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SHAVINGS M A R C H / A P R I L • 2 0 0 5

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Photo credit: Colleen Chartier

Ask any elementary school kid their favorite class and the majority will say “recess”. At CWB, the classes for kids and adults are always recess. The fun part of elementary school was the games we played, using teamwork and strategy to win. That experience is the core of our workshops. Students use the organization department of their brain, the sensory awareness department and their hands, all at once. Recess was great because it stimulated mind and body. Find the fun of recess again through CWB’s programs. We have completed the 2005 Programs Catalogue to make sure everyone can find a heritage maritime skill that fits their needs or fantasies. The Catalogue includes classes in Boatbuilding and Woodworking, Sailmaking, Rigging and Knotwork, Foundry and Maritime Arts, Sail and Steam Seamanship, Navigation, Voyaging and Youth Programs.

Contributions to funding this 32 page catalogue was made by FESTOOL, EDENSAW WOODS and FISHERIES SUPPLY. To get a copy, pick one up at CWB or ask us to mail you a copy. We would appreciate a donation to help defray the printing costs. Or check our website: www.cwb.org.

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The heart and soul of CWB are its educational programs and activities. We believe that direct experience is the most challenging and longest lasting means of learning.

To do is to learn. To have fun while doing is even more effective. CWB invites all members of our community to experience the magic of being on the water and the satisfaction of learning a new skill. These experiences provide a wider dimension of enrichment for every visitor. In addition to providing access to the water, we also invite our community to participate in stewardship of the boats, in telling our maritime stories, and in caring for the lake itself. Jeff Scott, once of our extraordinary volunteers reflects that “the volunteer community is not a supplement to staff, or to the museum; rather that community is part of the living museum experience, just as much the boats and the water.” Page 5 lists our upcoming events and pages 6 and 7 list our upcoming classes and workshops. But this is only the tip of the iceberg. In addition to these events are the over 90 adult workshops, ever-changing working exhibits, school tours, summer camps, youth sailing and seamanship, sailing for homeless youth, sailing for people living with AIDS and the countless unscheduled hands-on experiences our volunteers and visitors encounter. CWB’s world is a project in process. And more than likely, each visitor will leave with an “ah-ha” memory.

Inside This Issue:

FOUNDER’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NEWS FROM SOUTH LAKE UNION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NEWS FROM CAMA BEACH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 UPCOMING EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 MARITIME SKILLS WORKSHOPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 THE COLLECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 CWB FEED & CARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Shavings 1


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Volume XXV Number 5 ISSN 0734-0680 1992 CWB The Center for Wooden Boats

Shavings is published bimonthly by The Center for Wooden Boats, 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109

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phone 206.382.2628 fax 206.382.2699 To learn more about CWB, please visit our Web site at www.cwb.org

Our Mission

To provide a community center where maritime history comes alive and our small craft heritage is preserved and passed along to future generations.

CWB Staff

Betsy Davis Executive Director Dick Wagner Founding Director Jake Beattie Waterfront Programs Director Nita Chambers Business Relataions & Facility Rental Manager Patrick Gould Boat Sales Manager & Instructor Lauren Kuehne Volunteer Coordinator & Office Manager Laurie Leak Bookkeeper Edel O’Connor Boatwright & Workshop Coordinator Katie Kelso Visitor Services Manager & Registrar Heron Scott Lead Boatwright Doug Weeks Steamboat Program Greg Reed Livery Manager, Dockmaster & Youth Sailing Tom Baltzell Youth Field Trip Coordinator

Board of Trustees Alex Bennett Caren Crandell David Dolson Brandt Faatz Ken Greff Gary Hammons David Kennedy Andrea Kinnaman Stephen Kinnaman

Mindy Koblenzer Lori O’Tool Pike Powers Barbara Sacerdote Chuck Shigley Denise Snow Eric Sorensen Bill Van Vlack Joe Spengler, Intern

Design and production of Shavings by CWB volunteer Heidi Hackler of Dolphin Design, www.dolphindesignstudio.com. Printed by Olympus Press, www.olypress.com. 2 Shavings

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Against all odds the colonies won their fight for freedom. At war’s end thirteen dazed and bewildered newly born states were left with a vision, the Declaration of Independence, but no blueprint to implement it. The States agreed to send representatives to a Constitutional Convention. The group spent a long, sweltering summer in Philadelphia trying to figure out how they could get the best deal for their state or alliance of states. The bonding of the States against an oppressive empire had changed to an environment of mistrust. They won the war but lost the values. However they stuck together because George Washington wouldn’t let them leave without a consensus agreement. Finally, through hot debates and gracious compromises our Constitution was created. It is the rule book that enabled this union of states to become a whole greater than its parts. Today, against all odds there is an opportunity to create the first ever union of maritime heritage organizations. The Task Force on Maritime Heritage has been formed by King County’s 4Culture. Creating the maritime union is comparable to the founding of the United States. The historic organizations might use Washington crossing the Deleware as their icon; all in one boat. A door is open to create a maritime heritage center through collaboration. It can be a great cultural resource for our region, our nation, our world. It can be a whole greater than its parts.

