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FALL 2013

WHERE’S

THE FANATACISM? CALLING ALL TERRIER FANS

IT’S A PUMPKIN SPICE WORLD YOUR FAVORITE FALL TREATS

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DEALS: ART ON A BUDGET

OPPOSITES ATTRACT BOSTON UNIVERSITY’S FASHION LOOKBOOK

YOUR BEST FRIEND’S PLAYLIST


FALL 46

2013

08

21

Campus

08

15

Touring BU From the Top Down

Revisit Boston’s Hot Spot

ROOFTOP TOURS

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CAMPUS BUZZ

A Social Guide to Campus

City

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FIVE PLACES TO... Photograph Boston

AN INNOVATION

Arts

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STUDIO 52

Where Artists Collide

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OFF THE WALL

Beauty Behind Graffiti

On Our Cover Our cover features four Boston University student styles. Clockwise: Kirsten Glavin (COM ‘14), Andrew Lane (SMG ‘14), Alex LaSala (COM ‘14) and Caleb Fechtor (COM ‘15) are students that editors of The Buzz feel represent our campus and our style.


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36 Fashion

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41

BU’s Fashion LookBook

Inside the City’s Breweries

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Abroad

OPPOSITES ATTRACT

WARBY PARKER

Seeing Fashion in Boston

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Music

MY 24 HOURS One Day in Rabat

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Behind the Scenes of Boston’s Music Venues

Confessions From Overseas

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CAMPUS PLAYBACK

What Your Friends Listen To

Food

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46

36

INSIDE SCOOP

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BOSTON BREWS

PUMPKIN SPICE Fall’s favorite flavor

MY SO-CALLED LIFE

Sports

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GETTING FIT

The CrossFit Revolution

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WHERE IS THE FANATACISM? Terriers in Hiding


LEORA YASHARI Editor-in-Chief

“the clothing, the food and all the cultural events”

JASON FELDMAN Chief Branding Officer

FRANKIE BARBATO Features Editor

JULIE OSTROW, COURTNEY SCHWABE Art Directors

CINDY RUIZ Public Relations Officer “Seeing the leaves on the trees change”

WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT FALL IN BOSTON?

“I love the weather during the fall months”

IRENE BERMAN-VAPORIS Head Copy Editor

CHARLOTTE PARKER Social Media Manager

“Running on the esplanade in the afternoon”

SAMANTHA DUTRA Photo Director

JOSH JASON Cinematographer

SECTION EDITORS KATIE SMITH, Campus ASHLEY ROSSI, City Life CARLY HOFF, Arts RACHAEL ALLEN, Fashion ALYSSA LANGER, Food JESSICA LEACH, Music PETER ZAMPA, Sports KATIE LOHEC, Abroad

TIMOR BALAISH Broadcast Manager

KEVIN WELDON Assistant Cinematographer

“It doesn’t get better than football!”

COPY EDITING TEAM K ATE CAMPBELL · SARAH EPSTEIN · KELLY GAUTHIER · ELISE MARRINAN · TAYLOR MAZZUOCCOLA · GABRIELLE MILLER · SAMANTHA PETERS · STEVIE SNOW · SONIA SU · REBECCA TAN // ASSISTANT COPY EDITOR: JONATHAN CANDELARIA

PHOTOGRAPHY TEAM AARON GOLDSTEIN · K AREN LOEWY · DANIELA AMAYA · MACKENZIE WILER · CLARA BURR LONNON · ALICIA WINTON · CARLIN STIEHL · FALLON MORAN · KARA KORAB · BARRON ROTH MADISON SCHAEFER · SARAH MCCULLOUGH ·SARAH RUBIN

ART TEAM DESIGNERS: SARAH WEBB · GRACE GALLOWAY · BRITTANY MARTIN · K ARINA CROSS · AVA

DEVOE · AVIA BUI · CHLOE CONCEICAO · JESSICA VAN DER WESTHUIZEN · K ATHRYN RADIN · AMY ALEXANDER, CASSIDY KELLY · LAURA VERKYK · PAWARISSARA OSATHANUGRAH // ILLUSTRATORS: AMBER HUFF · JORDAN FREASE

PR + SOCIAL MEDIA + BRANDING TEAMS LIA BERGER · ANNETTE LEE · LOUISE LIU · LUCIANA RAMOS

WRITERS CAMPUS: SARAH WU · MARISSA CHOY · BAILEY CLEMENT · ABBY LESSELS · CASEY CARROLL · ANNIE GEASA · ANH

NGUYEN · GRACE GULINO // CITY: CATALINA CASAS · EMMA MCADAMS · OLIVIA IMPERATORE · STEPHANIE PAGONES · BRITTANY COMAK · ALLIE ORLANDO · JACLYN ROUILLARD · ALEXANDRA CAPIK // ARTS: LAWRENCE KNOX · VANESSA DE BEAUMONT · SARA DELNEGRO · RYAN SEGUJLIC · PRIYA DADLANI · ALEXANDRA CAPIK // FASHION: ASHLI MOLINA · BRIDGET JARECKI · EMILY GOLDMAN · ISABELLE EPSKAMP · JACLYN ROUILLARD · JEMMA DOUGLAS · MEGAN SMITH // FOOD: AMY GAINES · RACHEL LOWE · STEPHANIE SMITH · ALYSSA BARSANTI · SARAH WU · CLARA BURR-LONNON · MEGAN SMITH · MARISA SYMEONIDES · LIA BERGER · ELISHA MACHADO // MUSIC: JENNA REYES · ANNELIESE SCHECK · DANICA DANIELS · DEE HIBBARD · KATE RADIN · VICTORIA WASYLAK · LIA BERGER // SPORTS: KELLY LANDRIGAN · BRIAN ELBERG · DANIEL ALTER · CHRIS GRAY // ABROAD: KANDI WALKER · LUCY FINN · ALEX KAUFMAN · INES BOUSSEBAA · SEBASTIAN SCHOLL · EJIM MBANEFO


CONTRIBUTORS STORES Crush Boutique 131 Charles St. 264 Newbury St., Boston 617-720-0010 @crushboutique LF Boston 353 Newbury St., Boston 617-236-1213 @lfboston uniform. 511 Tremont St., Boston 617-247-2360 @uniformboston

THANKS OUR FALL ISSUE WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE AMAZING STUDENT TALENTS AND GENEROUS CONTRIBUTIONS FROM PARTNERING ORGANIZATIONS. A SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL OF YOU WHO HELPED MAKE OUR MAGAZINE POSSIBLE!

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

SUPPORTERS L7 Studio Taylor Barnes 310-367-4900 Insomnia Cookies @insomniacookiesofficial Boston University Study Abroad @buabroad

HAVE YOU HEARD?

Boston University Faculty Professor Safoura Rafeizadeh Dean Micha Sabovik

>> DAILY STORIES    thebubuzz.com

Hair and Make-up Styling Alicia Leone (SMG ‘14) fb: Makeup by Alicia Leone

>> WEEKLY VIDEOS    thebubuzz.com >> SPECIAL EVENTS >> THE MAGAZINE

Comments? Questions? Interests?

