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Girls Sailing Camp Girls Sailing Camp during Spring Break introduced eight enthusiastic new sailors to rigging and sailing El Toro dinghies and historic sloops. Here’s what the girls had to say at the end of the week. “The instructors were great. As a result I am not as scared as when I first sailed. I can now tie a bowline, figure of eight, and a cleat hitch. CWB was a great class. I actually learned how to sail whereas another camp put us in a boat with an instructor and told us to ‘watch and learn.’ Over all this was a fabulous class.” -Elena Becker “The instructors were awesome. We learned a lot about sailing. It was really fun!!! Capsizing was cool too!” -Tessa Lombard-Henley “My name is Claire Katz and I took a sailing class at The Center for Wooden Boats over spring break. At first I hated the idea of capsizing but after we did it I was fine with it. The class was fun. I learned how to rig and sort of sail a boat in one week so I’ll definitely come back next year to get better at it.” -Claire Katz “I learned a lot about sailing and it was really fun. I think I will take the class again next year. We capsized on purpose to see what we would do in that situation. I really like sailing now.” –Devon Lombard-Henley “My name is Reagan. I am ten. I never sailed until this week. I now love sailing because it is really fun. I learned how to tie a lot of knots.” -Reagan Wiley “This week was pretty windy. The instructors were nice and it was really cold when we capsized. We learned how to tie some knots and how to rig the El Toro dinghies. It was really fun.” -Una Ludviksen

May / June 2006

Restoring “Shrimpo”

Boatwright Eric Dow came out from Maine to spend two weeks teaching about and leading the restoration of CWB’s Herreshoff 12 1/2 Shrimpo. Photo above shows class installing new douglas fir sheer clamps.

“This class was both fun and terrifying. I learned to sail an El Toro and how to tie a bowline and a cleat hitch. On the last day we took out the Blanchard Jr. Knockabouts and sailed around the lake.” -Alice Whitaker “I took the Girls Spring Break Sailing Camp last year and there were many differences this year. For example, this week we got to capsize and last year we didn’t. I really liked capsizing. I own an El Toro and a bigger boat, a J-34. My family is really into sailing and I love steering. Well that’s me- a sailing freak.” -Sarah Brenden

The class replaced frames and floors, removed the ballast keel and replaced the keel timber. They also replaced the deck beams.

Inside This Issue:

FOUNDER’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NEWS FROM SOUTH LAKE UNION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NEWS FROM CAMA BEACH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CWB AT NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 UPCOING EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AROUND THE SOUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 MARITIME SKILLS PROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 THE COLLECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 HAIDA CANOE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 CWB FEED AND CARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Shavings 1


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Volume XXVI Number 2 ISSN 0734-0680 1992 CWB The Center for Wooden Boats Shavings is published bimonthly by The Center for Wooden Boats, 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 phone 206.382.2628 fax 206.382.2699 To learn more about CWB, please visit our Web site at www.cwb.org

Our Mission

To provide a community center where maritime history comes alive and our small craft heritage is preserved and passed along to future generations.

CWB Staff

Betsy Davis Executive Director Dick Wagner Founding Director Jake Beattie Waterfront Programs Director Patrick Gould Boat Sales Manager & Instructor Eldon Tam Volunteer Coordinator & Event Manager Jean Scarboro Bookkeeper Edel O’Connor Boatwright & Workshop Coordinator Heron Scott Lead Boatwright Greg Reed Livery Manager, Dockmaster & Youth Sailing Tom Baltzell Youth Field Trip Coordinator Saaduuts Artist in Residence Geoff Braden Shipwright in Residence

Board of Trustees Mark Barnard Alex Bennett Caren Crandell David Dolson Brandt Faatz Gary Hammons David Kennedy Andrea Kinnaman

Stephen Kinnaman Robert Merikle Lori O’Tool Walt Plimpton Chuck Shigley Denise Snow Bill Van Vlack

Design and production of Shavings by CWB volunteer Heidi Hackler of Dolphin Design, www.dolphindesignstudio.com. Printed by Olympus Press, www.olypress.com. 2 Shavings

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Between the midweek days of March 14 & 17th CWB was bustling. Youth from various schools and organizations were carving CWB’s Haida canoe Steve Philipp; there were school tours where children built toy boats and paddled the umiak. In the Pavilion restoration of our 15 El Toros was underway, the Puffin was on the drydock getting a new stern post. A Blanchard Jr. Knockabout restoration was in the final phases before launching and a Maine Peapod was in the beginning stage of restoration. In other words, it was a typical four days of CWB’s organized chaos. However, along with the standard sturm and drang of CWB was a new activity. It was our first conservation assessment, funded by the federal Heritage Preservation Fund. The assessment is a review of our curatorial collections. Its goals are to “develop a long range preservation plan for the collections, improve collections care and storage and develop a useful tool for the pursuit of collections care funding.” The assessment, was done by Jonathan Taggart of Taggart Objects Conservation, Anne Witty, internationally recognized maritime museum curator and Dana Senge, a conservation intern in her final year with the Buffalo program in conservation. The hectic activities at CWB were taken in stride by the assessors. They have had wide experience in museum environments, but

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not usually in one where the collections are regularly used by the public and restored as public exhibits. CWB may seem to be out of step with traditional maritime museums, but the collections conservators found that CWB is providing another dimension, direct experience, in the preservation of our maritime heritage. We put our collections to work. The assessment will be our standard for maintaining our collections in the best manner while allowing many of them to continue to be essential parts of our learn-by-doing maritime cultural learning center.

From the Conservation Assessment of The Center for Wooden Boats, funded by Heritage Preservation and Submitted by Jonathan Taggart, April 2006. “The mission of using and preserving collections are often at odds with each other. CWB works hard to balance these divergent goals in a way that both provides genuine experiences, along with care, maintenance and preservation of the collection...CWB has expressed some uneasiness in the past about its position as a museum that actually uses historic cultural artifacts (boats) in public programs. It is the opinion of this assessor that they have done an excellent job in walking the fine line between what could be seen as conflicting purposes.”

May/June May/ /June Shavings Contributors: Kaci Cronkhite • Betsy Davis • Chuck Fowler • Charlie Moore Greg Reed • Tom Riggs • Saaduuts • Heron Scott • Eldon Tam Eric Sorensen • Dick Wagner


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Never Mind the Rain A Day in the Life of CWB

Saturday April 15th brought lots of rain, but that didn’t seem to dampen the enthusiasm of the people participating in a wide range of programs. A sampling are shown below.