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When we first bought Pirate and brought her to Seattle, an open-ended commitment began that brought together a magic mix of dedicated backers, amateur volunteers, and sympathetic members of the marine trades. Given a promise to stay faithful to the original craft, this group resolved to complete the work to the highest standards and keep the project fully-funded and supplied. That the job would take over five years was not discussed. When the restoration of Pirate began, not everyone saw the potential of this under-taking or believed it was possible. When she rechristens in late April and begins her public sailing mission on Lake Union, most will have to agree this was not only possible but a necessary conservation of the very best of small boat building on Lake Union.

Volunteers Scott Rohrer (left) and Paul Marlow working on Pirate.

The Pirate rechristening will bring together so many really great yachting history supporters that the Pirate Committee felt something special was warranted for the event. “Legendary Vessels of a Maritime Genius” is the first historic exhibit of the work and life of Pirate designer Ted Geary. For this event, the CWB Gallery will be transformed into a gallery of drawings, photos and mementos of Geary’s life. Several Geary yachts, including motor yachts Blue Peter & Malibu, schooners Suva & Red Jacket, and the rumchaser Danae will line the docks. In addition, Seattle Dept. of Parks & Recreation has made available a small gallery in the Naval Reserve Building to exhibit and tell the stories of the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy and the Alexandra Cup. Tour hours are from 1 to 6 every day from April 24 through May 1. All proceeds go to the conservation of the Pirate and the kids’ pond boat program. We hope all CWB members will attend.


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Parks are created for a purpose. Yellowstone exists because of its unique natural beauty. New York City’s 600 acre Central because the city needed a catalyst in order to expand. The 12 acre South Lake Union Park was an opportunity. The Navy Reserve was withdrawing and the city already owned half the property. South Lake Union Park is the site of a former sawmill, asphalt plant and Naval Reserve base. It is a peninsula made of bark, wood chips, sawdust, broken concrete and excavations. A successful park is one that draws people. People are unlikely to be drawn to South Lake Union Park without a major dimension of fun, enlightenment and everchanging activities, especially related to the lake that virtually surrounds the park. It has no natural beauty but a few steps into the park and there is the lake, a counterpoint to the hurtling steel of the Mercer corridor and the loom of the downtown wall of towers to the south.

The lake is a large open space (700 acres between bridges) with a lot of personality. Its moods and colors are constantly changing. Its boats are a multiple of types. The lake can give definition to the park as a place where our rich, colorful maritime heritage can be interpreted through programs, activities, exhibits and events. South Lake Union can be a model for the park whose character can be enhanced through partnerships with educational and cultural non-profit organizations. Through partnership the parks can be more intellectually attractive and more vital. Currently on the Park and in the neighborhood of the park are a flotilla of maritime heritage resources, each one carrying a torch of our maritime past. These include Carving Cultural Connections, Center for Wooden Boats, Discovery Modelers Education Center, Fireboat Duwamish, Northwest Schooner

Society, Northwest Seaport, Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society, Puget Sound Modelers, Radio controlled Modelers, Sailing Heritage Society, Sea Scouts, United Indians of All Tribes and Virginia V Foundation. Success through partnership is an idea worth launching. Maritime heritage is woven into our tapestry of life. Water and boats have long been the themes of visual arts, music and literature. The South Lake Union Park can be the destination where all cultures of our community can find their common bond. The cultural memories will be endless and compelling. Each boat, each tool, each block and cleat, compass and sextant has a story to be told and the stories are interconnected with each other. There can be programs, activities and exhibits so magnetic the park will become an integral part of our community fabric and an icon for every other waterfront park.

New Workshop Space

The Center for Wooden Boats boatshop is bursting at the seams. With this year’s expanded maritime skills workshops, fleet maintenance, and restoration projects we needed more space. In combination with a great crew of volunteers, the CWB boatwrights transformed the spar shed just south of the Armory building into a great space for providing workshops. The crew added windows and sliding doors, put in a new drainage pipe and added gravel to the floor, built new benches and set up equipment. We’ve already run several classes in the space and the bustle of activity is a draw for visitors coming to South Lake Union Park.

Patrick touches up a Family Boatbuilding project in CWB’s new workshop space in South Lake Union Park. March/April 2005

The Center for Wooden Boats offered Family Boatbuilding at this year’s Boat Show held at the Qwest Field Event Center. Thanks to support from the Northwest Marine Trade Association, our Family Boatbuilding program was one of their featured “giveaways” in their promotional contest and a lucky winner will come build a family boat at CWB compliments of NMTA. Thanks also to Northwest Yacht Brokers Association for providing us complimentary space to show off some of our rowboats at the waterside Lake Union Boats Afloat Show.

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CWB Volunteer Patty Sandoval shares her stories of coming up to Cama Beach State Park in the 1950’s with other volunteers Suzy Bruznell and Sharon Paul.

