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The Center for Wooden Boats

SHAVINGS The Next Chart b y

When you are making a long passage offshore, you keep track of your position using charts that show big chunks of the ocean. Periodically, you figure out your position and mark it on the chart; over the hours and days as you navigate through your passage a track emerges, sometimes straight as an arrow and sometimes meandering, depending on the effects of wind and tide. Eventually you get to the edge of the chart and it’s time to pull the next chart out of the drawer. I love this, the moment you can see all the visible progress you have made, look back on the challenges of the passage so far and anticipate the new areas you will get to experience on the next leg of your voyage. This year, CWB’s youth programs have been getting close to the edge of the chart. The chart we’ve been on has seen CWB develop outstanding programs that give youth the opportunity to explore our maritime heritage, learn new skills and develop into productive adults. The just-concluded summer season programs served more than 2.500 youth, more than 700 of whom received full or partial scholarships; this number does not include the thousands of youth who participated in toy boat building at the Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival, the Seattle Folklife Festival and other community events. On the next chart, CWB has plotted a course to expand our outreach to underserved youth through our “Pay What You Can” program and strategic partnerships with other educational and youth service organizations and to add another leg to the passage: our new job skills training program. The Job Skills program is unique in that it will take place both at Cama Beach with four youth Crew Members and at South Lake Union with six youth Crew Members. The roots of the job skills program go back to the beginning of CWB’s effort to engage youth in meaningful experiences on and around wooden boats and the water. In 1991, CWB hosted a conference to develop programs Fall 2011

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preparing their students to succeed both personally and professionally in whatever path they choose to follow. Last spring, Adam Green from Rocking the Boat came to CWB and met with staff and volunteers to familiarize us with their program format and the impact that their program has on their students and community. What was really apparent from Adam’s 2011 Job Skills Crew Members Isaiah D. Chhorn, Iris Alejandro, report was the importance Nick Otto, Troy Joey, Angela Ness and Veronica Ramirez, with of helping students develop CWB’s Youth Program Coordinator Tyson Trudel (right) during a strong interpersonal skills and recent training sesson at CWB. -photo: Chris Maccini the ability to see past their current situation into what is to use small boats as teaching tools for at-risk possible. In May, CWB received a grant from youth. Following that, we added staff to work the Russell Grinnell Memorial Trust to pilot specifically with youth. Those staff members the job skills program at both Cama Beach established programs and partnerships that are and South Lake Union. still a vital part of CWB’s outreach to youth. The seeds that were planted by Dick Wagner continued on page 11 and the CWB community in developing the first youth programs with small boats have taken root, born fruit and are now helping to nourish CWB’s continuing development as a place that provides meaningful experiences for youth in and around small boats. In March of 2009, CWB, the Alexandria Seaport Foundation and WoodenBoat Publications co-sponsored a third Teaching with Small Boats conference, held in Alexandria Virginia. This conference put CWB in touch with a dynamic and growing group of individuals and programs from throughout the country that are using boats to teach everything from science and math to social and life skills to a diverse population of youth and adults. We found inspiration in programs such as the Hull Life Saving Museum’s Maritime Apprentice Program and New York City’s Rocking the Boat, which provide in-depth training in boatbuilding, operation and repair as job and life skills training with the goal of

I N S I D E TH I S I S S UE:

Founder’s Report ................................... 2 News From South Lake Union ................ 3-5 News from Cama Beach ........................... 6 Wendy’s Shoreside Sea Log ...................... 7 News From The Boatshop ......................... 8 News From The Docks ............................. 9 Junior Sailors .....................................10 News From Youth Programs ..................... 11 The Care and Feeding of CWB .............. 12-13 Upcoming Workshops .............................14 Buy a Boat from CWB .............................15 Upcoming Events .................................16 Shavings

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CWB Staff

Betsy Davis Executive Director Dick Wagner Founding Director Amy Arrington Sailing Instructor Shane Bishop Cama Beach Livery & Facility Manager Lucy Blue AmeriCorps/Crew Member Support Lead Dan Boyce Cama Beach Youth Boatbuilding Lead Rachel Carter Volunteer & Visitor Service Coordinator Oliver Davis Sailing Instructor Steve Greaves Boat Donations & Boat Sales Manager Joe Green Boatshop Assistant Eric Harman Cama Beach Boatwright-in-Residence Diana Hennick Interim Visitor Services Coordinator Christian Holtz Sailing Instructor Kyle Hunter Boatshop & Livery Manager Andrea Kinnaman Bookkeeper Dan Leach Community Engagement Lead/Boatwright Chris Maccini Youth Educator Stephanie Messa AmeriCorps/Environmental Education Coordinator Edel O’Connor Skills Workshop Program Manager Aislinn Palmer Development Assistant Judith Rickard Member/Donor Relations John Riley Nightwatch Mindy Ross Education Director Sāādūūts Artist-in-Residence Kenn Sandell Finance Manager Erin Schiedler Communications Coordinator Eldon Tam Operations Manager Tyson Trudel Youth Program Coordinator Andrew Washburn CWB Cama Beach Manager

Volume XXXI, Number 3. Fall 2011 ISBN 0734-0680 1992 CWB Shavings is published by

The Center for Wooden Boats 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 (206)382-2628 www.cwb.org

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Founder’s Report : Beating the Odds b y

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This message is to Sam Rowlins, Roman Shadduck, Finn Schneider, Balloch Schneider, Sean Deal, Maya Rovelstad and Tom Giggs, the students of CWB’s Quick & Dirty program August 15-19: Sailing boats and designing boats are complex problems involving science and math. You went out on the lake and, in just five days, nailed aerodynamics. You went into the shop and, in just five days, nailed hydrodynamics. These are big accomplishments achieved by 11- to 13-year-old kids, years away from high school graduation. Beating all odds of time and age, in a classroom of Lake Union, you learned to sail tippy little boats. In an open-air shop, you studied boats, drew plans, made models and then, using recycled materials, constructed three different boats designed by three different teams. And you launched and raced them. You now are graduates in seamanship, engineering and environment preservation from the University of CWB. Can the Ivy League top that? Once again, CWB waves the winning flag of education through experience. This was a record setting year for the Quick & Dirty boatbuilding class for kids, seven students built three boats and all of the boats stayed out on the water for more than an hour, and each of the boats found a home with a student from the class. Photo : Erin Schiedler

CWB Board of Trustees Mark Barnard Ros Bond Chris Butler Chad Cohen Jim Compton Caren Crandell John Dean Michael Hendrick Elsie Hulsizer

David Loretta Mark Nolan Lori O’Tool Walt Plimpton Noah Seixas Johnathan Smith Denise Snow Dick Thompson Jim Wheat