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CWB is programming two slips at the Historic Ships Wharf in South Lake Union Park. Here are just a few of the unique and historically significant vessels which will be in the Wharf spotlight this year. • 1913 gaff schooner Adventuress Adventuress, 101’ on deck • 1942 gaff ketch Yankee Clipper Clipper, 44’ on deck • 1944 Coast Guard Cutter CG83527, 83’ long • 1944 Coast Guard Cutter CG83366, 83’ long • 1989 brig Lady Washington, 67’ on deck

The Adventuress is as elegant a 1913 yacht one The Adventuress giving free public rides would ever find. She has been providing more from South Lake Union Park in April 2006. than admiration in Puget Sound since the late 1950’s, as a sailing trainer. Adventuress was dewill be a commemoration of the invasion that signed by the revered Bowdoin B. Crowninshield was the beginning of the end of World War II and built in East Boothbay, Maine by the Rice and the Coast Guard combat veterans, Coast Brothers yard. She sailed through the Straits of Guard veterans and active duty Coast Guard Magellan for a game hunting expedition in the members will be interpreting the vessels and Artic. In 1914 Adventuress became the San Franthe military maritime history of the wharf site, cisco Bar Pilot vessel Californian, and continued Seattle, King County and Puget Sound. in that role to 1952. Adventuress is now based in The original brig Lady Washington along Port Townsend, operated with the ship Columbia by Sound Experience and Rediviva under command provides a wide variety of of Robert Gray, were the sailing programs. first American vessels to The West Seattle Sea land on the West coast, in Scouts have been sailing 1788. Lady Washington is a Yankee Clippers for 75 floating representation of years. The first was a gaff Pacific maritime heritage. rigged sloop. The cur- 15 students learned about the She was the first sailing vesrent Yankee Clipper was engines aboard the Arthur Foss at sel on the Columbia River a conversion from a navy the Historic Ships Wharf April 15th and the first American ship’s boat. Sea Scouts has from instructor Adrian Lipp. vessel to arrive at Japan. proved itself to be a wholesome program for Her programs for youth and adults are for all youth involving life skills and maritime skills. ages, abilities and academic disciplines. There Yankee Clipper will give dockside tours and will be dockside tours and evening sails. In evening Lake Union sails when she’s at South 1989 Lady Washington was launched in Grays Lake Union Park. Harbor in commemoration of Washington’s 100th anniversary of statehood. The Coast Guard Cutters were designed for the Normandy invasion on June 6, 1944. Tom Baltzell led a workparty of students Their duty was to protect the landing barges who cleaned the lake, the lawn, and did approaching the Normandy beaches. This

Dennis Armstrong teaches Knot Tying.

Students train for participation in this year’s Pacific Challenge which is a competition for longboat crews from around Puget Sound.

Ten new sailors joined this Spring’s session of our first SailNOW! for Women, taught by women.

other site maintenance.

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The Cama Beach State Park will be the younger brother of Camano Island State Park, only one mile south. Camano Island State Park was built in one day in 1950 as a community effort. Most of the Islanders came with tractors, horses, shovels, axes and construction experience. Cama Beach State Park is about ready to publish a notice for bids by contractors. It’s taken over 10 years to complete the planning and the implementation won’t be done in a day, no matter how many craftspeople show up. But that reflects the change in life style in Camano Island and the rest of the US between 1950’s and 2000’s. Process and permits have replaced inspiration and initiative. While Cama Beach State Park is waiting for its happy birthday, Camano Island State Park is in its middle age and makeover period. This will have great benefits for both parks. For example, Camano is having a boat dock built next to its launching ramp. Cama will have neither. So trailered and cartop boats can be launched at Camano and land on the 6000’ beach of Cama just a mile north. Also Camano has camping sites, not Cama. Camano is just getting some cabins installed. They will not have restrooms but a new joint-used restroom is being built alongside these cabins. Those taking our Camano Island Family Boatbuilding which will take place in the Camano Island S.P. Picnic Shelter, October 21, 22, 28&29 can reserve cabins at the Camano S.P. or camp out there for the 2 weekends of the class. The cabins are $41 per night and will sleep five. Contact for more information about Camano Island State Park: 360.387.7542.

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Every summer, with the help of FOCIP (Friends Of Camano Island Parks), Camano Island State Park hosts interpretive programs in the park amphitheatre. The programs bring in knowledgeable and entertaining guest speakers who present a wide variety of topics ranging from wildlife to geology, and even history and mythology. While the shows are close and convenient for the campers, they are also popular with the locals and day-visitors. Everyone is welcome and invited. Interpretive programs are scheduled every Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. from Victoria Day Weekend (the weekend before Memorial Day) through Labor Day. May 20

Tom Riggs

Who Named Camano Island

May 27

Sue Murphy

Wildlife on Camano and Marine Mammals

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Harvey Palmer

Ragnaroc

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Sheila Pera and Sue Murphy

Birds of Camano Island

June 17

Jean Back

Backyard Wildlife Habitat – Living in Harmony with Nature

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Jeff Wheeler

History of Camano Island Logging.

July 1

Laurie Wheeler & Bec Thomas

Where do my Clothes Come From?

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Hazel Shipman

Crows and Ravens and the Myths about Them

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Claudia Motland

Crabs

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Dodie Markey

Visitors to our Waters – The Pacific Orca Whale

August 5

Hazel Shipman

Seed Dispersal

August 12

Dick Wagner

Somewhat True and Amazing Tales of Historic Watercraft

August 19

Kathleen Bander

Bats are our Friends!

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The Center for Wooden Boats participated in the second Classic Yacht Symposium™ held March 31-April 2 in Bristol, Rhode Island, co-sponsored by the Herreshoff Marine Museum and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME), March 31-April 2.