Cama Beach has lots of stories to tell. In the beginning the ice cap retreated, the seas rose and only the peaks and ridges of the northwest were left dry with deep water all around, creating Camano Island and the thousands of other stepping stones on the inland passage from Olympia to Skagway. There have been a lot of geologic burps over time. On January 26, 1700, a monster tsunami hit the northwest coast. We know the date by examining the growth rings of uprooted cedars on the Olympic Peninsula. This water wall deposited a bed of sand on Cama

Cama Boats Redux

Through a generous grant from the Hamalainen Foundation, three of the original early 1930’s Cama Beach rental boats will be duplicated. All have been measured and documented by Boatwright Rich Kolin, who will also build the replicas, with volunteers from his CWB boatbuilding classes. Cama Beach #5 is a 12’ flat bottom rowing skiff. Cama Beach #20 is a 14’ skiff. Cama #60 is a 15 ½’ v-bottom outboard. The grant also funds a 1930’s outboard motor for #. 60. The boats will let us offer an opportunity to step into a typical 1930’s resort boat at the last surviving Puget Sound waterfront resort.

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Beach about 100’ above high tide. The sand came from the east side of Whidbey Island. That means the wave, approximately 100’ high, traveled 6 miles. Visitors can check out the sand pile. The flourishing sea life was one of the reasons the first people of the northwest actually settled here. There were and still are clams, crab, salmon, flounder, seals, sea lions and whales. The archeological digs on the site have uncovered campfire rock circles, native tools, and projectile points (a.k.a. arrowheads) not to mention a 5000 year accumulation of clam shells and fish bones. The salmon are still around. They are magnets for the sea lions and orca that have recently been seen around Cama. The sea lions commute from California when they get the itch that the salmon are in Saratoga Passage. In between meals they lounge on the beach and appear to be driftwood. Do not approach too close. These 800 pound lumps can move fast on their strong flippers. Yappy dogs beware. Orcas don’t bother with pets, and they don’t take naps between hunting. In early January they were frisking and showing off at Elger Bay, just south of Cama Beach. Orcas exploding out of the water, black knife blade dorsal fin shining wet and body arched like a tight bow, is a sight long remembered. Camano Island is on a migratory flyway. It is one of four waterfowl migratory paths in the U.S. In the Spring and Fall a whole lexicon of birds take breaks in the lake at Cama Beach and the nearby deltas of the Stillaguamish and Skagit rivers, including a convention of snow geese. We are acquiring a flotilla of classic canoes to allow bird watching on the river deltas. At Cama Beach there is no off season. You can find programs to participate in and a living textbook of natural phenomenon to witness year round.


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3rd Friday Speaker: Tim Lee of the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Townsend will talk about a class project building an 18’ sloop designed by Carl Nordstrom in 1932. He will show the boat the school recently completed building. Free.

Lake Union Cleanup. Using wooden boats, youth and adults do spring cleaning of the lake. (9-11). Free.

Sailing regatta for physically disabled sailors. Organized by Footloose.

March 20 Equinoxial Ides of March St. Patrick’s Race. This involves two-person teams racing in rotating types of historic boats. Just what St. Patrick would do, on the Equinox. $5 per participant, pre-register at the front desk.

April 24 – May 1 The Ted Geary designed 1926 sloop Pirate rechristening and Legendary Vessels of a Maritime Genius exhibit, on the South Lake Union Parks Wharf and Armory. Spring Cruise. This is a step back in time; an event where we tour the lake in formation. The time is Prohibition years. Rumrunners, minus cargo, are welcome. Open to the public but please reserve a place in advance.

Photo credit: Ken Wagner

3rd Friday Speaker: Chuck Fowler and Tad Lahmon will give a slide talk on their ancestor’s experience in square rig sailing in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s.

June 17th 3rd Friday Speaker: Knick and Lyn Pyles will give a slide-talk on traditional boatbuilding in Chile.

The 3rd annual South Lake Union Classic Trawler Yacht Rendezvous. Tours in and talks about the classic North Sea fishing boats that are converted for recreational use. At least 10 Trawler Yachts will be open to the public to open for public viewing Saturday 11-6 and Sunday 12-4. Free.

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1st Friday Speaker: In conjunction with the Thunderbird Regatta and Rendezvous we’ll have a speaker illustrating what makes these boats special.

3rd Friday Speaker: George Todd will give a slide talk on his round world sail with three friends and a dog on the 40’ yawl “Suzy Wong.” Free.

April 22 4th Friday Speaker: In conjunction with the Ted Geary exhibit, Scott Rohrer will present “The Races for the 1909 Alexandra Cup and the Scandal that Ensued.” Following the talk will be a tour of the exhibit. The Alexandra Cup will be on display for the first time in Seattle in 96 years. Free.

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Wooden Canoe Heritage Association meet. Many types of canoes will be on display. Free rides, instruction in free style (like water ballet) paddling, talks and demonstrations will be given. Free.

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April 2 and 3

September 16-18

CWB’s 29th Annual Wooden Boat Festival combined with the 17th Annual Speedboat Show of the Antique and Classic Boat Society, at CWB and South Lake Union Park.

