things to change. Wildlife and biodiversity also seem to be winners through taking a more pinnacle role in our urban design. But there are so many factors our future city planners will still need to decide on – water abstraction, urban agriculture, transportation, the list goes on. So, whilst it seems unlikely, you may not want to rule out flying cars just yet.

FOLLOW @climatecrunch 18 | THE CLIMATE ISSUE

But advancements in battery technology are needed to cement these goals.


ECO FRIENDLY BRANDS

SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

@BAMBOO.LONDON

SUSTAINABLE HOMEWARE PRODUCTS BAMBOO CUTLERY SET COCONUT BOWL AND SPOON BAMBOO TOOTHBRUSH SET (ONLY UK DELIVERY)

BAMBOO TOOTHBRUSHES (KIDS AND ADULT) BAMBOO TOOTHBRUSH HOLDERS

LINKTR.EE/ECOFRIENDLYEKA

(AVAILABLE ON SHOPIFY AND AMAZON EUROPE)

@EKAECOFRIENDLY

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WWW.BAMBOOLONDON.CO.UK


@ECOVER_UK

SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

WHICH COUNTRY AM I? CLEAN, BIODEGRADABLE, PLANT-DERIVED INGREDIENTS THAT WON’T ADD PHOSPHATES TO THE WORLD’S WATERWAYS. LAUNDRY PRODUCTS CLEANING PRODUCTS DISHWASHER TABLETS REFILL STATIONS

WWW.ECOVER.COM

Below are five facts about a country in the world. Can you guess which country it is?

I am landlocked

I have the highest mountains in Europe

I am home to the longest glacier in Europe NOW SOLD IN LEADING UK SUPERMARKETS AND AMAZON.COM

I was originally called Helvetia

ANSWERS WILL BE REVEALED IN THE NEXT ISSUE!

JOIN THE #REFILLUTION AND START TO REFILL YOUR ECOVER BOTTLES AT REFILL STATIONS ACROSS THE UK. CHECK OUT THE WEBSITE TO FIND YOUR NEAREST...

ANSWER TO THE JULY 2020 ISSUE IS INDONESIA

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I am very famous for chocolate


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

RECIPES

D I S C O V E R I N G

C O M F O R T

F O O D

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VEGAN EDITION


SEPTEMBER 2020 | ISSUE 2

VEGAN AND GLUTEN FREE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE MAKES 4

2 avocados (from Spain is best for limiting carbon footprint and ensuring ethical farming) 2 heaped tablespoons of coconut cream 2 tablespoons of maple syrup 2 tablespoons of raw cacao powder 1 teaspoon vanilla paste 200g dark vegan chocolate, melted Handful of raspberries

METHOD

PREP TIME

Once the avocado mixture is smooth, pour in the chocolate and blend again until all the ingredients are combined. Evenly pour the mixture into ramekins and leave them to chill in the fridge for 30-40 mins until they have set into a mousse. Top each one with a fresh raspberry (or more, if you prefer). Enjoy!

Prep | 20 mins Set time | minimum 30-40 mins in fridge

Place all the ingredients except the chocolate into a blender. Whilst those ingredients are blending, melt the chocolate until smooth and glossy.

FOLLOW FOR MORE RECIPES @EVE.VEGANEATERY

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INGREDIENTS

Profile for The Climate Issue

The Climate Issue | Issue 2 September 2020  

Issue 2 | September 2020

The Climate Issue | Issue 2 September 2020  

Issue 2 | September 2020

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