Shavings Staff Dick Wagner, Editor Edel O'Connor, Production Manager

Shavings Contributors Betsy Davis • Ken Duvall • Joe Green Diana Hennick • Kyle Hunter • Wendy Joseph David Langstaff • Chris Maccini • Mitch Reinitz Judie Romeo • Mindy Ross • Erin Schiedler Jennifer Senkler • Tyson Trudel • Dick Wagner Andrew Washburn • Doug Weeks

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News From South Lake Union A record-Breaking event b y

For 35 years The Center for Wooden Boats has been attracting hordes of people to see, use and learn about wooden boats. Year-round, in sun, rain, sleet or snow. As regularly as the mail, we welcome people to participate in our hands-on maritime museum. We focus on the traditional small craft where visitors can be the captain for a row, paddle or sail or the boatwright building classic replicas. On the 4th of July weekend, we step up the pace with a multi-day Festival with yet more good wooden boats from near and far, from dinghies to tall ships, to admire, ride on and learn about. We offer visitors a chance to build toy boats, sail pond models, learn maritime skills, see demonstrations, watch Quick & Daring boats being built and raced, hear speakers and listen to music or just sit with food and drink and breathe in the environment. Well, our 2011 Festival did all of the above and in volumes we’ve never before experienced. Past Festivals averaged about 15,000 attendees. This year, we topped 30,000 visitors!. I think we perfected the recipe that made our annual Festival more tasty than ever before. One new ingredient was Lake Union Park. At last, after 10 years of design and construction, it is finished from street to shore (the construction still going on is inside the Armory Building, where the new home of the Museum of History & Industry is taking shape). While there were ongoing demonstrations of casting, carving, sharpening, mallet-making, building an Inuit kayak and steaming a Native cedar carved canoe, Quick & Daring boatbuilding has always been in a world all its own. It involves six teams of two persons; each team had submitted a design of a boat that they would build in a day. After construction the boats are carried to the lake for a race on a triangular course with one sailing leg, one human-powered leg and one leg with both sail and human power. The contest is judged on speed of building, cost of materials, showmanship, originality, aesthetics, speed (wind and human) and tool weight. Bob and Bear Zweibel’s Mini Armani Fall 2011

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This year the visitors could vote for their favorite boats by depositing CWB wooden nickels in “banks” on board each of the boats on display. The winners were: Best sail under 25’:

Eider (21’ Spritsail Cutter), Kirk Gresham

Best power under 25’: Woodwind (19’ Chris Craft), Doug reid Best sail over 25’:

Zodiac (160’ Schooner), Northwest Schooner Society

Best power over 25’: Katherine Jane (58’ Motoryacht), Jamie Lang & Brock Gilman Best overall:

Capolavoro (31’ Venetian water taxi ), Bob Lamson

Clockwise from top: All Hands Woodworking! Local shipwright Nathie Katzoff, along with his wife Lauren, spent the weekend building mallets with eager festival-goers; The popular Katherine Jane on the docks alongside Sea-Dog and Kwaietek; Kirk Gresham entertaining the crowds onboard his lovely Eider; CWB’s fleet of Pirate pond boats were a big hit at the model boat pond; Schooner Zodiac proudly flying its flags at the festival. - photos: Erin Schiedler, David Langstaff and Edel O’Connor.

took third place, Stiletto, the creation of Peter Chopelas and Carlin Robinson, was in second and the winner was Duck Duck, designed and built by Corrie Fisher and Brandon De Leo.

For three days the Festival just seemed to make life noticeably better. If you were there, you know what I mean. If you missed it, better make plans now for next year!

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News From South Lake Union CWB recognized with National Award for historic Preservation The Center for Wooden Boats is one of four Washington State historic preservation organizations among the winners of the 66th annual national Leadership in History Awards, the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history. The award, presented annually by The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH), recognized CWB for “overall institutional excellence in preserving Northwest maritime history since 1976”. CWB Executive Director Betsy Davis (center) accepted the award from AASLH Chair D. Stephen Elliott (left) and AASLH President and CEO Terry Davis (right) at the AASLH annual meeting in Richmond, Virginia, in September. Other Washington State winners were the Museum of History & Industry, the Washington Women’s History Consortium and Washington State Historical Society. “CWB is honored to be recognized for its commitment to making maritime history come alive,” Betsy Davis said. “We are lucky to live in a region with so many groups dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of our region’s history. Our colleagues’ work serves as an inspiration to us and a constant call to excellence.” - Photo: Dementi Studio. AASLH, 2011

Ed Monk Award Applications are being accepted now for the 2012 Ed Monk Memorial Award, which provides educational opportunities for the professionals working in traditional maritime trades. The mission of the award, which can be up to $2,000, is to further maritime professionals’ knowledge of traditional marine trades in other cultures. Study and research may include current and historical methods of boat construction using different materials, designs based on the functions to be served by the boats, materials available for construction and the state of technology. Applications are due on or before March 1, 2012. The applicant should explain how the project will enrich the existing knowledge of the applicant and how the funds would be used, which may include transportation, housing and other appropriate expenses. Also required is a traditional marine trades resume and a list of references. Decisions by the application committee will be made by or before April 1, 2012. Funds granted must be used within one year of the award. A written report of the activities and benefit derived from the experience must be submitted to CWB. The Award was named to honor Ed Monk, a prominent and respected boat designer and builder in the Northwest. It was established by John M. Goodfellow, a long-time CWB supporter and an advocate of preserving traditional maritime skills. WoodenBoat Publications has supplemented the Ed Monk Award Fund. For more information, contact Dick Wagner at (206) 382-2628 or dick@cwb.org.

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Sundays at CWB have been busier this year than ever before, with Pond Boat Sailing joining our CastOFF! Free Public Rides program. For years, we’ve facilitated school programs where students build wooden pond boats modeled after our racing sloop Pirate. Now that the Model Boat Pond at Lake Union Park is open, we offer these real miniature sailboats for rent every Sunday. Like full-sized sailboats, Pond Boats are controlled by trimming sheets so sails can catch the wind just so. They offer an excellent way to learn about sailing, as well to enjoy the grace of wooden boats on water. Pirate pond boats are not the only boats out there, though – visitors to Lake Union Park can bring their own boats and models to the pond. CWB’s gift shop also carries a variety of toy boat kits that really sail, as well as detailed plans to build a Pirate pond boat like those we rent. Pond boats are available for rent between 11 am and 2 pm Sundays for a suggested donation of $5. They also are offered free of charge the first Saturday of every month from noon to 2 pm.