The symposium included a panel discussing “The current state and practice of educating boat builders and restorers of classic yachts.” Moderated by Halsey C. Herreshoff, the panel included: • Betsy Davis, The Center for Wooden Boats, Seattle WA • Clark Poston, The International Yacht Restoration school, Newport RI • Jamie Houtz, The Landing School, Arundel, ME • David Mullens, Wood Construction Center, Seattle Central Community College • Rich Hilsinger, The WoodenBoat School, Brooklin, ME CWB’s paper, “Teaching Boatbuilding: A Vehicle for Lifelong Learning at The Center for Wooden Boats” describes our boatbuilding programs for youth, Haida canoe carving, skills workshops, volunteer program, working exhibits,

the internship program, and awards we make to recognize boatbuilders in the trade. Other sessions at the symposium included a talk by yacht designer Olin Stephens on the subject of tank testing, and presentations on six different restoration projects. Copies of the Proceedings are available through the museum. The next Classic Yacht Symposium will be held in April 2008, alternating years with the SNAME sponsored Chesapeake Sailing Yacht Symposium (CSYS). The Herreshoff Marine Museum and America’s Cup Hall of Fame are dedicated to preserving, exhibiting, and interpreting the accomplishments of the Herreshoff Manufacturing Company and demonstrating the influence of America’s Cup Competition, for the purpose of education, research, and the inspiration of excellence in the world of yachting. For more information, visit www.herreshoff.orgg, or contact the Museum at P.O. Box 450, One Burnside Street, Bristol, RI 02809-0450, Phone: (401) 253-5000, Fax: (401) 253-6222.

Betsy Davis, CWB Executive Director joined other panel members at The Classic Yacht Symposium held in April 2006 at the Herreshoff Museum in Rhode Island. From left to right: Roger Compton, Dean of Students at Webb Institute and President of SNAME, Clark Poston (IYRS), Rich Hilsinger (WoodenBoat), Betsy Davis (CWB), Halsey Herreshoff, Jamie Houtz (Landing School), David Mullens (Seattle Central Community College), John Palmieri (Curator of the Herreshoff Museum and Symposium organizer.)

Buy a Boat from The Center for Wooden Boats !

Snipe Sailboat – hull only. 15.5’x5’. Snipe hull in good condition. The deck has been repaired, but is solid. You will need a mast, boom, rudder,tiller daggerboard, and sails. A nice fellow in Tacoma has a snipe rig for sale for $100 less sails so you won’t have to work about making the parts. Please call for more info.. $450. For questions on either boat, contact Patrick Gould at CWB, 206.382.2628

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12’ Geodesic Whitehall type pulling boat 12’x4’, Unfinished ultra light Whitehall type row boat. Finished boat weighs in at 30 lbs! Comes with wood, fabric, Kevlar lacing and epoxy to finish the boat. Check out www. gaboats.com for info on this boat and the geodesic building technique. $400.

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U p c o m i n g Third Friday Speaker

7pm Friday May 19, 2006 CWB Boathouse Traditional Norwegian Boatbuilding Cornelius (Kees) Sprenger will give a slide talk about his 2 year experience of boatbuilding at a folk arts school in Norway. During that period Kees helped build and launch a 58’ lapstrake coastal trader, two smaller fishing boats and a 42’ Aafjords boat. Kees will tell us about the building techniques, materials used, sailing the boats and camping with his fellow students of the school.

All Hands on Deck for Preservation Saturday, May 13, 2006 11:30 am – 5 pm $29 / person

This event at South Lake Union is being produced by longtime preservation and boating enthusiast Rosanne Sachson. The afternoon begins with a delicious lunch and a Conversation with Mike Garvey, Chairman of Saltchuk Resources. He’ll talk about the Restoration of the 120’ Thea Foss yacht (circa. 1930), which was originally built for John Barrymore and christened Infanta. You’ll also visit the main deck of the Thea. Guests will then stroll along South Lake Union to visit the PSMHS Maritime Museum near Chandler’s Cove, and on to The Center for Wooden Boats, where they’ll view the 39’ Pirate R-Class Sloop (circa. 1926). At the Historic Ships Wharf, guests will see the 42’ Henrietta Foss private tug (circa.1930) and the 120’ - Arthur Foss tug (circa.1889). In addiiton they’ll view Northwest Seaport’s 129’ Lightship Swiftsure (circa. 1904) Advance prepaid reservations are required by May 3rd payable to Rosanne Sachson, POB 71, Gig Harbor, WA 98335 253.857.6302 (04fax) or email rosannesachson@centurytel.net. 6 Shavings

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Over 200 boats and 10,000 people will converge on the south end of Lake Union July 1-4 as The Center for Wooden Boats is joined by the Antique & Classic Boat Society in presenting the 30th annual Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival & Classic Speedboat Show. Boats at the Festival this year will include dazzling varnished wooden speedboats, dinghies, sail and power classics, fishing vessels, tugboats, steam launches, kayaks, canoes, and many, many more. In addition, CWB is once again working in partnership with the Pacific Northwest Chapter of ACBS, the Antique and Classic Boat Society, to display classic speedboats each day. In the spirit of the Center, where visitors have access to historic sailing and rowing vessels from the museum collection, this is a touch and talk show. All vessels will have owners, builders or skippers available to share their experiences. Larger boats will invite visitors aboard; smaller boats will give rides. Classic rowboats can be rented, and steam and sail rides will be running non-stop. Visitors are guaranteed to get out on the water. A few of the many other activities returning to this year’s Festival include the always exciting Quick and Daring contest, the kid favorite Toy Boat Building, our music stage and the Ed Clark Regatta. If you would like to participate, visit www.cwb.orgg. To register your boat or company for the event, click on the 2006 Festival link, download the appropriate form, and mail it back to CWB. To volunteer, click on the volunteer link. To have a form mailed to you, or if you have additional questions, please call 206-382-2628 and ask for the Festival Coordinator. Keep an eye on our website for updates! The Center for Wooden Boats would like to thank the following businesses for sponsoring our 2006 Festival! Orca Creative Group, Holland America Cruises, Vulcan, Fisheries Supply, Jensen Motor Boat Company, Edensaw, FesTool, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Parks and Recreation, Port Townsend Foundry, Viking Bank and more on the way! If you would like to discuss sponsorship opportunities, please contact Betsy at 206-382-2628.

Photo by Sarah Howell.