/@#THEBUBUZZ Photo by Steven Depolo

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Fall 2013 THIS PAST YEAR has been an exciting one for The Buzz—we launched

our daily-updated online platform, started holding events and kicked off the semester with our video segment, The Weekly Buzz. Not to mention, our staff and readership have doubled. Throughout this process, our focus remained staying true to the Buzz brand: we are a Boston University magazine by the students, for the students. This is why we are proud to present our first seasonal issue of the revamped and relaunched Buzz magazine.

You will find in the following issue topics that should fulfill all your fallneeds—everything from our favorite pumpkin treats to city sights in the fall to athletic trends that will keep you busy until winter. Our Features Team is particularly proud to present our fashion story, “The BU LookBook.” This project was truly a labor of love for us—a new experience to most and the first time many of us were able to exercise our creativity on what is very much a professional platform. We feel this feature represents much more than the clothes students wear. Rather, it is a representation of the different characters, faces and styles that students at BU continue to bring to the table. As Editor-In-Chief, my mission has always been to represent this school and the interests of our students in the best way possible. Boston University is a unique school in the heart of what we all know to be a spectacular and resilient city. It has been an honor working with some of the most talented students on this campus and learning with them how to create a brand and a publication that we are proud to call our own. Congratulations to everyone who has worked on this issue—I am genuinely proud of the team we built and hope to continue growing in the coming years. We hope you enjoy our Fall Issue and stay tuned for more exciting events and news from The Buzz.

-Leora Yashari EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

THE WEEKLY BUZZ

Visit our website to find weekly video segments featuring what’s new in Boston and around BU.


FROM THE TOP DOWN p. 08

CAMPUS


BEST KEPT

HOW TO GAIN ACCESS TO ONE OF BU’S

SECRETS by Bailey Clement

Photography by Sam Dutra


T

housands of students pass through Boston University’s School of Management everyday, and most never question the ceiling they walk beneath. Above what appears to be a ceiling actually houses the seventh, eighth and ninth floors. Only a select few are granted access to these floors, and one of these people happens to be Daryl DeLuca, BU’s assistant dean of students.    DeLuca has worked at BU for 35 years and has given rooftop tours for 11 of them. During that time, he said he predicts to have given tours to thousands of people.    DeLuca begins each tour in the SMG lobby, where he gives a quick overview of the school built in 1997. The elevators in this building read only six floors when in fact it is a 12-story building—there are three lower floors that provide underground parking.

   In the elevator, DeLuca swiped his card for access to the eighth floor. There is a west bank elevator that gives direct access to the upper floors, which was an attempt by the university to make SMG students feel like they had their own space and separation from the administration.   Above the seventh floor are the alumni and development offices. The eighth floor houses the president and the provost, and the ninth floor is home to the executive vice president and all the administrative offices that operate and manage BU.   The floor has a presidential observation deck, which DeLuca said is the location he most frequently uses on his rooftop tours because of the “sweeping panoramic view of the city, the river and Cambridge.”    Once we stepped out on the observation deck, we found ourselves directly eye level with the iconic Citgo sign. To the left was the Charles River, where over a dozen BU sailboats were practicing alongside a crew team. To the right was Fenway Park.   Throughout the tour, DeLuca was snapping photos of the spectacular view. He said he always carries around a camera in his pocket for this reason, and it is his love of photography that led him to discover the best views on campus.    We then headed up to the ninth floor, which houses the office of John Silber, BU’s former and final chancellor. He was never replaced, so his office was converted into a conference room.    Another BU secret is the hidden door between the bookshelves’ paneling in the room, which was

ONCE WE STEPPED OUT ON THE OBSERVATION DECK, WE FOUND OURSELVES DIRECTLY EYE LEVEL WITH THE ICONIC CITGO SIGN. built to hide people if there were ever an attack. Also on the ninth floor is a ballroom that can be rented out for an array of events, including weddings.    To say the least the tour was spectacular, and it is open to anyone. All you have to do is gather a group of friends, go to Dean DeLuca’s office on the third floor of the George Sherman Union and ask for a tour.


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FIND YOURSELF ABROAD WORLD-CLASS INTERNSHIP AND STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS. 4BU.EDU/ABROAD


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PEACE + QUIET ON THE CHARLES RIVER

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The Seven Secret Campus Hideout by Cassandra Carroll Photography by Fallon Moran

Mugar is packed—every study lounge is filled to capacity and you can barely hear yourself think. You haven’t started your essay due tomorrow, which is worth at least 25 percent of your grade and you are in full-on panic mode. At that moment, you realize you need a place all to yourself, far removed from the rest of the student body and your annoying roommate, who refuses to put her phone on silent to avoid even a minute of FOMO. But the good news is that the Boston University campus is 1.3 miles full od underrated study spots.

THE HOWARD THURMAN CENTER

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION LOBBY

Located in the basement of the George Sherman Union, the HTC is the perfect place to relax from your hectic schedule and meet new people.

The lobby of SED is cozy and comfortable and a great place to finish that last minute assignment in between classes. The benches and windows will eliminate a good portion of your stress while you cram in those last few pages of reading. [2]

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It may seem as though there is no place to hide from the hustle and bustle of overworked and stressed-out students, but these hidden spots on the Charles River Campus are there to give you the peace and quiet you need every so often.

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HILLEL HOUSE Hillel House on Bay State Road is the place to go to unwind and catch up on some work. The space is open and welcoming with several study spots to take advantage of. [3] TOP FLOOR OF 575 While the top floor of Stuvi might be known for its incredible views, this top floor is never as crowded and has some pretty spectacular views of its own. If you live in East Campus, it’s a great study place for those who like their personal space. [4]

SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

Inside the House on BHillel State Roa ay d

The STH library has more limited hours than Mugar, but it also has much more peace and quiet. Get some reading done or crank out a paper in the calming library where Dr. Martin Luther King once studied. THE COURTYARD OUTSIDE OF 10 BUICK STREET Outside the entrance to Stuvi 1 and Buick Street market there are tables,

chairs and a mini field of grass. It’s the perfect place to take a cup of coffee and notes to review before your test. [1] THE PARK BETWEEN CGS AND STUDENT SERVICES The quiet little park nestled in between the two buildings has picnic tables and a waterfall wall that make for a great lunch spot or space to clear your head.

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SOCIAL tweet, tag, follow, go.

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2

Almost fell over on the T singing and dancing to 1D #class #boston #1D @NORTHSOUTHBITCH

Sunset on the Charles. pic.twitter.com/ OnIVynJs4T 3

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@BOSTONTWEET

Founded in 1848, Boston Female Medical School was the first institution in the world to educate female physicians—it later merged with BU. @BOSTONTWEET

1. @UNIBOSTON;  So pretty it almost looks like a #postcard #comlawn #com #bostonuniversity #boston #trees #citgo #warren #warren towers.

2. @DATMUSICALSHORTY;   #graffiti #boston #train #stairs #bricks #windows

3. @SPENCAAAAA; Holy mother of god it’s freaking lobster night at BU! #lobster #bu #bu2017 #lobsternight #heaven #boston #boston university

4.@CELTICS; Seven #Celtics players and local students are split between two duck boats for today’s Kia Read to Achieve event.

