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SHAVINGS J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y • 2 0 0 6 2005 at CWB -- Putting Our Collections to Work B Y

Describing what CWB does for our community is like describing the qualities of my mother’s marvelous cheesecake, it was renowned throughout the mid Atlantic Coast. I will never forget a family gathering at our home that included my aunts, uncles, cousins and grandfather Ephraim. After the dinner, my mom went into the kitchen to bring out the dessert, her hallmark cheese cake. We heard a crash of a serving platter and a groan from mom. Everyone threw back their chairs and rushed to the kitchen with their dessert plates and forks. It was the stimulating experience of m o m’s cheesec a k e t h a t triggered t h e stampede. CWB experiences a stampede too for our “cheesecake” which is hands-on maritime heritage experience for kids - in the boats and in the shop. During 2005 our youth programs served about 2000 kids from 60 school and youth centers. Pre schoolers to 6th graders wake up every morning and see the wooden toy boat they built at CWB in 2005. Those same kids also have cherished memories of their Umiak trip around Lake Union. They had learned the thrill of passage-making in a

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heritage craft powered with heritage paddles, as a team. Over 200 7th to 11th graders earned their first vessel command role on our El Toros this past year. Several of them also graduated from our advanced sailing programs using our larger sailing vessels. Some took instruction in pond model construction, longboat expedition, navigation or boatbuilding. The variety of schools and organizations that utilized our resources in 2005 is amazing, and included pre-schools, public schools, independent schools, community centers, Boys and Girls clubs, YMCAs and YWCAs, all day once a week school curriculum programs, after school programs, summer camp programs, girls spring break sailing , programs for

homeless kids, youth with ADD, Cub Scouts, interns, Girl Scouts – from about 60 youth focal points throughout Puget Sound. In 2005 we added a program of sailing, seamanship and craftsmanship for youth from the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle. Special programs were created for Pathfinder Elementar y, Tops Middle School, Morningside Academy and the 7th and 8th graders from Alternative School No. 1. During the warmer months of summer we give free rides to people afflicted with AIDS and free sailing instruction to homeless teenagers. (continued on page 5).

Inside This Issue: FOUNDER’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NEWS FROM SOUTH LAKE UNION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NEWS FROM CAMA BEACH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 UPCOMING EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 SHOPTALK: TALES FROM A LAPSTRAKE BOATBUILDING CLASS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 THE FLATTIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 BOATSHOP UPDATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 CWB FEED & CARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 CWB FEED & CARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 THE FEED AND CARING OF CWB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Shavings 1


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Volume XXVI Number 1 ISSN 0734-0680 1992 CWB The Center for Wooden Boats Shavings is published bimonthly by The Center for Wooden Boats, 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 phone 206.382.2628 fax 206.382.2699 To learn more about CWB, please visit our Web site at www.cwb.org

Our Mission

To provide a community center where maritime history comes alive and our small craft heritage is preserved and passed along to future generations.

CWB Staff

Betsy Davis Executive Director Dick Wagner Founding Director Jake Beattie Waterfront Programs Director Patrick Gould Boat Sales Manager & Instructor Eldon Tam Volunteer Coordinator & Event Manager Jean Scarboro Bookkeeper Edel O’Connor Boatwright & Workshop Coordinator Heron Scott Lead Boatwright Greg Reed Livery Manager, Dockmaster & Youth Sailing Tom Baltzell Youth Field Trip Coordinator Saaduuts Artist in Residence Geoff Braden Shipwright in Residence

Board of Trustees Alex Bennett Caren Crandell David Dolson Brandt Faatz Gary Hammons David Kennedy Andrea Kinnaman

Stephen Kinnaman Robert Merikle Lori O’Tool Barbara Sacerdote Chuck Shigley Denise Snow Bill Van Vlack

Design and production of Shavings by CWB volunteer Heidi Hackler of Dolphin Design, www.dolphindesignstudio.com. Printed by Olympus Press, www.olypress.com.

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CWB Open Tuesdays-Sundays January through April From January through April CWB will be closed on Mondays, with the exception of President’s Day and Martin Luther King Day, when we will be open and welcoming all visitors. The CWB Staff, Board and Executive Committee went through a comprehensive planning process to build the plans and budget for 2006, thanks in part to new financial planning and cash forecasting tools we now have in place. While we would all love to keep CWB open 7 days a week, we determined that it just isn’t feasible this time of year with the resources we have on hand. If you walk down to CWB on Mondays during this period, you will find the Boathouse door locked, and no staff or volunteers answering phones or email. You WILL find us here seven days a week starting in May!

CWB Livery Open Weekends & Holidays Only January through March From January 1st until April 1st the CWB livery will be open to the public only on weekends and holidays. Again, as part of our annual budgeting and planning process, CWB’s staff and board took a close look at the typical pattern of livery usage throughout the year and our expenses to run the program. We decided to prioritize our staff resources during the months when longer days and finer weather draw the crowds to our docks. If you have had a sailing instructor level checkout you are more than welcome to come down during CWB business hours, check in at the front desk and go for a sail. Other folks can use our boats to their heart’s delight on weekend and holiday days from noon to 5pm.

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No CWB Facility Rental Reservations for 2006

There are three major construction projects surrounding CWB in Seattle this year. Because there are so many unknowns about the timing and extent of the work, CWB has stopped accepting reservations to rent the Gallery. Our priority will be to use the Gallery for CWB events during 2006, such as speakers, workshops, meetings, and field trips. The construction projects will all serve the area well in the long run. Construction of the South Lake Union Streetcar begins in April, and a stop will be constructed at the current entrance to our parking lot. A new entrance will be created on the West side of the parking lot as part of this work. After the Festival this summer, construction will begin to replace the roof of the Naval Reserve Building. We currently use space in that building for offices, storage, programs, computer servers, and meetings, and we anticipate that at least some of those functions will need to move over to the Boathouse during construction. Phase I of the South Lake Union Park construction is getting underway early in 2006. The plan includes removal of the creosote dolphins in Waterway Four, which may have implications for the placement of our houseboats (and utilities)during that phase of construction.

Staff Changes at CWB Due to the major construction projects going on around us, CWB is not taking reservations for facility rentals for 2006. As a result, we’ve cut our Facilities Rental staff position. We bid farewell to Nita with appreciation of her hard work and dedication. We also want to thank Katie Kelso for her hard work and service to CWB. As a result of our budgeting plan for 2006, we cut CWB’s year-round Visitors Services position, which she has filled over the last year with lots of energy, dedication and personality.


