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Your new and Local

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MATCH

PEWTER HANDMADE IN ITALY

Loaves & Fishes Cookshop 835 Franklin Ave Garden City 516-877-1010 For a complete cooking class schedule please visit

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SITE OF THE 2002 & 2009 U.S. OPEN

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page 2 Letter credits

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Publisher’s Letter

Reflections on Our Spring Issue By Angela Susan Anton, Publisher Our April Boulevard is the fourth issue of our wonderful new magazine, and I can breathe a sigh of relief! Bringing a new magazine to market is in many ways similar to bringing a new baby into this world. Our magazine, just like a newborn, is at the beginning of a continuing learning curve. You, our readers are helping our “newborn” grow with your thoughts, comments, and continued loyalty. Your interest and interaction has accelerated our growth and made us into a more exciting magazine. Thank you! As spring begins, we will be distributing The Boulevard not only to Nassau County, but to all of Long Island including the Hamptons and Montauk, and selected locations in New York City. This expanded distribution will give you, our readers, an opportunity to find out about the finest venues throughout our great city, and to read interviews with both local and nationally prominent celebrities, businessmen and civic leaders. We are proud of The Boulevard website, which has already become one of the most talked-about and exciting magazine sites on the Internet although it is still in its infancy and a “work in progress.” Take a few minutes to visit www.Boulevardli.com, which contains key Boulevard features, articles and photos, as well as “hot music” and streaming video/audio. I promise you will find it colorful, interesting, and worthwhile! In our April issue, we feature as our cover story Clinton Kelly, famed cable “fashionista,” who is an advisor to women on “What Not to Wear.” We also take a unique in-depth look at the emergence of a growing spiritual movement in the U.S. This spiritual rebirth is highlighted in the article on world-famous movie director David Lynch and musical icon Donovan. Both of these world famous artists are involved in the David Lynch Foundation, which seeks to help disturbed children overcome their emotional problems through the practice of transcendental meditation. We also feature an article on the new and growing interest in the ancient and mysterious Kabbalah and its growing celebrity following. We showcase the fabulous story of the birth and growth of London Jewelers from a small store in Glen Cove to one of the most successful privately owned jewelers in the U.S. These stories and others combined with the brilliant celebrity photography of Patrick McMullan are what make The Boulevard a totally unique reading experience. We have been extremely fortunate this year in having a relatively mild winter while other parts of our great country have suffered with unending cold, snow and ice. Hopefully, New York and Long Island’s good weather trend will continue for spring and summer and we will all be able to once again enjoy our beautiful beaches, museums, restaurants, hotels, resorts, theater, and child-friendly exhibits and amusements. There are many roads on Long Island and New York, and they all lead to The Boulevard to help find your ultimate destination! Peace, health, happiness, success and of course, love… Angela Susan Anton

PUBLISHER/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Angela Susan Anton GENERAL MANAGER William M. Delventhal, Jr. TECHNICAL DIRECTOR/ ASSISTANT TO PUBLISHER Jason Feinberg VP SYSTEMS Tomas Baade SENIOR EDITOR Dagmar Fors Karppi EDITOR Carla Santella ART DIRECTOR Paul Scheuer CREATIVE DIRECTOR AND DESIGNER Lucia D’Onofrio ASSISTANT PAGE DESIGNER Damien Monaco PHOTO EDITOR Jeremy Grand CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Barry Kay TRAVEL AND FEATURES EDITOR Christina D. Morris CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Tom Albright Jennifer Dunlop Dr. Stephen T. Greenberg Lauren Lawrence Irvina Lew Dr. John Loret Heather Muhleman Bob Ronzoni Michael Russo Dr. Deborah Sarnoff Maria Saperstein Dr. Robert A. Scott Dr. Suzzanne Steinbaum Tim Sullivan Venus Quintana CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Chuck Gosline Tina Guiomar Jason Feinberg Dagmar Fors Karppi Gene Lesserson M. Cyril Morris Joe Schildhorn Kathleen Wickham Austin Young CELEBRITY PHOTOGRAPHER Patrick McMullan

Supplement to Anton Community Newspapers


page 3 Americana Manhasset

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A M E R I CA NA M A N H A S S E T

Malandrino: Back to the Future The Spring/Summer 2007 Collection is a futuristic take on classic looks. From trenches to suits to minidresses, their shapes are constructed yet their feminine curves help define the new proportion of the silhouette. Hemlines are hiked, necklines take a plunge and dresses come in not-so-subtle halter and single-shoulder styles. Catherine Malandrino has created a body in movement in a city of perpetual evolution. This season’s collection reflects a world in progress: lightness for motion, knit dresses for

freedom, cylinder collars for protection and metal accents for strength, all contrasted by the sensuality of chiffon, the transparency of the organza and the soft draping of jersey. The soft color palette, featuring shades of steel, nude, nickel and white, are struck by shaf t s of primar y blue, yellow and red that

©2007 CASTAGNA REALTY CO., INC.

help define the graphic silhouette of Spring 2007.