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News from South Lake Union Fast Sailing Classics b y

Honoring the best-known name in wooden boatbuilding and yachting in the Pacific Northwest, the 12th Annual Norm Blanchard W.O.O.D. (Wooden Open One Design) Regatta took place September 24 & 25. The skies were clear with a light breeze of 3-7 knots on Saturday, allowing the race committee to conduct four races on the large boat course and seven on the small boat course. CWB’s Blanchard Jr. Knockabouts were the largest wooden one design fleet out of the 15 boats participating, joined by the San Juan 21 fleet and privately owned wooden boats ranging from 10’ to 35’. Contented sailors celebrated a good day, shared stories and a meal hosted by CWB staff and volunteers. Rain and high winds gusting to 20 knots whipped in from the south on Sunday. Races were abandoned by noon, just in time for dockside lunch and awards shortly after. Top place finishers in BJK fleet were Terry Linkletter, Mike and Margaret Bird and Jeremy Court (first, second and third). On the small boat course, under corrected Portsmouth Ratings, Tom Dorrance in a SF Bay Mercury beat out the Lightning Zap! skippered by John Watkins followed by Hank Myers in the Geary 18. Stephen Jensen in Charmed Juan earned first overall for the Classic Plastic Fleet. Sailing on the large boat course, along with Ziggy Glocker’s 35’ sloop, Susan, Sarah Howell’s Yankee One-Design, Gemini, and Mark Randall at the helm of the Friendship Sloop Amie was Charlie Griffes and crew sailing 26’ Blanchard Senior, Winsea, winning first overall. Norman C. Blanchard’s Blanchard Boat Company turned out more than 2,000 boats in 60+ years during the past century. Quality, performance and longevity are the hallmarks of Blanchard built boats. Thank you to all of the participants, staff and volunteers. Please join us next year, September 29-30, 2012.

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Sailing on the small boat course, (from left to right) CWB’s Geary 18 and SF Bay Mercury, Bob Smith’s homebuilt 11’ Swifty catboat, Della (partially hidden), CWB’s Lightning, and the Crescent, Kinship, sailed by the Chadsey Family. -photo: Mitch Reinitz (eMeLaR Photography)

Calling All Artists!

Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival Art Competition Now Underway! The theme of the annual Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival is heritage wooden boats. The ambiance is that of an oldfashioned, down-home waterfront festival where everything is fun, almost everything is free and nothing much is fancy. It’s as authentically grassroots American as you can get and has been for the past 35 years. “The Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival is one of the best family entertainment values in the Seattle area for the 4th of July weekend,” said Eldon Tam, Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival coordinator. “The Festival is one of the few hands-on maritime festivals where visitors can learn to rivet a plank to a frame, try out a classic skiff on the water or tour a classic Northwest wooden vessel.” Anyone is welcome to submit an entry. Submissions will be reviewed by a panel of judges consisting of CWB staff and volunteers selected by CWB’s Communications Coordinator. The Heritage Wooden Boats theme is merely a guideline; artists may interpret as they wish. The winning artist may be given feedback by the selection committee while in the completion process. Therefore, applicants MUST be willing to alter their design based on recommendations from the committee. The finished art will be used on Festival posters, postcards, t-shirts and for advertising and branding purposes. Therefore, the art should be both visually appealing as well as attention-grabbing, and the artist and committee will work together to achieve this goal. Visit CWB’s website http://cwb.org/festival-art-contest for competition rules and application details, as well as for inspiration or to see past Festival posters.

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Seeing the Whole Story b y a ndr e W W asHb ur n Cama Beach can seem like an unusual place to those not familiar with the history of early 20th century auto camps or Puget Sound Boathouses. Cabins lined up like military barracks face the water. A converted garage once housed the resort owned and operated fire truck, a testament to the once remoteness of Camano Island. Mysterious wreckage of railroad tracks descends below the tide. In the forest, ghostly charred stumps stand below the shade of second-growth cedars, fir and hemlock. The old entrance road - once the skid road - descends to a specific part of the beach at a specific slope. All these elements of Cama’s history require preservation and Participants in the 2011 canoe journey approaching Cama Bach. -photo: Dan Leach explanation. Through CWB’s partnership with State Parks we help interpret the resort and logging history of the site. Closing the Boathouse that evening, that native use was limited to the gentle Whether in many talks with visitors looking down the beach and seeing dozens summer months the fact remains that native or in writing, CWB staff and volunteers of canoes amongst the cabins, the whole people lived here. It wasn’t a vacation. attempt to explain the uniqueness of the history of Cama was illustrated. Try as we While certainly there were celebrations and site and what CWB and State Parks are might at CWB and State Parks, we cannot reunions similar to those hosted at Cama doing at Cama. The typical explanation is replicate that scene. Lets hope our new today, there was also certainly suffering, that the beauty of our effort at Cama lies in friends will choose to return year after year toil, and death. This was life and not a its simplicity. We do not have to pretend. on their journey and help us tell that whole diversion. What Cama was - a family fishing resort history. At Cama today we celebrate the fine Cama still is. What was fun and the reason Editors note: Annual Canoe Journeys work of CWB and State Parks and countless why people came here in the ‘30s is largely began in 1989. It was the 100th anniversary volunteers to preserve a piece of history, the same reason why people continue to of Washingtons statehood. The tribes of but visitors must be respectful of the come here. Washington’s coast responded with the deepest innumerable generations who lived and died All this time however, we’ve known in and most compelling exhibit of our state’s at this place and recognize our inability to our hearts that this not the whole story of history. They organized a canoe journey to tell that story. These stories are for native Cama Beach. There is a far more significant Seattle’s Golden Gardens Park for a three-day folks to tell or not. history. For thousands of years the beach gathering. The word got out to British Columbia This was brought into stark relief last July. we know as Cama was a summer gathering and Alaska, to Oregon and California. Each On a bright Sunday morning the first canoe place for at least four separate tribes. Family year the canoe people from San Diego to the glided to the beach. Soon after, a seemingly groups would spend the calm summer days Pribilof Islands paddle to various sites. And endless parade of canoes from dozens of collecting fish and shellfish from Saratoga each year their culture’s everlasting connection Nations from as far away as Southern Passage and head to less exposed areas when to boats and water becomes stronger. The 2012 California received permission to land. By the winter winds began to howl. In some Canoe Journey will be at Squaxin Island in the end of the day 40 canoes lined the lawns ways the modern use of the site echoes the the south end of Puget Sound, organized by the of the resort. Hundreds of pullers and their native use. Families return year after year Squaxin tribe. The Native people of the North supporters greeted each other talked of the to fish and gather shellfish. There is a big American coast will once again be as one. long paddle from Tulalip or the next day’s difference however. Andrew Washburn is Manager at CWB’s final leg into the Swinomish Channel. While archeologists have determined Cama Beach location.