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This Is Perfect! We evaluate ourselves by the quality of our visitors’ experiences. We believe quality of learning trumps quantity of attendance. Saturday, October 8 was just an ordinary day at CWB. That means we didn’t have any bombshell events planned. Here is a random review of who came, why they came and what they did. On every second Saturday morning of the month we give an orientation to new volunteers. We have over 650 of those saintly people who are essential in keeping us on course. On October 8 twelve recruits came aboard. Turnout for the initial training session is between 10 and 25. What brings them to CWB? This is a place where everyone feels comfortable being in a pleasant environment among a pleasant group who love good design, good craftsmanship, maritime heritage and contributing to a unique community resource. CWB had 10 youth interns this year who received training in every aspect of CWB. Some even became Junior sailing instructors. A 9 day workshop building a 16’ lapstrake rowing/sailing craft began October 8. Six adult students will build this boat designed by their instructor, Eric Hvalsoe. The day before, 4 adults completed a 3 day oar –making workshop taught by Rich Kolin. The day after the Hvalsoe workshop, Sam Johnson will give a 2 day class in bronze casting to 6 students.We provide about 100 skills workshops each year. Our goal is to preserve our maritime heritage by passing on the heritage skills. We believe direct experience is the most challenging and long lasting means of learning. On this ordinary October day volunteer boatwright Jeff Braden was restoring our 1906 steam launch Puffin. She is getting some new frames, planking, deck beams, stem and forefoot in time for her 100th birthday. CWB’s lead boatwright, Heron Scott, was overseeing the installation of the whiskey plank on a Blanchard Junior Knockabout restoration. This is the last plank. Apprentice Larry Roth, fastened it – the second broad strake on the starboard side. Larry and other volunteer interns have replaced four other planks, several

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frames and the transom. At any time there are several CWB boats being restored by staff and skilled volunteers where the public can view the process. Interns currently at the Boatshop are Amy Johnson, Brittany Corbin and Robert Posey. Several visitors walked the docks, examining every boat and reading the interpretive plaques. A few families took advantage of our boat crawling opportunities. They went aboard our larger vessels that are not ordinarily used for sailing instruction or livery. It’s hard to resist the chance to play with our exhibits and through hands-on experiences find a link to those who built and sailed them. Our livery opens at noon in the fall and winter days. By 1pm today, all the livery boats were out, cavorting on Lake Union. Six adults went forth on three boats at 11am, and six more at 1:30pm as Sail NOW! students.Each 2-hour session has one instructor and two students in each boat. CWB has been the incubator for thousands of sailors. About 200 adults graduate every year. Several SailNOW! graduates have gone on to earn Coast Guard captain licenses. Many are among the sixty-five SailNOW! sailing instructors. Sooner or later we will see some of our former students getting their Admiral stripes. From 10am till 4pm our Boathouse was packed with 40 participants for a Pacific Northwest Maritime Heritage Council meeting which we hosted. The main topic was a report from the Maritime Heritage Task Force. Their mission: “Create a vision and chart a course for a sustainable maritime heritage presence in Seattle, King County and Puget Sound.” The Task Force is made up of

government, business and maritime heritage leaders Attendees came from 28 organizations and museums in Seattle, Olympia, Tacoma, Anacortes, N. Vancouver, British Columbia, Portland, Oregon, Port Ludlow, Gig Harbor, Grays Harbor, Vancouver, British Columbia, Bellingham, Port Townsend, Steveston, British Columbia and Bainbridge Island. Five of our 154 El Toro catboats (all donated) were beating and running in a 10 knot wind. They were sailed by 5 home schoolers who were about 12 years old, from Edmonds Home School Resource Center. This was their 3rd 3hour session and their first solo sail. They are part of our After School program. Morningside Academy, a school for students with AD or ADHD, brings their 6th, 7th, & 8th grade students on Wednesdays and TOPS school comes with the same age group on Fridays. This year, to date, over 200 youth learned basic sailing and seamanship at CWB, including a spring break Sailing Camp for girls. The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle, a support organization for low income and minority families, sent youth during the summer and after school. Scholarships were given for all the youth who applied for our sailing programs. No kid is too young to have a memorable heritage experience at CWB. We provide field trips for those from pre-school through 6th grade. All build their own wooden toy boats and paddle an Aleut Umiak. Quite often this is their first tool use and boat ride experience. The total of field trip participants is annually over 2000. Hands-on history at CWB is an enjoyable experience for everyone, but the 6th through 8th graders are the most demonstrable in their enthusiasm. They are excited just to be here and learn new skills. They are lots of fun to work with. Arguably, the best explanation of what CWB is all about was expressed by one of the 12 year old home school girls on October 8th. She shouted as she zoomed past the instructor’s boat on her first solo sail: “This is perfect!”

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News from South Lake Union 200K Gift to CWB

Seattle City Councilmember Jim Compton announcing a new Maritime Heritage initiative for Seattle and King County.

Maritime Heritage Task Force Report Released At a press conference in South Lake Union park, on Tuesday December 6th, City Councilmember Jim Compton announced the final recommendations and report of the Seattle /King County Task Force on Maritime Heritage. The task force was convened in 2005 to “create a vision and chart a course for a sustainable maritime heritage presence in Seattle, King County and Puget Sound.” The two-year strategy calls for “collaborative new leadership among four successfulheritage organizations, and for activation of essential sites at North and South Lake Union. • Expanding maritime programs at South Lake Union Park - The Center for Wooden Boats. • Planning for maritime exhibits in the Naval Reserve Armory - MOHAI. • Creating a heritage shipyard at King County Metro Dock - Historic Seattle, in partnership with Coastal Heritage Alliance. • Forming a working Alliance of the four lead organizations, and other advisors, to provide continuity toward long-range goals. The report is available at: http://www.maritimeheritage.net/task_force/ 4 Shavings

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Back in 1981 the Oakmead Foundation gave CWB its first capital grant. It was used to build our first building, The Boatshop, and also to buy the shop tools and fund the restoration of about 10 boats of our collection for our first livery. Oakmead gave us our first computer, also made substantial donations to build the Boathouse, maintain our Boatshop and build our tug, Cap’n Pete. This year the Oakmead Foundation made another ground-breaking donation to CWB: $100,000 for a permanent endowment to help maintain the Boatshop and and additional $100,000 to help build our future education facilities in South Lake Union Park.