Contact AMERICANA MANHASSET’s complimentary Personal Shopping Service at 800.818.6767 or americanamanhasset.com

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page 5 London Jewelers

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oyster perpetual 36mm datejust turn-o-graph

OFFICIAL ROLEX JEWELER ROLEX

OYSTER PERPETUAL, DATEJUST AND TURN-O-GRAPH ARE TRADEMARKS.


page 6-009 Marilyn Rose DESIGN

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DESIGN

Marilyn Rose Creates the By Dagmar Fors Karppi nterior Designer Marilyn Rose is a “user friendly” decorator. She is a fascinating multi-dimensional woman with lots of interests and a reserve of information that makes her perfect for her job of interacting with design clients. Her goal is to create the interior space you want, sparked with her resources. The words “user friendly”is also a nod to the world of the Internet, which she uses to full advantage. Her Internet site MarilynRose.com shows pictures of recent design projects that illustrate that she works with her clients to give them what they want: their vision using her expertise in finding the “right stuff.” The important thing, she said, is to reflect that client. “I don’t work in a vacuum. Even if they think they don’t know what they want. Each job is a reflection of the client.” She often asks clients to look through magazines and tear out what they like. “I put the items together and I see what they are gravitating toward. I don’t go out and just purchase things. A lot of preliminary work goes into it,” she said. The only theme running through her work is an attention to detail and elegance. “Even if it is a Tuscany Villa it can be elegant,” said Marilyn. “Each design project is different. It is not just another string on my bow. The results come from listening to the client.” One of her clients in search of comfort sat in each chair and laid on each couch they were looking at to be sure they were comfortable. “In

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Home Her Clients Desire that house every room has a large TV set,” so there was reason to test the furniture that way, she explained. Marilyn Rose has done all manner of jobs – big is no problem, nor is small. She is willing to work on just one room, as long as there is a realistic budget. But remember, as a decorator, she has access to the wholesale market so your money will go further and bring you great quality. That is something she wants to provide, a finished project of quality. She has been working with a client over a period of six or seven years. “They are doing the house step by step, room by room,” getting just what they want. Interestingly she said if there was a choice between which room to spend the least amount of money on between the living room and the family room the one to chose is the latter, the living room she called an occasional room. It is not where the family lives.

Working Relationships One of the lynchpins of Marilyn Rose’s business is that she achieves quality through her great working relationships with her suppliers and craftspeople that guarantees that she and they stand behind the work. As she said recently chatting with Angela Kitchen: The perfect setting for any gathering. The soft honey cabinets along with the custom tile mural of the New York Skyline create a warm and inviting atmosphere. The window treatments add just the right touch of color to make this kitchen a place for a family to enjoy.

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Living Room: Glamorous living room with faux finished walls. This area rug was custom designed to enhance the overall pastels of the room.

Anton in her Locust Valley store, “Quality is what is important and in the long run the most economical way to go.” The shop on Birch Hill Road at the crossroads of Locust Valley is an extension of her design work. It houses her accessory business and is filled with the objects that are the finishing touches on a design project. She has often helped clients finish off a room done by another designer. The store is filled with eye candy. “I let people live [for a few days] with the accessories to see if they are right

for them,” she explained. Sitting in her cozy Locust Valley store, Marilyn’s Yorkshire terrier Annabelle greeted us. “People often ask how I pick fabrics. I jokingly say, ‘I throw them on the floor and when Annabelle sits on them - that is what I choose!” [But remember the fabrics she has assembled are already a choice group equal in desirability for the project at hand.] “You like animals,” says Angela Susan Anton, seeing horse paintings on the walls. “Bring me the pictures of my baby,” says Marilyn. [We think for a

moment that her Yorkie has had a litter. Wrong!] Her assistant Carol comes up with several choices: a sheaf of material from the Internet from the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust where Marilyn is picking out a baby elephant to “adopt” and a picture of her 8-month-old granddaughter, Coco Francesca Rose Coates at two weeks old, the baby of her daughter Marlene, a glass sculptor. “I’ve always wanted to be a veterinarian,” said Marilyn, proving that she brings a great many interests to her job. FYI: The baby elephants are orphans. The DSWT nurtures them and works to form a new “herd” for them, to release at a preserve and to ultimately live wild. Adopting an orphaned elephant costs $50 a year in American dollars. “Someday I’ll go there and see their work,” added Marilyn. That is ultra possible since Marilyn Rose already travels to Europe on buying trips to auctions, vendors and antique markets, as seen on her website. “I have price points all over the place, just as clients have different budgets. I buy from vendors I have used over the years and can depend on the quality they provide.” They

Bathroom: What better place than to end your day in this beautifully appointed bathroom to relax and let the bubbles take your troubles away!