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Wendy’s Shoreside Sea Log: Fire hoses b y

Like many in the Merchant Marine, longtime Northwest Seaport Volunteer Wendy Joseph spends time working at jobs on shore. She’s been chronicling her life ashore much as seamen do at sea. Here’s a recent report: The way shipping works out of the Sailors Union of the Pacific hiring hall, senior members have first crack at the good shipping jobs, actually going out as crew on a ship to China or somewhere. Those of us further down on the priority list have to wait our turn, in the meantime building up our seniority with shoreside work known in the trade as “Standby”. These are calls for sailors to go aboard ships that are tied up at docks for a few days and do various kinds of work. This includes loading food stores, deck and engine parts and supplies, chipping rust away and painting the chipped areas, replacing various equipment, greasing cables that operate the winches, replacing lines, and more. It’s a good way to get familiar with the ships we eventually will be crewing. Lately on the APL Shipping Lines ships, we’ve been doing the fire hoses. If there’s an emergency at sea, well, you could call 911 but you’d have to wait a while. Out there, we are 911. If there’s an emergency we have to handle it. And that includes fighting fires. A fire at sea is a sailor’s worst nightmare. There’s no place to run, except overboard. The amount of toxic matter that can burn on a ship is astronomical; say goodbye to your lungs. At sea, we have regular fire drills, not the kind you might have had as a schoolchild but the kind where you put the fire out. And that means all of us, from the Captain to the Steward’s assistant, have to go to fire-fighting school. Yep, red suspenders, hat, oxygen tanks, the whole works. I went to school in North Bend, where all the fire departments in Washington State go to train. We suit up and turn our hoses or spray tanks on different kinds of fires: electrical, oil/gas, wood, etc. We work outdoors and indoors, in pitch-dark confined spaces, and learn what kind of [water] stream to use, narrow or wide spray, how to direct the stream from the hose, how to communicate with our partners and look out for each. And you know what? Little me, 5’4” and 110 pounds, always clumping around in too-big boots because they never have any that fit me, Fall 2011

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did not fall down under all that gear. One of the big guys did. I got into the small spaces where the big guys couldn’t fit. I put out the fire. And it felt good. So we take fire safety very seriously out there - and so does the U.S. Coast Guard. They require us to have regular inspections of our equipment, including the fire hoses. And that’s where the shoreside work - Standby comes in. Every fire hose on the ship must be in working condition - no leaks, no broken connections. How do we check this on all the hoses? Glad you asked. We play hooksy-upsy. With all of them. First we go around and collect all the fire hoses from their fire stations, which are strategically placed inside and outside the bridge and crew quarters housing, in the engine room and around the deck. There are 40 to 50 hoses on a ship, each about 4” in diameter and 50’ long. We haul them all out on deck, lay them end-to-end and hook them up to each other in two major strings. One string is on the mooring station astern, with hoses running around and around maybe half a dozen times; then the nozzle end is tied over the rail. The second string is laid out back and forth along the deck, fore and aft on an 800’ ship, three or four times. In other words, the decks are paved with half a mile of fire hoses. The hose at the bow and the hose on the bridge deck are strung out and tied off separately. Then we turn the water on. People are stationed at each nozzle to make sure it doesn’t come loose and cause any damage. It’s a fine sight, the water surging out from the hose in a white arc of fire-quenching power. Real pretty. The fire hose inspectors walk the deck, checking every hose and connection for leaks, which takes about an hour. The engineers run water through the main water pump and the auxiliary pump to make sure both are working. Then we shut the water down, disconnect and drain all the hoses, coil them up and put them back where they belong. I forgot to introduce Mr. Spinner and Mr. Spanner. A spanner is a specially-designed wrench to help connect and disconnect the fire hoses. A spinner is a long metal two-pronged

pole with a 90-degree handle on top. We stick the prongs in the middle of the laid-out hose and then crank the handle to twist the hose around the prongs and coil it up. The whole operation takes a full day. Any leaky hoses are discarded and replaced. And sometimes you get wet.

Able Seaman and Shantyman Wendy Joseph has crewed the tall ship Lady Washington, the Virginia V, a WWII freighter, a fishing trawler in the Bering Sea and cargo ships the world over, from Norway to the Strait of Gibraltar to Singapore. She has been “chased by Somali pirates and weathered typhoons and hurricanes”. Ashore, she is the author of fiction and non-fiction, a produced playwright and an award-winning poet. She holds Masters Degrees in English from UCLA and the University of Washington. In 2006, she won first prize in the Seattle Maritime Festival’s “Songs and Stories of the Sea” contest.

CWB Wish List Help us continue to restore our collection of historic wooden vessels by donating an item on our wish list. Please contact us at cwb@cwb.org before donating.

• Paddles for livery boats • CLEAN tin cans from canned food • Adobe Software: (CS5) • Digital cameras • Heavy-duty cordless drills • Gas-powered pressure washer • Earmuff-style hearing protection • Anchors in excess of 50 pounds • Sturdy dock carts • Type IV PFDs • An oscillating spindle sander Shavings