CWB Programs at the Historic Ships Wharf As a one-year pilot project, CWB has been programming two of the slips at the Historic Ships Wharf in South Lake Union Park. Visiting vessels since June have included the Schooner Lavengro, the Sea Scout ship Yankee Clipper and the m/v Westward designed by local naval architect Ted Geary. Visiting Military Vessels have included the USCG Cutter Osprey, the WWII US Army Air Force crash rescue boat P-520, and CG-83527, WWII Coast Guard Crash Boat. Contact CWB staff member Jake Beattie if you have ideas of historic vessels you’d like to see visit the Historic Ships Wharf.

New Floats at CWB

CWB’s venerable 90’ float from the Boatshop to Boathouse was built by Dick Wagner with hand tools only in 1982.

It is now being replaced by a stonger, straighter float with the work of volunteers under the direction of Brian Greene.

In November, we realized the Oarhouse needed to move, to salvage lumber from the dock floating beneath it. The hitch, however, was that it weighs an inordinate amount of incredibly stubborn and immobile pounds. After a plea for help, over ten volunteers came down to our November work party to help shift the shack from one dock to another. Primitive technology combined with collective decision making to generate success once again at CWB. Our thanks go out to all those who contributed!!!


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News from South Lake Union 2005 at CWB -- Putting Our Collections to Work C O N T I N U E D

Our family programs also fill a need. Mom, Dad and the kids build their own sailing craft at CWB in only four weekend days. Family Boatbuilding hit the trail in 2005 with sessions in Edmonds, at Camano Island State Park, and the downtown Seattle Winter Boat Show (besides the 16 built in three classes at CWB.) We broadened our outreach with more events in 2005. This year besides our annual Wooden Boat Festival, Trawler Yacht Show, Norm Blanchard Regatta, Equinoctial Ides of St Patrick’s Regatta, Pond Boat Regatta, Mothers’ Day Sailing at Camano Island, Footloose (the annual sailing regatta for physically disabled persons) and History Cruise we added the 1926 Pirate Restoration launching and Ted Geary (Pirate’s designer) show including Geary related artifacts and several Geary vessels. Other new events were a meet for the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association and a Regatta for the Ben Seaborn designed Thunderbird class, 26’ sloop.

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Our public rides and livery operations grew in numbers. Our workshops expanded exponentially in types of heritage skills. Most of the students are desk-bound bureaucrats or recently retired executives. It’s satisfying to know we provide a place where everyone can learn a practical and historical skill. New programs in 2005 included a shipwright –inresidence, a boatbuilding apprentice and three boatbuilding interns through a partnership with Seattle Central Community College Marine Carpentry School.

The word “center” in CWB is our dominant gene. It means a place for everyone. If we are not a center we are not giving the rainbow of our community education, fun adventure and sometimes life-changing experiences. We grade ourselves on the excellence of programs we provide and the diversity of our participants. Our community grades us through their support. Some examples of CWB’s recognition in 2005 are: In January of this year a Task Force was convened by King County’s 4Culture, The Association of King County Historical Organizations, Historic Seattle Preservation Society, Washington Trust for Historic Preservation and the National Park Service to “create a vision and chart a course for a sustainable maritime heritage presence in Seattle.” The report by the Task Force presented on Dec 6. recommended that The

Center for Wooden Boats be the programming lead for all maritime activities at South Lake Union Park. A “Going to Seattle” article in July 17th’s Sunday New York Times extolled CWB as one of the most exciting, attractive and unique places in Seattle. The map of the Time’s most favorite Seattle places showed our Boathouse as dominating the 600’ Space Needle! Possibly most significant during 2005 were the freely given donations from hundreds of our many friends. CWB volunteers gave us

about 30,000 hours of their energy, and by early December our combined earned and contributed revenues topped one million dollars. 2005 was indeed a year of putting CWB’s collections to work! Shavings 5


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One feature of Cama Beach was the marine railway. Customers would load themselves and their gear in the boat in the Boathouse, and then ride down the tracks. They arrived at morning high tide and were expected to return at evening high tide. This reduced the time of launching and retreiving and the boat manager could use the inbetween time for boat maintenance.

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were economical but of minimal power. The inboard boats went about 3-5 knots. In addition to activitating the Cama Beach Boathouse with programs and traditional boat maintenance projects, CWB will help interpret the history of the marine railway for visitors. This may include building a model of the railway system, showing photographs and possibly video of its use, and exhibiting the remaining railway artifacts.

The Boatman’s railway operation room at Cama Beach State Park.

The most popular boats were the rowing skiffs. You didn’t need to go far for fishing and they could easily be landed on a beach for a picnic. The outboard skiffs were also popular, but you needed to bring your own outboard motor. There were lockers at the Boathouse so you could leave your motor there year-round. The inboard engine boats were good for large groups. They had a air cooled engines that

March/April Shavings Contributors: Jake Beattie • Dave Erskine • Lauren Kuehne • Greg Reed Heron Scott • Dick Wagner

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Camano Island State Park Ranger Tom Riggs holds the Cama Boat yoke. This was lowered from the overhead steel track to hitch on the boat needed to be launched, raise the boat and set it on the launching rail car.

Environmental Preservation Camano Island is fast becoming a nature preserve. The island is now one of 10 National Backyard Wildlife Habitats, certified by the National Wildlife Foundation. The 511 Camano properties included residences, business areas, a demonstration garden at Elger Bay Elementary School as an integral part of the curriculum, demonstration gardens at Four Springs Lake Preserve, the Camano Community Center, Camano Island State Park, Cama Beach State Park and the 297 nest heron colony. By using native plants these habitats provide food, water, cover, a place to raise young and corridors for wildlife. The Cama Beach road and parking areas construction required transplanting of native ferns, which can live for 50 years. The ferns have been replanted at their original location. Non-native plants have been removed at Cama Beach except for some exotic plants in the cabin area that were planted when Cama Beach Resort was built. Kristoferson Creek is Camano’s only salmon run. The creek flows into Port Susan on the east side of Camano Island. Island County Conservation Futures have recently purchased Camano properties, including Iverson Spit Preserve, portions of Four Springs Preserve and the Heronry. Conservation Futures have examined the creek and its Triangle Cove estuary. In the winter of 2004 over 100 adult Chum Salmon returned to Kristoferson to spawn. This year juvenile Chum and Chinook salmon were documented in this creek. Conservation Futures has applied to Island County to purchase 2.5 acres on both sides of a 200 foot stretch of the creek. This would be for protection and restoration, public viewing and educational programs about the Camano salmon. At this time, members of the human species are still acceptable occupants of Camano Island, but only if they tread lightly.