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Cocktail Room: An inviting area as an adjunct to a living room that is the perfect place to sit and relax and enjoy a cocktail. The carpeting was custom designed for the space as well as the furnishings.

appreciate her business she explained and they make sure she gets the quality she expects. Marilyn Rose doesn’t walk away from problems when they do happen. “I go to the mat to make sure the client gets what they want. We track everything we do for each client to make it happen. I have a nucleus of people I work with and cherish because they care. They show up!” She said, “In today’s world it is definitely more than just chosing a piece of furniture. It is successfully completing the job to the client’s satisfaction which becomes more and more difficult in today’s world. Therefore it is necessary to have a good nucleus of tradespeople with the same point of view.” Exactly on target, the door to the boutique opened and a man walked in, her wallpaper hanger, Steve. He was on his way to work on a card room she is decorating for a showcase at Caumsett that opens on April 21. “I chose to do a study that has a contemporary look, which might be a surprise to some people. They are used to seeing my more traditional look. Sometimes they think of me as only doing antiques and traditional projects. She said she looks forward to becoming friends with her clients and added that what’s important is that the decorator and client are a good match with mutual

respect: a good meld of personalities. Marilyn herself worked as a commercial artist and than went back to school to study interior design. Her knowledge of art and art history made the change of focus easy. She said, “This is my passion. That is very special when someone works at their passion.” Angela Anton asked what she hopes for her clients. “My hope for my clients, is that even if they are not sure of what their dream is, ultimately they come home to a completed project which is what they had hoped for and love it. I try to do all the work with their input so that the client can ultimately relax knowing a professional is helping them. It they chose to, they go to the showrooms, but I try to narrow down the confusion by picking the right vendors. In the end we make friends and that transcends the job and you leave with a good feeling.” She wants for her clients what she herself cherishes. “When I go home to my house - to me it’s my retreat, my sanctuary, my place to recover from life during the day. I want it to be warm and inviting. Even in a showhouse, people say of my work, ‘It’s warm and inviting’. There is not a mental velvet rope across it. That is what I want to create.”

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page 10,11 Diane Burns DESIGN

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Interior Designer Longs for Return of Classicism Diane Burn Doesn’t Do Modern By Dagmar Karppi iane Burn, a successful interior designer, was recently featured in the December 2006 issue of Architectural Digest’s list of 100 top interior designers and architects in the country. The Boulevard congratulated her on this recent accolade and took the opportunity to meet with her as part of our April/May Design Section. There is much to be admired in Burn’s repertoire and her efforts have not gone unnoticed, having appeared in both the United States and International Architectural Digest more than fifteen times, including nine covers.

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Burn credits John Loring, Tiffany’s design director of 28 years and friend, for launching her design career. At a young age, Burn, a teacher, purchased a magnificent Palladian-style fourstory historic landmark mansion built in 1864 by Henry Casebolt in Pacific Heights, CA. Casebolt’s company was responsible for all the steel cables for the cable cars in San Francisco. She hired a small army of artists to execute her ideas of paint effects, murals, faux finishes, hand-painted floor designs and trompe l’oeil, and enlisted cabinet makers to install the boiseries (wood paneling). She had imported most everything from France including 18th-century boiseries, fireplace

mantels, antique furnishings and many architectural elements complementing her designs for this extraordinary residence. Following the completion of her Pacific Heights residence, she invited Loring for cocktails and, of course, to see the results of her endeavor. The meeting was highly rewarding for the young designer and proved to be a timely opportunity for her, one that would effect a very smart career change. Loring by then was the New York bureau chief for Architectural Digest, and, suitably impressed by Burn’s talent and romantic style, called Paige Rense, editor-in-chief at Architectural Digest, to inform her that Diane Burn’s residence was a “must see.” Six months later Burn’s masterpiece was on the cover of Architectural Digest followed by an impressive 12-page feature. Thus began a 30year design career, leading her to assignments for an international clientele in Italy, France, New York, Los Angeles, and Palm Beach. The majority of projects she has undertaken both for herself and clients throughout the United States and Europe have been published, including Diane VonFurstenberg’s “ The Bathroom,” Linda Chase’s “In the Romantic Style,” Diane Saeks’ “San Francisco A Certain Style” Baldegren’s “The Bed” and many more. According to Architectural Digest’s profile of Burn, “When Diane Burn talks about her interiors, she uses the language of enchantment - ‘illusion,’ ‘charm,’ ‘fantasy.’” “Imagination is huge for me,”