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Peter Puget Is Back! June 17th

Two World War II Coast Guard Veterans Set to be Reunited with their Wartime Cutters during D-Day Event June 3-6

If you haven’t had a chance to meet Lt. Peter Puget, you’re in luck! The Discovery Modelers Education Center has scheduled another informal “performance” by the British naval officer for whom Puget Sound was named. The event takes place from 10 am to 11 am Saturday, June 17, in the Armory Building at South Lake Union Park (860 Terry Ave. N., Seattle). As portrayed – in full British Navy attire – by Andrew Loviska, Peter Puget will reminisce about the 1790s voyage of Capt. George Vancouver’s ship of exploration, HMS Discovery Discovery, to Northwest waters. That was the voyage that put Northwest waters on the map of the world – and resulted in naming many of the places we love to visit today. Mt. Rainier, Mt. Hood, Port Townsend, Whidbey Island and dozens more Northwest places still carry the names Vancouver bestowed on them. Peter Puget will be speaking in front of the 14’ scale replica of Discovery Discovery, which is on permanent display in the Armory Building. That’s not all that’s going on at Discovery Modelers. If you’re a ship modeler or a ship model collector, it’s not too late to get your model into the 12th annual Ship Model Exhibit, a part of the Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival 10 am – 6 pm July 1-4. The exhibit annually features dozens of models of every size, type and vintage and includes kit models, scratch-built, radio control and pond models. Even if you’re not a ship modelers, be sure to stop by the exhibit and take a look all the different models, talk to the modelers and watch them work. We have some great kids activities coming up too. There’s a Kids Ship Model Kits class from 9:30 am – noon on Saturday, May 20 in the Discovery Modelers workshop (Room 239 of the Armory Building). Kids as young as 5 years of age (parents should be prepared to assist kids 7 and under) can build their own ship models from kits, including tugboats, sailboats and working boats. The fee is $15 and reservations are suggested. The Discovery Modelers Education Center provides classes, workshops and seminars in the skills and techniques of building ship models of all kinds. Instruction is provided for those of all ages and abilities. Classes also are held on associated subjects, such as photographing ship models, hints and tips for building, pre-build research and more. For more information contact Discovery Modelers at 206.282.0985 or discoverymodelers@yahoo.com.

Out of the Lion’s Mouth

An Exploration of the Tibetan Frontier May 12 $15/person The Center for Wooden Boats is collaborating with the Pacific Northwest chapter of The Explorers Club to present “Out of the Lion’s Mouth” a photo presentation by internationally aclaimed photographer Jared Cruce. Documenting his travel by foot and kayak through western Tibet in 2005, Cruce will share his stunning photographs and stories of the people and vistas of Nepal and Tibet. Please join us for a wonderful evening of beautiful photography, fascinating people, and wonderful wine and hors d’oeuvre in a setting that is uniquely Seattle. Friday, May 12, 2006 at 6:30 PM at the Center for Wooden Boats, South Lake Union. www.cwb.org $15 per person. For tickets and information please call Betsy Davis at CWB 206.382.2628. Guests are invited to arrive by kayak. May/June 2006

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Next to the Wooden Boat Festival races, this is the largest gathering and race of classic wooden vessels in the northwest. Slips in Point Hudson are reserved for out of town boats. Race start and finish is off the Northwest Maritime Center Pier. Great food, great fun, great tradition. For information, see www.woodenboat.org or call the Northwest Maritime Center & Wooden Boat Foundation at 360-385-3628.

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Two World War II Coast Guard veterans are planned to be reunited with their restored, now historic 83-foot wooden cutters at commemorative ceremonies on June 6 (Tue.) at the Historic Ships Wharf at South Lake Union Park. The cutters will also be on public exhibit on June 3 and 4 (Sat. and Sun.) and open for tours. After more than 60 years, a retired 85-year-old Coast Guard Reserve captain may once again board the CG-83527, of which, as a newly commissioned ensign in 1944, he was the second commander in Tampa, Florida. The restored cutter is owned currently by Combatant Craft of America (CCoA), a Port Ludlow-based nonprofit military maritime heritage and education organization. Also an 84-year-old former Coast Guard signalman is scheduled to go aboard the former CG-83366, now a privately-owned yacht moored in Lake Union. As the USCG-11, this 83-footer was part of a 60 cutter fleet that participated in the D-Day invasion of Europe at Normandy, France beginning on June 6, 1944. The four day World War II exhibit of the two 83-foot cutters at South Lake Union Park in early June, and the reunion with their Coast Guard veteran crewmen, is being sponsored by Combatant Craft of America, in cooperation with the Center for Wooden Boats, Coast Guard veterans’ organizations and Coast Guard District 13 in Seattle.

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Maritime Skills Programs Knots 3: Ocean Plait Mat

Varnishing Workshop: An Introduction to Brightwork Repair and Maintenance.

Instructor: Dennis Armstrong Date: May 6 (Saturday) Time: 10:30 AM to 1:30 PM Cost: $40 members / $50 non-members

Instructor: Dave Thacker Session1: May 20 & 21 Time:9:00 AM to 2:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $120 members / $150 non-members.

Knots 4: Hitchings (Coverings)

Aleut Ikyak (Baidarka) Workshop

Instructor: Dennis Armstrong Date: June 11 (Saturday) Time: 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM Cost: $50 members / $60 non-members

Rigging for Women

Instructor: Margie McDonald Date: April 29 Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM (Saturday) Cost: $100 members / $140 non-members

Instructor: Corey Freedman (www.skinboats.com)

Women’s Woodworking: An Introduction To The Basics

Instructor: Hannah Browne Date: May 10,17,24 & 31 Time: 6 PM to 9 PM, Wednesdays Cost: $200 members / $240 nonmembers

Sail Making Workshop

Instructor: Sean Rankins, (Northwest Sails) Date: May 1 to 6. (Monday thru Saturday) Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Cost: $750 members / $900 non-members

Lapstrake Lofting

Instructor: Eric Hvalsoe Date: May 20 & 21. Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $175 members / $210 non-member

Caulking For Beginners

Canoe Building

Instructor: Eric Harman Date: May 6-12 (Sat thru Friday) Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Cost: $700 members / $800 non-members

Canoe Canvasing & Caning Workshop

Instructor: Eric Harman Date: May 27 & 28 (Saturday and Sunday) Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Cost: $190 members / $230 non-members.

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Instructor: Tim Reagan Date: May 20 Time: 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM (Saturday) Cost: $50 members / $60 nonmembers

Session 1: May 6 - 14 Session 2: June 10 - 18 Session 3: July 15 - 23 Session 4: Sep 23 - Oct 1 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday thru Sunday, 9 day workshop) Cost: $1100 members / $1300 non-members

Family Boat Building

Instructor: CWB Staff and Volunteers Session 1: May 20, 21, 27 & 28. (Weekends at CWB) Session 2: July 1 to July 4 (Saturday-Tuesday at CWB’s Annual Wooden Boat Festival) Time:10:00 AM to 6:00PM Cost: $1,300 members / $1,450 nonmembers

Bronze Casting Workshop

Instructor: Sam Johnson Date: July 29 & 30 Time:9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $230 members / $260 nonmembers


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Maritime Skills Programs Willits Brothers Canoe Building

Instructor: Patrick Chapman Date: July 26 - 30 (Wed thru Saturday) Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Cost: $550members / $650 non-members

WoodTurning Techniques

Instructor: Roger Goad Dates: July 22 & 23 (Saturday & Sunday) Time: 10:00 AM to 4.00PM Cost: $210 members / $250 non-members

Turning Bowls and Lidded Vessels

Instructor: Roger Goad Dates: July14 - 16 (Friday thru Sunday) Time: 10:00 AM to 4.00PM Cost: $310 members / $370 non-members

Lofting and Building the Heidi Skiff:

SailNOW!