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Third Friday Speaker Restoring and Running Unlimited Hydroplanes Friday, January 20, 2006 7:00 p.m. CWB Boathouse

David Williams, Executive Director of the Hydroplane and Raceboat Museum, Seattle’s other hands-on museum, will give a talk on their really, really fast classic wooden boats. Williams will give a review of how the hydroplanes evolved, how the museum came to be, how the restoration work is done and how these historically significant engineering marvels are being displayed.

Cruising Barkley Sound Friday, February 17, 2006 7:00 p.m. CWB Boathouse

Elsie and Steve Hulsizer have cruised to Barkley Sound from Seattle 18 times, beginnin in 1980. Barkley Sound, on the west side of Vancouver Island is a wonderland of coves, Streams, fiords, inlets and uninhabited iislands. The slide talk will be about Elsie and Steve’s many voyages in several sailing vessels. Besides passages to Barkley they sailed from Boston to Seattle via Hawaii in their 32’ Chesapeake sloop. Elsie has written a book of their sailing expeditions: Voyages to Windward, beautifully illustrated by Elsie’s photographs. Copies will be for sale.

Northwest Radio Controlled Ship Modelers

CWB Auction March 4 2006 Celebrating Maritime Heritage -- Three Decades Strong Saturday, March 4, 2006 5:00 - 10:00 p.m. The Mountaineers Club 300 3rd Avenue W.

Save the Date!

We’re already gearing up for our 2006 Annual Celebration and Fundraising Auction. It’s going to be bigger and better than ever, with the help of all our generous friends and enthusiastic volunteers. Our goal is to raise more than $100K to help fund our many exciting

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We hope that you’ll want to participate by donating an item (http://www.cwb.org/AuctionDonation.htm) or helping out with auction preparations. To learn more, call the Center at (206) 382-2628. For ticket purchases, visit our CWB store (http://cwb.org/store/).

Discovery Modelers Calendar of Events The Discovery Modelers Education Center provides classes, workshops and seminars in the skills and techniques of building ship models of all kinds. All classes are held at Room 239, Armory Bldg., South Lake Union Maritime Heritage Center (860 Terry Ave. N., Seattle 98109. For more info or to register, call Colleen Wagner, 206-282-0985, or email discoverymodelers@yahoo.com.

Sundays - January 9, February 5, March 5

Members of Northwest Radio Controlled Ship Modelers will be at CWB on successive Sundays, racing their varieties of boats around the docks at CWB from noon to 3:00 p.m. This is a fun event to watch - the public is welcome!

and growing programs, including those that serve at-risk youth. This year’s event is being held at the Mountaineers Club. It’s going to be a night of great food, music and the best auction items in town!

CWB Annual Meeting

Sharpie Schooner Workshop Date:

January 29, 2006 (Saturday)

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12:30 – 3:30 pm

He’s done the Swift Pilot Boat and the Chesapeake Bay Flattie. Now Instructor Harvey Nobe wants to turn his hands – and yours – to the creation of the Sharpie Schooner, a two-master with lovely lines and a beautiful finished presentation. We’ll do this one just like previous kit workshops: a three-hour introductory class and then monthly workshops to get help with problems, show off progress and exchange ideas and tips. The first class and the kit are $55; monthly workshops are $3 each (pay as you go). Limited to 6.

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Maritime Skills Programs Shop Talk: Instructor and Students Six students, led by Boatwright Eric Hvalsoe built a lapstrake boat at CWB in October. The class was organized by Edel O’Connor, CWB’s workshop coordinator. Here you’ll find comments from both the instructor and students about the class.

Noah was given forty days to build the ark. Bob, Barry, Richard, Fred, Tim and Mike faced the task of planking and framing a sophisticated lapstrake hull in nine days. Not just any boat mind you, but MY boat, a Hvalsoe 16. At 16 feet, something more than what you might think of as a dinghy. A backbone, nine strakes, twenty one ribs, nine days. You must be kidding. My job was to convey skills to these six individuals that were twenty five years in the making for me. Typically, the boatbuilding experience of the participants ranged from nil to only vaguely applicable to the task at hand. Talk about starting out at a disadvantage.

The crew threw themselves into it. We all pulled very hard at the oars. Because something so extraordinary was taking place we could do nothing but pull hard. I brought a strongback and molds and patterns, slabs of mahogany for the transom and stem, apitong for the keel, and an intimate knowledge of this particular boat. I also came with the determination to get out a good product, despite the inexperience of the crew. In two days we had the backbone set up, one garboard on the third day. The sheer planks went on five days later. That is eighteen planks, nine spilings, and no wasted cedar. These were long days, an achievement to test one’s stamina, patience, concentration, and good sense of humor. This gang grew a boat from a pile of lumber. I poked and gently prodded them, pointing 8 Shavings

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out the highlights and the lowlights. I touched up laps and lent a discriminating eye to the battens. To badly paraphrase one student’s comment at the end of the week, my commitment to quality was crystal clear, and still each student found their own way through to the end of the week. Taken as a whole, the comment was the highest praise I could hope for as an instructor. This was a journey and I expect everyone found something valuable along the way. Our backs were covered by a special and very busy staff person to whom we all express our thanks. This ‘band of brothers for a week’ did a fine job of building a boat. They ought to have a few stories to share with Noah. Eric Hvalsoe, Instructor

What a great way to begin a retirement! Spending nine days learning from a craftsman whose pursuit of excellence was abundantly evident and whose patience was biblical. The hand on experience of building a beautifully designed wooden boat with other eager participants was priceless. I knew nothing about lap strakes, steam boxes, clench nails, keels, gains, beveling. Garboard? What’s a garboard? Isn’t that Greta’s last name? Now I look at wooden boats with deeper appreciation. I have some idea as to the detail and excellence that goes into their construction. Will I build one myself here in the desert of southern Arizona? I have thought about it! Many thanks to the Center for Wooden Boats for providing the opportunity, I hope to return. With experiences like this, retirement is not overrated. Fred Wood.Tucson, Arizona

The lapstrake boatbuilding class was a great experience. Eric’s knowledge and skill along with his patient instruction helped us to understand the process. His emphasis on precision and attention to detail taught us to take the time to do things right and not be satisfied with less than our best. We came a long way in nine days as a boat building team, only making Eric’s knees buckle a few times with things like bevel angles that were off, bent nails, split wood, etc. The Hvalsoe 16’ is a thing of beauty! Thanks Eric and CWB, I’ll be back for more Barry Patterson. Woodinville, WA.