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August 6-7 Thunderbird Regatta and Rendezvous. This is a gathering of the 26’ sloop class designed by the prestige Seattle naval architect Ben Seaborn. Seaborn was a classmate of L. Francis Herreshoff at MIT. Friday evening speaker open to the public free of charge.

Camano Island April 2 A lunch, orientation and tour of Cama Beach for the Lake Union CWB volunteers. Please sign up with front desk if you’re planning to attend.

May 8 7th Annual Mother’s Day Sail. Besides the opportunities for rides in varied classic boats there will be toy boatbuilding and other kid crafts, guided beach walks and guided bird walks. At Camano Island State Park, 1 mile south of Cama Beach State Park. Free parking and everything else.

June 1 Volunteer Summit, organized by Camano Island State Parks staff. This is a gathering for information sharing of the many volunteer groups that are contributing their skills and services to Cama Beach State Park. The theme is “Looking to the Future.”

August 5-7 Stanwood/Camano Fair. A glorious roundup of all the potential prize winning pigs, goats, sheep, horses, flowers, vegetables, pets and educational organizations. CWB has won the “Best of Show – Education Exhibit” for several years.

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Maritime Skills Programs Bronze Casting Workshop

Instructor: Sam Johnson 10 AM to 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday March 12 & 13 $175 members, $210 nonmembers

Canoe Restoration Workshop

Instructor: Eric Harman 10 AM to 6 PM, Friday thru Thursday March 12 – 18 $700 members, $800 nonmembers

Going Aloft Safely

Instructors: Margie Mc Donald and Elize Nordske-Jones (BrionToss Yacht Riggers) Date: March 17 Time: 6 PM to 9 PM, Thursday Cost: $40 members / $50 nonmembers

Knots 2: Monkey’s Fist

Instructor: Dennis Armstrong Date: April 9 Time: 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM, Saturday Cost: $30 members / $40 nonmembers

Tool Making Workshop

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: April 9 & 10 Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Saturday & Sunday Cost: $175 members / $210 nonmembers

SailNOW!

Session 1: April 9 - May 14 Session 2: May 14 - June 18* Session 3: June 18 - July 23* Cost: $270 members / $300 nonmembers

Knots 1: Basic Knots

Date: March 19 Time: 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM, Saturday Cost: $30 members / $40 nonmembers

Get Your Captain’s License with CWB And US Maritime Academy

Instructor: Jeff Sanders Date: March 21 thru May 12 Time: 6 PM to 9:30 PM, Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays Cost: $1200 per person

Oar Making Workshop

Instructor: Rich Kolin

Date: April 2 – 4

Girls Sailing Camp Spring Break

Instructor: Courtney Bartlett Date: April 11 – 14 Time: 2 PM to 5 PM, Monday - Thursday Cost: $150 per student

Family Boat Building

Instructor: CWB Staff and Volunteers Session 2: 10 AM to 6 PM, Thursday thru Sunday June 2 – June 5 at the Edmonds Waterfront Festival (www.edmondswaterfrontfestival.com) Cost: $1100 members / $1325 nonmembers

Nameboard Carving

(Nameboards, Banners & Nautical Details)

A Day with a Surveyor

Instructor: Lynne Reister (LodeStarMarine@aol.com) Date: March 19 Time: 10 AM to 6 PM, Saturday Cost: $80 members / $95 nonmembers

Docking Intensive

Instructor: CWB Staff Session 1: April 10 Session 2: May 15 Time: All sessions meet 4 PM to 6 PM, Sunday Cost: $30 members and nonmembers / $15 SailNOW! Graduates

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: April 16, 17 & 18 Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Saturday - Monday Cost: $250 members / $300 nonmembers

RaceNOW!

Instructors: Oliver Davis & Kemp Jones Date: April 9, 16 & 23 Time: 11 AM to 4 PM, Saturday Cost: $225 members, $260 non-members

Sail The Museum Pieces

Instructor: CWB Staff Date: May 21 & June 18 (third Saturday of every month, May – September) Time: 2 PM to 4 PM, Saturdays Cost: $25 per session for members / $30 for nonmembers

Canoe Building:

The Atkinson Traveler Canoe Instructor: Eric Harman Date: April 16 – 22 Time: 10 AM to 6 PM, Saturday thru Friday Cost: $700 members / $800 nonmembers

Native Style Paddle Making

Instructor: Ray Arcand Date: April 23 & 24 Time: 10 AM to 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday Cost: $225 members / $270 nonmembers

Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Saturday – Monday Cost: $275 members / $330 nonmembers

Cold Molded Boat Building

Instructor: John Guzzwell Date: April 4 – 8 Time: 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday thru Friday Cost: $550 members / $625 nonmembers

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This is a listing of programs scheduled in the next few months. We are constantly adding new programs. Please check our website at www.cwb.org for the latest listings and information, or call us at 206.382.2628 to request a printed copy. NOTE: For courses costing more than $500 we ask you to deposit one half of your total costs and pay the remainder by day of course start at the latest. For all other programs, pre-payment in full reserves your place. Programs may be cancelled or postponed due to low enrollment.