CITY OF BOSTON, BOSTONTWEET, BOSTONDOTCOM, IVIDEOBOSTON, GAMEDAY BOSTON, BOSTON BASS DROPS

The walk to west campus is always the hardest bc there are too many cute people walking to and from the gym #bostonuniversity @DR_ATRAM

I think the Dunkin Donuts discount sold me on Boston University. @ITSSANNA

—Marissa Choy


AN INNOVATION p. 15

CITY


FIVE BEST PLACES TO TAKE A PICTURE AROUND BOSTON by Olivia Imperatore

Illustrations by Amber Huff

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CITGO SIGN

YAWKEY WAY A cozy street next to one of the most historic baseball teams and stadiums of all time, Yawkey Way at Fenway Park has a crisp fall look.

BEACON HILL Beacon Hill’s stretch of million dollar brownstones gives the area an old and classic feel that is beautifully Boston.

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3 4 5

As Boston University students, the Citgo sign is our North Star. Wait until nighttime when the sign is brightly lit against the Boston skyline to snap a truly dazzling picture.

You’ve got four years here, you might as well be a tourist.

BOSTON COMMON

Give Paul Revere some credit and head over to the Boston Common to take a picture by his statue. The “Make Way For Duckling” statues from your favorite childhood book are also nearby.

HARVARD BRIDGE The Harvard Bridge has a perfect shot of the Boston skyline and the iconic Prudential Tower. It also offers a view of crew boats on the Charles River nearly year round.


UP & COMING IN BOSTON:

by Jaclyn Rouillard

Photography by Sam Dutra

From techies to food snobs, Boston’s greatest resource is just outside the limits of the Green Line . Though off the beaten path, the Innovation District is one of the quickest developing areas in Boston.    This area of the South Boston waterfront includes the Seaport District and the Fort Point neighborhood, and is well on its way to become a mecca for collaborative work and startup businesses. Continuing its tremendous development over past years, it contains a wide range of companies, art galleries, boutiques and restaurants.    Since 2010, the ID has come alive with new businesses. Nichole Fichera, the Innovation District manager at the Boston Redevelopment Authority, said that some of the main attractions for startups in the area are collaboration.    [The new startups] are highly collaborative and very open and focused on sharing,” said Fichera. “Sharing space, sharing ideas and sharing resources, because they know it makes good economic sense for them to do so.”    Companies in the area are taking a new approach to business that involves working together to develop and make an impact. This concept can be seen in the abundance of collaborative spaces and energy for progress as new companies move into the area.    Do not be fooled that the ID is just for business professionals, techies and creative types—it is also set to become Boston’s newest retail and dining destination for both upscale and casual tastes.    The Fort Point neighborhood is bustling with new restaurants and unique shops. One in particular is Blue Dragon on A Street that opened its doors seven months ago and is already drawing in crowds. Blue Dragon

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

T he ID is set to become Boston’s newest retail and dining destination for both upscale and casual tastes.

reflects the bright, urban atmosphere of the ID.    Weichy Tsai, the restaurant’s manager, said it is a tapas-style Asian gastropub.    “Fort Point is so up and coming… and we wanted to get in a little bit early so that we could capture that market,” Tsai said.    The draw of the Innovation District is undeniable and has businesses, Boston residents and newcomers alike flocking to the area. Get out, explore the ID and see what it has to offer.

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OFF-CAMPUS

BUDGETING Boston University offers some beautiful dorms, but in most cases, living off campus can be cheaper if you know how to budget. Follow our tips on how to save on city living.

WATER

Hand wash dishes and do not let the water run. Take shorter showers to decrease your costs even more.

TRASH

Try and get a few bucks back by taking your recyclables to a redemption center.

by Allie Orlando

Illustrations by Amber Huff

$

ELECTRIC

Make common sense “green” choices to save energy and lower your electric bill.

CABLE/INTERNET

If you do not want to pay for cable, invest in a Roku or just use Netflix.

FOOD

Shaw’s tends to be a little overpriced but has a convenient location. Trader Joe’s tends to be cheaper.

GAS

If you can’t stand the Boston winters and like to keep your house toasty, you are going to pay more.

RENT

The more people you live with, the cheaper your rent will be. And typically the closer you live to Comm. Ave., the more expensive the rent.

TOTAL: $1,210 - 2,490

OTHER

You are going to need to buy toilet paper, laundry detergent and shampoo pretty regularly. Just be resourceful and buy in bulk.


OFF THE WALL p. 21

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

ARTS 17


STUDIO by artists, for artists by Sara DelNegro

Photography by Clara Burr Lonnon At 52 Everett St. stands a building that, if you did not know any better, you might assume is just some sort of warehouse in Allston. As you pass by, you might see someone about to lift instruments onto a loading dock or hear music coming from the facility.    If you take a second glance, you would realize that it is more than just a warehouse—because inside is a collaborative art space called Studio 52.    Studio 52 is run by artists and made for the over 300 artists who utilize the space. Musicians make up the majority of these artists, but sculptures and athletes, for example, also share Studio 52.    The brains behind the venue are general manager Rich Anton and marketing director Glenn Michael. Both are members of the band Before Disorder, which helps them relate to

musicians who come play in the studio.    Although Anton and Michael did not specify the ratio between musicians and other artists at Studio 52, they said anyone with a passion for any art form is welcome.    Anton said that he had a vision of a new and revitalized atmosphere for artists to rehearse their craft. He learned about the property through his job in real estate and said that he thought that it would be the perfect place to turn his vision into a reality. With investors onboard, he and Michael launched Studio 52 in June 2012. Today, the fcility is home to 120 studio spaces, including 16 that are currently under construction and on track to be completed in November.    Anyone with a passion for the arts can rent a space and is free to enhance it as he or she wishes, as long as the


space is not damaged or ruined for future artists who may want to work there.    Artists are given free reign after a room has been rented, and as a result, each individual space is set up in its own unique way.    One artist, for example, rented two spaces and combined them into one, added additional soundproofing to the walls and built himself a mini recording studio. In another space, a band built an elevated platform to hold a drum set and a shelving unit on the wall to store its guitars.    “If you set the room up well, it can be a really great place to play or record,” Michael said.    It is easy for artists to meet and learn about each other’s music at Studio 52, where there is most likley always someone jamming out on a guitar with a friend or rehearsing with their band. Anton and Michael said they both try to be there as often as they can to help out their tenants as needed.    In addition to collaborative artist spaces, Studio 52 opened a recording studio, Plaid Dog Recording, this summer. A performance

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

venue, Arch, is under construction.    “We built this space for artists [to practice], so we’ve got to give them somewhere [to perform],” Anton said.    Though music was the driving force behind Studio 52, Anton and Michael

They’ll come in to practice sometimes.”    Both Anton and Michael are supportive of the musicians that work in Studio 52 and want to see them succeed. They said they always attend artists’ shows to support their talent.

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Anyone with a passion for the arts can rent a space

do not limit their facilities to just musicians. They said they are open to renting out a space to anyone, as long as it used for artistic purposes, whether that means music, visual arts or even sports.   “The Boston League of Women Wrestlers has a space,” Michael said. “One of them plays [music] here [which is how they knew about Studio 52].