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Maritime Skills Programs The Lapstrake Boatbuilding Workshop was a great experience! The nine days went very fast. We started with a pile of wood, and ended with a beautiful sixteen foot hull, and the expectation that it will be a fine finished boat in the future. We had every opportunity to learn what there is to know about such a project from a master teacher. He was thorough, exacting, and he had a kind heart when his students demonstrated skills not yet at their peak. A group class is a great way to learn. The group was six guys from very different backgrounds. I learned almost as much from them as I did from Eric. I may or may not try to build a boat like this in the future, but now I know how it is done. Bob Kremers, Seattle

The Center for Wooden Boats is a refreshing change from any other maritime organization I have ever come in contact with. It seems truly dedicated to spreading its message to anyone who wants to hear it. Not just the gentry, like you would run into at most places. Eric Hvalsoe gave us as much practical information as we could handle, as well as always remaining patient while we tortured some very expensive pieces of wood. My fellow students were a great mix of professions, who were all pulling in the same direction…to give us the confidence and basic knowledge to build our own wooden boats. My thanks to all the people who made this happen. Richard Jagoe, Calgary, Alberta .

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After 30 yrs of sailing I caved to my wife and bought a plastic gas-guzzler. Well she’s happy with it and I kind of like it too. But that urge to sail still hangs on so I figured why not build a sailing dinghy. Hey people have been building boats for thousands of years how hard can it be. Well it doesn’t take long when you start to research plans that there may be more to this craft then remodeling your basement. After attending a watercolor workshop at the CWB I saw a notice for a lapstrake boat-building course. Hey that sounded like just the thing to find out if I could do it. Eric’s class had 6 guys 4 of which were retired all with the same basic idea, build a boat. One person in the class was professional mechanic and another had built his own house but it was clear we were all novice boat builders. Eric had his work cut out for himself, which he handled professionally with no B.S. and a clear focus on the job ahead. People would ask, “are you having fun” well like any education it’s not always fun. It is sometimes complicated sometimes tedious and yes sometimes fun. Well in the overview I must say in 8 days I learned more then any 8 days of my life. The tools of the trade and how to properly use them. Learning nature of wood used in boat building. Spiling, so who ever heard of that? Well I have now and I’m glad I did. The boat we build is a work of art much like a sculpture in wood and Eric Hvalsoe is truly an artist and craftsman. I would recommend this class to anyone with the time and inclination. In conclusion I think the lofting class would be a good prerequisite. Mike Corcoran, Sumner,WA.

I was seated at my desk when I read in Shavings that Eric Hvalsoe’s lapstrake boatbuilding class was nine days long. Wow, I thought, that’s quite a commitment. Then my eyes wandered out beyond my cubicle and into my bosses office. In retrospect, perhaps nine days is a bit short. Men and women who work in offices should take a little time off to build Eric’s pretty little 16 footer. I worked hard in this class, as did my five classmates, and I learned a lot from Eric about boatbuilding. And while I’m sure that those who took the class could now build their own boat if they wished, the best part of the class was my realization that together we made something that will exist longer and likely mean more than anything I would have accomplished in those days of work that I missed. Be like me. Skip work. Build a boat. You know you want to. Tim Yeadon. Seattle.

To get information about our workshops for 2006, go to www.cwb.org or phone us and we’ll be happy to mail you our 2006 Program Catalogue.

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C o l l e c t i o n The Flattie B Y

I had a mental image of a Flattie as a waterborne rocket. That was back in the summer of 1957. Many of my friends were involved with sailing. I was brought along on races and weekend cruises as moveable ballast. None of the boats I sailed were re m o t e l y close to a rocket. Now that I was being introduced to sailing I regularly checked the sports section of the morning Post Intelligencer and evening Times. Their sports pages had more news about sail racing than anything else. There were lots of repeat winners in the race reports but the winner in the weekly Flattie class was almost always Felix Moiteret and his Flattie Whippet. I was working at Boeing as an architect and Felix was a superintendent of my architect group. Eventually I felt confident enough in sailing to ask him how he always won. There was a 3 second pause and he said, as if he was responding to a “how do I walk” question: “I just let Whippet do what she was designed for.” After that Moiteret and I only spoke architectese. It took me 40 years to understand what Felix meant. I was interviewing Norm Blanchard about the history of Blanchard Boat Company. He was giving me the company chronology since his dad, N.J. Blanchard started building boats in 1900. Norm got to 1928 when his dad gave him his first lead project, lofting the first Flattie, and the wisdom of Felix finally made sense. This is the story Norm told me: In the fall of 1927 a tragic event happened 10 Shavings

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on Lake Washington. A group of teenagers attempted to sail across the lake on a cold stormy day with white frothed waves abeam. Their open 23’ Star boat capsized-sunk and four of the six youth drowned. The Seattle Yacht Club began examining the small craft that were at their docks and decided a new type of boat was needed for youth sail training; open and unsinkable. In 1928 notices were distributed to naval architects for proposals. The SYC boat selection committee listened to many presentations. Ted Geary gave one of them. Geary had a well-deserved reputation as a designer of extreme sail racing vessels and elegant motor yachts in the 100 ton category. SYC eyebrows must have risen when they heard Ted Geary had designed a modest sail trainer, and Geary must have anticipated that because he asked to be the last to present and he began “I want you to understand this is not a boat you can sit in and watch the ducks swim by.” Ted Geary came up with a plan that was too good to refuse. It appeared to be a simple 18’, flat bottom, transom sterned boat. It was inexpensive to build, would not sink but would be fast to sail because of its hull proportions (low freeboard reducing windage, narrow bottom, reducing drag). To get the best balance the Flattie had a mast and inboard rudder that could easily be adjusted fore and aft. SYC selected the design. The well-regarded boatbuilder, N.J. Blanchard had already built many Geary designs. He had seen the plans before the S.Y.C. had reviewed them and was so confident it would be the chosen boat that he asked his 17 year old son, Norm, to loft the first Flattie. (To loft means laying out a full size working drawing of the lines and contours of a boat’s hull.) N.J. offered to build the first 10 for $150 (ready to sail) and following orders for $200.

Blanchard built 29 Flatties in the first two years. He also sold kits with pre cut Douglas fir frames, red cedar planking and decking. Over 100 kits were sold by Blanchard. It turned out the kits were more profitable than the built boats. The popularity of the Flatties was that they were fast, inexpensive and with the flat bottoms, could be hauled up on a float. Their competition, the Stars, cost more and because of their fixed keel, had to be left on a mooring. The Flattie was both fast because of its hull shape and also stable because its beam was carried almost full length – with the same beam 4/5 of the length. It is unsinkable because of its great stability and wide decks. Flatties are now called Geary 18’s for good reason. Geary made a simple, safe, flat bottom skiff that was a water-borne rocket.