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Maritime Skills Programs Lofting A Carvel Planked Sailing Boat

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: April 23, 24 & 25 Time: 9 AM to 5 PM, Saturday thru Monday Location: At The Marysville Boatshop Cost: $275 members / $330 nonmembers

Building A Carvel Planked Sailing Boat

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: May 2 – 6 & 9 – 13 Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Mondays thru Fridays Location: At The Marysville Boatshop Cost: $900 members / $1100 nonmembers

Women’s Woodworking:

Sharpening, As You Like It! Instructor: Jan Zoltowski Date: May 7 & 14 Time: 10 AM to 2 PM, Saturdays Cost: $85 members / $100 nonmembers

Boat Photography

Canoe Canvasing

Instructor: Dennis Armstrong Date: June 11 Time: 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM, Saturday Cost: $50 members / $60 nonmembers

Instructor: Phil Webber Date: May 7 Time: 9 AM to 6 PM, Saturday Cost: $80 members / $95 nonmembers

Instructor: Eric Harman Date: May 14 Time: 10 AM to 6 PM, Saturday Cost: $85 members / $100 nonmembers

Instructor: Hannah Browne Date: May 4, 11, 18 & 25 Time: 6 PM to 9 PM, Wednesdays Cost: $200 members / $240 nonmembers

Instructor: Seaton Gras Date: May 7 Time: 11 AM to 1 PM, Saturday Cost: $45 members / $55 nonmembers

Aleut Ikyak (Baidarka)

Instructor: Corey Freedman (www.skinboats.com) Session 1: May 7 – 15 Session 2: June 11 – 19 Time: All sessions meet 9 AM to 5 PM, Saturday thru Sunday (9 day workshop) Cost: $1100 members / $1300 nonmembers

Knots 3: Ocean Plat Mat

Instructor: Dennis Armstrong Date: May 14 Time: 10:30 AM to 1:30 PM, Saturday Cost: $40 members / $50 nonmembers

Building A Sail Rig For A Carvel Planked Sailing Boat

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: May 21 – 23 Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Saturday thru Monday Location: At The Marysville Boatshop Cost: $275 members / $330 nonmembers

Half Model Workshop

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: June 4 & 5 Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Saturday & Sunday Cost: $175 members / $210 nonmembers

Basic Power Boating: Safe Powerboat Handling

Instructor: Patrick Gould Date: June 10, 11 &12

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Knots 4: Hitchings (Coverings)

Half Day Sailing Camps

Morning Session: 10 AM to 1 PM Afternoon Session: 2 PM to 5 PM Cost: $150 Beginning Sailing / $140 Intermediate/Advanced Sailing Ages: Beginning - separate sessions for 9-11 and 12+; Intermediate & Advanced - ages 9+.

Beginning Sailing

Conceptual Navigation

Instructor: Seaton Gras Date: May 7 Time: 2 PM to 5 PM, Saturday Cost: $55 members / $65 nonmembers

Introduction To Steam Power

Instructor: Doug Weeks Date: June 11 Time: 12 PM to 4 PM, Saturday Cost: $40 members / $50 nonmembers

An Introduction To The Basics

Historic Navigation: Building A Quadrant

Time: 6 PM to 8 PM Friday, 10 AM to 6 PM Saturday & Sunday Cost: $205 members / $225 nonmembers

June 27 – July 1 (morning or afternoon) July 11 – 15 (morning or afternoon) July 18 – 22 (morning only) July 25 – 29 (morning or afternoon) August 1 – 5 (morning or afternoon) August 8 – 12 (morning only) August 15 – 19 (morning or afternoon) August 22 – 26 (morning or afternoon) August 29 – September 2 (morning only)

Intermediate/Advanced Sailing: July 18 – 22 (afternoon only) August 8 – 12 (afternoon only) August 29 – September 2 (afternoon only)

Advanced Power Boating: Safety, Rescue And Support Boat Handling

Instructor: Patrick Gould Date: June 18 & 19 Time: 10 AM to 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday Cost: $185 members / $200 nonmembers

Wood Strip Kayak: Pre-built Workshop

Instructor: Action Fish Kayaks (www.actionfish.com) Date: June 20 – 26 Time: All sessions meet 10 AM to 6 PM, Monday thru Sunday Cost: $2,500 members / $2,750 nonmembers (Price is per boat. Friends and families are welcome to build a boat together.)

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The Eighteenth Century was the Age of Enlightenment. Nations organized expeditions to search the lands and seas beyond their horizons for new resources to utilize and new cultures to understand. Highly developed ships and navigational technology of the 18th century made oceanic exploration especially attainable. The exploration fleets included scientists and artists in the afterguard, to document the natural and cultural phenomenon they would find. Each ship was fitted with several rowing/ sailing boats to do inshore surveys and charting and to observe and record the features of the new found places. Vancouver’s 100’ Discovery in the 1792-96 charting expedition of the Northwest carried five boats. They ranged from a 16’ jolly boat to a 26’ longboat. Our longboat is typical of the type used by the Western European nations and America in the late 18th Century. It was built from the lines of the famed Mutiny on the Bounty boat. The planking is lapstrake, which is lighter in weight than carvel (flush) planking. The lapped strakes (planks) are half the thickness of the carvel. The overlaps create effective lateral beams which strengthen the hull and reduce the chance of shrinking when out of water and then leaking when launched. The frames are sawn from tough, interlocking grain wood, usually white oak. This gives both strength and good holding for fasteners.

