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Level 2 options (GCSE and equivalent)

for courses starting in September 2013


Contents Planning for the future Sample options form Courses, options and pathways Art Business BTEC level 2 ext. Drama Economics English Language English Literature Food Technology French Geography Graphic Products History ICT Latin

3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Mathematics Music PE Religious Studies Resistant Materials Science A Science (Additional) Science (Further Additional) Spanish Statistics Textiles Hackney UTC

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Options Evening Map

36

Parent and Carer involvement The City Academy, Hackney recognises the importance of students, parents, carers and the school working together to establish the best route for each student to achieve their potential. Students have fewer options and their choices are limited but it is important that students understand why these limitations are in place. As well as numeracy and literacy, learning a language, developing writing skills, and an understanding of scientific investigation provide a broad and balanced education. The school expects parents and carers to play a key role in supporting their children as they make their option choices, providing the support and encouragement needed at this important stage in their education, helping them to achieve their aspirational target grades.


Planning for the future Most students will not have decided what they would like to do as a career in the future but many will have decided how they will give themselves the widest possible chances and opportunities. Expecting to go to university is a really important start. You cannot get to university without 3 or more very good A level qualifications (or equivalent) and you cannot begin A level courses unless you have 5 A*-C GCSE grades including English, maths and science. In addition, it is expected that a foreign language and either history or geography would be the best indicator that you are able to think for yourself and to work independently of teachers’ and other adults’ help.

Career/ job

University degree

Good A level grades**

A*- C GCSE grades including English, maths, science, a modern language, and a humanities subject plus subjects of your choice * or equivalent level 3 qualification

3


Year 9 options form 2013 Your details Please complete in full

Tutor group:

Adam Smith

Parent/Carer’s name:

Parent/Carer signature: J.

John Smith

Language choice Please tick one French

LGI

C. Smith

Humanities choice Please tick one Geography

Spanish

History

E

Student’s name:

To be returned to your tutor on Monday 25 February.

Main options choices Please indicate 1st, 2nd and 3rd preferences for both options columns by writing a 1, 2 and 3 next to your subject choices.

Option 2

PL

Option 1

1

Art Drama

Drama

SA M

Food*

Art

Food*

ICT

3

ICT

3

Music

2

Music

1

PE**

PE**

Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Business BTEC

Economics

Graphics*

Geography

Textiles*

Resistant Materials*

* Only one Design and Technology option can be chosen as the qualification is ‘Technology’. ** Only PE or Sport BTEC can be chosen. Not both.

2

Sport BTEC**

Students who already speak their community language would be expected to study for a GCSE in this language during one of their three Additional Studies classes. We also offer an accelerated Latin GCSE.

Latin

Please tick if you would be interested in taking Latin as an extra option during Additional Studies. This will not affect your options choices.


GCSE Maths

7 6 5

GCSE English

4 3 2

Year 11

Year 10

1

E-Bacc. MFL = Spanish or French / E-Bacc. Humanities = geography or history. The 30 periods in a week will be made up of the above lessons.

E-Bacc. MFL GCSE Science

GCSE Science

E-Bacc. MFL

E-Bacc. Humanities

Option 1

Option 2

PE

PHSCE

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Assembly/Tutor

Courses available Nearly all students will study for the English Baccalaureate. This is a collection of very important subjects listed below:

English, maths, science + a modern foreign language + either geography or history In addition, all students will have two hours of PE per week.

Options choices Having chosen a modern foreign language and a humanities subject, students will then be able to choose two options subjects to study alongside the English Baccalaureate. Options choices are as follows:

• Art • Business BTEC • Drama • Economics • Food* • Geography • Graphics*

• ICT • Music • Physical Education • Textiles* • Religious Studies • Resistant Materials* • Sport BTEC

* Only one Design and Technology option can be chosen as the qualification is ‘Technology’. You cannot choose one from each option block.

Pathways explained All students at The City Academy, Hackney will be entered for Level 2 courses in June 2015 ( or sooner). Extended pathway students will take Science A and Statistics in Year 9. All Extended and Core pathway students have to do English, maths and science, French or Spanish, and history or geography. A maximum of 15 students will be following the Foundation pathway and will not be expected to study a language or history/ geography. They will be given additional support in English, maths and science. They will have a structured programme of support with vocational qualifications during option time.


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Subject: Art GCSE

Faculty: Creative Studies

Exam board: OCR

Syllabus #: J160-J167

Course outline: GCSE Art is an exciting programme which aims to introduce you to many aspects of art. This course requires students to create a portfolio of coursework based on a theme. The portfolio must demonstrate that the student has; made accurate drawings and studies of what they see; experimented with a wide range of materials, techniques and processes; developed their skills and modified their work as it progresses. Exam: Unit 2: Set Exam Task This is a 10 hour practical exam involving the creation of a final piece that will take place towards the end of the two year course. Students will have a choice of starting points set by the exam board. and will have 6 weeks to research, experiment with techniques and plan what they will produce for their final piece. Students will also have a mock exam during the Spring Term in order to experience this time scale. Unit 2 (A120) Set Exam Task • 10 hours set task. • Choice of starting points set by OCR. • Assessed as a whole and to extent of meeting objectives. • 40% of final grade. Coursework: Research, preparatory and developmental studies and their outcome(s). 60% of final grade. Unit 1: Coursework Portfolio In Year 10 students will choose a starting point for Unit 1 and begin researching their topic. They have the equivalent of 15 school weeks or 45 hours to complete this unit under controlled assessment conditions (supervised in lesson time). Unit 1 (A110) Coursework Portfolio • 45 hours assessed portfolio. • Personal response to a starting point set by centre. • Assessed as a whole and to extent of meeting objectives. • Supervised in lesson time. • 60% of final grade. Independent study: Every week the department will run Additional Studies sessions for GCSE students to receive extra tuition, use the materials in the department and complete or improve work. Students who attend these sessions and spend time completing independent research achieve higher grades at GCSE. Future study: A level Art , Fine Art and Photography. Career opportunities: Graphic designer , Architect , Animator , Cinematographer, Web Designer, Prop designer , fashion designer , Jewellery designer, Painter , Printmaker, Illustrator, Cartoonist, Artist.