SailNOW! Dates: Session 3: May 6 – June 10 Session 4: June 10 – July 15 Cost : $300 members / $330 non-members

A week of Boatbuilding for the Beginner. Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: June 10-18 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday thru Sunday, 9-day workshop) Cost: $800 members / $950 non-members.

Conceptual Navigation

Instructor: Seaton Gras Date: June 10 (Saturday) Time: 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Cost: $45 members / $55 non-members

Historic Navigation: Building A Quadrant

Instructor: Seaton Gras Date June 10. (Saturday) Time: 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Cost: $55 members / $65 non-members

Cedar Bark Potlatch Pouch: Traditional Twining with Native Fibres.

Instructors: Laura Wong Whitebear & Carol Emarthle-Douglas Date: May 18th Time : 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM. (Thursday) Cost: $65 members / $80 non-members

Traditional Woodworking Woodworking:

Use and Care of Hand Tools. Instructor: John Belli Date: July 18, 19 & 20 Time:6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (Tuesday - Thursday) Cost: $140 members / $180 non-members.

May/June 2006

SailNOW! Intensive

Dates: April 22 – May 7 Cost: $300 members / $330 non-members,

Boat Photography at the Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival

Instructor: Greg Gilbert Date: June 24 & July 1.(Saturdays) Time:10:00 AM to 2:00 PM (June 24) , 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM (July 1) Cost: $80 members / $95 non-members

Native Style (HAIDA) Paddle Making

Instructor: Saaduuts Dates: July 15 & 16 (Saturday & Sunday) Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Cost: $225 members / $270 non-members

The Sail Survey

Instructors: Kay Robinson and Gae Pilon Date: July 22 (Saturday) Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Cost: $90 members / $120 non-member

The Measuring Bag

Instructors: Kay Robinson and Gae Pilon Date: July 29 (Saturday) Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Cost: $90 members / $120 non-members

SailNOW! for families

Dates: May 6 to June 10. Cost: 280 per adult / $135 child (under 14)

Docking Under Sail

Instructor: CWB Staff Session 2: May 7 Session 3: June 11 Time: 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (Sundays) Cost: $30 members and non-members / $15 SailNOW! Graduates

Introduction to Spinnakers

Instructors: Kemp Jones and Suzy Brunzell Date: June 10th Time :11:00 AM to 4:00 PM. (Saturdays) Cost: $65 members / $80 non-members Prerequisites : SailNOW! graduate or equivalent

Diesel Engine Theory

Instructor: Adrian Lipp (also on Arthur Foss) Cost: $500 CWB/NWSP members / $550 non members Ages: 14 and up Dates: June 3,10,17,24 & July 1 (Saturdays) Time: 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM

To get information about our workshops for 2006, go to www.cwb.org or phone us and we’ll be happy to mail you our 2006 Program Catalogue.

Shavings 9


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Perhaps the greatest thing about boats is the people they bring together, and by the time this article reaches print Eric Dow, Maine boatbuilder and restorer of Herreshoff 12 ½’s, will have come and gone at CWB as instructor for our “Restoring the Shrimpo” maritime skills workshop. He brings with him years and years of experience plus a little yankee flavor to our scene down here at South Lake Union. This type of interaction and experience is one of the things that helps define CWB as a true gathering place for the preservation and application of wooden boat heritage. It also marks for us a unique way of dealing with the preservation and restoration of our precious relics, in this instance the H 12 ½ Shrimpo, by offering up the project as a class with a distinct individual such as Eric. Shrimpo herself is in for a major change, from a new laminated douglas fir keel plank to all new white oak frames, the boat is getting a total rebuild. The students enrolled in “Restoring the Shrimpo” will experience the beginning of this process literally first hand as they steam bend frames and cut floor timbers, but the job won’t end after Eric leaves. The plan is to move the boat over to the space currently occupied

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by the nearly completed Blanchard JR, and finish the job. There will still be lots to do after “Restoring the Shrimpo” (hmm…maybe there should be a “Finishing the Shrimpo” class); from the planking to interior work, and also the long process of refinishing the boat will demand a significant amount of time. I’m estimating the construction work will be done sometime in the fall of this year, and she’ll be sailing by this time next year. Please stop by sometime to see this classic being put back together, and meet some of the folks doing it. Upcoming projects: • Building a new rudder for the Bristol Bay Gillnetter, Admirable • Refinishing the Dewey • Construction of a new main mast and boom for the recently restored BJK • Refinishing of the peapod (originally built by CWB students instructed by Eric Dow) • Continued restoration work on the steam launch Puffin

Tom Sawyer Never Had It So Good B Y

When he was casting about for a crew to run away with him on his 100-ton schooner, Wanderer, Sterling Hayden took out an ad. So it seemed like the natural thing to do for Mistral, the Center’s 5-or-so-ton Seaborn Mistral sloop. “Help maintain -- and sail -- a classic sailboat,” quothe our fleeting spot on Craig’s list. “Free sailing and lessons. The sailing vessel Mistral is seeking volunteers to help with maintenance, crewing and general knocking about on a classic 31-foot wooden sailboat designed and built in Seattle. The deal: you work, you sail, you learn. Novices welcome.” The ad went on to point people to From the Dock, the Mistral blog, and steer them to the next Saturday’s volunteer orientation. Four would-be Mistralites responded and attended the orientation. Another two visitors to the orientation decided to throw in as well. 10 Shavings

May/June 2006

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Suddenly, many hands are making Mistral work. Sandi and Forest have sanded and sealed the hatch doors, and Sandi replaced the elastics on a cover recently refurbished by megavolunteer Paula Weir. Passion, Alexandra and Scott picked up on the fine work started by Dave Derse and the Mistral veteran Martin Feldman, sanding the glorious spruce mast and getting down the early coats of varnish. And, true story, Doug, an electrician who puts in ten-hour days much of the week, volunteered to install the recently refurbished Mistral head. Volunteer slots are still open; would anyone like to replace the manifold gasket on an Atomic 4? Feel free to look in on the blog at svmistral.blogspot.com or contact Eric S o r e n s e n , t h e M i s t ra l s k i p p e r, a t svwhim@yahoo.com. svwhim@yahoo.c

Dave Derse and Martin Feldman get underway with the scraping o’ the Mistral mast. What you can’t see is that Dave’s arm was in a cast. That’s dedication, Mistral style.


