Page 1

The

Center

for

WOODEN

BO A T S

SHAVINGS J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 0 7

New Youth Programs at CWB! b y

Young people are everywhere at The Center for Wooden Boats. All year long they carve dugout canoes, take sailing lessons, paddle umiaks, teach sailing lessons, and volunteer in the livery or the shop. Once in a while you can even see them driving tugboats. Building on the success of past years, there are several new exciting programs that will get more kids involved in more ways. Throughout the winter kids at CWB will be building boats. Students at Billings Middle School will be constructing 8’ El Toro dinghies; the same boats we use in our youth sailing program. Twice a week for the spring, 7th and 8th grade students will put their math skills to practical use as they measure and calculate the size of each piece, then shape it to fit using traditional hand tools. This program will be taught at the Billings campus and will be part of their school curriculum. The last day of the class will be the launching ceremony where the kids will be able to sail the boat they built themselves. The students’ work will live on at The Center as the boats they build will be used in sailing lessons for years to come. Also this winter The CWB Boatshop staff will be building an umiak with foster youth in Tacoma in partnership with Gateways for Youth and Family Services. The umiak is a Native American skin-on-frame boat of Inuit design. Interestingly the entire boat is made without a single metal fastener; the entire boat is held together by lashings and wooden pegs made from bamboo chopsticks. The umiak built in this class will remain with the organization for them to use in their own programming. Springtime at the CWB is the beginning of school groups coming to The Center, nearly 1,500 kids a year come as part of school tours. This year we have expanded the field trips available to include a new EALR (state-required social studies learning requirement) aligned two hour class that surrounds the January/February 2007

J

a k e

B

e a t t i e

lives of fishermen. The history of the Pacific Northwest is rich with the stories and culture of the fishing industry. This class engages students in this tradition by sailing the Bristol Bay gillnetter, setting a net, and creating their own label for a can of salmon. Building off of the success of our youth sailing programs that teach kids to sail in the fleet of El Toro dinghies, the CWB staff has created new programs to enhance the experience. Kids who like books or are looking to get a head start on their summer reading list can enroll in the new “Words on Water” program that includes time for reading maritime themed books while learning how to sail on

our El Toro dinghies. Big Boat Buffet is a new class that teaches kids 12 and up about sailing both on the El Toro dinghies and the bigger boats of the collection. Students will learn the concepts of sailing on small boats and then use the same knowledge as part of a crew. This class blends the greatest lessons of small boat sailing with the unique experience of sailing museum pieces. Whether the young people have an interest in building boats, using boats, or volunteering as part of our community there is something for all interests at The CWB in 2007.

Inside This Issue:

FOUNDER’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 News from South Lake Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 At the historic ships wharf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 The Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 News from Cama Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Junior Sailors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Buy a BOAT from CWB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Feed and Caring of CWB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Upcoming Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Shavings 


T h e

C e n t e r

Volume XXVI Number 7 ISSN 0734-0680 1992 CWB

Shavings is published bimonthly by The Center for Wooden Boats 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 Phone: 206.382.2628 fax 206.382.2699

Our mission

To provide a community center where maritime history comes alive and our small craft heritage is preserved and passed along to future generations.

CWB Staff

Betsy Davis Executive Director Dick Wagner Founding Director Courtney Bartlett Curriculum Specialist Jake Beattie Waterfront & Youth Programs Director Geoff Braden Shipwright in Residence Corrina Douglas Sailing Coordinator Crystal Goodner Operations Assistant Patrick Gould Boat Sales Manager & Instructor Bonnie Loshbaugh Americorp Member, Docent Program Julia Makowski Sailing Instructor Katy Mathias Business Manager Erik Neumann Grantwriter Edel O’Connor Boatwright & Workshop Coordinator Greg Reed Livery Manager, Dockmaster Sāādūūts Artist in Residence Heron Scott Lead Boatwright Eldon Tam Operations Manager Adam Karpenske El Toro Maintenance Manager

Board of Trustees

Mark Barnard Stephen Kinnaman Alex Bennett David Loretta Caren Crandell Lori McKown Jim Compton Robert Merikle David Dolson Walt Plimpton Brandt Faatz Chuck Shigley Gary Hammons Denise Snow David Kennedy Bill Van Vlack Andrea Kinnaman Design and production of Shavings by CWB volunteer Heidi Hackler of Dolphin Design, www.dolphindesignstudio.com. Printed by Olympus Press, www.olypress.com.  Shavings

January/February 2007

f o r

W O O D E N

Founder’s B y D ick I think we all know, from recent headline exposé’s, that financial accounting can be quite creative. The statistical data can be interpreted in many unique ways. CWB doesn’t have a problem about accounting. We just had an audit and the result is that we are boringly straight shooters in our bookkeeping. Urban planning is another discipline that is also more art than science. And these days CWB is in the eye of the urban planning hurricane of South Lake Union. Both bookkeeping and urban planning begin with a plan and goals for private or public benefit. That’s the easy part. Next come the priorities and strategies for attaining the goals. In South Lake Union everything related to reinventing a neighborhood is on the table. We need to consider the density and height of new structures, transportation, recreation, open space and views, population changes and social diversity changes. CWB is vigorously responding to all the issues, putting forth our position on educational, recreational and esthetic public benefits. We are in the vortex of changes and we are working hard to make sure our neighborhood will became the best possible place to live, work, play, and learn.

B O A T S

Report W

a g n e r

Ironically, about 100 years ago our town was in a similar transition. History is valuable on many levels. In the instance of urban planning, history tells us what changes were made and how they affected the citizens. That’s why the article “Birth of a Metropolis” is in this issue’s News from South Lake Union. A hundred years from now, the rebuilding of South Lake Union will be another historic item in the Shavings page on News from South Lake Union.

New CWB Staff

Several new staff members have joined CWB recently. We’re proud to have them on board. Bonnie Loshbaugh, Americorp Member: Bonnie was born in Homer, AK, and grew up skiff-camping, rather than car-camping, in a 26 foot flat bottomed boat. She went to Connecticut for college, majoring in Russian and giving all her spare time to the crew team. Three summers as a kayak guide, however, has made her more interested now in following oceans than Russians, and she’s been volunteering at the Seattle Aquarium for a year. She’s looking forward to learning to sail – if she picks up some canoe skills as well, there won’t be many small boats left she can’t handle! Erik Neumann began writing grants as an intern at the Richard Hugo House, and subsequently at The Center for Wooden Boats. For over a year he has done fund raising for organizations and individuals specializing in literary arts, music production, and cultural affairs. Crystal Goodner is taking on various responsibilities as Operations Assistant. Her recent job experiences include anthropology, archaeology, molecular biology & genetics, and sailing the tall ship Lady Washington. Her favorite activities are working on historic marine diesels, sailing, running, and traveling away from the U.S.A. Her favorite quote to best describe her is, “I don’t know a lot about anything, but I know a little about practically everything”, Laura film 1944.