Flattie For Sale at CWB This Flattie was unearthed from a garage on Mercer Island. It’s been in suspended animation for the past 40 years, and is in surprisingly good shape. It does need some attention, but would be a worthy project. We would really like this boat to go to an individual or an organization that has an appreciation for Northwest small craft and the means to restore it. Our ideal scenario would involve a volunteer restoring the boat for use in our programs, but we’re open to any ideas you might have.


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This fall brought two new interns from SCCC down to the Center. Brittany Corbin, in her fourth quarter in the boatbuilding program and Rob Posey, in his third quarter, can be found down her on Thursdays and Fridays. Both are working on the nearly completed Blanchard JR. in the Seaport yard. Brittany is installing original deck hardware and new gitoba rub guards and Rob is just finishing a laminated red cedar skeg. If you haven’t been by lately to see the progress on that BJK, it’s worth a visit. In October we put the final plank on, what is traditionally known as the whiskey plank, and now the detail work has begun. All the fairing, caulking, and painting will keep us warm during the coming cold and if you’d like to learn about this process of boat construction, this a great project to check out. On your next visit to the boatshop, be sure to stop by the dry dock to watch the continuing restoration of the Puffin. The Puffin is our one hundred year old wood fired steam launch that is used for various programs, including public sails every Sunday. She is carvel construction with white cedar planking on white oak frames. For her age she’s in remarkably good shape, but over time the hull itself has spread open under the considerable load of the boiler. This has caused numerous cracks and opening in the deck and coamings which have in turn allowed fresh water leaks in deck of the vessel. As we’ve opened her up we’ve found this fresh water has caused rot to develop in many places, from the hood ends of decking, deck beams and the sheer clamp to the coamings and covering boards. Another major problem we found was the degredation of the stem knee. Basically, the stem knee is the piece of wood the connects the stem to the keel. CWB shipwright Geoff Braden laminated two pieces of African mahogany together to create the stock for the stem knee and has already installed the new knee with the help of Amy Johnson, another Seattle Central Community College intern. Together they are January/February 2006

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Amy Johnson, one of CWB’s interns from the Marine Carpentry program at Seattle Central Community College is helping on the restoration of Puffin, CWB’s 100 year old wood-fired steam boat.

working on replacing several oak frames just aft of the stem, and soon will be replanking the foredeck with white oak, as well as installing the original covering boards and coamings and opening up the stern. So come on by, this is a great chance to see the structural degradation of a 100 year old boat, and some of the tricks we boatbuilders use to bring her back together (think lots of Dutchmen). Here are some of the upcoming projects for the boatshop: • Planking over Puffin’s foredeck • Rigging the black Beetle cat • Hauling out the Hvalsoe 13’ to fix a leaky centerboard trunk • Hauling out the Sid Skiff for annual maintenance If you’re interested in working on any of these projects or general boatshop volunteering, please contact Heron Scott, CWB Lead Boatwright.

CWB’s Shipwright in Residence

Geoff Braden has completed the new bow deck beams and framing for the steam boat cockpit coaming of Puffin. Geoff is a Journeyman Shipwright who comes to CWB’s staff with over 30 years experience in the trade. He provides guidance and oversight to our interns and apprentices, and provides practical advice to visitors based on years of experience. Shavings 11


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C o l l e c t i o n Chopsticks and seine twine: ingredients for an Umiak B

Building an umiak is a very organic process. Unlike “traditional” boatbuilding the shape tweaks and morphs throughout the different stages of construction. This is both fun and a challenge, but we liked to think our method of building didn’t differ too much from how they where done thousands of years ago in the Aleutian islands. There are some obvious differences though. For one, the skin is definitely not that of a walrus but rather ballistic nylon commonly used as the first layer in bulletproof vests, not so commonly used in the modern construction of “skin” boats. And for sealing it we used a two part polyurethane compound used to finish asphalt in parking garages. Applying this was akin to putting epoxy onto fiberglass but much

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heavier and with a faster cure time. It took all of us three solid hours to put four even coats on and by that time the “goop” had become unworkable. The boat is basically held together with two things: dowels and lashings. For lashing we use a product called seine twine. It’s a syn-

thetic line treated with tar, very strong and durable, and all of us wrapped our fingers with duct tape to prevent the stuff from biting into are skin as we went about all the various lashings in the vessel. For dowels we often used small bamboo chopsticks, complete with either red or green Chinese letters. Larger components of the frame, like the stringers, were pegged with mahogany or yellow cedar dowels. One of the unique things about this boat is there’s not a metal fastening in it’s entirety. How many 27’ boats can claim that? To learn more about the umiak building process and to see a photo gallery of the building process log onto our website ,www.cwb.org, or visit the Skin Boat School website www. skinboats.com.

Out with the old and in with the “Numiak” B This November CWB sent a six person crew to Cory Freedman’s skin boat school in Anacortes, Washington to build an umiak. I inherited our current umiaks last February when I was hired on as the field trip coordinator. It didn’t take long for me to become worried about their condition. One was dubbed the “leakyak” for obvious reasons, and the other has marginal wood and lashings, degraded from ten years in the sun and rain of the Puget Sound. By the end of the summer, shipwright Heron Scott and I had begun discussing building a new boat. We decided to replace the two questionable umiaks with one solid, reliable boat. Those

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who helped with the building would become part of a crew of individuals who could educate the public and keep up with maintenance on our umiaks and biadarkas. In addition, we wanted to alter the design slightly on the new boat. Previous umiaks had a lot of windage, so we lowered the freeboard on the new one. As a result the new boat will not get blown around as much and it will be easier for kids to reach the water with paddles. The umiak is a crucial part of the field trip program at CWB. Built by the Aleut people for the last 5000 years or more to hunt big sea mammals in the Bering Sea, umiaks are stout and stable “skin on frame” craft and they are

made to hold tons of weight (literally). Thus they become perfect high occupancy water craft for use on the lake. The umiak can easily fit 15 to 20 elementary school aged youth on board for a paddle around Lake Union. Since last February, over 1800 kids have been exposed to the lake via the umiak. A paddle in the umiak is a dynamic experience. Groups may see wild life, sea planes, and variety of other water craft. They also interact with each other as a team of paddlers. For some it is the first experience on a boat, for many it is the first time on Lake Union, and for most it is the first time encountering a native style skin on frame craft and native style paddles. Everyone leaves with some new knowledge or experience, and that is a success for the center. I look forward to having the experience enriched by our new umiak and my own new knowledge about its creation.