The Studio 52 Facebook and Twitter pages are flooded with promotions for both current and past artists.    It is obvious that they are passionate about what they do and that helps make Studio 52 a real success. Whether you are an artist, a musician or just a music lover, Studio 52 is a studio worth checking out.

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A Profile of Lindsay Kopit

PLAYING IT by Carly Hoff

COOL

Photo courtesty of Katy Meyer for Stage Troupe’s production of “Alice in Wonderland” Walking down the staircase of an Allston apartment, Lindsay Kopit (COM ’15) appears to be every bit the actress her resume boasts. With confidence in her strut and an assertive tone, you would never know that this Ohio native grew up with a stutter.   At Boston University, she found solace in the world of performance art.   “For some reason, when I get on stage, all of that goes away,” Kopit said.   She attended speech therapy classes from the age of four and continued them throughout high school. Kopit said any kind of performance became an important coping mechanism.   “When I was little, I could hardly get a word

When I was little, I could hardly get a word out...

out,” she said. “Being in theater now is more special to me, because I would never have been able to do that had I not gone to speech therapy.”   Kopit’s acting resume features campus favorites like “The Vagina Monologues” and “Alice in Wonderland,” while in Ohio, she practiced in the mediums of speech, debate and spoken word poetry. Freshman year, her college acting career began to flourish.   In an effort to sharpen her acting skills, Kopit was eager to get involved in the acting community at BU.

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To achieve this goal, Kopit said she thought it was important to research and contact theater groups on campus before even enrolling in her first semester of classes.   Kopit decided she wanted to seek out Stage Troupe—the oldest theater group on campus. All of Stage Troupe’s productions are completely student-run.   Acting is not the only thing Kopit is passionate about at BU. She and her friend Connor Murdock (COM ’15) started the student group Students of the World this year.   “It is a group that merges creative media and activism,” Kopit said. “Which are two of my interests—being in COM and being an actress.”   Kopit said that the group’s specific objective is to be “an organization that provides students with the plaform to create socially relevant media with a call to action.”  


An Inside Look Into Street Art Around Boston University’s Campus by Ryan Seguljic

Photography by Courtney Schwabe


pictures jumping off the walls The corner of Reedsdale Street and Brighton Avenue on the outer wall of Mixx stands Allston’s most unusual work of art: the unexpected mural-esque graffiti painting of a young man with wings and a megaphone yelling into the city: “Broadcast Your Dreams.”    Graffiti artists are usually written off as vandals with lewd messages on a mission to deface public spaces. Despite the negative reputation, the Banksys of the world will sometimes grace us with the most strange but thought-provoking concepts.   What is most appealing about this work of art, is that one of our own brought us the message—the artist behind the mural is Jeffrey Marks (CFA ’16). His inspiration derived just last year as a freshman in the seminar “Art for the City.”   “The premise of the class was to conceptualize a work of public art,” Marks said.    Matt Paterno (COM ’13) the former WTBU station general manager assisted Marks in putting the project in motion. The two decided to incorporate radio into the design, evident through the megaphone and the message.    “Matt started with the phrase ‘broadcast your dreams,’ which I interpreted as a call to action,” Marks said. “What came to mind was an Icarus-like dude with a megaphone, amplifying his voice over Boston, the city of beans.”

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

   After deciding upon his message to the city of Boston, Marks sought out the perfect canvas for his work.   “Once we settled on a design, we pitched the mural to the landlord over at the yogurt joint and he was cool with it,” Marks said.    After getting approval, Marks said the project began to fall into place pretty quickly for him and his team.    “We bought our paint stuff, primed the wall, laid out a grid, sketched the image, painted the mural and that was that. Lots of pizza was involved,” Marks said. “The whole process took maybe two or three days and a solid group of ten-ish volunteers.”    John-Michael Sedor (COM ’15) also helped Marks with the mural. He became involved in the project through his work at the radio station and helped by collecting a group of volunteers to work.   “We got a lot of people working together to make it happen,” Sedor said, “We put out a message over the radio and a few people showed up.”    Rather than the blank wall that initially took up Allston’s prime artistic real estate, Mixx is now host to what could be an iconic art piece for passers by. If you have a frozen yogurt craving this fall, don’t be afraid to stop and stare.

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Boston Art on a Budget:

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DEALS Boston has a thriving arts community that is readily accessible for college students to explore. Here are some arts opportunities available to Boston University students for free or at a discounted price.

by Carly Hoff

Illustrations by Jordan Frease

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MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

Free when students present their IDs at the front desk.

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7 8 2 3 4

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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Get one free ticket for select performances when you show a BSO college card.

BOSTON BALLET

Only $20 for full-time BU students with ID.

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

The public library hosts various events for the arts community. Whether it be free movie screenings, art displays or performances, many events at the Copley location are free for students to attend.

IMPROV ASYLUM

Ticket prices range but can be as low as $5 for students.

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INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART

HUNTINGTON THEATER COMPANY

Only $10 for students, with free entrance on Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Students get $10 off tickets for all performances at the theater.

BLUE MAN GROUP

Discounted tickets for $25. Student rush tickets are available based on availability on the day of the performance. Each student can receive up to two tickets with a student ID.

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ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM

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Free admission for students with their BU IDs.

PANOPTICON GALLERY

A photography studio where students can go and view photo exhibits by both local and international artists for free.

NEW REPERTORY THEATER IN WATERTOWN

A $20 student price for select performances.


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BU LOOKBOOK p. 26

FASHION


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  PRETTY IN PREP CRUSH BOUTIQUE FREE PEOPLE SWEATER, $168; LF STORES PLAID SKIRT, $132; MODEL’S OWN SOCKS AND BOOTIES.


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  PUTTING THE HIP IN HIPSTER UNIFORM JOHN VARVATOS BLACK BLAZER, $398; GANT CHAMBRAY SHIRT, $125; SCOTCH AND SODA “RALSTON” GOLD CHINO, $139; MODEL’S OWN BRACELETS, WATCH AND SUNGLASSES

OPPOSITES ATTRACT BOSTON UNIVERSITY’S FASHION LOOKBOOK Fashion Editor RACHAEL ALLEN Photography by SAMANTHA DUTRA


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  WEEKEND WARRIOR UNIFORM RETROBRAND T-SHIRT, $39; SCOTCH AND SODA VEST, $135; LEVI’S COMMUTER CARGO PANTS, $89.

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  YOU’RE GOING DOWN LF STORES SEQUIN EMBELLISHED TANK, $124; FLANNEL PLAID SHIRT, $108; GREEN COATED JEANS, $258; CHARCOAL BEANIE, $30; BACKPACK, $155; PLATFORM BOOTIES, $98; MODEL’S OWN JEWELRY.