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

Sailing in the City

B

y

M

i r a n d a

P

r i c e

A few short days before Halloween, CWB wrapped-up another season of teaching local middle-school students the art of small boat sailing in our after-school El Toro program. The following article was written by Miranda Price, a TOPS Middle School student, for her school publication, TOPS News. (reprinted with permission) Every Friday at 2:30, twelve students get to experience the joy of swiftly (or not so swiftly) sailing across Lake Union. Many people have a lot to say about why they like it even if it’s not many words. “The water,” to quote Chanda Jones an eight grader in the program. “Just not having a class with homework,” to quote another student. “Just the sailing.” The 12 students ride in small two person El Toros and there are two groups.

B

One group has no name and the other is called “group therapy” for more experienced sailors. The very nice and patient teachers quickly teach us to handle anything, wind or no wind, on the beautiful lake. It is a great opportunity for students and even if you are not a child you should at least try and feel the water under you and the wind in your hair.

Docents at CWB y

B

o n n i e

What is your favorite part of CWB? What is the most important thing for our visitors to walk away with? What information are visitors looking for? How can we better reach out to the general public when they visit our docks? This winter is the beginning of a new program at CWB, and a new opportunity for volunteers as well. Bonnie Loshbaugh, an Americorps volunteer, will be working with CWB until August to start a new docent program. Docent is a Latin word meaning ‘to teach,’ and that’s just what CWB’s docents will be doing – teaching the visiting public about our boats, our programs, and all of our maritime heritage. While we’ve previously tried to have docents around doing tours, we want to design something closer to The Center’s hands-on January/February 2007

L

o s h b a u g h

principles and use more personal interactions to provide interesting information to visitors. Current ideas are to have docents stationed on the docks, to answer questions about the boats, to speak before and during public sails, and also to be around as information sources during special events, such as the Festival. If you – or someone you know – knows a good deal about something at CWB or the Historic Ships Wharf, and has some experience in teaching or public speaking, or if you would like to gain some such experience and are excited about sharing the wonders of CWB with visitors, please email Bonnie – bloshbaugh@cwb.org, call, or stop by. The planning stage is now, and the first docent trainings will be taking place this spring. Comments and suggestions are always welcome.

B O A T S

Tourism Grant

B

y

B

e t s y

D

a v i s

The Center for Wooden Boats is honored to receive $10,000 from Tourism Cares, an international organization which makes grants to cultural and historic destinations around the world. The funds will help construct a new gangway between Lake Union Park and The Center for Wooden Boats, better integrating CWB’s historic and cultural resources into the design of the new park. Tourism Cares is a non-profit supported by the tourism industry, that gives back through grants to cultural and historic sites worldwide and through scholarships to tourism students. Their philosophy is inspiring. Travel is intrinsic to human nature. The journey expands

our knowledge. The exploration broadens our horizons and introduces us to a wealth of cultural experiences. Tourism Cares exists to protect and enhance these experiences for future generations. Carolyn Viles, Program Director at Tourism Cares congratulated CWB on the award: “The Center for Wooden Boats was one of only seven grant applicants, chosen from a pool of more than 200 for that particular deadline, to be granted an award by Tourism Cares. This unique heritage museum for historically significant wooden boats had secured matching funds for the $10,000 requested and has strong support from the Seattle Convention and Visitors Bureau as well as the Washington State Tourism Commission-both Grant Funding Preferences for Tourism Cares Worldwide Grant Program. The project is to upgrade and redesign the entryway of one of Seattle’s top attractions to make the facility more visible and accessible to the visiting public.” CWB thanks CoraLee McGovern of Washington State Tourism and Tracey Wickersham of the Seattle Convention and Visitors Bureau for their support.

Shavings 


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

News from South Lake Union SailNOW! wins Best of Seattle

Interpretive and Exhibit Master Plan Update b y

B

e t s y

The Center for Wooden Boats and many others are moving forward in a shared planning effort to define an Interpretive and Exhibit Master Plan for Maritime History at CWB and South Lake Union Park. The $250,000 project is funded through Federal Transportation Enhancement funds which are administered by Washington State Department of Transportation. We have identified thirteen key questions and invite participation from everyone interested in working on them. 1. What is the history of maritime and other forms of transportation on Lake Union? 2. How do we design interpretation, exhibits, and programs to be compelling for kids? 3. How do we support visiting exhibits? 4. How does CWB best preserve, exhibit and interpret our own collection? 5. How can the Landmark Vessels best be preserved, exhibited and interpreted?

 Shavings

January/February 2007

D

a v i s

6. How can exhibit and interpretation design support community involvement in the park? 7. How can these exhibits be integrated with the rest of the city? 8. How can these exhibits be integrated within our region? 9. How will Native American culture and history be featured? 10. What archival material exists regionally to support maritime exhibits and interpretation? 11. What are the natural history themes we want to communicate in exhibits and interpretation? 12. How do we best exhibit and interpret active maritime working skills? 13. How best to integrate boat rides into the interpretive experiences? If you are interested in more information about the project there is a link to the project website on CWB’s home page, www.cwb.org. Please contact CWB’s Executive Director, Betsy Davis, with questions or ideas, at 206382-2628 or betsy@cwb.org.

Seattle Magazine recognized CWB in their “Best of 2006” issue. In its award for our SailNOW! program, Seattle Magazine wrote “...in five weeks, you’ll impress the nautically savvy with your knowledge....after finishing the lessons, you’ll be able to rent boats at CWB and let your friends reap the benefits of your newfound knowledge.”

Great 2007 Classes The Center for WOODEN BOATS

Program Catalog 2007

The 2007 course catalog is out. We have lots of new exciting workshops as well as our perennial favorites. At CWB you can learn skills to build a lapstrake boat, tie knots, cast bronze, build a baidarka, sail a boat, and just about any other maritime skill. We’ve added several new art classes this year where your subjects will be The Center, our boats, and the wonderful scenery of Lake Union. To receive a course catalog, stop by CWB or give us a call at 206.382.2628. Members automatically receive a copy of the catalog. You can also download the entire catalog from our website, www.cwb.org.