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H a i d a C a n o e The Center for Wooden Boats is pleased to host Haida carver Saaduuts as our Artist in Residence. Saaduuts recently completed carving The Spirit of Peace at The Center for Wooden Boats and South Lake Union Park in Seattle. The canoe was then trucked to Hydaburg, the hometown of Saaduuts. From there, Saaduuts and his Haidi family paddled the canoe to a Tlingit village, Klawock. Hydaburg is gifting a new log to The Center for Wooden Boats which Saaduuts will be carving over the next year. That canoe will be named the Steven Philipps and will be used in programs at The Center for Wooden Boats. The village of Klawock will be gifting an Honor Pole to Saaduuts and The Center for Wooden Boats and Alternative School #1 as a thank you for the canoe. The Honor Pole will arrive in Seattle during August.

2006 Programs Sneak Preview CWB is proud to annouce CWB’s new Program Catalogue for 2006. Several new classes and new instructors complement the old favorites. View online at cwb.org or phone us at CWB 206-382-2628 if you’d like to receive a printed copy.

Restoring the Shrimpo: Herreshoff 12 ½ rebuilding Instructor: Eric Dow Date: March 27-31. (Monday thru Friday) Time: 10:00 AM TO 6:00 PM Cost: $550 members / $625 non-members

This traditional Haida dougout canoe was at The Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle

SailNOW! for Women carved

Cedar Bark Potlatch Pouch: Traditional Twining with Native Fibres. Instructors: Laura Wong Whitebear & Carol Emarthle-Douglas Session 1: May 18 (Thursday) Session 2: November 10 (Friday) Time: 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM Cost: $65 members/ $80 non-members

SailNOW! for families Dates: May 6 to June 10. Cost: 280 per adult / $135 child (under 14)

SailNOW! for Women The Spirit of Peace arrives at the shore of Klawock on August 16, 2005. The village celebrated the arrival of the canoe with a potlatch.

Dates: April 1 – May 6 Cost: $300 members / $330 non-

Reflections from Saaduuts. As the Artist in Residence at The Center for Wooden Boats, I am happy to invite people to participate in our program of Carving Cultural Connections. My goal is to keep our families connected and for all of us to learn about what we can each do to take care of our Earth Mother. We gifted this canoe to the Klawock people and family for healing and for keeping families connected. I look forward to starting the next canoe and meeting all the people who want to visit and participate in the project.

January/February 2006

How to Feed Your Crew ...and shipboard life

Instructor: JoAnn O’Connor Dates: March 30 & April 6 Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM (at CWB) TBA-Overnight transit trip aboard the Zodiac Cost: $300 members / $350 non-members

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The Feed and Caring of CWB Bon Jour Martine B

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Martine Roudier, a new CWB member, comes from pirate country. Although she has salt water in her veins, Martine is more inclined to help, on land or sea, rather than plunder. Martine is from the Brittany coast of France on the English Channel, home port for the corsairs, which is a politically and poetically correct term in French for pirates. All the waterside bistros of Martine’s hometown of St. Malo have art work of the classic corsair vessels. She was brought up playing with boats. The family vessel was a 21’ lapstrake double ender of Norwegian vintage, sloop rigged. The Norse Vikings not only raided the French coasts, but some stayed behind in Brittany and Normandy, probably teaching the raid and plunder business to the natives. So the Norwegian-French connection is not unique. At any rate, Martine got the traditional boat virus early on. She remembers her first single-handed experience very clearly. At age 16 Martine was given sole responsibility for sailing Galley, the family sloop, from a cradle in the harbor to her mooring in the marina. Between tides she scrubbed the bottom and topsides and at high tide slipped off the cradle and sailed to the moorage as captain and crew. An achievement any kid would proudly remember. Since those carefree summers at St Malo, sailing, fishing, crabbing, Martine received her Doctorate in Pathology and migrated to the French island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbe-

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an. Yet another old pirate and rum homeport. Martine continued pathology research (the diagnosis of changes caused by disease in tissues) there and she also rented a sailboat. Due to the prevailing winds, trips to Les Saintes, French West Indies required close hauled sailing from Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe. Martine obtained a captain’s power boat license and thus cut the voyage time in half. In 2000 Martine moved to Seattle. Rumrunners were our minor pirate footnote in history, but we do have cutting-edge facilities for pathological research. This was the carrot that lured Martine. Once here she discovered Brittany all over again. It was CWB, with its collection of classic wooden boats and the friendly, energetic staff and volunteers who keep the operation going. When Martine joined CWB she inquired about our logo, the sailing gillnetter. As any scientist should, she researched its historic significance. Then putting hands and mind together, as anyone participating in a CWB event should, she designed and cast 30 silver gillnetter pins. Martine has donated these pins to CWB and we will give them to the first 30 donors of $2000 (or more) to our Annual Appeal. Martine is now on track to achieve another document, her U.S. citizenship. With that and her U.S. built 1927 power cruiser, Zella C, we expect to hear of her adventures voyaging in our Pacific Northwest. Whether its pirates or pathology, she will have some interesting stories. Au revoir.

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GOT YOUR ATTENTION? NOW, LET’S SPEAK TO THE ISSUE. . . Spring saw the demise of our pick-up due to old age and many miles on highways and rutted trails to gypo mills. We managed to get through the summer with a borrowed vehicle. Thank you generous loaner of the Ram 1500. For the long term we need a CWB-owned replacement, a stalwart, multitasking, flexible and handsome representative of its type. (Is this a truck or a subject of a personals ad?) OK, a 1/2 or3/4 ton conventional pickup, a tow hitch, reliable drive train and good maneuverability in the city. An alternative would be a large van. We need a roof rack in order to haul the long lumber needed for the shop. A roomy cab will allow us to carry the bulk mailings and pick up supplies for the Boat House. This truck will need to carry boats and gear, the yearly movement of festival setup supplies and, many times a year, to fetch wood from those back road mills for making toy boats. With many programs for the public, kids projects and outreach to diverse community groups we need a good road transportation system. I pledge to spearhead the truck’s maintenance and upgrade committee, but any help from the membership would be welcome. Donations of money, or a truck itself, is tax deductible.