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explains the designer. “All of my interiors make you feel transported to another era.” Heavily influenced by European design (“Even as a child I had a passion for Versailles”) her tranquil, romantic rooms evoke those of 18th-century châteaus. Louis XVI pieces and whimsical print and check fabrics, not to mention her signature wall treatments, all figure prominently. “I really don’t do modern,” says Burn, who counts among her inspirations designers Renzo Mongiardino and Madeleine Castaing and collector Lillian Williams. “I long for the return of classicism or traditional design.” Currently for Burn, work has started on a boutique hotel in Cappitola, CA, called The Rispin. Architectural Digest has photographed it in the “before” state to eventually appear in a “Before and After” feature in a future issue. She shuttles between her homes in New York and in West Palm Beach, where her 1925 Spanish Colonial house was recently featured in the November 2006 issue of Architectural Digest with 10-and-one-half pages illustrating her beautiful, unique design style. Having lived in Europe off and on for more than 20 years, Burn’s knowledge of antiques and painted finishes (frescoes, etc.) have become continually more refined. Her passion is in renovating old houses, always consistent with her design goals of creating magic, beauty, comfort and living environments filled with charm.

Photos by Russell MacMasters

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page 12-15 Peerless Perfection DESIGN

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Peerless Perfection in a Moderne Mode By Christina D. Morris he pristine walkway in gray herringbone paving was bordered by 2-foot angled stucco and blue stone garden boxes planted with a variety of specimen bushes. A 30-foot silver-dollar Gum tree anchored a rock garden spread with white rough pebbles and ground evergreens. It had an oriental

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appeal illustrated by the sharp angles, straight lines and precise order of plantings. The landscaped entrance provided a clue to the interior of this North Shore contemporary house by Lee Najman, whose signature appeal is reflected in his extraordinary use of materials in wallscapes, architectural design and avant garde creative expression. Architecture Week has said

of Richard Neutra, an icon of moderne architecture and design characterized by streamlined and curved forms admired by Najman, “Neutra is considered one of the world’s most influential architects. He responded to the Southern California climate with designs in which indoor and outdoor spaces flow freely together and into a carefully arranged landscape.” Najman has followed the master and forged his own landscape here on Long Island. The front door was given a geometric design by applying cedar strips of alternating colored wood. The hallway entrance features a soaring 18-foot vaulted ceiling and one’s eye is immediately drawn to the flooring zigzagging in all directions. Najman pointed out the floor’s continuous geometric pattern, visualized by 18inch wide black and gray Canadian granite strips, that flows through the first floor’s open landscape design. The master suite and a powder room have doors, while entrances to the spacious kitchen, den and living room are architecturally design apertures that serve to delineate complex angled walls. Significant architectural details abound. The vaulted ceiling allows for a second floor hallway with an open balcony sans Juliet. The hand-bent aluminum stair railing,

The boldness of black in the entrance foyer derived from the continuous geometric pattern of Canadian granite. A soaring 18-foot vaulted ceiling, shimmering aluminum stair rail along with bold splashes of red…welcome to contemporary design!

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page 12-15 Peerless Perfection DESIGN

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A seat at the glass dining room table affords a panoramic view of the spectacular kitchen, a harmonious array of cabinets, countertops and flooring that remain honest with the overall color theme.

shimmers under skylights, holding great promise for a future Romeo. A striking black molding divides the vaulted ceiling anchoring four hanging lamps dressed with delicate blue shades. A bold red, blue and gray textured metal console contrasts with the wall of gray slate tiles we first encountered on an exterior wall near the house entrance. Off to the left, a wall of cobalt blue crystallized glass tile serves as a backdrop for chipped-edged, celery colored, glass shelves displaying whimsical glass animal ornaments. This corner of beauty turned out to be a passageway to an extraordinary power room...more a work of art than its utilitarian function. The same crystallized tiles continue on the powder room’s wall bordering a large mirror. A curved free-form vanity top in black granite with gold bird’s eye maple insert is a perfect surface to hold a magnificent glass bowl sink featuring a kaleidoscope interior and splendid cobalt blue exterior.