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C o l l e c t i o n The Collection in the Pavilion B

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For most, arriving at CWB involves parking in our lot, walking under an The construction possibly reflects the shortage of large diameter cedar arbor, along a gravel path, through the pavilion across a bridge, down a ramp logs. By mid 19th century sawmills had sprouted all over Puget Sound and then on a maze of floats, floating buildings and a display of about 100 where the big cedars and firs were quickly mowed down and shipped out. wooden boats afloat or under restoration in the shops and on the floats. The bow and stern of this canoe are Nootkan (Nuu-cha-Nulth) style. Next time, stop when you reach the Pavilion and look up. The marvelous War Canoe was built by the Brown Brothers Canoe Company of wood trusses are a sight worth seeing itself, but there are also some boats Ontario, Canada in the 1930’s. Its construction of cedar planks and hanging from the truss’. Here are their stories: frames covered by canvas was developed in the early 1900’s to reduce Cuna cayuco is a dugout made the cost of canoes which were by the San Blas de Cuna tribe of then competing with mass prothe San Blas Islands of Panama. duced bicycles as recreational This boat was designed for fishalternatives. ing and general transportation This 30’ canoe was deamong the islands and nearby veloped for group sport at mainland rivers. It was paddled youth camps. Canoe jousting and sailed. The sail was a high involved bamboo poles with peaked boomed spritsail. The scraps of cloth secured to the helmsman steered with a paddle ends. The object was to tip over and handled the sheet. A crewthe opponent. man hung out to windward on a Olympic Kayak was develrope from the mast head to keep oped for serious competition. the narrow tippy canoe level and It is a K-4 class for four padsupport the mast which had no dlers. It was designed and built standing rigging. The thwarts by Struer of Denmark raced in were removeable so the crew the British Empire Games in could sleep inside the canoe. 1954 and the Olympic Games Coast Salish Canoe is a red cedar in Mexico in 1968. dugout which was expanded in At CWB’s entry Pavilion visitors can see a range of historic smallcraft. In this The construction is lamiwidth through a process in which picture, left to right you see the 30’ War Canoe, the Coast Salish Dugout nations of thin wood bent water in the vessel was brought to Canoe, the Olympic Kayak and on the far right is the Nootka Canoe. over a solid form and glued steaming temperature by hot rocks together. This creates an exwhich softened the lignin resin in tremely strong structure, integrating the hull and deck and also a very the wood and allowed spreading sticks to push the sides out. This created light structure. flaring sides and curved sheer. Take an envelope and push the ends towards Ikyak frame The Aleut people developed boats thousands of years each other. You will see the sides flare out and the straight upper edges ago using the Aleutian Islands natural materials of driftwood (carried curved from end to end. to its treeless shores by current from the China, Japan and Philippine This canoe was judged to be carved about 1880, possibly on Lake area) and sea mammal skins. Union. Its size and lines are very similar to one shown in a photo taken The Aleuts called their small, fast hunting boats Ikyaks. Ours is in about 1900. Some steam bent frames were added in 1912 to keep the the process of construction by a master builder of Arctic aboriginal cedar from splitting by the Reed family of Tacoma. They found this boats, Corey Freeman. He works on this boat as a skills exhibit during canoe then in poor condition. They used it for a family boat at their our annual Wooden Boat Festivals. home on Salmon Beach, Tacoma for 70 years, and donated it to CWB in 1983. Nootka Canoe is a transitional style northwest native canoe with carved red cedar hull and cedar planks to provide necessary freeboard. May/June 2006

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Ah the venerable Coastal Red Cedar. It evokes thoughts of dripping forests, a green impressionist painting daubed with shafts of sun as the grey clears from a passing squall. It is the smell of the forest, the spice that combines with earth, moss and myriad other ingredients that smell of place, our place, here on the planet. Traditionally it was used by native tribes such as the Tlingit, Tsimshian, Chinook, Haida, Kwakiutl, Nootka and many others. They carved incredible totems, fish hooks adorned with carvings of sea otters and octopus, masks of impeccable quality and amazing creativity. All made to symbolize a clan, an animal spirit, a special event. They built dugout canoes up to 60’ long (20 meters), by fire and adz, that are otherworldly. Imagine them appearing out of the mist, the boat dressed in fierce characterizations of Orca the Sea Wolf and Bear the great fisher. The human occupants dressed in Chilkat Blankets, and masks, ready for a potlatch, or perhaps a raid. As you might expect the indigenous peoples were definitely onto something. As boatbuilding material it is unrivaled, when Quartersawn it is one of the more stable woods known. It doesn’t twist, warp or bow. It doesn’t shrink, check or rot. As the tree ages it produces natural toxins that discourage the growth of the molds and mildews that cause decay. Where the craftsperson leaves it, it stays, many times for over 100 years. It is available in wide boards up to 40’ long. WRCedar is soft, easy on tools, a dream to work, straight grained, fine textured and free of pitch. Frank Prothero planked the schooner Alcyone in cedar for the above mentioned reasons. I once asked Sugar Flanagan, he and wife Leslie are the current owners of Alcyone (one of the finest run boats on the West Coast), if he was ever concerned about his planking being such a soft wood, his response was, “I certainly try not to run my boat into things”. Coming from a man that has sailed over 100,000 miles in the last 6 years, I found that to be a meaningful endorsement. The largest WRCedar tree is 19.49ft (5.94m) in diameter, and nearly 154’ tall. If I come back as a tree (karma?), I wanna be a WRCedar.