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The bow is full to give buoyancy in rough water and to carry heavy gear. These boats were meant to carry people and gear to shore, carry anchors out to deep water if the ship has run aground, to be lifeboats in the worst case accidents. But their main importance was being small enough to stow onboard their mother-ship and shallow draft enough to do the inshore charting of the new lands. The charting would normally begin at 4 a.m., with the boats loaded with food, water, tents, guns, cutlass’ and charting equipment for a weeks’ period. After a breakfast at dawn of hardtack, cheese and water, the work would begin. They took soundings and bearings from the boat on its passage along shore, until dusk, finally landing, setting up camp and cooking a meal. The longboat was rowed when there was no wind or the wind was coming from the destination point. It is faster to row straight into the wind rather than sail about 60° off the wind and tack through 120°. The oars are pulled against single thole pins, with rope grommets. The sailing rig is 2 boomless dipping lugsails on unstayed masts. They are easy to set and easy to take down. The boomless sails can be quickly furled, and are the safest to jibe.

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The Center for Wooden Boats now has educational opportunities onboard the Longboat Discovery. Our overnight courses are designed to teach participants the myriad skills needed to safely operate a vessel of 18th century design including sailing, rowing, traditional seamanship, outdoor living, and navigation. This summer we are offering two opportunities for people to come rowing and sailing for 5 days on Puget Sound. The adult longboat course is July 18th -22nd, the youth trip (14+) leaves August 1st through 5th. These trips are a once in a lifetime opportunity to see the waters of Northwest Washington as Peter Puget did. We are also offering custom courses for private groups. If desired, the curriculum of the custom courses can be tailored to fit your group’s needs. Longboats are natural platforms for leadership training and teambuilding. Custom courses can be arranged for groups up to 10 people and over a 3-7 day time frame. We provide instruction, facilitation, food, and gear. All you do is show up with your clothes for the week and a desire to live a week of your life in unison with the weather and tides.

CWB offers Longboat Expedition programs for youth, for adults, for families, and for other groups by arrangement. Contact CWB’s Waterfront Programs Director Jake Beattie for more information.


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C o l l e c t i o n A Career Switch

BY CDR LARRY A. ROTH, CHC USN (RET.) Life is getting better and more stimulating after retirement – that is if you make Center for Wooden Boats the focus of your life! I have learned a valued secret of how to grow younger. After 23 years as a chaplain in the U.S. Navy, I retired. Now what? I have always loved the water and boats, especially wooden boats. So I joined CWB last May. Before long I was looking for a “project” and higher level of involvement. After several meetings with Founding Director, Dick Wagner, the idea of beginning an Apprentice Program under the top tutoring of Boatwright, Heron Scott, grew to reality. In September I began a new life as Boatwirght apprentice and began to discover the joys of restoring an aged Blanchard Junior Knockabout. There is a special “tonic” in working to give new life to an old wooden boat. I have been trying to define what it is about CWB that gives this good feeling, this sense of well-being, and pure joy. Even when the physical work of boat restoration tests creaky joints and strains tire muscles, I feel younger, more alive. I even sleep better at night! My dreams are even more meaningful. A recent Seattle Times feature on “The Inner Workings of Your Cat” (by staff reporter, Sherry Stripling, January 20, 2005) helps me appreciate better what may be going on in my active retired life. The experts say, “Plenty of physical and mental stimulation during the day will help cats sleep better at night.” My experience at CWB takes this one step further – plenty of physical work in the boat shop and mental stimulation learning the “secrets” of wooden boat restoration will make you not only sleep better at night, but feel an inner satisfaction all day, every day! Stimulation alone isn’t the key. My life in the Navy gave me plenty of stimulation. Working alongside Marines in live-fire exercises in jungle training, providing holiday meals and “holyday” services to those guarding our most lethal weapons and watching the teams that assembled the “devices” that go atop our ballistic missiles – yes those weapons of mass destruction with power that one’s mind can never fully understand, even when you stand at the epicenter of destruction in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. That kind of stimulation doesn’t make you sleep better at night. I can’t really put my finger on exactly what is going on, but it has a lot to do with working with people who love the water, love wooden boats, maintaining them, rowing and sailing them, and teaching others (especially children and youth) to learn nautical skills. Volunteers made the best friends! But there is more. The smell of freshly milled cedar or fir and the varnish provides something special to life. It sure beats the smells I had in the Navy. The blackened air downwind from Kuwait in the Gulf War, as the oil fires filled the air we breathed aboard a ship with toxic fumes wasn’t the kind of smell that made you feel well allover. My life at CWB as an apprentice is filled with great people, super volunteers and supportive staff. It smells good, tastes good, and feels good. Satisfaction in live makes you grow younger as you get older. I highly recommend CWB as the best medicine you can take! Hey, this old cat is sleeping better at night. March/April 2005