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Subject: Business BTEC level 2 Extended

Faculty: Business, Health & Citizenship

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 500/6745/X

Course outline: The BTEC Level 2 Extended course consists of five units totalling 30 credits - equivalent to two GCSEs, grade A* - C. This is a practical course which involves looking at real life business issues as well as analysing case studies and attending field trips. Students will cover the following units at Key Stage 4: 1. Unit 1 Business Purpose: Understanding different business ownerships and purposes (5 Credits). 2. Unit 2 Business Organisation: Focusing on the aims and SMART objectives of businesses. Looking at functional areas such as marketing, HR and finance and how they are linked. (5 Credits). 3. Unit 3 Financial Forecasting for Business: Financial implications of owning a business such as cash flow, break-even and identifying start up costs and operating costs. (5 Credits). 4. Unit 4 People in Organisation: Focusing on organisational structures of businesses. (5 Credits). 5. Unit 21 Promoting Branding in Retail Business: Focusing on different sectors and distribution channels, as well as creating and promoting brands (10 Credits). Exam: No exams. 100% coursework Coursework: All assessments are coursework based.

Independent study: As this unit is 100% coursework based, there is an emphasis on independent learning. However, a proportion of that time involves teacher-led learning in the classroom. Students are expected to undertake three hours per week of independent study outside of the classroom. Homework is given fortnightly and is both practical and theoretical with the aim of achieving excellent marks throughout in pursuit of a distinction (A* - A equivalent). Future study: BTEC Diploma Level 3 is equivalent to two A levels at Key Stage 5. This can lead to higher education opportunities. At university you could study a range of courses including Business studies; Business Management; Marketing; Human Resources and Business Computing.

Career opportunities: Possible career pathways include: finance; retail management; office administration; entrepreneurship; customer services; human resources and accountancy to name a few.


Subject: Drama GCSE

Faculty: Creative Studies

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2DR01

Course outline: Unit 1 In this unit you will explore a theme, issue or topic through Drama. Includes two different texts from different cultures and/or times Unit 2 In this unit you will study a script and use the text to create Drama. In-depth study of a play text with a review of a live performance and written portfolio about our work. Unit 3 (technical or performance candidates) Rehearsed performance (devised or scripted) based on a specific theme. Your devised or scripted work will be performed to an audience and an external examiner. Exam: Unit 1: Drama Exploration - worth 30% of your GCSE 20% practical 10% written Unit 2: Exploring a text - worth 30% of your GCSE 15%practical 15% written Unit 3: Drama Performance - worth 40% of your GCSE (Candidates can focus on Technical aspects / or Performance) 40% practical ( no written work)

Coursework: • 1hr of homework a week. • You will have a strict rehearsal schedule and will be required to come to additional rehearsals (including weekends) • You must be prepared to budget at least £30 each academic year to go to theatre shows with GCSE classes as part of the course requirements Future study: GCE Drama and Theatre Studies at AS and A2 Level; BTEC National Performing Arts (Acting) Career opportunities: Actor, stage manager, journalist, arts administrator, drama teacher, drama therapist, radio presenter, cultural ambassador, youth/community worker, grant writer, broadcaster, theatre historian, charities administrator, marketing manager, theatre practitioner, casting director, producer, front of house manager, Lighting/Sound Technician. 9


Subject: Economics

Faculty: Business, Health & Citizenship

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4135

Course outline: This course aims to equip candidates with the basic tools of the economist to help them understand their place in and contribution to the local, national, and global economy as consumers, workers and citizens. They will be encouraged to investigate a range of contemporary issues, analysing the evidence from different perspectives so as to make reasoned judgements and informed decisions. Over the two years students will study the following topics: • Money • Work • The national and global economy • Managing the economy • Current economic issues

Exam: 100% examination. Two papers, each accounting for 50% of the total mark Paper 1 70 marks/50% - written paper: Personal Economics Paper 2 70 marks/50% - written paper: Investigating Economic Issues

Coursework: No coursework. Independent study: Homework will be set on a weekly basis. Students will be required to do extensive self-guided study to ensure high grades in this subject. Candidates are required to do at least 3 hours of studying each week. This course is only suitable for students with the following characteristics: • Hardworking • Self motivators • Conscientious • Reliable • Critical thinkers Please note that this subject will require students to have strong competency in Maths. Future study: Students with GCSE Economics will be able to progress into taking any A levels of their choice. Candidates with A level Economics will be able to apply to prestigious universities for highly regarded courses.

Career opportunities: Studying Economics will provide many career opportunities such as investment banking, law, ministerial posts, public policy, economics and business journalism.


Subject: English Language

Faculty: Essential Studies

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4505

Course outline: The English Language GCSE course begins for all students in the spring term of Year 9 with Unit 3: Extended Reading. This unit involves the study of Of Mice and Men and the completion of one Controlled Assessment. This will be followed in Spring 2 by Unit 3: Creative Writing, and in the summer term by Unit 3: Spoken Language Study. In Year10, all students will begin with Unit 1: Understanding and producing non-fiction texts. This is the only unit that is examined externally. In this unit students will be taught how to respond to a non-fiction text in exam conditions. Throughout Years 9 and 10 there will be multiple opportunities for students to complete the three speaking and listening activities assessed for Unit 2. All students will have completed all English Language units by the end of Year 10.