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

News from South Lake Union CWB Passes Audit with Flying Colors B

y

K

a t y

M

a t h i a s

The word “audit” strikes fear in the hearts of The answer is simple: accountability. With many. They picture IRS agents descending on these audited financials, we are able to demthem, making them dig old receipts out of onstrate a higher level of accountability to our shoeboxes in the back of a closet, grilling them community of members, donors, neighbors about whether they were sure that cell phone and the public. Our financials are clear, transbill was really a business expense. parent and independently validated. Well, strike that image from your mind. In addition, foundations and other major The Center for Wooden Boats was actually donors often want to see audited financials bethrilled to have an audit this year, the first in fore making a grant – having been audited, we its 30 year history. have access to new sources of funding. There is also evidence to suggest that new legislation CWB hired the independent accounting down the road may require non-profits of a firm Clark Nuber to conduct an audit of our certain size to be audited – should that come 2005 financials. A team of five accountants to pass, we’re ahead of the game! came to CWB to pore over our financial records, physically count and view our asAchieving this milestone was a true team efsets, interview our staff and generally put us fort. In addition to current staff, we owe considthrough the wringer. erable thanks to former staff, board members and friends who volunteered their time for this major The result? project: Roger They have isCoulter, John sued a clean Davis, Lauopinion, stating rie Leak, Len that our 2005 Marklund, Paul financials are Marlow, Janet in compliance Martin, Robert with Generally Merikle, Scott Accepted AcRohrer and counting PrinJean Scarboro. ciples (GAAP) We also owe for the United great thanks to St a t e s . T h a t Business Manager Katy Mathias holds up a copy of the the Oakmead means that anycompleted audit. Foundation and one reading our several anonymous donors whose funding made financials can be assured that they follow the it possible to hire the auditors. same standards as any other audited set of financials anywhere in the country. What is What’s next for us? Well, the next audit more, because the auditors look not only at is only four months away. While scheduling the numbers themselves but the process we challenges pushed the audit of our 2005 finanused to get there, the reader can be assured cials to the second half of the year, we expect that our internal controls minimize the risk to complete the audit of 2006 financials early of fraud. in the second quarter of 2007. And we have a lot of work to do to get ready! The auditors left Why, you might ask, is this important? us with a list of improvements we can make to Why would we invest over 150 staff hours our processes, systems and policies before the (not to mention the auditors’ fees) to get what next audit – we’ll have our hands full to get it boiled down to a 13 page report? all done, but we welcome the challenge. January/February 2007

Kids Build an Umiak By Adam Karpenske In mid-November the CWB started building an umiak, a skin-on-frame 26’ long canoe, with the Gateways for Youth Foundation in Tacoma. Primarily, Gateways provides foster youth with a facility where they can meet and work together. The foundation contacted the CWB for guidance in building an umiak with their youth. CWB boatshop staff member Adam Karpenske and former boatshop intern and former staff member Amy Johnson lead the program. Corey Freedman, the Northwest’s skin-boat building guru, has provided an umiak kit and thoughtful guidance. Adam and Amy will be working with the students every Saturday at the Gateway’s facility in Tacoma, guiding them through the process of skin-boat building and proper hand tool use and mastery. Corey will be stopping by periodically to observe and introduce new stages of the building process. The students have completed the first two scarfs of the eight needed to extend the undersized gunnel and stringer stock to its full 24 foot length. There is still nothing resembling a boat in the Gateway’s shop, but progress is quick with these boats and enthusiasm is high among students and teachers. The boat is expected to be finished in late spring for the upcoming paddling season.

Shavings 


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

News from South Lake Union Birth of a Metropolis B

Seattle is a very young city, only a bit over 150 years old. Even so, it has attained a long history of colorful individuals and impossible dreams. However, the underlying character of Seattle, in spite of its many utopians and dreamers has been capitalism. A capitalist city usually begins at a cross road of commerce. Seattle wasn’t a cross road of anything until the railroad came. And how Northern Pacific came to Seattle was another example of attaining an impossible dream. Northern Pacific had good reason not to choose Seattle. Why they changed their mind is a story filled with strategic tricks and gambling against all odds. Our founders would not accept anything less than a metropolis and a major railroad terminal would be an essential element. The railway hub is only a small portion of the Lake Union story, but the determination to deal with formidable challenges exhibits the true heart of Seattle’s history. It was 1870 and every settler in Washington Territory knew Northern Pacific had begun to lay track across the continent and that Seattle, the largest city in the Territory would be its destination. This created a land rush in Seattle and the population zoomed to 2000. Northern Pacific took full advantage of the deal they were given for right of way in the yet unmapped west. They would be granted 23 miles on both sides of the track. Thus the Northern Pacific plan was to pick a route where they would gain the most land value. In the Northwest they chose to go wherever the primal forests were. After the rail line was finished they could return and reap the trees. As a result the rail was planned to take a wide sweep across forests west of the Cascades and end on the Columbia River, not Puget Sound. That was bad news for Seattle, but even worse was the telegram Northern Pacific sent from Kalama, on the Columbia River, to Arthur Denny on July 14, 1873. “We have created the terminus at Commencement Bay.” Northern Pacific would provide a spurline to Puget Sound. It would not run to Seattle but it would be yet another Northern Pacific profit  Shavings

January/February 2007

y

D

i c k

W

a g n e r

bonanza because there was no settlement on Commencement Bay. The railroad would own a town yet to be born. A lot of Seattle folks moved south, to claim a beachhead on this city-to-be, Tacoma, and to be first in line for a job with Northern Pacific. Tacoma began as a company town. Mad as hell was the attitude of the remaining Seattleites. Instead of fuming, they decided to build their own railroad to the wheat country, through Snoqualmie Pass. Within two months $500,000 was subscribed to build the

Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad and Transportation Company. Volunteers began building the trackage from the water front at Yesler’s pier. The story of the mouse railroad enterprise that roared hit the press from coast to coast. A lot of people with legal and management skills came to Seattle to help it outplay the bully. By early autumn of 1873 Northern Pacific completed the spur to Tacoma. Two hundred who had evacuated Seattle were there to greet the mighty Northern Pacific. Ironically, 1873 was the year that was also the beginning of a depression, the Panic of 1873. Northern Pacific arrived in the future Tacoma on credit and promises. The workers had not been paid and threatened to tear up the rail. Northern Pacific stopped all plans. Seattle, who never said never, found an investor. James Coleman, stepped up and funded the Seattle and Walla Walla Line to reach the Renton coal fields. The wheat in Walla Walla

would have to wait, but the coal from Renton could now fund the operation of Seattle’s tiny railroad. At the same time, The Lakeshore and Eastern Railroad tracks were built around Lake Union to serve the nearby sawmills and villages. The terminal was the foot of Columbia Street and there were stops at Ballard, Lake Union’s Ross, Fremont and Ravenna, the sawmill town of Yesler on Union Bay, and around the north end of Lake Washington. With the discovery of new coal fields, the Lakeshore and Eastern Railroad was extended. Its east end was Issaquah, with a bridge crossing the Snoqualmie River. The Northern Pacific had recovered from the panic and out of desperation that Seattle would monopolize the coal and wheat shipping; they bought the Lakeshore and Eastern, transforming a Lake Union tinker toy operation to a major commercial transportation operation. Northern Pacific built a south Lake Union freight station on the line in 1913 between Republican and Thomas on Terry Ave. Rail was high tech transportation in the 19th century, but in Seattle it was second in capacity to horses. Seattle was provided with a privately owned horse car system in 1884. It went on Second Ave from Seattle’s historic center to Pike Street, Seattle’s northern city edge. Two years later it was extended all the way to Lake Union. The fare was five cents each way. David Denny’s Lake Union Lumber and Manufacturing Company took over the southwest corner of Lake Union in 1882. A steam tug, The Maud Foster, was built for the mill at the southeast corner of the lake, where the Ford Assembly plant now stands. Maud Foster, locally known as Mud Hen, would fetch logs that were from Lake Washington via the flume at the Portage. The Western Mill, a big sawmill operation, mercilessly logged and sawed the ancient forest surrounding the mill. The sawdust and bark filled up the lake where Lake Union Park in now sited. The sawmill continued through the late 1930’s. People had heard about electric streetcars, but the City Council wouldn’t touch them