WARBY

PARKER Bold Shades Come to Boston

BOSTON ’S FOUR- E YED fashionistas should brace themselves. Picking out eyewear

will no longer be tedious because Warby Parker has come to 83 Newbury St. It is not an easy store to find, but if you look above eye level, you’ll find the “83” on a glass door. A quick ride up to the second floor will take you from a bare, mirrored room to a world of vintage-inspired eyewear.

by ASHLI MOLINA

Photography by Aaron Goldstein & Julie Ostrow


In contrast to the traditional brick-and-mortar strategy, Warby Parker first began as an online website, which helped the new business boom and stay cheap.   In 2013, Warby Parker ventured into the retail world. Moving into their home in SoHo, New York, Warby Parker started in a building housing offices and small businesses, featuring their glasses like a gallery rather than a shop. The online startup quickly expanded beyond New York City and Los Angeles, and has finally reached Boston.   Its Boston store opened in May 2013. Yet, with its heavy cult following in New York, some might wonder why the company chose a smaller, less fashionable, version of Manhattan to target.    Kelsey Leahy, a sales associate at the Newbury Street location, said that she thinks Boston fits Warby Parker like a glove.   “Warby Parker obviously fits in New York because it’s the hub of fashion, but Boston is a college city,” Leahy said. “Our mission is to provide affordable eyewear for everyone.”

“ THE BUZZ FALL 2013

  To understand why a New York-based company came to Boston, look no further than its customers and their budget. For some customers, the attraction might stem from this moderate pricing, with sunglasses ranging around $100.   “When Warby Parker opened in SoHo [New York] I went crazy,” Tiffany Stawiarski (COM ’16) said. “I ended up buying like three pairs and now it’s on Newbury so I know I’ll be back for more.”   If the bustling store and generational cliental says anything about the experience, it is that Bostonians have started to embrace the Warby Parker expansion. The quirky and fun styles lure Bostonians in and keep the cult growing.   “Spreading the word and spreading the love is what keeps us going and what will keep our store alive in Boston,” Leahy said.

SPREADING THE WORD AND SPREADING THE LOVE IS WHAT KEEPS US GOING AND WHAT WILL KEEP OUR STORE ALIVE IN BOSTON

31


STREET

STYLE   —Bridget Jarecki

MATT DWAN // SMG ‘14

CHRISTINE LAST KOCH // CAS ‘14

ALISON VANOUSE // FIRST YEAR MASTERS STUDENT 32

JELENA KERO // CAS ‘16


HALL OF MUSIC p. 34

MUSIC


FOR ME MUSIC HAS ALWAYS BEEN A REALLY INTROSPECTIVE EXPERIENCE AND IT’S KIND OF LIKE A MIRROR

TWELVE MINUTES WITH

HALL OF MIRRORS by LIA BERGER PHOTOGRAPHY BY KARA KORAB

Performing under the pseudonym Hall of Mirrors, Marco Lawrence is breaking ground on the electropop music scene. Lawrence collaborates with friend and cellist Jenna Callabro to create an ambient, textural experience.   Lawerence has already released his first EP, appropriately titled, “Begin” and recently debuted his first music video for his standout track “Keep.” The self-taught musical prodigy has proved a force to be reckoned with.


HOW WAS YOUR PROJECT BORN? I had been writing acoustic music for five years— just piano and voice—and also playing with my friend Jenna who plays cello. And when I got to college, I really wanted to do electronic music, so I kind of got more into that. I decided I wanted to combine them, and I just did it one day. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME HALL OF MIRRORS? I always feel weird talking about this because I don’t want to sound pretentious or anything, but for me music has always been a really introspective experience and it’s kind of like a mirror—a tool to see yourself in different situations from different perspectives. I thought [Hall of Mirrors] fit well for what I was doing. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR SOUND? I think at the core it’s definitely electronic pop music, but it’s not straight up dancey. It’s kind of somber. Some people say it’s relaxing. Like nighttime driving music. That’s what I would like it to be.

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

WHAT ARTISTS INFLUENCE YOUR MUSIC? I really like artists like Depeche Mode. I love them. The band, Austra is great. I’m actually seeing them tonight. They’re one of my favorites. WHAT’S IT LIKE PERFORMING LIVE? At first it was terrifying. I had no idea what I was doing. I had no idea how to perform the songs since electronic music is a lot more complicated than just showing up and playing piano and singing. The biggest challenge is making it interesting, but as time went on I sort of figured it out.

WHAT HIGHLY ACCLAIMED BAND DO YOU HATE THE MOST? Oh no… I don’t like talking shit about people. But… FUN. I respect them [laughs], but I saw them live at a free outdoor concert and I left because it just wasn’t for me. I just find it to be really cheesy. ARE YOU WORKING ON ANYTHING NEW RIGHT NOW? Yeah, I’ve been trying to work on new things for a long time, but I just can’t decide what I want to do next. It’s definitely going to sound a lot better, though.

DO YOU HAVE ANY PRE-PERFORMANCE RITUALS? I would, but I’m always just so flustered beforehand. I’m usually just really freaked out and scattered beforehand and then the five minutes before I just try and calm down… so I guess calming down is my pre-performance ritual.

35


INSIDER’S SCOOP behind the scenes of boston music venues

by Jessica Leach

Photography by Barron Roth

IN POP CULTURE UTOPIAS

like Boston, hipster music venues are abundant. Almost more importantly, passion for artsy-home grown talent is prevalent as well. Part of the charm of local venues is the lack of big-corporation management—local venues have a team of highly specialized people who are dedicated to promoting small bands.    Clay Fernald is the general manager of the Middle East Nightclub in Cambridge and has the insider’s perspective on how local music venues are run. The club has four different stages and takes on musical acts of all kinds nearly every day of the year.

    Fernald said there are many different ways his small venue finds local talent.     “Agents ask for their bands to play here, promoters arrange for bands to play and plenty of bands send in electronic press kits [an email with streaming links] to play at Middle East,” Fernald said.     Surprisingly, Fernald also said that sometimes the Middle East will book a band without ever hearing the band live—a gamble, but a worthwhile one. Fernald said there is a common misconception among audiences about the job of the venue.

The best feature of local venues is their respect for bands    “We don’t help the band set up. We set up the stage for the bands: an important distinction there,” Fernald said. “We don’t touch people’s guitars for example. A band’s guitar tech does that.”    The venue does have one person work the lighting, although sometimes bands bring their own lighting specialist.    As far as on-stage shenanigans go (think Alice Cooper’s or Lady Gaga’s concert antics), artists are prohibited from using smoke, “messy goop” foam or anything that could be potentially hazardous. Most notably, Fernald said one band used goat blood on stage during their performance.    “You can Google to see who it was, but that was…unpleasant. No more of that please,” Fernald said.    Perhaps the best feature of local venues is their respect for bands. The Middle East never takes a cut of merchandise profit, and they always give bands proper treatment.    “We love all of our bands and we treat them with respect,” Fernald said. “The respect comes right back to you, 99 percent of the time.” 36


Our door is open to any band that is actively playing in the scene or reaches out to us