Exam: One exam worth 40% of the total GCSE marks. Duration: 2 hours 15 minutes. Paper 1: Understanding and producing non-fiction texts Section A: Reading (20% of the total GCSE marks). Students answer three/four questions based on three reading sources. Section B: Writing (20% of the total GCSE marks). Students do two writing tasks. Coursework: Two Units worth 60% of the total GCSE marks are examined by Controlled Assessment Unit 2: Speaking and Listening (20% of the total GCSE marks). This includes an assessment of Presenting, Discussing and Listening and Role Playing. Unit 3: Understanding spoken and written texts and writing creatively (40% of the total GCSE marks). This includes an assessment of Extended Reading, Creative Writing and Spoken Language Study. Independent study: The study of English Language requires regular independent study from all students. This should amount to at least 1½ hours study each week. This will take the form of reading, writing and research. Future study: The study of English Language will naturally lead to the study of A-level English Language and Literature. It also benefits students wanting to pursue humanities subjects such as History or Religious Studies, or more practical subjects such as Drama. Career opportunities: Students should be aware that most employers will expect prospective employees to have at least a C grade in GSCE English Language. A secure grasp of English Language will help you in any career. Attaining a higher grade can lead students into a wide range of careers including journalism, publishing and broadcasting. 11


Subject: English Literature

Faculty: Essential Studies

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4710

Course outline: All students begin the English Literature course in Year 9 with two transitional units in the autumn term. In the spring term all students study Of Mice and Men which is examined in the final examination in Year 11. All students will return to this text in Years 10 and 11. Year 10 begins with the study of Modern Prose (The Crucible by Arthur Miller or DNA by Dennis Kelly) which is examined in the final examination in Year 11. At the end of Year 10 all students study an anthology of poems which is examined in the final exam in Year 11. Year 11 begins with the only English Literature controlled assessment. This involves a comparison of Othello with one other text from the English literary heritage.

Exam: Two exams worth 75% of the total marks. Paper 1 Unit 1: Exploring Modern Texts (Duration: 1½ hours) Section A: Modern Prose or Drama (20% of the total GCSE) Section B: Exploring Cultures (20% of the total GCSE) Paper 2 Unit 2: Poetry Across Time (Duration: 1¼ hours) Section A: Poetry Cluster from the Anthology (23% of the total GCSE) Section B: Responding to an Unseen Poem (12% of the total GCSE) Coursework: All students will complete one controlled assessment. Unit 3: The Significance of Shakespeare and the English Literary Tradition (25% of the total marks). This Unit involves a comparison of Othello with one other text. Independent study: The study of English Literature requires regular independent study from all students. This should amount to at least 1½ hours study each week. This will take the form of reading, essay writing and research. Students are encouraged to read other books by the author they are studying. Future study: The study of English Literature will naturally lead to the study of A-level English Literature or English Language. It also benefits students wanting to pursue humanities subjects such as History or Religious Studies, or more practical subjects such as Drama. Career opportunities: English Literature GCSE helps develop students’ critical thinking skills which will help them in any career. Attaining a higher grade can lead students into a wide range of careers including journalism, Law, publishing and broadcasting.


Subject: Food Technology GCSE

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4545

Course outline: Food Technology is an exciting and fast moving course. It focuses on the practical and theoretical side of Food Technology. This course is not just cooking. The theory side of the course will focus on food materials and components, design and market influences and food production processes and manufacture. The practical side of the course will see you put your theoretical knowledge into practise as you design and create a range of food products. You will learn a wide range of practical skills which will help you develop and improve your outcomes. The course will appeal to you if you: • Are interested in any area of food production • Enjoy hands on practical tasks • Like to cook • Enjoy problem solving • Like to develop and improve upon your ideas • Are interested in where our food comes from • Like to try new and exciting taste sensations

Exam: Written Paper (2 hours) 120 marks, 40% of the overall mark. One paper with two sections: Section A - 30 marks A design question based on a theme supplied before the exam Section B - 90 marks Covers all aspects of the specification content. Candidates answer all questions in two sections using pre-release material issued by the exam board. Coursework: Design and Making (Practical Task). Approximately (45 hours) 60% of the overall mark. A single design-and-make activity selected by students from a set of task given by the exam board. Students will create a final product that is supported by a folder of design work. Independent study: one hour of homework each week. Future study: A level, AS/A2 in Food Technology. Career opportunities: Sensory Scientist, Food Researcher, Food Buyer, Food Technologist, Environmental Health Officer, Food Microbiologist, Marketing – Food Products, Food product developer, Product assurance manager, Food research scientist, Chef, Baker, Food store manager & Food production assistant. 13


Subject: French GCSE

Faculty: Society and Culture

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2FR01

Course outline: During this course, four core topic areas will be covered: Media and Culture, Sport and Leisure, Travel and Tourism, Business, Work and Employment. These core topic areas will continue to build on the curriculum of Key Stage 3. Students will be able to share interests, ideas and opinions with French speakers and study French culture. Students would be encouraged to participate in a trip to France as its impact on all four skills cannot be underestimated. Although there is no longer a coursework component to this course, student’s preparation for the controlled assessments in Speaking and Writing skills would require a similar dedication to meeting teacher deadlines and responding to feedback on work and redrafting as necessary.

Exam: Students are assessed in all four skills – Listening, Speaking , Reading and Writing. Listening and Reading skills are assessed by exam papers taken at the end of course while Speaking and Writing skills will be assessed at any point when the teacher believes that the student is ready to give his / her best performance. Paper 1 Listening and Understanding

20%

Externally assessed

Paper 2 Speaking

30%

Internally assessed.