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We’ve been doing a lot of boat maintenance and repair, and well as working on a couple restoration projects. Thank you to all the volunteers helping out with these projects. • Annual maintenance of the El Toro fleet • Major repair on the deckhouse of the Thunderbird along with new paint and varnish • Beetle Cat restoration continues – will likely be back in service in two months. • Restoration of Blanchard Junior Knockabout continues as working exhibit

Blanchard Junior Knockabout Restoration.

Upcoming Projects Please contact CWB Lead Boatwright Heron Scott is you are interested in participating in any of these upcoming projects. • Laminating a spar for a Geary 18 out of Sitka spruce • Hauling BJK’s out on the newly renovated dry dock for annual maintenance • Performing annual rowboat maintenance here on site • Hauling the longboat at Seaview for its annual Coast Guard inspection • Hauling the Puffin this summer and doing some major repair work • Starting back up on the Herreshoff 12 ½ restorations this Fall Shavings 9


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The Feed and Caring of CWB In Memoriam

Saving The Day…One Day At A Time B

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When Tim Nesseth, NOAA engineer and diver, attended a friend’s party a few months ago, little did he know that he would soon add “CWB Diver” to his extensive resume. After hearing about Tim’s enthusiasm for and knowledge about diving, I took the opportunity to nail down his goodwill into a concrete Saturday to come and look for a “needle in a haystack” - a Blanchard Junior rudder (value about $800) that had been lost two months before. Amazingly, it took Tim only about a half hour to find the rudder and gain instant hero status! Tim happened to drop by a few weeks later, only to discover that one of our dry dock tanks had broken off the night before, and our dry dock was standing up-end in the water. Tim threw on his dive gear and several hours later had the dry dock fixed, and the other tanks resecured. Tim has since saved the day again – when the City asked us for an underwater map of the anchors for our floating structures, with Tim’s help we were able to get it to them within two weeks. In addition to his engineer work with NOAA, Tim also runs his own nonprofit organization “Innerspace Exploration Team”, which does diving retrieval work for nonprofits and the families of accident victims. Although in his case it is quite literal, Tim is just one of the many volunteers that keep CWB afloat, and continue to amaze with the diversity of skills they are willing to offer. CWB volunteers’ unique stories and backgrounds are as much part of the museum experience as the boats themselves. Not only did Tim fix the dry dock, but he rescued staff member Edel O’Connor’s freshly painted hubcaps! Photo: Lauren Kuehne.

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When I think of Marlys Jolley I picture her bright smile and can-do attitude. Marlys died, too soon, on February 2. She was a Camano Island resident and came to one of our Open Houses at Camano five years ago. She saw a worthwhile effort and joined the CWB volunteer corps of Cama Beach. Marlys participated and often led the many activities we have done on Camano Island from Mother’s Day Sails to the Stanwood/Camano Fairs. She and Dennis Conroy volunteered to research and write the history of Camano’s Waterfront as a boat tour guide. The Westside guide book has been published and the manuscript for the north side done. Last Mother’s Day, Marlys and husband Elwyn Pearson were in their boat assisting our Mother’s Day sailing vessels. Marlys was creative, reliable, organized, inspirational and lots of fun. She will be long remembered by those she served with at CWB/Cama.

CWB Wish List

All Hands on Deck

re-awaken fond memories, share long-remembered experiences or widen their horizons to capture the richness and depth of our water connections. Contact us for application forms for boats in water, boats on shore, exhibits, demonstrations and vendors at the soonest!

Photo credit: Sarah Howell

One of Seattle’s best family fun waterfront events is fast approaching. Our 29th Annual Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival will occur on July 2 – 4. It will be bigger and better than before because the 17th Annual Classic Speed Boat Show will be included. Together we will create a critical and beautiful mass of wood, glistening varnish and shiny brass. Our event thrives on displays of accessible boats, exhibits and demonstrations. This is a touch and talk and share experiences and skills event where the visitor can get expert advice and hands-on opportunities in the world of wooden boats. Through offering the widest diversity of boats, exhibits and skills, our visitors can

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❑ Digital Camera & Charger for documenting boat restoration projects. ❑ Pegboard ❑ Adobe Acrobat 6.0 & Adobe InDesign CS. ❑ Wood working bench vises. ❑ Wooden Boat Magazine, issues 1-12.