A wall of windows provides a view of the garden and patio from the family room, dining area and kitchen. The spacious and brightly lit kitchen is a symphony in white high-gloss epoxy cabinets with brushed stainless steel handles. Black and gray granite backsplashes, black countertops and appliances all contrast with a bold splash of red in ceiling trim and ribbed red vinyl-covered corner columns. Here functionality takes priority and the black, white and gray theme of the entire first floor is captured. A large two-tiered serviceable center isle provides for both dining and displaying food. A glass oblong table capable of extending to banquet size is angled in view of the kitchen island, as well as a family room. It is surrounded by black and gray contemporary chairs and features an attractive, rather unusual, contemporary-shaped glass vase. Colorful and interesting shaped glass ornaments appear on built-in shelving, including a vibrantly colored

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page 12-15 Peerless Perfection DESIGN

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Artistic expression prevails in the living room where custom designed seating appears as a composite of art. The wall treatment serves as an art gallery.

glass trumpet. These colorful accessories are in stark contrast to the minimalist, albeit luxurious, furnishing of the family room adjacent to the dining area. What appears as a freestanding gray slate tiled wall with a sprinkling of mica that responds to light is actually the support for the second floor balcony. Here again, the wall is given an opening allowing an oversized painting in (you guessed it) black, white and red to be viewed from the hallway and the family room. A soft, black and white fabric dresses the sofa nestled in a gray suede frame trimmed with a woven leather base. It appears to be built into the wall. Custom-built wall units in a patterned aluminum and black laminate conceal practical amenities such as a bar. Entertainment equipment and a fireplace share the wall. The comfort of soft carpeting halts the granite floor adding warmth to this space where whimsy takes over. Gray wool borders black squares decorated with zigzags of silver lorex. A solo red leather chair appears as a symbolic compromise to color. The cocktail table incorporates many shapes and replicates the colors of the hall console. Its two-tiered L-

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shape features a red laminated metal top with a gray, textured, laminated lower level. A circular blue top completes the design, another work of art in itself. Along to the hallway to the living room, the image-oriented design takes another giant leap. Here the space is so serenely coordinated that one is tempted to whisper. The owner’s accessories have found a

wonderful home on Najman’s champagne colored wallscape that includes a stainless steel fireplace. A black oak platform provides the definitive setting for a sumptuous curved sofa in white suede with black woven bolsters. Anchoring this seating is a magnificent contemporary sculpture by Cory Springer made for the owners in celebration of their new home. The room includes several colors making it distinct from the others. They are subtle, nevertheless. A gold, plum and gray textured carpet adds contrast. A trio of curved, suede ottomans in bright copper, blue and yellow are nestled below a huge painting of twohalf-faces, each with different coloring. The painting’s title: Color Blind. The angled wall under the stairs features a gold metallicized vinyl wallpaper and leads to the only visible door in the hallway, that of the master suite. Here again, there is both drama

The bedroom’s tranquility reflects the monochromatic use of grays setting the scene for the boldness of blue, black and vibrant red.


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and tranquility. Black and gray along with cobalt blue dominate this spacious, well-lit area. The master suite comprises three sections. The bedroom with sleek contemporary wall units in a soft gray laminated surface includes a fireplace and entertainment unit. An elaborate marble headboard angled to fit into a corner highlights the angled bed. This marble design is replicated on the ceiling. Standing guard between these two marble designs is an exquisite glass sculpture of a family unit (man, woman, child). Off to the left there’s an entrance to built-in closets, a dressing room and shower bathroom. Masculine in design, it features a lustrous blue pearl granite tile. Madam’s separate, although larger bathroom, on the opposite side of the room, includes an attractive built-in vanity table with chair, a walkin dressing room, a wall built for shoes, as well as a shower, commode and Jacuzzi tub. The black, white and gray color theme is continued. It is above this spacious bedroom suite that the owner chose to have a home office. Mounting the stairs, one finds a multicolored square oil painting and a vibrant red sculpture standing guard at the top, distinct in the overall monochromatic theme. Najman’s signature is immediately apparent in the texture and style of the sleek cabinets featuring aluminum laminated doors. A gray suede sofa and cocktail table are joined by a red leather lounge chair and ottoman. It is clearly more than an office and to accommodate its dual usage, an entertainment unit that would serve both the desk area and the seating area was designed in a cylinder shape, made of black oak with an aluminum center that rotates for viewing options. Also on this level are three additional bedrooms and bathrooms and an additional back staircase to the kitchen, laundr y room and basement.