Paper 3 Reading and Understanding

20%

Externally assessed.

Paper 4 Writing

30%

Externally assessed.

Independent study: It would be expected that students of French would spend at least three hours a week on independent study. During this time they would be expected to engage in reading for pleasure in French, using online multimedia resources and most importantly on expanding vocabulary. Future study: Successful candidates at GCSE could be expected to pursue French at A level. Career opportunities: “Graduates without a second language are disadvantaged when looking for a job” (Michael Palin, interviewed for the Independent Newspaper 2009). The nature of the study of a language means that it can be successfully combined with any other course of study. Interesting Careers: Event Manager, MI6 Officer, Journalist.


Subject: Geography GCSE

Faculty: Society and Culture

Exam board: OCR

Syllabus #: Geography B - J385

Course outline: The specification consists of four main themes: Theme 1: Rivers and coasts (what processes are involved in rivers and coasts? What threats do they pose to human settlement? How are they managed?) Theme 2: Population and settlement - (Is the world overpopulated? How do countries manage their populations? How is the pattern of land use changing?) Theme 3: Natural Hazards – (where do natural hazards take place and why? How can human activities affect the impact of natural hazards? How can we protect people from natural hazards?) Theme 4 – Economic development – (Why are some countries rich and some poor? Why do certain economic activities locate in certain places? How do multi-national countries affect development? How does economic development affect the environment?) Exam: 75% of the course is assessed through two written papers. Paper 1: Geographicaly Themes - 50% 1hr 45 mins Paper 2: Sustainable Decision Making - 25% 1hr 30 mins Controlled Assessment 25 % This section of the course is assessed through a field work study which is completed in year 10. Students are required to gather data over the course of a one day field trip. They then return to school, complete their analysis and write up their findings under controlled assessment conditions. This piece of work should be no more than 2000 words. Independent study: Geography is a very literate subject. Students will be expected to complete a minimum one hour of homework every week and are encouraged to read widely including current articles as well as guided work materials. Independent study is vital for preparation for their controlled assessment.

Future study: This GCSE will equip students with the necessary skills to take A level Geography. Career opportunities: The breadth of study covered in geography leads to many different employment opportunities such as work in the charitable sector, conservation, journalism, town planning, countryside management, international development, project management, environmental officers/ managers, food industry and a range of jobs within the public sector and the business world. The skills developed include –critical thinking, statistical analysis, group work, independent study, ability to discuss current affairs and voice an opinion, non-verbal reasoning and high level and structured essay writing skills. 15


Subject: Graphic Products GCSE

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4550

Course outline: In Graphic Products students design and manufacture using compliant materials and focus upon manipulating visual aspects of products. A range of skills are developed such as sketching, pictorial drawing, production drawing, information graphics, typography, CAD applications, digital images, nets, tessellations and CAM (computer aided manufacture). Assignments cover packaging disassembly, analysis and redesign exercises. Following the design process students are required to produce an outcome, in the form of a working product, to a perceived problem. This will be manufactured in card, foam, paper, plastic and other compliant materials using CAD/CAM and other enhancement techniques to produce a quality product. Students will also learn about the way Graphic Design works in the world outside school. In particular they study how industry is organised to manufacture good graphical products. Students will learn about professional graphic design skills and techniques then incorporate these skills into their work. Students will have the opportunity use digital photography then edit using Multimedia software. The course will appeal to you if you: • Are creative and innovative and enjoy designing & manufacturing • Enjoy Craft, Design, Graphics and Art but also like to solve problems • Like to work with and investigate soft materials and their properties • Have or would like to gain knowledge of Computer-Aided Design & Manufacture • Enjoy working with tools, machines and equipment in order to produce quality products • Have an interest in learning about 2D & 3D graphical techniques to communicate concepts and ideas

Exam: Written Paper (2 hours) 120 marks, 40% of the overall mark. One paper with two sections: Section A - 30 marks - a design question based on context supplied before the exam Section B - 90 marks - covers all aspects of the specification content Candidates answer all questions in two sections using pre-release material issued by the exam board. Coursework: Design and Making (Practical Task). Approximately (45 hours) 60% of the overall mark. A single design-and-make activity selected from a choice of set tasks, consisting of the development of a made outcome and a concise design folder and/or appropriate ICT evidence. Independent study: 1 hour of homework each week. Future study: A level, AS/A2 in Product Design. Career opportunities: The course lays an appropriate foundation for further study of Design and Technology or related subjects such as Product Design, Multimedia design, Illustration, Web Design, Graphic Design, Print Industries, Publishing, Architecture, cartography, animation, graphic design, interior design, web design, computer based work in all design and manufacturing related professions.


Subject: History

Faculty: Society and Culture

Exam board: WJEC

Syllabus #: WJEC History - Route A

Course outline: The USA : a nation of contrasts: Consider the main problems and challenges facing American society between 1910-1929. A look at the major economic problems and the development of American culture and society, including the study of Immigration, Prohibition and the era of gangsters. Germany in Transition: Factors which led to the rise of the Nazi regime, the impact of change on the lives of the German people and the significance of war for Germany. The development of the USA: Consider the developments, events and personalities which have shaped the recent history of the USA. Students will examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have affected the lives of the American people over the whole of this period. Includes study of The Wall street crash, Civil rights movement and The cold war.