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

News from South Lake Union with a long pole. They equated alternating current with erratic power, and feared the street cars would change direction on the whim of electrons. Public safety was not to be compromised by this electric stuff. But, on the other hand, the city fathers heard Tacoma was considering electric streetcars, so in 1889 Seattle Electric Railway and Power Company was created. By 1890 Luther Griffith installed an electric streetcar running on a trestle along the west side of Lake Union. The steam launch City of Latona was launched on April 18, 1890. Unfortunately, the Griffith streetcar began operation on October 25, 1890 and immediately took away the major patronage from the steam boats on Lake Union. However the Maud Foster, who gave rides, as well as the Latona, and City of Latona hung on and provided service around the lake for over 10 more years. Some people would rather travel the old way. Streetcars quickly became the popular way to get from neighborhood to neighborhood, town to town. It was pleasant riding because most of the routes passed through untouched natural environments. In 1892, the Leschi streetcar encountered a bear and a cougar on the tracks in one trip. Streetcars also offered social opportunities. Conductor Adelbert W. Mudgett had a girl friend on each stop and married two of them, until they both decided to ride on Mudgett’s car at the same time. It took three policemen to get Mudgett safely off the car and into jail. The Griffith streetcar trestle was filled in 1925 and became Westlake Ave N. The 34 electric streetcars in Seattle became obsolete in 1940. All were destroyed in Georgetown except one, #13. It is now part of the Museum of History and Industry’s collection. Seattle’s Great Fire of 1889 wiped out 60 acres of its center of commerce. The core of Seattle had to be rebuilt and the city decreed it could only be brick or stone buildings. Brick factories sprung up and they required clay. The hillside tumbling to the southwest corner of Lake Union had a clay layer which was benevolently deposited by the Vashon Glacier. The hill was attacked. There are still shelves of flat land on Southwest Queen Anne hill made through the mining of clay. The city’s downtown was beginning to look like a place that was built to last, but around the fringes it still had ramshackle wood shacks and ancient log cabins. The original 1851 January/February 2007

Denny cabin at Alki Point was offered to the city by the Denny family. It was refused because the city was not in the preservation business. The family burned it in 1893. Seattle was looking ahead, not behind. They hired Reginald H. Thompson as City Engineer. He put in a sewer system. At that time, the 1890’s, the population was 40,000, but Thompson designed the system to serve 400,000. He built a water pipeline for Seattle from the Cedar River and bought 80,000 acres for the river’s watershed.

a “million dollars of gold” had arrived. No one in 1897 America understood a million of anything. When the Portland docked the Seattle Chamber of Commerce hired a journalist Erastus Brainard as their press agent. Brainard titled the Portland’s arrival as bringing a “ton of gold.” Everyone knew “ton.” Because of the great marketing skills of Brainard, Seattle came to be synonymous with the front door to the Klondike. Thousands of people from all over the country wanted to rush to Alaska and get their sack full of golden nuggets. Every steam-

Thompson sluiced Denny hill into Elliott Bay because its perpendicular sides prevented city expansion. The flat he created, known as the Denny Regrade had to wait almost 100 years before an urban skyline was added. Another Thompson vision was parks. The city had chopped down all the trees, and created mud roads and splintering plank sidewalks. Thompson talked the city into acquiring 2000 acres to be made into parks and playgrounds. All these projects were completed by 1900. The Panic of 1873 was a mere mosquito bite to our economy, compared to the Panic of 1897. Seattle was in the dumps as well as the rest of the nation until the steamer Portland arrived at Schwabacher’s wharf on July 17. It had come from St Michaels, Alaska, at the mouth of the Yukon River in the Bering Sea, and it had passengers from the Klondike with boxes full of gold! The news spread and it changed Seattle as nothing else before or since. A few weeks before the Portland docked in Seattle, a ship with miners from Alaska landed in San Francisco. The press announced

boat that floated was put into business. Many more were under construction. The ex-mayor of Seattle, Robert Moran and his brothers built twelve 75-foot stern wheel steamers to get miners to Alaska. The current mayor of Seattle, Col. S. D. Wood even bought his own steamer and deserted town to find his fortune in the Klondike. A lot of folks just stayed home and got into the outfitting business. They sold clothing, tools, and some even kidnapped pet dogs and sold them as Alaskan sled dogs to the novice miners on their way north. Seattle had shaken off the depression. The Gold Rush gave birth to Seattle’s middle class. Before was feudal governance, a small committee of land inheritors smoked cigars, sipped whiskey and decided Seattle’s future. As a result of the Gold Rush, a large constituency of business owners in outfitting and transportation industries had tipped the scale on who was in charge.

Shavings 


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

Historic

W O O D E N

Ships

B O A T S

Wharf Historic Ships at the Wharf in 2007

Carlyn at the Dock b y

G

r e g

Rain and wind were the norm in November and December. Still, two hardy souls and a big white boat waited patiently at CWB to take folks on Lake Union for our free Sunday sails. The 61-foot wooden yawl Carlyn is riding out this winter on the Historic Ships Wharf in Lake Union Park, undergoing routine maintenance and awaiting another season of taking youth on saltwater adventures. In exchange for their foul-weather moorage, Captain Kevin Campion and Mate Jeff Anderson took the reigns of CWB’s Cast Off! public sail program as fall edged into winter. “Carlyn is designed to be kid friendly; slightly under-sailed and very straightforward,” said Campion while waiting for temperatures to lift high enough to return to his varnishing work. As such, the boat works well for both Salish Sea Expeditions and Orcas Island’s Camp Four Winds—the two organizations that make use of the boat each spring through autumn. Salish is a Bainbridge-based non-profit that hosts students on week-long marine-science  Shavings

January/February 2007

R

e e d

voyages in Puget Sound in spring and fall. Four Winds is famous for taking on campers in the San Juan Islands during summer. Campion captains the boat for both organizations, which together had Carlyn built in 1996 by the Scarrano brothers of Albany, New York. “The boat was shipped to the West Coast unfinished,” he said. “We’re redoing a lot of the finish work now, as well as painting and varnishing wood down below that never was done.” It was ordered by Four Winds, and constructed in Albany, New York of strip-planked, Port Orford white cedar. The hull is covered by a thin layer of fiberglass. During the months Carlyn is in use, it is hard to get to the woodwork, Campion said. “The kids are all over the place, and with Salish, we have up to 30 people on the boat at one time. We are in full maintenance mode, so that the boat is ready to run its programs.” Come down to CWB to see Carlyn or take a free ride offered every Sunday at 2pm this winter (weather permitting). For more information call CWB at 206.382.2628.