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One of the unique attributes of the CWB her initial launch, coming out looking bright this adds an exponentially greater amount of Boatshop is the diversity of hull forms and rigs and shiny. Improvements included a bigger complication to the repair. We had to make a that we work with. Recently, we have serviced rudder for more maneuverability and updated bending jig that we could clamp the steamed everything from pedal boats to sailboats, diesel electrical gauges for more user-friendly mahogany to. The question was: how much tugs to electric launches. Two do you have to over-bend the booms snapped, including one wood to get the curve you need? on our New Haven Sharpie Betsy We made a pretty intelligent D. Six boats have been hauled guess, based on experience and and five have been launched after the grain of the wood. We repairs. There is never a shortage were pretty close, within oneof work to be done on our livery sixteenth of an inch. We built a fleet. new two-part steam box that can steam 6’ or 12’ pieces. One of the bigger jobs was restoring and refinishing the Another complication that Poulsbo boat, one of two electric had to be addressed in the boats available at CWB to quietly removal of a transom was navigate Lake Union. This boat providing enough support to is named for Terry Pettus, who maintain the shape of the boat led the charge to preserve Lake while the transom was gone. We Union houseboats. Poulsbo boats addressed this rather simply: a were prolific between the ‘30s and cross-brace 2x4 and clamps, the ‘60s, with more than 900 of with a vertical support to keep it them built for the fishing resorts from collapsing. With the wood CWB Boatwright Joe Green and boatshop volunteer Mark Preuss, working on of Puget Sound and the San Juan replacing Dewey’s transom, damaged during a particularly bad winter storm steamed and splined together, Islands. They were designed and last year. -photo: Edel O’Connor we were ready to roughly cut built by Ronald Young of Poulsbo the transom to shape and glue operation of the complex electric motor. This on the lower floor of his vehicle repair shop. on the cheek pieces. The old transom gave restoration would not have been possible this Terry Pettus was intensively used to pick up reference to take the appropriate bevels and year without the initiative of these volunteers. floating debris on the lake and then was laid make our cuts with confidence. By the end of Like the volunteer crews of Puffin, Pirate, up for several years in our warehouse with this repair, no one will be able to notice the Zap and Aphasia, the Dora team is directly a rotten forefoot and jeopardized garboard transom was ever replaced. responsible for keeping that boat looking great planks. Rotary Club of Lake Union saved the Other repair projects: the pedal boat and a pleasure for so many to enjoy. boat from the dust and darkness by raising Aphasia got a completely new bottom, the money to pay for its restoration this spring. Currently, the Boatshop staff and volunteers Spritsail Plover got a rebuilt centerboard The boat was launched on the first day of our are working on replacing Dewey’s transom, trunk that stopped a five-year-old leak, and 2011 Wooden Boat Festival and has already which was damaged in last winter’s storm. a few rowboats received routine paint and logged several hours on its newly rebuilt Dewey, a Woods Hole Spritsail, and Dora varnish maintenance. We also launched the electric motor. were named after Dewey Duggan, a Seattle Blanchard Junior Knockabout, Sterling, after longshoreman, and his wife, a sweet and Our other electric boat, Dora, was built at it was hauled out to fix a leaky rudder post. elegant lady. WCC students built both boats Seattle Central Community College Wood These projects have been an extraordinary through grants from the Duggan family. Construction Center (WCC) in the spring of amount of work that could not have been done 2007. This spring, under the steady hands of without the dedication of the extraordinary The first step was to get the old transom volunteers Dave Barden and Larry Smith, she volunteers and staff who make CWB the great off and make patterns from it. This boat has underwent her first haulout and paint job since place that it is. the only curved transom of any in our fleet;

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If you’ve strolled the docks lately, you may have spotted some new additions to the fleet. You may have admired the sleek lines and immaculate brightwork of the lovely Gemini or the comfy cockpit of the Gardendesigned double-ended sloop Lorelei and, while reading the dockside interpretation, noted that these boats are privately owned and participating in CWB’s Visiting Boat Program. Perhaps you wondered what Dave Thacker, owner of William Garden-designed Lorelei, chats the program is all about and with a visitor while working on replacing the boat’s lifelines -photo: Edel O’Connor why these boats were chosen or participation in public rides or skills for the program; maybe you even wondered workshops. CWB also requires boat owners if you could bring your own boat down to be comply with Clean Marina Washington Best admired by our many visitors and volunteers Management Practices, a set of environmental too. practices that can reduce pollution and Well, here are some answers to your show our commitment to preserving the questions. CWB strives to provide an optimal surrounding environment in accordance with visitor experience. We do this through the the guidelines issued by the Washington State presentation of unique, historic small craft. Department of Ecology and the requirements In 2010 CWB established a Visiting Boat of the Federal Clean Water Act. Program and allocated a certain amount of Boats participating in the 2011/2012 dock space for privately-owned wooden boats. season include the Gemini, a 30’6” Yankee Some boats are chosen for their programmatic One-Design built in 2009 by students at the nature, some for their roles as working Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding exhibits and some for their museum quality in Port Hadlock, Washington, under the condition. guidance of Chief Instructor Tim Lee. Gemini’s In order to participate in this program fascinating story, along with the history of boat owners agree to provide both volunteer the Yankee One-Design fleet was recently hands-on work and financial contributions to published in WoodenBoat (issue #221 July/ defray the costs of running the program. Their August 2011). Sarah Howell, Gemini’s owner, vessels must meet certain safety and upkeep who has been a CWB volunteer since 1994, requirements in accordance with CWB’s thoroughly enjoys the program. “I spend hours standards. These include dockside interpretation fiddling around on my boat at the dock. People and an ongoing maintenance and restoration are so impressed with all the boats on display plan. Participating boats also provide some and it’s fun to see wooden boats through form of programmatic contribution, which the eyes of those who are new to them. But can include live interpretation such as dockside every few days I have a good long talk with a tours, verbal interpretation of working exhibits stranger from out of town who opens up to me Fall 2011

about his or her lifelong love of boats. These conversations are a gift. I find myself inspired, and so often surprised, by what comes up when strangers share something as mysterious as the love of an old wooden boat.” Harvey Nobe, owner of the Friendship Sloop Amie, thoroughly enjoys the programmatic contribution part of the program. Amie has participated in the Sunday public sail several Sundays this year. She has taken out more than 100 passengers, as well as countless CWB volunteers, for sails. She gave public rides for the July Wooden Boat Festival and participated in the recent Blanchard regatta. She now has five active skippers, with several in training, and a growing group of volunteers to help bring her up to CWB’s standards of dockside presentation. The tugboat Isswat - a faithful friend of CWB that has spent countless hours towing boats between Seattle and Cama Beach for our annual Mother’s Day Weekend sail, helped out with moving docks to set up for the Festival and even been the vessel of choice for a formal dinner cruise offered as a donation to CWB’s fundraising auction - also has participated in the program. Owner Lia Stamiatou noted, “I bought a wooden boat and it has been one of the most rewarding things I have ever done. It came with so many friends and stories.” Currently Isswat is under restoration at a boatshop in Ballard but Lia hopes she’ll return to CWB looking better than ever and continue to share stories with volunteers and visitors. CWB will be reviewing applications for entry into the Visiting Vessel Program in the spring of 2012. If you have a wooden boat, or know someone with one, and feel that this program is a good fit, please email Edel O’Connor, eoconnor@cwb.org, for application details. Application deadline for 2012/2013 participants is April 1, 2012.

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J u n i o r Ask the Captain

Dear Captain Pete, If the wind pushes my sailboat down to the end of the lake, how can I possibly make it back home? How can I sail against the wind? Sincerely, Stranded Dear Stranded, What a great question, a conundrum for any young sailor! The answer is simple. You can’t! That is, you can’t sail directly against the wind. But you’re not stuck. You can make it back by sailing at an angle to the wind. Here’s how it works! You’ve already discovered that a sail can push a boat downwind by catching air, but it can also produce lift just like an airplane’s wing, which will allow you to sail back home. To do this, you’ve got to point your boat at an angle to the wind, not directly into it. If you set your sails properly, the sail will split the wind, allowing air to travel on both sides. The air travels faster along the curved-out side and slower along the curved-in side. This creates low pressure along the curved-out side of the sail, which actually pulls or lifts your boat into the wind. The lift from the sail works together with the shape of the hull (the body of your boat) to allow you to sail into the wind. Since you can’t sail straight upwind, you’ll have to zig-zag by tacking back and forth. You can sail at an angle with the wind on one side of your boat and then quickly turn your boat through the wind and sail with it on the other side. It sounds tricky, but with some practice, we’ll have you home in no time! Fair Winds, Captain Pete