Exam: 75% of the course is assessed through two written papers. Unit 1 - 50% Paper 1: The USA: a nation of contrasts, 1910-1929 - 1hr 15 mins Paper 2: Germany in transition, 1929-1947 - 1h 15mins Unit 3 - 25% Paper 3: The development of the USA, 1929 – 2000 - 1hr 25 mins Controlled Assessment - 25% A two part investigation into an issue of historical debate or controversy. Both assignments will be based around questions of ‘How far did ‘x’ change/improve over time’ or ‘How important was ’x’ over time’ or ‘How much did ‘x’ change over time’ – Both assignments are to be completed in exam conditions in school and should be no more than 2000 words altogether. Independent study: History is a very literate subject. Students will be expected to complete a minimum one hour of homework every week and are encouraged to read widely including historical texts as well as guided work materials. Independent study is vital for preparation for their controlled assessment. Good written communication skills are essential. Future study: GSCE history is an academic subject; highly valued by both employers and further/higher education providers. It will lead directly to students taking A level history and A level Government and Politics. Career opportunities: The course will develop key skills including Communication, information, communication technology, improving own learning performance, problem solving, working with others. Such skills are high valued in many careers including: Law, Management, Media, Advertising and marketing, education at all levels and Journalism.

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Subject: ICT GCSE

Faculty: Business, Health & Citizenship

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2IT01

Course outline: The exam unit consists of students exploring how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. They learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and wellbeing and on the move). They develop awareness of the risks that are inherent in using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice. The controlled assessment consists of students broadening and enhancing their ICT skills and capability. They work with a range of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. They learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and responsible practice.

Exam: One paper accounting for 40% and 60% is controlled assessment Paper 1 5IT01

Living in the Digital World (Exam 40%)

Coursework: There is one coursework titled Using Digital Tools which is a controlled assessment worth 60% of the total mark. Independent study: Students will be set homework every week and should spend a minimum of one hour per week on independent study. Future study: Students will be able to study A level ICT, Business Studies, Computer Science and Economics. They will also be able to study Level 3 equivalents in these subjects. Career opportunities: Students will have many career options after studying ICT. They can become Computer Scientists, Programmers and Game Designers, Database administrators working for large companies, Network and Security specialists, Web designers and developers, Systems Analyst and Project Managers to name just a few.


Subject: Latin

Faculty: Society and Culture

Exam board: OCR

Syllabus #: JO81

Course outline: This is an accelerated course which gives students the opportunity to study the language and literature of ancient Rome through the study of the works of famous authors such as Virgil, Ovid and Cicero. Students will learn to develop a sensitive and analytical approach to language and will gain a greater awareness how ancient Roman civilisation has impacted on the world today. Exam: There are four papers written examination papers, each equally weighted and all externally assessed. Students must complete papers 1 and 2 and two of papers 3, 4 and 5. There is no coursework component to this course of study. Latin Language 1 25% Compulsory Comprehension and translation of Latin passages passed on mythology and Roman domestic life Latin Language 2 25% Compulsory Comprehension and translation of Latin passages based on historical stories Latin Prose Literature 25% Optional Comprehension and literary appreciation questions on the prose texts studied. Verse Literature 25% Optional Comprehension and literary appreciation questions on verse texts studied Sources for Latin 25% Optional Source-based study of Roman civilisation

Independent study: It would be expected that students of Latin would spend at least three hours a week on independent study. Future study: Successful candidates at GCSE could be expected to pursue Latin at A Level. Other possibilities beyond A Level: Ancient Greek, Ancient history, Classical civilisation, English, law. Career opportunities: Latin can be successfully combined with the study of history, law, medicine. 19


Subject: Mathematics

Faculty: Essential Studies

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 1MA0

Course outline: The Maths course will cover the following areas: Number & Algebra, Geometry & Measures, and Statistics & Probability. All these areas will be covered in detail with direct linkage to real life situations (FM) and problem solving.

Exam: (Linear Specification) There aretwo different tiers of entry: Higher and Foundation. Each tier consists of two papers Non-calculator (50%) and Calculator (50%). Grades available for foundation tier are from G to C whereas Higher tier grades are available from D to A* (Grade E allowed). Functional elements of Maths are assessed on each paper: Higher (approximately 20-30%) and Foundation (approximately 30-40%) All students are expected to take the iGCSE qualification in mathematics alongside the Linear Specification. Paper 1F Foundation Paper 2F Foundation Paper 1H Higher Paper 2H Higher

1hr 45min 1hr 45min 1hr 45min 1hr 45min

Non Calculator paper Calculator paper Non Calculator paper Calculator paper

50% 50% 50% 50%

Coursework: No coursework requirements. Independent study: Students will be required to complete to a high standard, 1 piece of written homework as well as online homework (mymaths). In addition to this, students may be expected to complete mini projects to enhance their problem solving as well as their Handling data skills. Future study: GCSE Additional Mathematics as well as A-Level Mathematics will be offered to students who achieve an A or A*grade in the subject. This will build on work covered at GCSE level. A minimum of Grade B in GCSE Maths is a pre-requisite for A-level Economics. Career opportunities: In today’s world, Mathematics has an important role in providing Key Skills needed in many different careers. It provides a logical approach and intellectual rigour that contribute to an ability to solve a wide variety of problems. The subject has become a popular prerequisite to many programmes of study at higher levels of education: Engineering, Banking & Finance, Economics, Business, Education, Actuarial Sciences, Stock Brokerage, Medicine, Scientific research, etc. A qualification in Maths is essential for almost all jobs and careers.