   At a different end of the spectrum, another Boston production company, Murdock Manor, hosts bands at their venue The Attic and also provides innovative setups for bands at some local clubs.    While the company does charge for its services, all of its five employees work for free. Any profits are used to buy more equipment in hopes to endorse local music and add a creative vibe to the concert atmosphere.    Renee Goudreau, one the volunteers, took the time to elaborate on both the company’s specialties and her own.    “I book the show. I promote the show. I produce the show. I’m there to help with audio and lights, and do post production after the show,” Goudreau said. “If something goes wrong, I’m there to make sure it’s fixed.”    Likewise, the Manor’s lighting expert, Charlie Gargano, works everything from a do-it-yourself light box that he created, to faders and light boards to make the lighting flow with the live music.    “Charlie works with what he hears. He can accent a slow song and go nuts with a fast one,” Goudreau said. “He just goes with the band and he loves it.”    The Manor’s lighting techniques are admirably creative, to say the least. Goudreau said the Manor’s fascination for funky lighting began when she refused to take Christmas lights down after New Years. Charlie plugged them into a dimmer and choreographed the lighting to the music, so to speak. Thus, the lighting obsession was born.    “The best part is how Charlie has to groove with the music. I always catch people giving him a big smile,” Goudreau said.    As a final touch after the show, the Manor uploads the music recorded during the concert to their Bandcamp and Vimeo accounts. The Manor has special audio engineers that run live recordings and supply multi-track recordings as a part of the full package when a band works with the Manor.    The overall dedication of Murdock Manor to local music is overwhelming.    “Basically, our door is open to any band that is actively playing in the scene or reaches out to us with interest in working with us.” Goudrerau said.

We love all of our bands and we treat them with respect. The respect comes right back to you, 99 percent of the time

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

37


MUSIC

T PLAYLIST ­—JENNA REYES

TONI HAYAKAWA

SAM GREEN

KRISTIN CONCANNON

CAS 2016

COM 2014

COM 2015

01. JACK JOHNSON    Better Together

01. THE NATIONAL    Don’t Follow The Cap

01. ATLAS GENIUS    Trojans

02. ZEE AVI    Honey Bee

02. ANDREW BIRD    Fake Palindromes

02. IMAGINE DRAGONS    Demons

03. REEL BIG FISH    Another Day in Paradise

03. THE WALKMEN    Four Provinces

03. LANA DEL REY    Radio

04. NIRVANA    In Bloom

04. FATHER JOHN MISTY    Hollywood Forever Cemetary Sings

04. HOWIE DAY    Collide

I’m not really into current music but I’ve been listening to these songs nonstop for the past few weeks. ‘Better Together’ is such a soothing song and ‘Honey Bee’ reminds me of my boyfriend. I longboard to class and Reel Big Fish and Nirvana are definitely some of my favorite bands to skate to. They pump me up.

38

I love ‘Don’t Swallow The Cap’ because its very eerie and depressing, but The National spin it in a way that you can be happy listening to it. The main lyric in the chorus is ‘to see me cry, play Let It Be or Nevermind,’ which is an homage to music and a mixture of happiness and sadness. No other band sounds like them.

Atlas Genius and Imagine Dragons have been some of my favorite bands since last year. I saw them in concert last semester and I plan on seeing them again. They were that good. I’m a new fan of Lana Del Rey. “Radio” is definitely my favorite song of hers. Howie Day’s “Collide” never gets old. It’s such an awesome throwback


T

IT’S A PUMPKIN SPICE WORLD p. 40

FOOD


SUGAR, PUMPKIN SPICE & EVERYTHING NICE by Amy Gaines

Photography by Daniela Amaya T H E R E E M E RG E N C E of students wearing cozy sweaters and packing into Boston University buses on chilly mornings is a clear sign that it is fall. For some BU students, the best sign of the season can be found at any Starbucks on campus: pumpkin spice lattes.    Pumpkin spice lattes were unveiled in 2003. Ten years later, the drink is still popular and has inspired pumpkin-flavored treats in many coffee shops and bakeries around Boston. Whether you are on a budget or do not want to travel far from your room, this list covers the pumpkin treats you just can’t miss this season.

PUMPKIN PIE LATTE Blue State Coffee Look no further than Blue State Coffee on Commonwealth Ave. for new pumpkin coffee this fall. True to its name, this latte tastes just like the pie. For no additional charge, the barista will even top it off with fancy latte art. PUMPKIN WHOOPIE Breadsong Corner Bakery This southern staple hits Boston in a big way. Breadsong Bakery’s pumpkin whoopee pies are dangerously delicious. From the chocolate chip studded cake to the sinful cinnamon cream, this seasonal sensation should stick around all year.

ICED PUMPKIN LOAF Cook’s Farm Orchard Nestled in downtown Boston, the Copley Square Farmer’s Market provides fresh produce and delicious baked treats on Tuesday and Friday afternoons from May through November. At the market you can find Cook’s Farm Orchard’s iced pumpkin loaf. With sweet and tangy cream cheese frosting, this slightly spicy cake tastes like fall. PUMPKIN ICE CREAM Richardson’s Ice Cream A family-run ice cream shop in Middleton, Mass., Richardson’s is perhaps the king of homemade ice cream. Since 2007, Rhett’s in the George Sherman Union has served Richardson’s ice cream year round. It might be worth it to swap out cookie dough or rum raisin to try this seasonal favorite. PUMPKIN TEMPURA Haru Downtown Boston’s Haru serves up fresh Japanese cuisine and offers fried pumpkin tempura. Though not exactly student-budget friendly, it is definitely worth the splurge for this warm and inventive pumpkin sensation. The tempura is a little savory, a little sweet and a whole lot of goodness.


N O T S BB ROE W E R I E S ith anie Sm by Steph

TO VISIT:

SAM ADAMS & HARPOON

Photography by Alyssa Langer & Stephanie Smith


REGARDED BY MANY AS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE TOUR, GUESTS THEN HAVE 20 MINUTES TO TRY AN UNLIMITED AMOUNT OF BEER

F O R T H E 21+ C ROW D at BU, bars like Tavern in the Square and White Horse Tavern are Allston favorites—but, for frequent visitors, the routine might get old after a while. This fall, students can journey away from campus for a change of scene and a few quality beers?   Boston offers two breweries that are easy to get to and fun to explore. Each teaches the brewing process and the intricate details required to create the perfect beer.   Head over to these local breweries to taste some fresh and cold brews; even bring a six-pack home for later.


1

HARPOON BREWERY 306 NORTHERN AVE., BOSTON

Harpoon Brewery was established in 1986, and has since been the longest operating and continuous brewery in Massachusetts.    Hop on the Silver Line in front of the brewery and enter into Harpoon’s beer hall. This large room serves as a waiting area to order a beer or grab a pretzel before the tour. The warm, soft pretzels are served with various dipping sauces and might even be the best kind of snack to have while gulping down a brew.    The one-hour tour costs only $5 and each person on the tour gets a pair of beer goggles. On the tour, energetic beer captains teach everything there is to know about Harpoon. They explain the difference between a bottle brewed in Boston and one brewed in Vermont.    Before they move into the brewhouse to teach the mixing process, the captains explain what ingredients make a beer. Next, the tour group gets to see the beer set and ferment. Regarded by many as the highlight of the tour, guests then have 20 minutes to try an unlimited amount of beer.    The tour ends at the bottling line, which teaches visitors how the bottling process ensures the best taste and flavor in every bottle of Harpoon beer.