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S a i l o r s THE BOOK NOOK

Torrie and the Pirate Queen by K.V. Johansen Age 9 – 12

This exciting sea story follows Anna, a young girl who inherits her grandfather’s pirate ship. With a rag-tag crew of retired sailors, she sets out on a journey filled with danger and adventure to rescue her father from the clutches of the Pirate Queen, Nevilla. The story is filled with colorful characters, hidden treasure, bravery and humor. This is a great story for any young person who loves pirate stories, but especially for girls who will relate to and look up to Anna, the strong, decisive captain. - Chris Maccini

Down to the Sea with Mr. Magee by Chris Van Dusen (Age 2-7)

Searching for a fun, sea-oriented adventure story that you actually want to read 99 times per week? Drop everything and go find a copy of Down to The Sea with Mr. Magee by Chris Van Dusen - a delightful, clever tale about a man, his dog and a playful whale who interupts a picnic outing on their little boat. The rythmic verse and whimsical illustrations draw you in immediately, but the story is what keeps you coming back for more. It was an instant hit with two-year old Hank, who asked us to read it no less than five times the first day. Thank you, Mr. Magee. - Jennifer Senkler

If you want to see for yourself how moving air can create lift, try this fun experiment. Hold one end of a small piece of paper up to your lips so that it is curved and the end away from you hangs down. Blow a stream of air across the top, curved surface of the paper and watch it lift up! Think of the piece of paper as your sail. It works the same way! Fall 2011


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The Cama Beach Job Skills program has been working closely with Stanwood and Lincoln Hills High Schools to recruit students. The Cama Beach Crew Members will begin their activities on October 17. The South Lake Union students will focus on learning how to operate the boats used in youth programs at CWB including safety boats, El Toros and the Discovery; they also will work on maintaining and repairing these boats.

1 Additionally, we are in the preliminary stages of planning a fourth Teaching with Small Boats conference, to be co-sponsored by WoodenBoat Publications and the Alexandria Seaport Foundation, tentatively scheduled to be held at Cama Beach next spring. If you would like more information about Youth Programs at CWB please visit our website at www.cwb.org or contact Tyson Trudel at ttrudel@cwb.org. Tyson Trudel is CWB’s Youth Program Coordinator.

Job Skills Crew Members, Veronica (left) and Iris, navigating their way home from Lake Washington on a recent overnight trip to Seward Park. -photo: Chris Maccini

Over the summer, as we planned this program, we sought to combine what we have been learning from other programs about how to equip youth for positive futures with CWB’s extensive experience in hands-on learning. While the youth in the job skills program at our two campuses will have some different experiences, much of the program will be the same. The Job Skills program covers three distinct skill areas, including the operation of rowboats, sailboats and powerboats, the repair and maintenance of all types of boats, and the skills required to find, get and keep a job. Additionally, staff will work with students to help them consider and make progress toward the next step in their personal and professional development. The Cama and South Lake Union Programs are starting on different dates. The South Lake Union program interviewed 14 students on September 28 for 6 spots. The following week, the students selected attended an overnight orientation trip on the Discovery, CWB’s replica 17th Century longboat. Fall 2011

The Job Skills Crew Members at Cama Beach are going to focus on woodworking skills, culminating in the construction of a traditional small boat for use in programs at Cama Beach. As we begin to mark out our progress on the next chart, there are many exciting opportunities to be involved in both the Job Skills and other youth programs at CWB. In support of the Job Skills program we are looking for people who work in a maritime career to come and talk about how they choose their career and the training that it took them to achieve it. We also are looking for volunteers who are interested in helping out with field trip and other youth programs.

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The Care and Feeding of CWB CWB Moves Forward at North Lake Union b y

The Center for Wooden Boats and a broad array of heritage and community partners have been working to realize their longstanding vision of preserving working waterfront at King County’s surplus “Metro” property at the north end of Lake Union. They took a big step forward in September when the Metropolitan King County Council unanimously voted to support negotiations between Metro and CWB toward a lease agreement. The Metro property provides immediate onshore space to support heritage vessel boat maintenance projects as a companion campus to The Center for Wooden Boats and Lake Union Park on the south end of Lake Union. Fixing the onshore facilities and making them useful and accessible will lead to the protection, cleanup and re-use of a vital section of the Working Waterfront. Over the longer term, these improvements may lead to realizing the vision of a second

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waterfront location for CWB’s maritime heritage programs and a place for National Historic Landmark vessels to perform maintenance, which will create broader access to traditional boats, ships and craftsmanship for the public. Just as The Center for Wooden Boats has evolved and grown during more than three decades at South Lake Union, CWB’s presence at North Lake Union will be evolutionary as well. The strategy is to begin with a lease to use just the shoreside facilities – the 5,000-square-foot warehouse and adjacent one-third acre of open yard space. The building will provide excellent space for preservation and maintenance of CWB’s fleet of historic small craft. Over time, the space can be developed to support workshops, exhibits and other public events. There will be a locked fence between these facilities and the water, so during this first phase CWB will not be running any on-the-water programs at the north end of the lake.

Artist rendering of CWB’s restoration shop at the North Lake Union Metro site.

As a resident of the Walling ford neighborhood, Geoffrey Braden, CWB volunteer and a member of CWB’s original Metro/North Lake Union steering committee, is looking forward to CWB’s expansion. “This long-term plan is exciting and will be of singular benefit for the city, the lake and the maritime community. And, by making use of an existing modest structure, it will not impact the north lake environment with more high-rise development.”

over the Bar: Lon Fredrick Israel Back in 1981 Lon Israel heard through the grapevine that a group in Seattle was planning a hands-on small craft museum. I met Lon and his wife, Mary, and over dinner we talked about The Center for Wooden Boats, its mission, vision and strategy.