This year will be a busy one at the Historic Ships Wharf on the north end of Lake Union Park, right next to CWB. This is just a partial list of the many vessels you’ll see in 2007! Lady Washington - Operated by Grays Harbor Historical Seaport Authority, this vessel had a starring roles as the HMS Interceptor in the film Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. She tours the west coast hosting educational programs and sails. Visit www.ladywashington.net to learn more. Adventuress - this 136’ schooner offers environmental programs from spring through fall. Based in Port Townsend, she is operated by the nonprofit Sound Experiences. For more information is available at www. soundexp.org Steam Meet - This August, CWB and the Historic Ships Wharf will host steam powered launches and other vessel from throughout the Northwest. Rides and demos will be available Don’t miss the Wharf ’s year round residents the tug Arthur Foss, Lightship Swiftsure, fireboat Duwamish, and steamship Virginia V. Keep an eye on our website, www.cwb.org, for schedule updates.


T h e

C e n t e r

Historic

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

Ships

Wharf

Those secrets need to be exposed so that we can continue to preserve this important local icon and continue to employ the ship. Surveyors of wooden ships know how to uncover those secrets. To that end, Northwest Seaport is hosting a weekend wooden tug boat survey class in mid- to late February during a scheduled haulout of the ship. The Survey Class will be a quick overview of what the job of a wood tug boat surveyor consists of and how to read what lies behind paint, tar, and wood. Our instructor, Lee Ehrheart, is a local well known wooden boat surveyor who also teaches these skills in his own survey school. We’ll learn about the different types of dry rot and how they attack a ship, iron sickness, the affects of bilge oil on fastenings, and how small electric currents in the water affect the wooden and metal structures. During our next haulout the shipyard will be conducting work while Northwest Seaport will have Lee and other expert shipwrights working together with ten participants to survey the hull, fasteners, and caulking. The workshop will generate a work list for the

February 2008 haul out where we will carry out these recommendations, and help us to generate a long range plan on how to preserve and restore the Arthur Foss. The lines of a ship on the water are one thing – a ship hauled out is a monumental sight. Come and join Northwest Seaport for this workshop and learn more about the Arthur Foss, and about what is needed to keep Seattle’s wonderful fleet of wooden vessels afloat. Applicants do not need any experience, must be 14 years or older, and must be able to climb a ladder. Financial help may be available for high school students from the Youth Maritime Training Association. See the Northwest Seaport website (www.nwseaport.org) and CWB Program Guide for more details. To sign up for the Survey Class, go to www. cwb.org or call 206.382.2628. Special thanks to The Center for Wooden Boats Youth Maritime Training Association, The Foss Company, Linda Becker, and Coastal Transportation.

Tugboat Classes on the Arthur Foss b y

F

S

h a n n o n

i t z g e r a ld

A ship on the water is often pleasing to look at, attractive to the eye and able to tell a story of its life at sea by the lines, structures, and gear on board. One such vessel is Northwest Seaport’s historic tugboat Arthur Foss. The ship’s story is familiar to many, and through volunteering on board, public tours, and programs such as the Tugboat overnight program, Diesel Engine Theory and Engineer for a Day Programs, it is becoming familiar to many more. There is another story, another life, behind this all – one that is supremely important. That is the story of the wooden structures and how the ship is standing up to the forces that work against all wooden vessels, large and small. Fresh water promotes the dry rot that destroys the wood while salt corrodes the fastenings that holds a ship together - and a ship such as the Arthur Foss, whose life has been spent in both fresh and salt water has many secrets hiding behind the ironbark sheathing, the coats of paint along her hull and superstructures, and underneath the tarred decks.

January/February 2007

Shavings 


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

T h e

W O O D E N

B O A T S

C o l l e c t i o n From the Boatshop B

y

H

e r o n

S

c o t t

This winter brings new arrivals as well as good byes to the shop. Jeremy Katich, our intern from the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding, will complete his six month internship here at The CWB boatshop and will venture forth in to the world as a builder of boats. See his thoughts on his time here and where he’s going next in the article “Report from a Boatshop Intern”. Personally, Jeremy has impressed me with his consistency, persistence, and amiability, and anyone that has interacted with him can attest to this as well. He has worked on a variety of projects during his internship, most notably restoring the hull of our Herreshoff 12 ½ Shrimpo, and doing a complete deck rebuild of one of our Blanchard Junior Knockabouts. To help fill the gap left by Jeremy’s departure, two new interns from SCCC (Seattle Central Community College) will join us this December. This internship is set up much differently than the one from NWSWB. These students will be joining us while enrolled in the boatbuilding CWB Shipwright Geoff Braden applies BOAT Sauce to the coamings for the dory Q’ona. curriculum at the Wood Construction Center. interesting restoration challenges and will be extended projects, lasting Designed to supplement the education that they are into the spring and the beginning of the sailing season when both boats getting at school, the internship here gives students practical opportuniwill be needed. Due to a less then perfect planking job, Plover needs ties to apply the trade as they are learning. I have set two projects aside some of the planks to be replaced and some seams to be routed out and for the SCCC interns: the Captain Pete and the Plover. Both present repaired. The Captain Pete requires new covering boards, a new stem New SCCC intern Joe Hazard starts in on the restoration of the and various small repairs to the coaming and dash. Captain Pete. Also underway at the shop is the ongoing restoration of the dory Q’ona. The structural work is complete including a new transom, new stem, and decking. Now the items on the hit list are mostly finishing tasks. Finish work, as any boat builder knows, takes time, especially with the cold weather and the rain, and I expect the boat to be operational by the end of January. As I mentioned earlier, Jeremy and I have been going to town on the planking of the Shrimpo. That work will be completed by the end of December, and the boat will basically be shelved until April for a week-long restoration class, much like what we did last spring, taught by Herreshoff 12 ½ builder and Main-iac Eric Dow. The class will pick up where we leave off, a completely planked, faired, and caulked hull. The class will construct a sole, deck, thwarts, and coamings for the boat. Contact Edel O’Connor for more information on the class at 206.382.2628 or eoconnor@cwb.org. 10 Shavings

January/February 2007


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

T h e

W O O D E N

B O A T S

C o l l e c t i o n Report from a Boatshop Intern B

y

J

e r e m y

My time here from the beginning has been fleeting. It seems like only last week that I was whittling away on my first Blanchard Junior Knockabout (BJK) tiller or making minor repairs on the Geary 18’s centerboard casing while enduring the blazing 80 degree sun with swimming breaks every hour or so. Thinking then that I had five more months to hone CWB intern Jeremy Katich readies the steambox for planking the Shrimpo.