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I don’t recall when exactly I first met Martin. I probably saw him hanging around the docks at the Center for Wooden Boats, doing stuff that I did when I first volunteered there: pumping bilges, painting, and sanding, varnishing CWB boats. He’d stop by on occasion and we’d talk about our favorite subject--wooden sailboats, and in particular, my Friendship sloop, Amie. Martin had spent some time on the east coast and had sailed quite a few races around Boston and New England, so we certainly had a common bond in the Friendship Sloop. Of course, he wanted to go out on Amie, and, of course, I wanted to go sailing on Amie too. I found Martin to be an excellent sailor. He had spent much time sailing Marconi rigs, but he was interested and eager to learn more about sailing a gaffer. Since I wasn’t (and still am not) an expert at sailing them, it was fun to learn more together. Martin was one of the first sailors on Amie that knew not to pinch the boat going to weather. I never had to ask him to let the main out and sail more of a reach than close hauled. He understood the fine art of the controlled gybe, something not everybody grasps. We had many good sails together. Then he asked if he could help me work on the Amie! No major work, but the day to day care and feeding of your basic 25 year old wooden sailboat. I’d come down on the weekend to do a project, only to find it done by Martin-and done well. I’d offer to pay him for his services, but all he ever wanted to do was to go sailing. He brought his wife, Ann, down, and the three of us would often go out, just for a pleasant day sail. The 3 of us would also sail the occasional race on Lake Union. We had many grand times finishing last, just enjoying our time out on the water. As time went on, Martin’s skills and helpfulness became well known at the Center for Wooden Boats. He would teach sailing January/February 2006

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lessons, help families build their own boats, take school children and youth at risk out for sailing excursions. There wasn’t a thing he was asked to do that he wouldn’t do. All this time he still helped maintain Amie. On rare occasion he asked to take Amie out when I wasn’t available. (Of course I’d let him take Amie out--Martin was a better sailor than I any day of the week). He was thrilled when he’d take her out, and gushed with praise for her when he’d come back. About three years ago I was sidelined for six months with back trouble. Not only did I get constant cheering from Martin and Ann, but I’d get blow-by-blow progress on keeping Amie up. A year later, when I had Amie hauled, Martin was there to help take the boat to the yard, and helped sand and paint. When we found some bad caulking on a garboard seam, Martin said “I’ve never caulked before, but I’m willing to try”. He stayed till about 8:00 on that Saturday night to put in about three feet of caulking. Amie has not leaked since. We were all saddened when we found that Martin and Ann were leaving town for a new job in the San Francisco bay area. Nonetheless, we kept in close touch, emailing and visiting when either they were up in Seattle or we were in the Bay area. We had a wonderful time with them earlier this summer when Martin showed us the yacht club where he taught sailing. This past week we found that Martin had passed away suddenly. He apparently had a seizure and drowned after a wonder evening sail with Ann and friends. He would have been 42 in October. The Sequoia yacht club in Redwood City, CA held a memorial service for Martin. We held one at the Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle. Although I could not be in both places at once, I’m sure there wasn’t a dry eye at either service.

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If the answer to the above question is yes and you participate in the Employees Community Fund (previously known as “BEGNF”), you can, without any additional personal cost, significantly increase your financial support of CWB. The Employees Community Fund (ECF) gives donors the ability to direct where their contributions go, either to multiple beneficiaries or to a single one. This is known as “positive designation” and to take advantage of it only requires the filling out of a few simple forms available to you on the Boeing web. Any 501(c) 3 corporation is eligible to receive ECF funds and CWB is registered as an entity eligible under this program. Once these forms are filled out designating your contributions to go to CWB, funds are sent automatically to CWB from the ECF office. The form will ask for CWB’s organization number, and that number is 50825. The best part about taking advantage of positive designation is that it will result in a 10-30 fold increase in the amount you contribute to CWB over what your membership fee provides. For more information on the details of positive designation as well as the form you need to designate to CWB, here is the Boeing web address: https://wsso-prod.ca.boeing.com/wssologin10.html. For you members that have friends or family that have recently joined CWB or are thinking about joining, let them know this option is out there for Boeing employees; every little bit helps.

Such is the legacy of a true friend and sailor who did so much for so many.

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Buy a Boat from The Center for Wooden Boats ! Alpha One sailboat: 14’x5’6” Nice little boat that’s very similar to a 420. Comes with good sails, dagger board, rigging and rudder. $450

William Garden double ended sloop Victoria: Strip planked red cedar hull in great condition. She’s a able little cruiser that could take you to the San Juans, Alaska, or around the world if you wanted. Her cozy cabin makes her a great potential live-a-board. $19,995 1948 Fairliner Sedan Cruiser: A rare and desirable Puget Sound powerboat. She needs to be rebuilt but would be one of the most unique boats in the area. $750 Historic Flattie. (See article page 10.)

1010 Valley Street Seattle, WA 98109-4468 206.382.2628 • www.cwb.org • cwb@cwb.org

1968 Fairliner flybridge: New engine installed and runs, but needs some work to complete installation. Solid hull, and otherwise solid boat that’s halfway through an updating. Take advantage of the low price on this diamond in the rough. $2995 1999 12’ Skiff: Built to professional standards by an employee of the Nexus Boatbuilding company as his personal boat. Comes with 2000 King Trailer and 2000 Honda 8hp four stroke outboard engine. $2500 1942 Atkin gaff rigged cutter: Twenty Eight feet of salty charm. Two cylinder universal diesel, wood stove, full canvas cover, and a cozy cabin. $4000.

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CWB Annual Auction and Fundraiser: Celebrating Maritime Heritage – Three Decades Strong Saturday, March 4th 2006 The Mountaineers’ Club 300 Third Ave West Seattle, WA Doors open at 5pm.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of The Center for Wooden Boats! One of the highlights of this year will be our annual celebration and auction on Saturday, March 4, 2006. Come support CWB and our exciting youth programs by… DONATING items to our silent and live auction. We accept a wide range of items including maritime goods and services, gift certificates, event tickets, wine packages, and unique experiences. This is also a great way to promote your business or organization! 100% of the proceeds from the silent and live auction goes to support The Center! VOLUNTEERING your time. We need help procuring items, planning the celebration, and running the auction itself. Your donation of time helps us maximize our fundraising efforts! ATTENDING the auction. This is a wonderful evening of delicious food, good friends, and a lot of fun. Tickets are $80 (members)/$100 (general) or $800 for a table of ten. Over 1/3 of our auction tickets are already sold! Reserve your spot today! For additional information on any of these opportunities, visit us at cwb.org , or contact our auction coordinator, Eldon Tam, at (206) 382-2628 eldon@cwb.org.

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit No. 1583

Shavings Volume 26 Number 1 (January-February 2006)  

The Center for Wooden Boats membership newsletter

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