Visiting with the Yankee Clipper B Y

Nearly sixty years ago, the Sea Scouts in West Seattle converted a donated Navy barge into the 44 foot sailing ship now known as Yankee Clipper. This spring, the ship ran free public sails from docks at the Center for Wooden Boats. “For us, this was a chance to get more people aware of who we are and what we do,” said Daniel Jorum, who took over as the ship’s skipper around the first of this year. As a Sea Scout sail training ship, the Yankee Clipper’s major function is to teach about all Clipper’ aspects of boats, from their operation and navigation, to safety and marlinspike skills. But, similarly important are the character development and team building skills the program offers to co-ed youth 14 to 21 years old. “Our sailing really shows everybody how much easier things are when you work together,” Jorum said. “It takes a lot of work to sail the Clipper well.” 12 Shavings

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According to the ship’s committee chairman, John Kelly, the Yankee Clipper and its crew sail weekly from their home on the Duwamish River, near West Seattle. Kelly first joined on with the Clipper in 1938, when the Sea Scouts operated another boat, a motorsailor, from the same moorage down on the Duwamish. That vessel was struck by a barge and sank, Kelly said, which lead to the donation from the Navy of an open-hulled troop transport barge built at the Naval shipyard in Bremerton. Among Sea Scout members at the time were Kelly, a trained naval architect, and Carl Nyberg, who ultimately drew up plans for the new boat’s renovation into a 44 foot gaffrigged ketch.. “We lengthened the boat, and added a keel, the cabin and a deck,” Kelly said. “Its drawings were based on the earlier boat that sank.” Now owned by the Boy Scouts of America,

the Yankee Clipper Clipper’s charter is held by the West Seattle Lion’s Club. The Clipper and its crew sail year round, partaking in weekly sails, ecosystems cruises on the Duamish River, monthly overnight cruises in the summer months, and an annual extended cruise to the San Juan Islands that takes the crew sailing for two weeks. “The more people I can get involved with sail training, the happier I am,” Jorum said after a pair of free public sails from CWB in April. “We are a resource for low income and special needs kids, as well as others,” he said. “It is possible that by doing work trade for your uniform and fuel expenses, you can sail every week for a year on under one hundred dollars.” For more information about Yankee Clipper, visit http://www.sssyankeeclipper.or http://www.sssyankeeclipper.orgg or call (206)947-6199.


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H a i d a C a n o e George Lucas Educational Foundation Features “Carving Cultural Connections” Over the last year, the George Lucas Educational Foundation has interviewed and filmed Saaduuts and others involved with our Haida Canoe Carving program, Carving Cultural Connections. The resulting story has now been posted to their website at Edutopia.org and the 7 ½ minute video is a great description of the project – I encourage you to take a look. (You can find it by searching on the word “canoe” and it will take you the project-based learning section of their website.) The story is also printed in the April/May edition of their magazine, Edutopia.

Carving Underway on the “Stephen Philipp” B Y

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Students from Red Eagle Soaring are coming to CWB and South Lake Union twice a week to carve as part of CWB’s program Carving Cultural Connections. “It is a wonderful feeling to teach the young adults about themselves, and what they can do together: building a canoe together and building spirit together as a family. Working for peace and love,” Saaduuts

May/June 2006

Thank you to the Lucky Seven Foundation and to The Hugh and Jane Ferguson Foundation for recent grants supporting the Carving Cultural Connections program at The Center for Wooden Boats.

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The Feed and Caring of CWB Donation of Line B Y

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Yes, it’s a fact. The Center for Wooden Boats fleet is old. That’s the point! Even some of the newer boats on the docks were built as replicas of trademark historic craft at our workshops more than 20 years ago. But our boats are meant to look good and function well. We are a small craft museum and hub of on the water activity, providing beautiful and well-rigged boats for adventure on Lake Union and beyond! In March Samson Rope donated a handsome shipment of new line that will help upgrade the rigging of our fleet. Nobody measured the heavy coils and partial rolls spilling out of two bulky boxes as they were opened in the Gallery, but it seems that a nice whipping job could be done on the Space Needle with all the “ends” that arrived. Hundreds feet of line were included in the donation.

“It looks like they gave us both ends of that one,” said EL Toro maintenance director Adam Karpenske while holding many masts worth of halyard line for the youth El Toro fleet. Thank you Samson! Your contribution will go a long way for our boats. 14 Shavings

May/June 2006

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Thanks to the support of over 500 individuals and businesses, our 2006 auction was an outstanding success. The generous donations from throughout the community helped us raise over $115,000 dollars to support The Center for Wooden Boats wide array of innovative, hands-on programs. A particular highlight of the evening was $30,000 in donations specifically targeted to our youth programs. A few of the many memorable quotes from the evening include: “We felt empowered by the awesome support from the community.” “The generosity shown towards the youth programs really moved me.” “It was great to see people having so much fun while supporting The Center.” The nearly 300 guests who attended the auction at The Mountaineers’ Club on March 4th included many public officials who continue to show their support for CWB as a vibrant addition to Seattle and Cama Beach. On behalf of Senator Maria Cantwell, Shakti Hawkins presented a letter supporting CWB’s contributions to the community. “With it unique methods of presenting and preserving maritime history The Center for Wooden Boats has become an integral part of the community . . . I strongly support the preservation of our maritime heritage, and applaud your efforts.” Other public officials in attendance included Seattle City Councilmembers David Della and Peter Steinbrueck, former council member Jim Compton, Port Commissioner Pat Davis, Director of Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission Rex Derr, and representatives from Seattle Parks and Cama Beach State Park. This event was a success due to the tremendous work of our volunteers whose creativity and dedication were particularly inspiring. The staff would particularly like to thank our volunteers on the auction committee, Denise Snow, Paula Weir, and Tina Renteria. We want to especially thank the organizations and businesses who supported this year’s auction through their sponsorship of the event. Orca Creative Group Holland America Lines Davis Wright Tremaine Vulcan Edensaw Northwest Yacht Brokers Association Mithun Architects Fisheries Supply Classic Yacht Association – Pacific Northwest Chapter Jensen Motor Boat Company. This year’s auction was such a success, we’re already planning the next one! Save the date of March 3, 2007 for CWB’s next exciting gala!


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The Feed and Caring of CWB Thank you for donating to CWB’s Auction 2006 ! 48 Degrees North A Layered Cake Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services Air Combat USA, Inc. Allen, Bob Anonymous, Anthony’s Restaurants Antique and Classic Boat Society Antique Lighting Company Arboretum Foundation Argosy Cruises Artswest Playhouse Axxness Hair Salon Baggywrinkle Boatworks Balabuste Catering Bay Cafe at Fishermen’s Terminal Beattie, Erin Beattie, Jake Bellingham Sailing Benham Gallery Bennett, Brian Biddle, Bill Big Picture Blue C Sushi Boatshowgallery.com Bond Family LLC Bond, Ros Bond, Ros & Marsden, Jill Bonefish Grill Boyd, Robert Brindle’s Market Buendia, Rene Burpee, Jon Cafe Flora Callihan, Ron Camaloch Golf Course Camano Sail Canlis Cape Hatteras Captain’s Nautical Supplies Car Talk Carpenter, Richard Chartier, Colleen Chateau Ste. Michelle

May/June 2006

Chihuly, Dale Christina’s Chyna Sea Ventures, Ltd. City Cellars Fine Wines Country Cottage Wine Merchants Crandell, Caren CSR Marine, Inc.