January/February 2007

K

a t i c h

my small repairs skills, I was excited when Heron assigned me to replace the worn deck on the BJK Meg. It seemed like a pretty straightforward fix—but as I have come to understand, nothing about fixing a 70-year old wooden boat is ever easy or straightforward. This was a great discovery, because what I thought would essentially be cutting out new plywood pieces turned out to be a smorgasbord of restoration opportunity, including fixing multiple rotten plank sections, the top of the transom, beefing up the deck substructure with all new side-decks and centerline blocking, and even casting a new gudgeon for the rudder mount. But even after laying on the new plywood, fiberglass and then new combings, my work had just begun. Next came weeks and weeks of finishing work where my only inspiration was the encouraging comments of volunteers whose weekly or biweekly visits enabled them to see the slow progress. Eventually the job came to an anticlimactic end when we dropped the boat back in the water just to watch her develop a substantial leak around the garboard plank that wouldn’t swell despite Heron’s ingenious attempts at underwater sawdust repair. Resigned to the fact that we were going to have to pull her out of the water, caulk and then refinish her, time proved to be the remedy and a week later the boat was back in the fleet proudly decorated with the scars of sail trainee’s trial dockings. Since then my time has been spent primarily on the Herreshoff 12 1/2 Shrimpo that is currently in the Northwest Seaport’s yard under cover. Contributing to the nearly complete restoration that began this last spring, I’ve helped orchestrate the salvaging of the topside planking and have started replacing the planking below the waterline that we deemed unsalvageable. This project has been particularly fun for me as I’m able to practice a lot of the new construction techniques that I learned at the Northwest School of Woodenboat Building (NWSWB) all the while working on the very same boat that we lofted and made a half model of in our basic skills quarter. What comes next? This coming spring I’ll be joining a friend and fellow student from the NWSWB in South Korea, his native country, where with the support of his government we will be opening up the wooden boatshop “Oliver”. Being the first of its kind in decades, the direction that the shop takes will be greatly a matter of trial and error. That said, we will begin with the new construction of contemporarilybuilt small craft, both sail and motor. Eventually, over the next several years, the shop will be turned into a school where mostly post-collegiate students will join us in revitalizing a Korean tradition that has essentially been forgotten. As the shop and its workings are merely in the planning stage, more details will have to wait.

Shavings 11


T h e

C e n t e r

A r o u n d Great Work on the Cama Site Plan b y

D

i c k

W

a g n e r

It’s never too late to study history. History gives new and valuable perspectives on today’s problems. It may even identify problems one never was aware of. Thanks to history, a fresh look was taken of the Cama Beach State Park site plan. Modifications have been made that will make it even better aesthetically and functionally. The changes will calm the storm of cultural memories to those who came to Cama before. The first time visitor will see Cama as a whole fabric without patches of contrasting design and scale. Because Cama Beach was used for thousands of years by the native people for clam gathering and for almost 60 years as a waterfront resort, the new structures that were planned on the waterfront will be redesigned and resited so they will not clash with the historic buildings and midden. The Commons (a.k.a. dining hall) will be located a short walk above the waterfront meadow with a screen of mature forest separating it visually from historic structures below. The Bath House will be part of the historic waterfront zone, but instead of a new structure, it will be inside the 1932 Ping Pong Pen. Both changes were done to leave the waterfront as close to original as possible. Arriving at the waterfront will still be an experience of discovery and wonder. The visitors will emerge from the winding path through dense woods and suddenly see the flat, grassy meadow and modestly scaled cabins nestled comfortably between the forest and the sea.

12 Shavings

January/February 2007

f o r

W O O D E N

t h e

B O A T S

S o u n d

Formally Informal — Reaffirming our links to the past B

y

C

h a s

D

o wd

At a recent CWB meeting about the South Lake Union Maritime Park, I was pleased to see how many people were there. But keen-eyed Deborah saw something else and decided to fix it. So when I was getting ready to do my annual stint as Boat Show announcer she surprised me with a set of wide red suspenders. “When we attended those early meetings, all the Center old-timers – the fishermen, the tugboat men, the boat builders, the make-and-break marine engine mechanics – all wore red suspenders,” she explained. “Dan Dygert wore them, Charlie Olsheski wore them, and Deb Harrington wore them. At the Lake Union Plan meeting there were sportcoats, golf shirts, and even some neckties, but no red suspenders. Something has been lost.” I could only agree. Mindful of the Center’s history I made some small adjustments to my Uniform of the Day. When I showed up at the CWB Library and Boat Show Command Center I was wearing my Dan Dygert Memorial Red Suspenders, my Steve Phillips Memorial Greek Fisherman’s Hat, my Deb Harrington Memorial Worn Chambray Shirt, and my Charlie Olsheski Memorial White Cotton Socks.

Making a fashion statement

In the sartorial trends that have drifted through the U.S. there are some notable outfits. The Chicanos of pre-World War II L.A. invented the “Full Zoot” with “reet pleats,” “ape drape,” and “sky high.” Many African-American jazzmen adopted the style and early white jazz hipsters wore Full Zoots to identify with them. In the 60s, the Midwest came up with a “Full Cleveland.” It was defined by a leisure suit over a Tommy Bahama Hawaiian shirt with its collar on the outside, accessorized with a with a white patent-leather belt and white patent leather loafers that had a little gold chain over the instep. At my local supermarket I fell into conversation with a sociologist wearing a Pabst Blue Ribbon International Team bowling shirt over Hawaiian shorts and flip-flops, topped off by a tan narrow-brim straw fedora with two golf tees instead of a feather decorating the left side of the hatband. When asked, he identified it as a “Full Indianapolis.” Now with red suspenders and all the rest we have our sartorial signature. We can call it the “Full Center.”

Who are these guys?

Dan Dygert was probably the only Reed College student to fish under sail in Bristol Bay. He had once owned a tugboat that loomed large in his legend. When I asked him to describe it, a friend of his interrupted before Dan could get started, “Have you ever seen an Eagle Scout’s knot board…” Charlie Olsheski was a long-time boatbuilder. When we were debating the lines of the Poulsbo Boat for our first monograph, Charlie interrupted. “Lines, lines lines – all you guys are hung up on lines,” he said. “Ed Monk he had six moulds. You want a 30-foot boat, he’d put ‘em so far apart. You want a 40-foot boat, he’d move ‘em so far apart. You want a 50-foot boat…” Steve Phillips grew up among the Tulalips. He taught CWBers how to make fish spears, tule mats, and bird nets. He told stories about racing in dugout canoes during his youth, about “log-jumping races” and “roll-over races.” The canoe Saaduuts is making for us will be named after him. Deb Harrington was an old-time machinist. He taught our early Toolmaking Workshop in his Vashon Island shop. He built his shop first and then built his house over it. He had his own priorities, did Deb.