March/April Shavings Contributors: Jake Beattie • Lauren Kuehne Patricia Lander • Scott Rohrer Larry Roth • Heron Scott Dick Wagner


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Memories of a Girl and Her Boat From Editor: This is a letter sent to us from Patricia Lander (formerly Pat Parker)

BY PATRICIA LANDER

Photo credit: Lander Collection

I was raised in the Montlake district, about ½ joined the navy in the Midwest and never had mile from the Seattle Yacht Club and I had a been near the ocean. I had many beginning sailors Dad (ex-navy WWI) who loved boats and could aboard who hung onto the mast for dear life. build anything. Then we were required to have a license for In the summer of 1938 I decided to see if the boat for identification purposes. And that was my allowance, twenty-five cents a week, would when I met the United States Coast Guard. When be enough to buy gasoline to run the 12-foot they found I was a 16 year old teenager with her fishing skiff Dad had built. Dad got home and own boat, I began to have USCG babysitters. found me adding numbers on the front porch. Sometimes in the summer I would take someone He wanted to know what I was doing and I out from about 7 to 10pm. The Coast Guard guys told him. About a week later he appeared home adopted me as their small sister. I never knew, on from work with a complete set of blue prints for a summer evening, how many times the Coast a “Flattie”. So for the winter of 1938 and 1939 Guard would go through Lake Union and out into Dad, with help from me at 13 years, worked Lake Washington. I did know that I would be well nights and weekends to finish the boat. chaperoned by my Coast Guard “brothers”. Editor’s comment: My Mom got The “Flattie” is an 18’ friendly with the boys flat bottom sloop deand we had many signed by Ted Geary in Sunday dinners with 1928 as a sail training 2 to 4 Coast Guard vessel for The Seattle boys as guests. They Yacht Club. were far from home and loved the chance Our house had a to talk to “Mom, basement that proDad and little sisjected about 30 inches ter”. Many of them above ground. When wrote to her through friends would come the war and after and to see the boat they I wrote to most of would begin looking them until after the around to see how we Miss Pat, May 1, 1940 at Seattle Yacht Club war was over. As I were going to get it out. write this, I wonder what happened to my Finally Daddy put a cardboard sign over one of the “brothers” and wish I had stayed in touch with windows that said, “Boat Goes Out Here”. them. They should know that they made the war In Mid April 1939 we squeezed the hull through much easier for Mom when she could bring a the window and set the hull on saw horses in the lonesome GI or Sailor home for dinner; it was backyard. Working together to finish painting and her contribution to the USO, I guess. waxing the hull, so it would go faster, and finishing During all this time I was still sailing and goshrouds, stays and the sails, the centerboard, etc, ing to college. Then I wanted to see some more we launched her May 1, 1940 at the Seattle Yacht of the USA, so I packed my clothes, and took Club. From that point on until I left to go to San the train to San Francisco and that was when the Francisco in 1948, my life revolved around the Miss Miss Pat was sold. I have no idea who bought Pat, Flattie 207. her or when, only that it was after I moved. If I was the only girl in a Seattle high school who anyone has a Flattie with the name Miss Pat, had her own boat. I became very popular and lots numbered 207, that is my baby. of those at Garfield High would want a ride. Then So I am sending this photo of Miss Pat. I when the war started in December 1941, The Unihope you like it; I hope she is in the company versity of Washington became a Navy and Army of other traditional wooden boats and I hope the training school. So we had boys from all over the present owner (if there is one) would contact me country attending UW. I took lots of boys from at: 9607 E Calgary, Sun Lakes, Arizona 85248 Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas who were not familiar or mspat206@juno.com. with sailing. I always felt sorry for those who had March/April 2005

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Ed Monk Scholarship B

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The Ed Monk Memorial Award Fund has been established to provide educational opportunities for professionals working in traditional maritime trades. The mission of the award is to further maritime professionals’ knowledge of traditional marine trades in other cultures. Study and research may include current and historical methods of boat construction using different materials, designs based on the functions to be served by the boats, materials available for construction and the state of technology. CWB is seeking applications from qualified persons. Applications are due on or before May 15, 2005. The applicant should explain how the project will enrich the existing knowledge of the applicant and how the funds would be used. The budget for the grant may include transportation, housing, and other appropriate expenses. Also required is the background of the applicant in traditional marine trades and a list of references. Decisions by the application committee will be made by or before June 15. Funds granted must be used within one year of the award. A written report of the activities and benefit derived from the experience must be submitted to CWB.

Grants awarded will total $1,500.

The Award was named to honor Ed Monk, a prominent and respected boat designer and builder in the Northwest. The Fund was established by John M.Goodfellow, who has participated in the hands-on history activities at The Center for Wooden Boats. He is an advocate of preserving traditional maritime skills and wishes to encourage this through studies of those traditional skills being carried on beyond the applicants’ local regions and local knowledge. Applicants can be of any locality, wishing to study indigenous materials and techniques of other areas. For more information, contact Dick Wagner at 206.382.2628.

Maritime Treasure Sale

Saturday, March 19, 9am-4pm South Lake Union Park, Armory Bldg Tables - $20, no commission on sales Information/Reservations: Discovery Modelers 206-282-0985

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1010 Valley Street Seattle, WA 98109-4468 206.382.2628 • www.cwb.org • cwbmail@cwb.org

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Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit No. 1583


Shavings Volume 25 Number 5a (March-April 2005)