Subject: Music GCSE

Faculty: Creative Studies

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2MU01

Course outline: Performing (30%) Students will spend a third of the course developing both their solo and ensemble performing skills. This will range from creating whole class performances similar to those created in KS3 lessons to students working independently on their own individual skills. In order to meet this part of the course, students must be able to play an instrument, sing or rap. To thrive in this area, it is highly recommended that students have instrumental lessons alongside the GCSE course at a reduced price of £20 for ten group lessons and £40 for individual lessons. Composing (30%) Students will spend a third of the course developing their composing skills. Independently, students will use live instruments and/or computer software to compose music in a variety of different styles including popular music, African music and classical. Listening and Appraising (40%) Students will spend a third of the course developing their listening and appraising skills. Students study and analyse 12 pieces of music in a variety of styles and their understanding of the music will be tested at the end of the two year course. 90% of the exam is multiple choice and short answers with an extended written response accounting for the remaining 10%. Overall The GCSE is a largely practical subject involving minimal writing. It is a perfect choice for students who enjoy actively engaging in the study of music and will build on student’s creativity, self-confidence, self-discipline and ability to work independently and with others. Exam: Students will sit a 1½ hour listening exam (40%) taken at the end of the two year course. Questions relate to a range of set pieces taught throughout the course. Unit 1 - Performing Music Unit 2 - Composing Music Unit 3 - Listening and Appraising

Coursework: Performance (30%) - One Solo Performance and one ensemble performance Composition (30%) - Two Compositions in varying styles Independent study: Students will be required to complete one hour of homework a week and practice their performance skills regularly too. Future study: After successfully completing the GCSE, students may continue studying music through A level Music or A level Music Technology. Career opportunities: There are a wide range of jobs available in the music and entertainment industry; professional musician, composer, teacher. 21


Subject: PE

Faculty: Business, Health & Citizenship

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2PE01

Course outline: Theory In the first year of the course you will study ‘Your healthy, active lifestyles’, including physical activity, exercise and fitness. You will then study ‘Your healthy, active body’ including cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and skeletal systems in the second year. Practical In this section of the course you will study a wide range of sports as a player, coach and official. You will then select your four strongest sports to be assessed in. At least two of the four performances must be as a player.

Exam: Theory (40%) Each student is assessed in a 1 ½ hour exam consisting of multiple choice, short answer and long answer questions. Practical (60%) Each student is assessed in four sports/ activities of their choice. This will include 12% coursework.

Independent study: 1-2 hours per week Future study: AS and A level PE, BTEC National Diploma Sports and Exercise Science Degree Career opportunities: Physical Education Teacher/Lecturer, Physiotherapist, Nutritionist, Sports/Leisure Manager, Sports Analyst, Sports Journalist.


Subject: Religious Studies

Faculty: Society and Culture

Exam board: WJEC

Syllabus #: 4610

Course outline: Religious Studies GCSE deals with a range of moral and political dilemmas, and looks at what different religions have to say about those dilemmas. You will study two religions throughout the course – one of those will be Christianity, and the other can be a religion of your choice. Each paper is broken up into 4 units. The first paper explores answers to a number of moral dilemmas. Unit 1 deals with issues of love, marriage, and sex; Unit 2 is concerned with questions about justice, equality, prejudice and discrimination; whilst units 3 and 4 deal with philosophical issues about life, death, creation and the existence of God. The second paper covers questions of political philosophy. Unit 1 deals with issues of war and conflict; Unit 2 is about questions of medical ethics; Unit 3 deals with when and how we should allow religious expression – for example in this unit we will be looking at, among other things, the French headscarf ban. Finally, Unit 4 will cover issues of human rights, punishment, and authority. All students will sit their GCSE after one year, students will then either go on to study for an AS level in Critical Thinking, or do extended work in Religious Studies. Exam: You will sit two exams; each is 1 hour 45 minutes long. Religion and Life Issues This paper is broken up into four units: Relationships; Is it Fair?; Looking for Meaning; Our world. Religion and Human Experience This paper is also broken up into four units: Religion and Conflict; Religion and Medicine; Religious Expression; Authority – Religion &State.

Coursework: There is no coursework for Religious Studies. Independent study: There will be approximately 45 minutes of independent study each week. Future study: RS GCSE leads directly into A Levels in Religious Studies and Philosophy. However, it also builds debating and critical analysis skills which are useful for other subjects such as Law, Psychology, Sociology and Politics. Career opportunities: RS is an academic subject valued by all employers and universities. Studying RS and Philosophy will give you skills that are important for jobs from law to politics to business – our current Prime Minister studied Philosophy at University.

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Subject: Resistant Materials

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4560

Course outline: Design and Technology (Resistant Materials) is a practical subject area which requires the application of knowledge and understanding when developing ideas, planning, manufacturing products and evaluating them. RM offers a practical approach that encourages students to design and make products with creativity and originality in a variety of practical activities, using a range of materials and techniques. In your Key Stage 4 course you will also learn about the way Design and Technology works in the world outside school. In particular you will study how industry is organised to manufacture good products. The course lays an appropriate foundation for further study of Design and Technology or related subjects such as Manufacturing and Engineering. The course will appeal to you if you: • Are creative and innovative and enjoy designing & manufacturing • Enjoy designing, making and Art but also like to solve problems • Like to work with and investigate materials/components and their properties • Have or would like to gain knowledge of Computer-Aided Design & Manufacture • Enjoy working with tools, machines and equipment in order to produce quality products • Are interested in learning about 2D & 3D graphical techniques to communicate concepts Exam: Written Paper (2 hours) 120 marks, 40% of the overall mark. One paper with two sections: Section A - 30 marks A design question based on context supplied before the exam Section B - 90 marks Covers all aspects of the specification content Candidates answer all questions in two sections using pre-release material issued by the exam board. Coursework: Design and Making (Practical Task). Approximately (45 hours) 60% of the overall mark. A single design-and-make activity selected from a choice of set tasks, consisting of the development of a made outcome and a concise design folder and/or appropriate ICT evidence. Independent study: one hour of homework each week. Future study: A level, AS/A2 in Product Design. Career opportunities: The course lays an appropriate foundation for further study of Design and Technology or related subjects such as Architecture, Mechanical Engineering, Surveying, Graphic Design, Interior Design, Web Design, All Manufacturing Industries, computer based work in all design and manufacturing related professions, health and safety, material testing, civil engineering & environmental planning.