Two weeks later, Lon and Mary and their Oakmead Foundation donated $40,000 to CWB. At that moment, a dream became a reality. Lon and Oakmead gave us our first building (the Boatshop), one-third of our last building (the Boathouse), our first computer, furniture for our first office,

the major donation for our first tugboat (Cap’n Pete) and an endowment for maintenance for the Boatshop. Lon and Mary saw the potential of CWB. As Mary once said, CWB “. . . was almost the first entity we supported when it was just a gleam in Dick Wagner’s eye and turned out to be one of the best.” Lon gave us more than donations. He kept us on course: Stick to the mission and vision and build the program structures to last. His spirit will always be a part of The Center for Wooden Boats. -Dick Wagner

CWB’s Boatshop and Boathouse echo the stick and shingle designs of 1900’s-era boat liveries. -photo: Edel O’Connor

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The Care and Feeding of CWB Passion, Patience and Persistence What makes a funky non-profit organization succeed? It’s not done by winning the Lottery, having daddy pay the bills or robbing a bank. It’s a process of passion, patience and persistence. CWB has a high batting average for all three. We began with monthly speakers at The Old Boathouse, spring and summer regattas at Gas Works Park, and workshops on maritime skills every Saturday in any place in our metropolitan area that was free. We had free use of the Lake Union Naval Reserve Base every July 4th weekend for the Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival; all we had to do was provide the toilet paper for the restrooms in the Armory. The plans and a model of our future site on Lake Union were displayed and discussed from Bellingham to Olympia at neighborhood centers, boat shows and any other public

b y d ick W agner gathering with a maritime theme. We created a newsletter (Shavings) and visited City Council members, state legislators, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the state Department of Natural Resources about our vision of a

museum that preserved our maritime heritage through direct experience of heritage skills. And then came the IRS non-profit status, a City/State permit to develop Waterway #4 and donated funds from foundations, corporations and individuals to build the Boatshop, the Pavilion, the Oarhouse, the Boathouse, the ramp and floats. These facilities allowed us to

start up a medley of learn-by-doing projects for our diverse community. People soon discovered The Center for Wooden Boats amid the gritty environment of South Lake Union. They bonded to our grass and trees, stick and shingle buildings, classic small craft and the friendly, dotouch ambience. We gave the community everything we promised - and more. After three years on our site, the Mayor declared us a living museum and forgave us any rent charge because of the community benefits we provided. Funky ideas can succeed by building a bank of friends. Forget about robbing banks.

An Unexpected Gift

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Puffin steaming into Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival at Point Hudson with a load of happy passengers. -photo: Doug Weeks

Our venerable 1906 steam launch Puffin became an international sensation this summer, participating in both the Victoria and the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festivals. In 1992, Puffin went to the Victoria Festival and won the Best Open Award; 19 years later she came home with the Oldest Power Award. Puffin’s Fall 2011

d uval l “Steam Team” – including Jeff Darrin, Ken Duvall, Brian Bennett, Sean Romanczuk , Katy Noonan and Doug Weeks – put in six weeks of preparation for the two-week festivals trip. In Victoria, they offered free rides, catching up with Puffin’s old friends and making new ones. One of these was Dick Corrigan, owner of the 92’ converted fishing vessel Cape Naden, a familiar sight at Lake Union’s Historic Ships Wharf. Dick invited the Steam Team aboard for the duration of the Festival – offering warm bunks and his world-famous bruschetta. Then it was on to Port Townsend via the ferry Coho. In no time Puffin was back on task, introducing people to the mysteries of steam propulsion. Port Townsend being closer to Seattle allowed more members of the Puffin team to share in giving rides and gave everyone a chance to experience the Festival.

A CWB member in Norfolk, Virginia, read the article about our underwater archaeology in the summer issue of Shavings with some stunning results. What he read inspired Bob Guess to build a model of one of the shipwrecks the project has documented lying on the bottom of Lake Union. This is the 95’ J.E. Boyden, built in Seattle in 1888. Bob generously offered to send us the model as a donation “to the best wooden boat center in the country”. Luckily, the plank-on-frame model is only 25” long. Bob normally has built models of Chesapeake Bay work boats and donated them to local non-profit environmental groups and a home for disabled children. He has visited CWB several times in the past three years. - photo: Patti Petty

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Fall Workshops & Classes SailNoW!

Learn to Sail at CWB Instructors: CWB Sailing Instructors Date: October 29-December 3 Cost: $335 members / $375 non-members

Glued Lapstrake Canoe Building Instructor: Mark Reuten Dates: November 6 -11 (Cama Beach) Cama Cabin reservations available Time: 9 am - 5 pm (Sunday - Friday) Cost: $800 members / $900 non-members The design is J.H. Rushton’s “Canadian Ugo” canoe, a little under 16’ in length x 30” beam. This project will start with a mold already set-up. Backbone members will be installed and planking will begin quickly. Construction will involve use of epoxy adhesive and 4mm marine grade plywood to create a lightweight easily-maintained hull with a classic traditional appearance. We will be using a construction method adapted from Tom Hill’s “Ultralight Boatbuilding”. Discussions will include use of the lofting process, traditional vs. modern technique, laminating, scarfing, etc. No previous experience required.

This is the signature CWB learn-to-sail program for adults and families. Students will learn the basic boat handling skills that are the foundation for a lifetime of sailing. Each session starts with Shore School, a two-hour class where sail theory and terminology are explained. Following Shore School is a series of six on-the-water lessons which give you the opportunity develop your skills toward sailing solo. Lessons are taught by dedicated, trained volunteer instructors in CWB’s fleet of classic Blanchard Jr. Knockabouts. Shore School is the first Saturday of each session from 10am to noon. Two-hour onthe-water lessons are available Saturdays and Sundays from 10 am to noon and 12:30 pm to 2:30 pm. Students choose available lesson dates and times that work for their personal schedules. Lessons are coordinated individually via email or phone prior to Shore School.

Get Zapped! Learn to Sail Intensive Instructors: CWB Sailing Instructors Available: April - December Cost: (for two students) $650 members / $700 non-members An intensive three-day sailing course for two people. This condensed and personalized version of the SailNOW! program is scheduled to fit your needs in a combination of three four-hour lessons taught by CWB’s talented instructors. It’s a perfect way for couples, friends, parent-child duos and out-of-town guests to learn to sail in a short amount of time. Lessons are sailed in Blanchard Jr. Knockabouts. Call CWB at (206) 382-2628 for available lesson dates and times or email mross@cwb.org

one-on-one Sailing Lessons Instructor: CWB Sailing Instructors Cost: $50 per hour members / $60 per hour non-members. $15 per hour for additional student in the boat. For beginner sailors with sporadic schedules or those who would like to refresh their boat handling skills, we offer One-on-One sailing lessons. Work individually with an instructor to help identify skills to focus on and improve your sailing. Lessons are available by appointment in many of the classic vessels maintained by CWB. Livery Checkouts are complimentary as part of each lesson. Not sure if you want to learn to sail, but want to go for a sail to see what it’s like? This can be a great introductory experience! Call CWB at (206) 382-2628 for available lesson dates and times or email one-on-one@cwb.org

Dead reckoning An Introduction to Classical Navigation Instructor: Katey Noonan Session 3: October 22 Time: 10 am - 2 pm (Saturdays) Cost: $40 members / $50 non-members Have you ever wondered how nautical navigation was performed before Loran, radar and GPS became commonplace? Ever wondered what they mean by “boxing” or “swinging” the compass? Join us as we explore non-electronic means of accurately travelling by boat from one place to another. At the end of the class students should be able to box the compass to 32 points, know the basic use and methods of celestial navigation, know the basics of Deviation and Variation as they relate to chart navigation and be able to chart a basic course heading from CWB to Gas Works Park. Limit: 10 Students

Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis so we recommend early registration. Workshops are held at CWB’s Lake Union, Seattle location unless otherwise noted in the course description. We are constantly adding new programs. Please check our website at www.cwb. org for the latest listings and information or call us at (206) 382-2628. The Center for Wooden Boats keeps class size small to promote quality instruction and experience.