2

P L A N N I N G YO U R V I S I T

SAMUEL ADAMS BREWERY 30 GERMANIA ST., BOSTON

The Samuel Adams Brewery is about a half-mile away from the Orange Line’s Stony Brook stop. While in line for a tour, guests can look at an endless array of Samuel Adams memorabilia.    Once the free tour begins, the first stop is the ingredients room where you’ll learns about malt, hops, yeast and water. Here, you have the opportunity to taste the malt and smell the hops that go into each pint. Next, walk to the brewhouse where the enthusiastic tour guides will go through the process of mixing the ingredients.    It is then time to sit at the long tables to taste and enjoy three different brews.   Each guest is given a tasting glass to keep and to fill up as often as possible from the pitchers on the table. Every group goes through an appraisal and uses sight, smell and taste to understand the hard work that is put into each batch.    After the tasting, a free party trolley goes to Doyle’s Cafe in Jamaica Plain for guests to try delicious burgers and sip on cool Sam Adams beers. After the meal, guests can take home a free Sam Adams Boston Lager glass that is engineered to optimize taste and temperature.

1

2

BREWERY HOURS

BREWERY HOURS

M O N - W E D : 11 : 0 0 - 0 7 : 0 0 T H U R S - F R I : 11 : 0 0 - 11 : 0 0 S AT U R D AY: 11 : 0 0 - 11 : 0 0 S U N D AY: 11 : 3 0 - 0 7 : 0 0

M O N - T H U R S : 10 : 0 0 - 3 : 0 0 *last tour starts at 3pm

TOUR HOURS

S AT U R D AY: 10 : 0 0 - 3 : 0 0 *last tour starts at 3:00, gift shop & tour center close at 4:00

M O N - W E D S : 12 : 0 0 - 5 : 0 0 T H U R S - F R I : 10 : 0 0 - 5 : 3 0 *starting every hour S AT U R D AY: 11 : 2 0 - 6 : 0 0 *starting every 20 mins S U N D AY: 11 : 3 0 - 5 : 3 0 *starting every 30 mins

COST

$5

F R I D AY: 10 : 0 0 - 5 : 3 0 *last tour starts at 5:30, gift shop & tour center close at 6:30

COST

$2

suggested donation; price benefits local charities

including tastings MORE BREWERIES

Aside from these iconic Boston breweries, there are still many other micro-breweries that serve up a tasty glass of cold and frothy beer.    In Everett, Mass., for example, check out Idle Hands and Night Shift breweries or take a quick trip across the Charles to visit Cambridge’s John Harvard’s Brewery and Ale House or the Cambridge Brewing Company.    Regardless of the brewery, it is sure to be a day of beer-filled fun and a refreshing change from your can of Bud Light.

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

43


24 HOURS LATER p. 46

ABROAD


by KANDI WALKER Illustration by AMBER HUFF

JET-SET TO MOROCCO

24 HOURS IN RABAT

YOU HAVE ONE DAY IN MOROCCO’S CAPITAL CITY, RABAT, HERE’S WHAT YOU DO: Spend the morning getting lost in the medina, the oldest part of the city of Rabat. This is the best area to observe unchanged Arab and Moroccan culture and get lost in a maze of colorful walls. Watch out for the aggressive motorcyclists winding through the narrow streets, and expect to hear “Obama!!” yelled at you at least once in these parts because you’re “Amreekee” (American), of course.


Le Tour Hassan and Mohammed V, located right next to one another, are the two must-see historical landmarks in Rabat.

M

ake your way over to the souk, or market section of the medina for some mid-morning bargaining. Here, you can find anything from spices, to handmade leather goods, one-of-a-kind rugs and jewelry, and plenty of friendly shopkeepers looking to assist you in selecting the perfect souvenir for home. An experienced bargainer should be able to haggle the price down to about ¼ of what the shopkeeper originally demands.    Le Tour Hassan and Mohammed V, located right next to one another, are the two must-see historical landmarks in Rabat. The Mohammed V mausoleum holds the tomb of the two past kings of Morocco (Mohammed V and Hassan II). The white marble and intricate Moroccan designs of the mausoleum, coupled with the massiveness of the Hassan Tower, will leave you amazed. On your way out, don’t miss the ladies waiting around the gates offering custom henna tattoos to departing tourists.    One of the most prevalent areas of French influence in Morocco is the café-culture of its cities and towns. Sipping mint tea, eating pastries, and people watching with friends is a daily activity for many Moroccans. Spend the afternoon at one of Rabat’s many beachfront cafes or head to the popular café in the Kasbah (walled part of the city) for stunning views of Rabat and the Atlantic Ocean.    Find one of Rabat’s many rooftop terraces where you can peacefully watch the sunset over the medina.    Head home after sunset for dinner—it is rare for a Moroccan family to eat dinner before 9 or 10 o’clock. On Friday, Moroccans eat the traditional dish couscous with vegetables and meat in the middle. Otherwise, you can stop at one of the many street food vendors for a wide variety of exotic foods and sugary deserts, a perfect way to end your day in Rabat.

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

47


ABROAD CONFESSIONS

Boston University students spill their secrets from across the globe

Illustrations by JORDAN FREASE

“I threw up on the dance floor at a club in Prague and blamed it on someone else.” London, England

“I ate a kangaroo and thought the cute, fuzzy guy was delicious.” Sydney, Australia

“We have to buy our own hand soap and cleaners for our dorms. Yet, being that my roommate and I are on a budget, we figured we would just acquire some toilet paper... Tonight we left the restaurant we went to with slightly fuller purses than when we walked in.”

“Everyone in my host family pees with the door open.” Madrid, Spain

London, England

“I accidentally got drunk in my wine industry class.” Sydney, Australia

“I’m from Texas, but I told people I was from Boston to avoid the George W. Bush jokes.” Sydney, Australia

48


WORKOUT WITH RIGGS p. 50

SPORTS


WORKOUT WITH WOMEN’S ICE HOCKEY

by KELLY LANDRIGAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARLIN STIEHL

Ever wonder what it is like to workout like a college athlete? Meghan Riggs (COM ’14), a senior forward on the nationally ranked women’s ice hockey team, took us through a workout that the team performs on rotation. The workout begins with high hurdle jumps followed by a Dynamax overhead smash. HIGH HURDLE JUMPS Line up five hurdles and continuously jump over all five without stopping (four sets). DYNAMAX OVERHEAD SMASH Take a 14-pound ball, lift it above your head and slam it down on the ground (five reps, four sets). The girls then move on to the next leg of their workout: kettlebell swings, stability ball rollouts, trapbar deadlifts and weighted chin ups. KETTLEBELL SWING (Prep) Straddle kettlebell with feet slightly wider apart than shoulder width. Squat down with arm extended downward between legs and grasp kettlebell handle with overhand grip. Position shoulder over kettlebell with taut, low back and trunk close to vertical. (Execution) Pull kettlebell up off floor, slightly forward, just above height of ankles. Immediately dip down slightly and swing kettlebell back under hips. Quickly swing kettlebell up by raising upper body upright and extending legs. Continue to swing kettlebell back down between legs and up higher on each swing until height just above head can be maintained. (Return) Swing kettlebell back down between legs.