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

J u n i o r

W O O D E N

S a i l o r s Ask the Captain

THE BOOK NOOK

Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome, 1930 Reading level: Ages 9 and up This is a wonderful story of four brothers and sisters who sail their own boat to an island and live there for part of the summer by themselves. They meet a retired pirate, search for treasure, and have lots of other grand adventures. But the best part of the book is the sailing. The descriptions are so good you can picture yourself coasting along in the cat boat yourself. Read it and be a part of Arthur Ranson’s adventure.

B O A T S

Dear Fish by Chris Gall, 2006 Reading level: Ages: 4 and up One day a small boy writes a note to the fish inviting them to visit him. This is the story of what happens when a lot of fish visit the human world. There are beautiful illustrations with lots of color, plus fish puns to try and find throughout the book. It is a terrific read.

Dear Captain Pete, What material are sails made out of? Corrina Dear Corrina, Sails were first made from animal hide  or woven plant fibers, such as palm leaves, cedar bark, silk, flax, or cotton. Eventually, most were made from canvas, similar to the material artists use for oil paintings but only a heavier version. Once again, sails are made from lots of different materials. The most popular is Dacron which is a man made material (unlike canvas which is made from the cotton plant). Spinnaker sails are usually made from Nylon. And some sails are made from even higher tech materials like Kevlar (bullet proof vests are also made from Kevlar) and carbon fiber. Fair Winds, Captain Pete If you have a question about sailing, boats, or the water, write Captain Pete at The Center for Wooden Boats.

How To Tie The Figure Eight Knot This is a great knot to know. It is used as a stopper knot on most boats for the jib sheets or even the main sheet. Follow the four steps to tie your own figure eight knot.

January/February 2007

Shavings 13


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

B uy a B oat fro m CW B !

Occasionally The Center for Wooden Boats has a boat donated that does not quite fit with our programs. We find good homes for these boats and use the proceeds to fund our operation. For more information call Patrick Gould at 206-218-6547 or see our website www.cwb.org.

Everyone Loves a Wooden Boat b y

P

a t r i c k

G

o u ld

While people come to CWB for various reasons, everyone loves wooden boats. We like to look at them, we like to use them and we even enjoy the labor that it takes to keep them working and looking their best. William Garden Sloop 47’ LOA. This boat is owned by Front Desk volunteer Ros Bond. He w i l l d o n a t e $12,000 to CWB if we find a buyer for him. It’s all teak, and it’s the best built wooden boats we’ve ever seen. You’ll get a perfect boat and CWB will get some cash to help us provide all the programs that you know and love. Please call for full specs and more info. $169,000 23’ Norwegian Kutters. One of the sexiest daysailers ever built. These little racers are the pocket sized descendants of boats like the R Boat Pirate and the Dragon. They’re nimble, easy to single hand and a real hoot when the breeze picks up. They were donated as a fleet of four and we’ve decided to sell them individually. They all need work, but they’re worthy projects. $3,000

14 Shavings

January/February 2007

What’s fascinating for me is observing how different people react to different boats. For some a varnished Chris Craft runabout is as good as it gets. Others won’t look twice at the Chris Craft, but go nuts for a well maintained lapstrake rowboat. Still others only have eyes for the large sailboats. As the person in charge of bringing newly donated boats to The Center I have had first hand experience with this phenomenon. In the days following the arrival of a new boat

on the dock I get a steady stream of opinions from staff, visitors and regular volunteers. It’s impossible to tell who is going to like what boat, but it interesting to see different peoples reaction to the different boats, and how one person’s piece of junk is another’s dream boat. All in all it just goes to show that the diversity of our fleet is one of the things that creates diversity in our visitor and volunteer population and helps to make CWB the wonderful place that it is.

32 Bristol Bay Gillnetter. 32’ Classic William Garden designed fishing boat built by Commercial Marine on Lake Union. It has spent its entire life in Alaska fishing for Salmon. At one time the entire fleet was comprised of wooden boats, but they are slowly being replaced by glass and metal. Usually when there is a surplus wooden boat it’s burned on the beach. The person that donated this one decided that he didn’t want that to happen to his boat. At great expense he had it shipped to Seattle and donated to CWB. It is in rough condition but runs great. It has great pedigree and would be a terrific conversion to a pleasure cruiser. Turbo diesel, diesel stove, radar, gps, full fishing gear! $2,500

Another 23’ Kutter! Fully restored. This boat has had a full structural restoration. It has a new stem, new floor timbers, many new or repaired frames etc. Basically anything that needed to be replaced has been. There are some minor cosmetics that still need attention, but they are truly m i n o r. C o m e down and take a look at this beautiful boat. Note: The boat includes a trailer, but it will need to have the wooden bunks replaced with metal if you want to take the boat on any long trips. $11,000

18’ William Garden Designed Sloop. This is the famous “Diane” that is featured in William Garden’s book of Yacht Designs. The story is that is was built by a man who was blind and had only one arm! It’s has a small cabin with two berths. The cockpit is very roomy for a boat this size, and exceptionally comfortable. It comes with a 5 hp Four stroke Honda outboard that is about 2 years old. The boat is in great shape and should only need some minor cosmetic work above the rail. $7,500

28’ Norwegian lapstrake cruiser. What a find in Seattle. This boat is a true Norwegian Classic Motor Snekke. It’s planked lapstrake style with Norwegian Pine on Oak frames. The fastenings are copper rivets. It’s powered by a Volvo diesel. The cabin is roomy with a v- berth, enclosed head and dinette in the forward cabin. The aft cabin has a nice v-

berth. The center cockpit is very roomy and safe. The boat looks very sound, runs great, and should only need cosmetics and new carpet to be a show boat. Price TBD.