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Group Sail at CWB We offer sailing excursions on Lake Union for your community, school or business group (6-50 people) aboard our classic wooden boats. Have fun with friends and family while connecting with maritime heritage and skills. To schedule an hour or an afternoon sail, row or paddle in one of our CastOFF! Public Sail boats, contact groupsail@cwb.org. Available Tuesday-Saturday

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Buy a Boat from CWB The Center for Wooden Boats accepts donated boats that do not quite fit with our programs. We find good homes for these boats and use the proceeds to fund our operations. Contact Steve Greaves at 206-371-0486. Also check our website - www.cwb.org - for updates to this list.

Eleanora. 26' Blanchard Senior Knockabout Sloop. Cost: $120 per hour/boat for members Built in 1946 by the Blanchard Boat Company. or educational organizations/$175 23' on deck, 6' 6" beam, 3' 10" draft, Hull non-members. number 36. Carvel planked red cedar over Whether you’re a business group looking to build some teamwork or just white oak frames. Refastened with silicon a bunch of folks out for an afternoon on the water, the 63’ classic gaffbronze. Well cared for. Tohatsu 6hp 4 stroke rigged 1927 Biloxi Schooner Lavengro is just one of the vessels available outboard. Fully rigged and ready for cruising. for Group Sails. A frequent visitor to Lake Union’s Historic Ships Wharf, A classic example of Norm Blanchard's talent. Lavengro plies Northwest waters as a charter and sailing training vessel July 2010 survey. Price Reduced: $5,500 where the art of raising sails is exhilarating whether you are heaving on the lines or just observing.

11’ Rana Sailing Pram. Pine on oak frames. All bright. Built by Rana Boatworks in Norway. Comes equipped with a sprit rig, daggerboard, oars, cover and trailer. $2,750 20’ Thompson Outboard Runabout 1968 classic lapstrake hull. Good shape. Popular design. 125hp Force 2-stroke. EZ-Loader trailer. Ready to go. $3,900 Wood Duck. 19’ Core Sound Sharpie. Mid ’90s construction. 9.9hp Yanmar Diesel. Gaff rigged. Cover. $7,900 16’ Salmon Wherry Rich Kolin design, new construction. Traditional clinker, red cedar, oak frames. $2,500 12’ Catspaw Sailing Dinghy. A 1995 red cedar, oak frames, copper riveted classic hull. Has had very little use, comes with a trailer. $2,500 30’ Chris Craft Sedan Cruiser 1941 wood hull. Classic traditional Chris Craft design. Single gas Chris Craft 6 cylinder. Price Reduced: $3,900 37’ Monk Flybridge Cruiser. 1962 white and red cedar on oak hull. Classic traditional design. Chris Craft 307 V8 gas motor. Sleeps 6. Two heads with holding tank. Bimini top. Fully rigged. Ready for cruising. $7,900 11’6” Flattie Rowing Dory. Designed by Ed Monk, built by the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in 2009. Western red cedar and fir, silicone bronze fasteners, spruce oars and cover to match, beam: 4’, weight: ~145 lbs. $1,750 Ace. 12’ outboard runabout. 1950’s Popular Mechanics plans plywood design. Inspiration for the Sande Ace. Merc 400 complete plus a second Merc 400 parts motor and two Mercury tanks. In the ‘50s every kid on the lake wanted one of these. Now is your chance. Includes a trailer. Deck was replaced, but otherwise quite original and true to the plans. $1,250

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U p c o m i n g Cast OFF! Free Boat Rides Sundays at 2pm, CWB in Seattle. Every Sunday of the year we offer free public boat rides on Lake Union through our CastOFF! Program. Come early to sign up! Rides are firstcome, first-served. Pond Boat Sailing at the Model Boat Pond Sundays 11am – 2pm at Lake Union Park Model Boat Pond CWB carts out a fleet of model boats for the public to rent and enjoy. Pond boats are a great way to learn about the basics of sailing and how air pressure on sails propels boats. This makes a terrific activity for families and children, but is great for all ages. Happy Hour for Good at CWB to Benefit Lake Union Park Ambassador Program Thursday, October 20, 2011 | 5:30 – 7:30pm Enjoy an evening of networking, snacks and drinks and feel good knowing that your funds are benefiting a great cause! The “cause” for this month’s Happy Hour will be the Lake Union Park Ambassador Program. Third Friday Speaker: Chris Cunningham Friday, October 21, 7pm at CWB in Seattle Chris Cunningham has built a variety of small boats powered by oar, paddle or sail. He has cruised them 7,000 miles - and will talk about his experiences, as well as the Garvey he has built with a pop-up cabin, wood stove and hot and cold running water. Tugboat Storytime Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, 11am to noon, aboard the historic Arthur Foss (a 122-year-old tugboat). Stories about boats, kids and the sea. Geared for ages two through five, but also fun for adults! After stories, there is time to explore the boat. New Volunteer Orientation November 12 or December 10, 10am- Noon at CWB in Seattle Join the hundreds of active volunteers who lend a hand in almost everything we do! We look for volunteers who have sailing experience or are looking for sailing experience, who enjoy the water, love sharing history or are looking to try a new experience.

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MARINE SURPLUS SALE Saturday, November 12, from 9am to 1pm CWB Offsite Storage: 420 Pontius Ave N. EVERYTHING MUST GO!  DOOR PRIZES!  RAFFLES! Boats (power, sail, row and kayak) . Boat Trailers . PFDs . Oars Sails of all shapes and sizes (bring the dimensions you need) Good fuel tanks . Rigging cables/hardware . Crab traps Spars (masts and booms) . Magazines . Books . Marine stoves Battery chargers . Outboard engines . Stationary planer . Tablesaw (Powermatic 66) . Jointer . Odd - sized wood scraps Outdoor Umbrellas . BBQ . Hand tools . Office Supplies AND SO MUCH MORE!

ALL PROCEEDS SUPPORT CWB!

206.382.2628 • www.cwb.org

1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109-4468 Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit No. 1583

Shavings Volume 31 Number 3 Fall 2011  

Quarterly newsletter from the Center for Wooden Boats

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