Subject: Science A

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4405

Course outline: Biology: Keeping Healthy , Interdependence and Adaptation Chemistry: Fundamentals and Materials, Oil and the Earth Physics: Heat and Energy Transfers, Generating Electricity and Waves Each of the topics covers 6 -7 weeks teaching time. End of topic tests every 6 weeks will monitor the progress of students. There will be a 2 week revision period for each module in the run up to external exams, including sitting a mock exam. The controlled assessment will be carried out within the teaching of the units. It will take 6 lessons to complete. This will be submitted along with the final terminal exam in year 10.

Exam: Students will sit three written module exams lasting 1 hour. A further two written papers are sat in conjunction with the controlled assessment element. Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4

Biology Physics Chemistry Controlled Assessment

25% 25% 25% 25%

Coursework: - Controlled Assessment. 3. Students plan an experiment to test a hypothesis. They then sit a written paper on planning skills. 4. Students carry out the experiment and analyse their results. They then sit a written paper on analysis skills.

Independent study: Students will be set weekly homework of about an hour. This will include past questions when appropriate. Students should be reviewing the work covered in class. Future study: The Science A GCSE can be used to go onto the Additional Science Award. Alternative exams might include Additional Applied Science and B-Tec Science.

Career opportunities: ...

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Subject: Science (Additional)

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4408

Course outline: Biology: Cells and Organ Systems, Processes and Genetics Physics: Forces and Electricity, Radioactivity Chemistry: Structure and Bonding, Reactions Each of the topics covers 6-7 weeks teaching time. End of topic tests every 6 weeks will monitor the progress of students. There will be a 2 week revision period for each topic in the run up to external exams, including sitting a mock exam. The controlled assessment will be carried out within the teaching of the units. It will take 6 lessons to complete. This will be submitted along with the terminal exam in year 11.

Exam: Students will sit three written module exams lasting 1 hour. A further two written papers are sat in conjunction with the controlled assessment element. Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4

Biology Physics Chemistry Controlled Assessment

25% 25% 25% 25%

Coursework: - Controlled assessment. 1. Students plan an experiment to test their own hypothesis. They then sit a written paper on planning skills. 2. Students carry out the experiment and analyse their results. They then sit a written paper on analysis skills.

Independent study: Students will be set weekly homework of about an hour. This will include past questions when appropriate. Students should be reviewing the work covered in class.

Future study: The Additional Science GCSE will count towards the EBacc Qualification. Also further studies at A-level. Career opportunities: Marine biologist, Astronomer, Pharmaceuticals , Engineer, Doctor


Subject: Science (Further Additional)

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #:

Course outline: P1: Exchange mechanisms in plants and animals P2: Periodic table and reactions, chemical analysis P3: Medical Physics, Keeping Moving. Each of the topics covers 6-7 weeks teaching time. End of topic tests every 6 weeks will monitor the progress of students. There will be a 2 week revision period for each topic in the run up to external exams, including sitting a mock exam. The controlled assessment will be carried out within the teaching of the units. It will take 6 lessons to complete. The most successful piece will be submitted along with the final terminal exam in year 11. Exam: Students will sit three written module exams lasting 1 hour. A further two written papers are sat in conjunction with the controlled assessment element. Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4

Biology Chemistry Physics Controlled Assessment

25% 25% 25% 25%

Coursework: - Controlled assessment. 1. Students plan an experiment to test their own hypothesis. They then sit a written paper on planning skills. 2. Students carry out the experiment and analyse their results. They then sit a written paper on analysis skills.

Independent study: Students will be set weekly homework of about an hour. This will include past questions when appropriate. Students should be reviewing the work covered in class. Future study: The Additional Science GCSE will count towards the E-Bac Qualification. Also further studies at A-level. Career opportunities: Astronomer, Particle physicist, Engineer, Energy Industry,

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Subject: Spanish

Faculty: Society and Culture

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2SP01

Course outline: During this course, four core topic areas will be covered: Media and Culture, Sport and Leisure, Travel and Tourism, Business, Work and Employment. These core topic areas will continue to build on the curriculum of Key Stage 3. Students will be able to share interests, ideas and opinions with Spanish speakers and study the culture of Hispanic countries in greater detail. Students would be encouraged to participate in a trip to Spain as its impact on all four skills cannot be underestimated. Although there is no longer a coursework component to this course, student’s preparation for the controlled assessments in Speaking and Writing skills would require a similar dedication to meeting teacher deadlines and responding to feedback on work and redrafting as necessary.

Exam: Students are assessed in all four skills – Listening, Speaking , Reading and Writing. Listening and Reading skills are assessed by exam papers taken at the end of course while Speaking and Writing skills will be assessed at any point when the teacher believes that the student is ready to give his / her best performance. Paper 1 Listening and Understanding

20%

Externally assessed

Paper 2 Speaking

30%

Internally assessed.

Paper 3 Reading and Understanding

20%

Externally assessed.

Paper 4 Writing

30%

Externally assessed.

Independent study: It would be expected that students of Spanish would spend at least three hours a week on independent study. During this time they would be expected to engage in reading for pleasure in Spanish, using online multimedia resources and most importantly on expanding vocabulary. Future study: Successful candidates at GCSE could be expected to pursue Spanish at A level. Career opportunities: “Graduates without a second language are disadvantaged when looking for a job” (Michael Palin, interviewed for the Independent Newspaper 2009). The nature of the study of a language means that it can be successfully combined with any other course of study. Interesting Careers: Event Manager, MI6 Officer, Journalist.