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

B O A T S

T h e F e e d a n d C a r i n g o f CW B “Thanks” from Edmonds Home School

When I think of CWB certain names come to mind, Lake Union, Cama Beach, Seattle Central Community College, AS #1 (Alternative School #1), and others. These people and places are part of the vision and activities that make CWB a success. And if I may, I’d like to add ‘Edmonds’ to the list, as for the past 10 years, students from the Edmonds Homeschool Resource Center (EHRC) have been active participants in CWB youth programs. This school year is a milestone for us as about 100 students have now completed CWB introductory sailing lessons, including a class of seven this fall. Tom Powers was my first contact, and other instructors have followed including Sven, Nancy, Jake and Adam. CWB staff have also conducted maritime skill workshops at the school. During the past two years, as part of our annual Maritime Celebration Day, we included building small wooden boats provided by The Center’s volunteers (quite a scene I might add). It’s just not our Edmonds students who have enjoyed our 10-year relation. This fall, the city of Edmonds Parks and Recreation Department and EHRC, in coordination with CWB, arranged a day sail on the longboat Discovery for Edmonds’ residents. Six stalwart citizens (including my wife and me) set sail for four enjoyable hours around Lake Union that included a brief stop at Ivar’s. So from all of us up north in Edmonds, this is a big thanks for a decade of great times and learning. Jim Underhill, Edmonds Home School

CWB Wish List

• • • • • • •

A pickup truck Firewood for the shop (unpainted) Wooden Boat Magazine Issues # 1-12 Kids’ Books DVD Player Refrigerator (please contact us first!) Storage space

January/February 2007

Leaving a Legacy B

y

B

e t s y

D

a v i s

There are a growing number of friends of The Center for Wooden Boats who have decided to include a gift to CWB in their will. What a legacy they will be passing on to future generations! If you are interested in considering a planned gift to The Center for Wooden Boats, here is a little information which may be helpful to you as you work with your financial planner and/or attorney on defining your own charitable giving plan in your will. To make a proportional bequest:. “I give to The Center for Wooden Boats of Seattle, Washington an amount equal to five percent (5%) of my adjusted gross estate to be used in such manner as the Board of Trustees of The Center for Wooden Boats shall, in its sole discretion, determine.” To make a specific bequest: “I give to The Center for Wooden Boats of Seattle, Washington the sum of $_______ to be used in such manner as the Board of Trustees of The Center for Wooden Boats shall, in its sole discretion, determine.” “I give to The Center for Wooden Boats of Seattle, Washington 100 shares of XYZ stock to be used in such manner as the Board of Trustees of The Center for Wooden Boats shall, in its sole discretion, determine.” To make a residuary bequest “I give to The Center for Wooden Boats of Seattle, Washington the rest, residue and remainder of my estate to be used in such manner as the Board of Trustees of The Center for Wooden Boats shall, in its sole discretion, determine.” To make a contingent bequest. “In the event that ________________(name of spouse, child, sibling, etc.) shall not survive me, then I give the same to The Center for Wooden Boats of Seattle, Washington to be used in such manner as the Board of Trustees of said Foundation shall, in its sole discretion, determine.” You also have the option as to the purpose for which your charitable bequest will be used. An unrestricted bequest allows The Center for Wooden Boats to use it where the need is greatest at a given time. Some individuals request that their charitable bequest be added to The Center for Wooden Boats general endowment fund. The principal of an endowment fund is retained and invested in perpetuity, and only the income generated from the principal is spent. Other individuals specify that their contribution is restricted to support a particular program or area of interest. Many thanks to the growing number of individuals who are including The Center for Wooden Boats in their wills and planned giving. Through their inspiration, The Center for Wooden Boats will remain a vital ingredient in people’s lives for generations to come. For more information on planned giving, please contact Betsy Davis at betsy@cwb.org or 206.382.2628.

January/February Shavings Contributors: Jake Beattie • Betsy Davis • Chas Dowd • Shannon Fitzgerald • Crystal Goodner Patrick Gould • Jeremy Katich • Adam Karpenske • Bonnie Loshbaugh • Julia Makowski Katy Mathias • Miranda Price • Greg Reed • Heron Scott • Eldon Tam • Jim Underhill • Dick Wagner Shavings 15


T h e

C e n t e r

f o r

W O O D E N

U p c o m i n g Frostbite Regatta

Sunday, January 7, 2007, 12 P.M. CWB Docks Suggested donation $5/person

This event invites the volunteers to spend an afternoon “unwinding” from the holidays. It also gives the volunteer coordinator an opportunity to communicate with the volunteers about the help at the Seattle Boat Show and the yearly fund raising auction. Five teams will race five heats in five different boats. Teams must change crews for each heat. Team skipper must be checked out in the boat being used (Dragon; T-bird; Kutter; BJK; Mercury). Crew members do not need to be checked out. A potluck and dancing to follow the races! Teams must register before the races begin. Costumes invited

3rd Friday Speaker Vasa, the Ship and Museum January 19, 2007 CWB Boathouse, 7pm

Nathaniel Howe will give a presentation about the 378 year old vessel in Stockholm Sweden that is one of the world’s key maritime treasures.

Vasa was the largest warship in the Baltic. She was launched in 1628 and sailed less than a mile when a gust heeled her, burying her open lower deck gun ports. She sunk in a minute or two. In 1961 Vasa was discovered and raised. She was virtually intact including lines, sails, crews gear, some of the crew’s bones, bronze cannon and over 700 carved sculptures. She even floated again. The Vasa Museum attracts half of Stockholm’s tourists and is an icon of Swedish pride. We will learn how a museum that was built around a historic ship actually works. Nathaniel Howe is a Fulbright scholar doing work/study at the Vasa Museum since January 2006. He graduated from Beloit College with a degree in Marine Studies and was a WilliamsMystic Maritime Studies scholar in his senior year.

Book Sale Seafaring Heritage in Partnership (SHIPS) will have a book sale during the first 3 days of the 2007 Boats Afloat Show. This will be on Friday, January 26 – Sunday, January 28, 2007, 10am to 5pm, in the Northwest Seaport work shop just west of Wawona. There will be free coffee, cocoa and cookies. Those who purchase boats can have free tours of the 1922 steamship Virginia V and the 1889 tug Arthur Foss, at the Heritage Ships Wharf. Both vessels are recognized as National Heritage treasures For more information contact Colleen Wagner at (206) 282-0985.

B O A T S

E v e n t s CWB’s Annual Auction Creating New Wonders, Preserving our Treasures

When: Saturday, March 3, 2007 Where: The Mountaineers’ Club, Seattle

It’s time again to get everyone involved in the largest fund raising of the year for CWB. Last year’s event brought in over $100,000 to fund CWB’s youth programs, dock and facility upgrades, boat building, and hard working staff. You can get involved by: Attending the event: Individual tickets are only $80.00 for members, $100 for nonmembers. Tables are $800.00 (table of ten). Tickets include dinner, beverages, music, and the opportunity to bid! Donating: To donate an item, fill out the donation form on our website at www. cwb.org. Volunteering: We have over 40 shifts available to choose from. Contact Eldon at eldon@cwb.org. Becoming a sponsor: Help advertise our auction by telling the rest of our community. We hope to see all of our past guests, gracious donors and loyal volunteers as well as many new faces.

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit No. 1583

1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109-4468 206.382.2628 • www.cwb.org


Shavings Volume 26 Number 7a (January 2007)  

The Center for Wooden Boats membership newsletter

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you