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Viewing the downstairs hallway from the office provides a true appreciation of the complex angles of the construction process and as Najman pointed out, a great deal of steel was necessary to provide stability. While the entire house is new design and construction, it was derived from the footprint of a three-bedroom hi ranch. What has transpired is a spacious 4,000-square-foot, young-at-heart, sophisticated, entertainment-oriented house for adults with a penchant for modern design and a love affair with the classic use of black, white and gray. Credits: Lee Najman Designs, Inc. Photography: Busch Studios

Adjacent to the dining room, a family room introduces cobalt blue cabinetry in s harp contrast to the black fireplace and gray carpeting.

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page 16, 17 Maria COLOR DESIGN

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Exterior Color Can Make a Powerful Statement ... And Help to Personalize Your Home By Maria Saperstein or most homeowners, painting a house represents a significant financial and emotional commitment. Because most homes get their character from paint, architects and designers have developed palette combinations that complement each

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other while following all the hard and fast rules. Color choice is personal and, depending on the age and style of your house, should dictate the direction in which you choose to go. Color can convince one’s eye that a small house is larger, a one-story structure taller, and an ordinary house a little more interesting. It’s always wise

Cape Cod Cottage

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to try a quart of paint on the side of the house for a trial run before making a final decision, as a color will appear much different on an entire building than it does on a sample swatch. Color can camouflage a multitude of sins and accentuate the most intricate of details. Some basics to keep in mind are the house’s existing


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Queen Anne Victorian

colors and features such as brick, stone and roofing. You can draw from these elements for a more streamlined look. Consider your exposure; southern and western exposures have much more sunlight whereas a northern exposure will give a blue cast to any color. For your prominent color, neutrals, shades of white, and paler shades are the safest choice. Choose a contrasting color for the trim to add drama. Keep warm body color with warm trim colors and cool with cools. The front door is a focal point on most homes, so you can be more playful with a vivid or outrageous color that you love. This should not be done on garage doors to avoid drawing attention to them. If your house is a particular style, go with it. Colonials, typical of American architecture, traditionally look best in white, cream or pale yellow. The trim and shutters should be a darker shade such as green, black, red or blue. Split-levels, postwar born, have become popular in browns and grays with off-white trims. The Cape Cod, originating in Massachusetts, is delightful in taupes, reddish browns, platinum gray, pale yellow and

white, with black, dusty blue, burgundy or dark green shutters. Villa styles such as Tuscan, Spanish or textured stucco typically call for pale tans and grays, beiges and light browns. Historical-style homes such as Queen Annes, Victorians, bungalows and cottages can combine as many as three body colors. It is now uncommon for these homes, regardless of size, to have contrasting porch, trim and ornament colors. These eclectic styles favor colors from the past such as maroon, olive and terra cotta. Getting our home to look its best is always a priority, and painting it is a huge job. To simplify the task, take the time to look at other homes similar to yours. Drive around the area and make mental notes, or photos, of combinations that appeal to you. Also collect photographs from magazines that have a color you like. Once you have gathered your information, you can make a hybrid design of how you would like your house to look. If you are still confused, spend some time browsing around your local paint store to see what is available. You never know what you will find.

Stucco Villa

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page 18 Peter Marino

DESIGN

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Peter Marino Links Technology and Design By Dagmar Karppi eter Marino’s design for the Louis Vuitton boutique at the Landmark building in Hong Kong has earned him the 2007 AIA Institute Honor Award for Interior Architecture. The internationally acclaimed architecture firm Peter Marino Architect is the designer of the Americana Manhasset and the designer of the new wing for the Nassau County Museum of Art.

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The new three-level luxury boutique, occupies a prominent corner in the central district of Hong Kong, for Louis Vuitton Malletier. The 25-foot-high, semi-transparent box allows natural light to pour into the store, providing a shimmering backdrop for the interior spaces. The main stair volume, designed as if carved out of a solid block of stone, organizes the project by connecting three distinct levels. The sandblasted glass treads of the stair feature built-in LED panels containing video images on each walking surface. The entire visual narrative of the LED stair spreading over three sections can be viewed from the uppermost level of the boutique and as reflected from the mirror on the ceiling. The AIA Jury commented on the design saying: “Sophisticated elegance that sets a high standard for contemporar y design through integration of new technologies and materials towards engaging a new audience for this renewed brand...They went beyond the effective use of technology by imbedding the technology into the a rc h i te c t u re. . . Th e l e ve l o f d e t a i l i n g i s appropriate to the specific merchandising of the products.” The AIA Institute Honor Awards are the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design. Mr. Marino will be recognized on May 3 at the AIA 2007 National Convention and Design Expo in San Antonio, TX. Peter Marino, FAIA, is the principal of Peter Marino Architect, PLLC, an international architecture firm with eight Associates, over 130 employees, and satellite offices in Paris, PhiladelNatural light pours into the store, phia, East Hampton and providing a Santa Barbara. In 2006, Mr. shimmering backdrop Marino was awarded an for the free-standing jewelry display. AIA Merit in Design award for the Nassau County Photo by Victor Knapp Museum of Art.