Subject: Statistics

Faculty: Essential Studies

Exam board: EdExcel

Syllabus #: 2ST01

Course outline: The Statistics course will cover the following areas: Planning and collecting data, Processing, representing and analysing data, reasoning interpreting and discussing results and Probability. The course will enable students to develop skills and understanding of statistical techniques and concepts, statistical problem solving and also the importance and limitations of Statistics. The course is available and taught alongside GCSE Maths for the most able Mathematicians.

Exam: There are two different tiers of entry- Higher and Foundation. Each tier consists of one written paper and a controlled assessment. Grades available for foundation tier are G to C whereas Higher tier grades are available from D to A* (E allowed). Students taken the course will be expected to Sit the Higher tier paper. Paper 1F Foundation Paper 1H Higher

1hr 30min 2 hours

Calculator paper Calculator paper

75% 75%

Coursework: No coursework, however students will be expected to take a controlled assessment weighting 25%. Independent study: Students will be required to complete to a high standard, one piece of written homework as well as online homework. Future study: A level Statistics will be offered as one of the optional applied Maths modules required to gain a qualification in A-Level Maths/Further Maths. Career opportunities: The course provide a direct progression to higher level Statistics as well as supporting the techniques used in a wide variety of other Subjects such as Psychology, Sociology, Sciences, Business Studies, Geography, Economics, Marketing, Medicine, Sports etc. A higher qualification in Statistics is an advantage if you intend to work as one of the following: business analyst, data analyst, quantitative analyst, market analyst, risk analyst, actuary, econometrician, biometrician, researcher, research assistant, research associate etc. A lot of statistician work for businesses and use statistical models to predict future sales/business growth. 29


Subject: Textiles GCSE

Faculty: Discovery

Exam board: AQA

Syllabus #: 4570

Course outline: Textiles Technology is a creative and practical subject. It focuses on the design and creation of textile products from many areas such as clothing and fashion, accessories and home wear. Students will learn a range of decorative and construction techniques which they will then use to turn their designs into reality. The theory side of the course will back up the practical knowledge learnt by students. Areas such as properties of fibres, fabric construction, Textile manufacture and the environmental effects of the textiles industry will be studied. The course will appeal to you if you: • Enjoy designing and making products • Are a creative person • Like to work towards solving a design based problem • Want to develop your textiles skills base • Enjoy practical hands on tasks • Want to develop your design skills • Want to work in the fashion or textile industry Exam: Written Paper (2 hours) 120 marks, 40% of the overall mark. One paper with two sections: Section A - 30 marks A design question based on a theme supplied before the exam Section B - 90 marks Covers all aspects of the specification content Candidates answer all questions in two sections using pre-release material issued by the exam board Coursework: Design and Making (Practical Task). Approximately (45 hours) 60% of the overall mark. A single design-and-make activity selected by students from a set of task given by the exam board. Students will create a final product that is supported by a folder of design work. Independent study: 1 hour of homework each week. Future study: A – Level – AS/A2 in Textiles Career opportunities: Textile Designer, Print Designer, Fashion Designer, Foot wear Designer, Accessories Designer, Costume Designer, Tailor, Milliner, Knitwear Designer, Dressmaker, Fashion/Textile buyer, Clothing Manufacture Engineer, Garment Technologist, Pattern Cutter, Technical Textile Designer, Textile Colour Technologist & Upholsterer.


A new specialist school opened in September 2012. Students currently in Year 9 will be able to choose to continue their education at the UTC. The emphasis will be on technical, vocational and employability skills and you will focus on the exciting digital and health technology sectors, both of which are experiencing a growth in employment opportunities. What is the UTC curriculum like? For students aged 14-16, you will spend 60% of your time on general education and 40% on the specialisms. General education includes GCSE courses in English, mathematics, science, a modern language, Humanities and IT. There is also a programme of enrichment including PE, performing arts and enterprise. What are the UTC specialisms? Digital technologies will focus on Creative Digital Media. Example projects are: • Creating a digital infrastructure to support digital broadcasts • Creating animations and games for the entertainment business Health Technologies will focus on the key requirements within the health sector including hospitals, laboratories, doctors’ surgeries, first aid facilities, paramedic and peripatetic health providers. Example projects are: • Managing a Care in the Community Centre • Delivering forensic, pharmaceutical and medical sciences in a hospital, health care or scene of crime environment The specialisms will be accredited by BTEC qualifications designed by EdExcel What support will be available? You will receive extensive support from our sponsor employers, including BT and the Homerton and from our partner university, the University of East London. You will have extended work experience opportunities – up to 40 days a year. Future study You will be able to continue your general and specialist studies to A level and advanced vocational level. For a sixth former 40% of your time will be spent on general education and 60% on your chosen specialism. Your work experience will increase to 80 days a year.

Career opportunities You will go on to full-time higher education, a higher or advanced digital and health technology apprenticeship or full-time employment with continuing training. How can I find out more about Hackney UTC? Visit our website at http://hackneyutc.co.uk or speak to us at your Options Evening.

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Year 9 Options Evening Wednesday 13 February 2013, 5.45 p.m.

Canteen

Following an introduction to the GCSE options process in the theatre, our teachers will be available in the canteen and foyer areas ready to talk to you and your child about our curriculum offerings at Key Stage 4.

Hackney UTC Creative Studies

Society & Culture (Humanities)

Art Drama Music

Geography History Religious Studies

Business, Health & Citizenship Business ICT Economics PE

Discovery (D&T) Food Graphics Resistant Materials Textiles

Theatre

Society & Culture (MFL) French Spanish Latin

Heads of House

Main entrance

Theatre entrance Please complete the Options Evening feedback form on the reverse of your Options form. We really value your input.


GCSE options booklet 2012