50

STABILITY BALL ROLLOUTS Take a stability ball and get on your knees. Roll out until you cannot roll out anymore and your back is straight. TRAPBAR DEADLIFT Stand with feet shoulder width or narrower inside trap bar, with weights on each side. Squat down with feet flat and grasp handles. Lift bar by extending hips and knees to full extension. Pull shoulders back at top of lift if rounded. Return to floor by bending knees forward slightly while allowing hips to bend back behind, keeping back straight and knees pointed in the same direction as feet. WEIGHTED CHIN UPS (Can be performed with or without weights attached around waist.) Pull up on the bar until chin passes above the bar; hang on the bar going down until arms are straight; pull up again (3 reps per set). FLOOR SLIDES Lay flat on your back and slowly lift arms overhead while your whole body remains flat on the floor.

The final set of the workout consisted of the following: downward dog pushups, partner hamstring drops and stability ball “stir the pot.” DOWNWARD DOG PUSHUP Begin by doing a pushup and then pull yourself into the downward dog position; hold for three seconds and then do another pushup and repeat the cycle (10 reps/set). PARTNER HAMSTRING DROPS Grab an Airex pad and a partner. Have your partner hold down the heels of your feet and slowly drop down until you touch the floor then immediately push yourself back up. Repeat (exercise should be felt it in hamstrings). STABILITY BALL “STIR THE POT” Grab a stability ball, placing elbows on the ball and feet on the ground. Make 15 circles with the ball going one way, repeat going the opposite way.


CROSSFIT: THE WORKOUT REGIME FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

>> by DANIEL ATLER

Have you ever struggled to sprint down Comm. Ave. trying to catch the Boston University Shuttle or barely been able to carry a hamper full of laundry down three flights of stairs? The popular fitness regimen CrossFit is here to help.    Functional movements make up a majority of daily activities and CrossFit is built around this concept. The program aims to improve overall life quality through fitness regimes.    Greg Glassman founded the company in 2000, and ever since, CrossFit has gained a significant following, including many BU students.    Jim Russell (COM ’15), who has earned CrossFit’s level-one certification, said his passion for the program is rooted in the changes it has brought to the fitness community.    “For the longest time, it seemed the only reason people were interested in working out was for purely aesthetic purposes,” Russell said. “I love the fact that CrossFit has such a focus on functionality.”    CrossFit’s success in recent years could possibly be attributed to the sense of community it usually fosters when people do these workouts together.    For Jose Yarzebski (SAR ’16), his love for the fitness program is because of this community feel.    “We sweat together, and we celebrate each other’s PRs [personal records] and push each other to get better and better,” Yarzebski said.    Although CrossFit has already coined the phrase the “sport of fitness” to describe its

THE BUZZ FALL 2013

program, controversy has resulted from this particular style of training.    Scoreboards and a running clock during workouts might be a great source of motivation, but some critics argue that it is easy to disregard safety when trying for the fastest time or highest number of repetitions.    Noah Friedman (SMG ’17), who started CrossFit earlier this year, said he thinks the competition is beneficial.    “I understand why it may seem that racing would lead to sacrificing form,” Friedman said. “But I find that sticking to form leads to consistency, efficiency and in the end a faster time for the workouts.”    CrossFit is not necessarily superior to other exercise regimens, but its practicality is what draws many to the program. For Russell, the best analogy he has heard to describe CrossFit’s functionality is that the gym is similar to a lab.    “We’re programming our bodies to move with maximum efficiency, so that when we have that heavy box of clothes on move in day we are prepared,” Russell said.

I love the fact that

CrossFit has such a focus on functionality.

51


WHERE by PETER ZAMPA

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARLIN STIEHL

52


THE BOTTOM LINE: WE GO TO SCHOOL IN A CITY, AND CIT Y LIFE DE-

TRACTS FROM NORMAL ‘COLLEGE-Y’ THINGS.

OP-ED

O N T H E W E E K E N DS I browse around social media and all I see is a slew of drunken selfies. The one similar characteristic throughout all of these pictures that I’ve noticed is color; most are wearing clothes with their school colors.    I see these pictures, and I can’t help but think that most of the students at Boston University would not be caught dead wearing our colors. Most simply do not rally behind BU’s sports teams, nor do they show pride in our institution. It’s a shame that our university lacks major sports fanaticism that would help bring more school spirit to our campus.    Our school’s urban setting hinders enthusiastic collegiate sports fans. I know what you are thinking, “but Boston College does it!” Yeah, well, down with BC (look, my fanaticism is showing!). Honestly though, if anyone thinks going to BC is going to college in a city, they are sorely mistaken.    BC does not have a speck of the urban feel that enthralls BU students. The bottom line: we go to school in a city, and city life detracts from normal “college-y” things. Instead of house parties being the only option, your fake ID gets you into bars and clubs downtown. You have access to exponentially more events—like concerts, art shows, professional sports games, basket weaving showcases or whatever it is those hipsters do in Cambridge—than any other school in the nation.    So yes, it makes sense that going to see a Bruins or Red Sox game is more appealing than a hockey game at Agganis Arena. The bright lights of the city justifiably guide interest elsewhere, leaving little time for amateur sports.    That being said, University leadership is usually blamed for some of this. We are not a unified campus, and it is excruciatingly obvious. Students will walk down Comm. Ave. in red and white on occasion, but are they identifying themselves with this university or simply wearing a shirt they were given at orientation because they have not done laundry in three weeks? THE BUZZ FALL 2013

   At times, it feels as if the administration is trying to create a professional environment, which is absolutely beneficial, but might not be what every student signed up for.    Some students might want a vintage college experience and sports events where the entire student body is drunker than acceptable at 10 a.m. It is the last chance for these students to be kids (plenty more where that cliché came from), so why not give it to them? It will simply give them something to identify with in the four years on our urban campus.    As of now, BU students do not have an identity and it seems the University’s every move is to keep it that way. Adding absurd sports that students and Bostonians would never in a million years consider attending? Check. Terrible promotion of a potentially marquee men’s basketball program? Check.

events” like football games and ample excitement to inspire enthusiasm. Every wrong turn this administration takes, enthusiasm among students continues to dwindle.    Students who go here do not just come from different backgrounds but often from completely different worlds. The city life that our town provides is much more endearing than the chance of a good time attending a BU athletic event. It could simply be that so many beneficial opportunities present themselves that there is no space in the life of a BU student for obsessing over athletics.    By choosing BU, we elected for a “real-life” atmosphere rather than an air of unity and fanaticism. We made the right choice, but having big time collegiate sports would make our experience that much better. Peter is the Sports Editor for The Buzz.

AS OF NOW, BU STUDENTS DO NOT HAVE AN IDENTITY AND IT SEEMS THE UNIVERSITY’S EVERY MOVE IS TO KEEP IT THAT WAY. Cutting football in order to build a state of the art hockey arena? Check-mate.    When it comes to athletics, BU just cannot get out of its own way. The hockey team is fantastic and fun to watch, but even it cannot unite an entire campus. It takes quintessential “college 53


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THE BUZZ FALL 2013

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The Buzz | Fall 2013  

The Buzz | Fall 2013  

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