page 19 Lord Jewelers

3/29/07

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Show Him Your Shape

“Available in every size rings, earrings and necklaces”. All Certified Diamonds Available

Manufacturers and Cutters of Fine Diamonds and Jewelry

516-869-9542

446 Plandome Road • Manhasset • 516-869-9542


page 20 Carolina Amato FASHION

3/28/07

10:04 PM

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FASHION

Carolina Amato Has What You Need for Spring Signature Prom Accessories

In a full spectrum of colors, the glove collection in matte satin gives this year’s promgoe r t h e c h a n ce t o s h ow h e r sophistication.

While shopping for prom dresses, many young women will find their peers on the prowl in the same territory. Not to worry. With the right combination of Carolina Amato’s elegant and glamorous accessories, young women can achieve a truly signature look for prom night. Formal gloves are a must for dress up. With over the elbow length gloves that match her gown, or smart wrist gloves that accent her bracelets, she can enjoy an accessory cut to flatter the lines of the hands and arms. When it’s time to slip into the carriage, Carolina Amato’s wraps give the warmth and a touch of flare to any ensemble. Frosted organza wraps are a luxurious choice and the colors for this spring’s soft basic wrap are nothing less than candy for the eyes. For the experimental teenager, layering and wrapping up with Carolina Amato’s shrug, wrap, and belt collection can lead to a prom ensemble for the torso that modifies tradition. These pieces allow for versatility and creativity. For those high piled up-dos so popular for prom, accenting the style with a pearl and gem encrusted headband or hairpin is an elegant choice. The gems splash white light from afar to match the twinkle in one’s eyes on this enchanted evening.

Carolina Amato wraps, scarves and shrugs in all the right colors and shapes are a must for early spring’s resort customer.

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In Like a Soft Pleated Wrap, Out Like a Lamb Through winter, we’ve been frozen, blown, beaten by the chill and we look it…pale, dry and scaly skin along with a few ex tra pounds acquired at the holidays. Time for a golden or sandy sheen to bring us to a sun-drenched paradise or a bright soft accessory to breathe in the new life of spring. Resort wear for Spring 2007 has just launched and colors are bold and bright. I n addition to style, extra elements of resort wear are comfort and ease of use. Versatile wraps, scarves and shawls are a smart choice for accessories for warmer weather. The possibilities for one garment are numerous and functional. Soft pleated or cut weave wraps are light and perfect for a beach cover up or a wrap to accompany casual evening wear. Soft metallics are ver y in this s e a s o n . Th e co t to n c ro c h e t s h r u g achieves geometry and softness with a more established form. Throw it over a swimsuit for poolside partying or over a tank for dinner and drinks. The neutral colors go with the trends a n d w o r k w i t h a ny t h i n g, a n d t h e overall look is light, sophisticated and versatile.

The Bridal Accessory Collection is the place to find hairpieces for formal wear.


page 21 Cotter Kroboth

3/29/07

7:43 AM

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page 22-26 Lord Taylor FASHION

3/29/07

7:47 AM

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The OC by Oleg Cassini Spring 07 Collection

at Lord & Taylor

A collection of sheer and breezy cotton, sensuous silks and vibrant prints and solid fabrics for this romantic collection of day and evening dresses for memorable Spring into Summer days and nights.” To Be Well Dressed Is A Little Like Being In Love”...Oleg Cassini is the theme for this totally romantic collection of flattering shapes using natural fabrics.

Mare Moda - Shot in the new Atlanta aquarium - soon to be the Fifth Avenue windows of Lord & Taylor as background. The vivid hues of the underwater scene set a perfect backdrop to this crisp white cotton lace shirt dress Short and sweet, reflecting the rising hemlines for Spring into Summer 2007. Sleeveless with button front - A line skirt and accented with stand-up shirtwaist collar for perfect Spring into Summer dressing.

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page 22-26 Lord Taylor FASHION

3/29/07

7:47 AM

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Aquaflora - Water color Oleg Cassini print long evening gown in supple and smooth - aqua silk charmeuse with detailed sweetheart neckline - tied with a double ribbon detail and a center bow with a softlly gathered floor length skirt, narrowed midriff caught with two ribbons & center tie bow.