Holland America Lines Hulsizer, Elsie Humphrey, Megan Imago Inc. Island Marine Instrument Co, Inc. Ivar’s, Inc. Jensen Motor Boat

Cutty Sark Nautical Antiques CWB Volunteers Daly’s Paint & Decorating Davis, Betsy Dean, John Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley Restaurant & Night Club Discovery Modelers Education Center Diva Espresso Dolson, Daniel Dolson, David Duke’s Chowder House Dusty Strings Acoustic Music Shop Early, Bob Eastlake Bar & Grill Eisenberg, Tom Elegant Gourmet Erskine Service and Repair Everett Symphony Faatz, Brandt & Faatz, Robin Feltrup, Jim & Feltrup, Mary Freestone Inn Fuel Coffee Futurewise Gellermann, Casey Gilbert, Greg Girl Scout Troop 1044 Glanister, Chris Gould, Patrick Grupo Puntacana Hammer, Chuck Hammons, Gary Hartman, Madeline Hatley, Steve Haywood, Carol Lois Herban Feast Highline Community College History of the World Fine Arts

Johnson, Sam Jones, Kemp Kinnaman, Andrea Kirkham, Jack & Kirkham, Mary Knapp, Timothy Koch, Melissa Kolin, Richard & Kolin, Cathy Kuehne, Lauren Lake City Florist Lake Union Water Taxi Laurel Ink, Inc. Lockwood, Kathleen Lombardi’s Italian Mackay Restaurants Marine View Farms, Inc. Marklund, Len Marlow, Paul Mason, Fred Mathias, Katy Matt’s Greenwood Auto Care Matt’s in the Market Matter, Janne McCormick & Schmick’s McDaniel, Judy Merikle, Robert Meyer, Ken Middle Fork River Expeditions Miller, Pa Monsey, Steve Mosaic Media of Boulder, Colorado NICBFIT Fitness & Massage Northwest Chamber Chorus Northwest Chamber Orchestra Northwest Maritime Center Northwest Outdoor Center Novelty Hill Winery NW Folklife Olsen, Tom

Olympic Nursery, Inc Pacifica Children’s Chorus Philpott, Robert & Smith, Robin Pirate Committee Plimpton, Margaret Plimpton, Walt Ponti Seafood Grill Port Townsend Foundry Portage Bay Goods Puget Sound Sailing Institute Puget Sound Thunderbird Fleet Puget Soundkeeper Alliance Queen Anne Books Redhook Ale Brewery Co Renteria, Anthony & Renteria, Jennifer Renteria, Tina Reveal Redesign and Staging for Your Home Rich Passage Riggs, Tom & Riggs, Heather Rignel, Raymond Romeo, Judie Rosario Resort & Spa Rose Point Navigation, Inc. Rubin, Arlene Saaduuts Sailing Heritage Society Scarboro, Ann Schattaner Sails Schenken, Carrie Schooner Martha Foundation Schwan, Judy Seattle Athletic Club – Northgate Seattle Fire Department Seattle Lighting Fixture Co. Seattle Women’s Teen Challenge Serafina Silver Cloud Inn Lake Union Simple Measures Skamania Lodge Skillingstead, Jan Skillingstead, Kathi SkySmith Insurance Agency Smith Tower Snow, Denise Snow, John

Snow, Lilyan Soaring Adventures of Americ Soth, Jon and Kari Soundview Mortgage Spirit of Washington Dinner Train Starpath School of Navigation StarSail Cruises LLC Sternola-Brown Interiors Stoneway Hardware and Supply Stumbling Goat Bistro Tam, Eldon & Lamp, Bridget Tam, Elsie The Berger Partnership, P.S. The Center for Wooden Boats The Don McCune Library The Sassy Shop The Triple Door The Wood Construction Center Thiel, Philip Trade Fair Trevor Shaw Safaris U.S. Submarines, Inc University Inn Vacation Internationale Vander Goes, Catherine Velez, Vern Virginia V Foundation Wagner, Dick Wagner, Dick & Colleen Washington Water Trails Association Weir, Paula Weiss, Joan Wheeler, Bob & Wheeler, Jytte Wheeler, Jeff White, Leon WHOZYAMAMA Zydeco Band WoodenBoat Publications Woodland Park Zoo Woodmark Hotel & Spa

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Over the Bar: Phil Webber Phil was an eccentric spirit, in its fullest and happiest meaning. Everyone was a grand person in his eyes, especially women, who were always beautiful to Phil. He was a trim handsome guy with sparkling eyes and lots of wavy grey hair until the end. He was witty and charming and dressed outrageously, by design. He set new couturial standards in color, contrast, textures and pattern, from head to toe. One doesn’t often see a person wearing a pair of high quality hand made shoes, each of a different color. Phil believed in high quality social behavior, more or less, and high quality quirkiness. High quality was Phil’s work philosophy too. He began working full time as a photographer for the Post Intelligencer when he was

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19 (he started selling photos to the P.I. at age 14). Phil eventually rose to chief photographer of the P.I. until he died at age 67. Phil smoked a lot. Phil was a water rat and hung out around Lake Union. He took some great photos of our Boat Festival for the P.I. He gave us copies for

our newsletter and press kits. I once asked Phil what was the best camera. He told me the best photos are not a product of the camera, but the vision and passion of the photographer. He asked me to teach him to sail, but he never took the helm or the sheets. He said he was learning the essence of sailing by watching me and listening to me. And I learned too, how much life can be enhanced through the words and eyes of good friends like Phil. The Museum of History and Industry will be presenting the works of Phil: “History Shouts, Winks and Weeps” from April 22 to September 4, 2006.

Join Our Friends Aboard Adventuress

1010 Valley Street Seattle, WA 98109-4468 206.382.2628 • www.cwb.org • cwb@cwb.org

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit No. 1583

Shavings Volume 26 Number 2a (May-June 2006)  

The Center for Wooden Boats membership newsletter

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