April ~ May 2007

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page 22-26 Lord Taylor FASHION

3/29/07

7:47 AM

Chinoiserie- Surplice V-neck Kimono cotton dress in a crisp black and white stippled floral print with black accented trim. To highlight the allure of a shaped silhouette - the dress is shaped to the body with a signature A line skirt. Worn with high black canvas espadrilles.

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Page 4


page 22-26 Lord Taylor FASHION

3/29/07

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Baby Doll - is a fun and flirtatious jet black cotton wrap dress with mini cap gathered sleeves, swing skirt and wrapped waistline. A fabulous fit.

April ~ May 2007

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page 22-26 Lord Taylor FASHION

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Pretty Woman - Sheer cotton voile with a filigree Oleg Cassini print for this shirt dress with mini cap gathered sleeves, and button front skirt acceted with a banded soft belt with navy trim.

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page 27 Hamlet Catering

3/29/07

7:50 AM

Page 1

A Must See When Planning Your Event

Be The First To Experience Our Newly Perfected Ballroom

Your guests will enjoy singular service in our newly renovated ballroom at The Hamlet Golf and Country Club. We have enhanced and refurbished even the smallest of details, from the flatware to the ceiling, to bring you the most breath-taking surroundings for your event. We’ll take care of the extraordinary cuisine, the unrivaled service, and the atmosphere of understated elegance. You, simply, enjoy your day, knowing your every need will be anticipated and luxuriously fulfilled in our beautiful private country club setting. For information and reservations, call 631.499.5200 or visit www.hamletgolfandcountryclub.com

Bring this ad in when booking your next event at The Hamlet Golf and Country Club to receive a complimentary ice sculpture at your event.

COMMACK, NEW YORK


page 28,29 tiffany FASHION

3/29/07

2:38 PM

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TIFFANY KOURY FASHION SHOW

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Photos by Jason Feinberg


page 28,29 tiffany FASHION

3/29/07

2:38 PM

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April ~ May 2007

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page 30 Michael Russo FASHION

3/29/07

7:51 AM

Page 2

Celebrity Event Planner MICHAEL RUSSO

Of Roses-N-Lollypops

Brides always ask me what is the key to planning a stellar reception. I have two very simple answers: a great venue and lighting! I can’t stress enough about lighting, as most brides don’t even think of this element: imaginative and creative lighting ideas combined with distinctive and unique touches to make your personal or corporate event a unique and memorable experience through the use of innovative lighting and electrical equipment. Frost Lighting can transform your entire event from ordinary to extraordinary! Call their New York office at 212-751-0223 The Wedding Company is an innovative bridal boutique with all the latest bridal trends, marrying old world traditions with a new cutting edge flare. The boutique offers custom handmade invitations, favors imported from Italy, calligraphy, bridal accessories, jewelry for the bridal party, boudoir items, shower gifts and novelties. Visit this unique boutique and get married in style. The Wedding Company is located at 1663a Northern Boulevard, Manhasset, NY. Call 516-365-3245.

Tip of the Month Most brides and grooms forget to visit their dentists, who now have amazing whitening treatments that only take an hour or so. Recently, I was given a BriteSmile gift certificate and it was the best gift I ever received. The treatment left me feeling more confident about my smile and I found that people do notice! Dr. Steven Ruden has a convenient Long Island BriteSmile Spa at 216 Sea Cliff Avenue, Sea Cliff, NY. Call 516-676-8148 to make an appointment or for information on the treatment.

Children add a special touch to your wedding day. For most little girls, being part a wedding is a once in a lifetime memory. However, finding that perfect dress can be a bit of a hassle. Designing Dreams in Mineola is a perfect gem in every sense of the word. They custom make all their gowns; even the readyto-wear off the racks are custom. A custom flower girl dress begins at $275 and takes about eight weeks to complete. From toddlers to preteens, your flower girls will love wearing these couture creations. Designing Dreams also does pillow boy suits and all accessories. Brides and mothers can choose from couture designer Elena do Vale’s 50 styles to achieve the perfect wedding day look. Elena says, “It’s our teamwork that makes the one-of-a-kind gown so beautiful.” Designing Dreams is located at 216 East Jericho Turnpike, Mineloa, NY. Call 516-248-1988.

For questions or comments, email Michael Russo @ MikieR@rosesandlollypops.com or call 631-979-0520 or 516-220-6843.

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page 31 Hamlet Country

3/29/07

7:52 AM

Page 1

If you’ve ever thought about joining a private country club but didn’t think you could afford it, think again.The Hamlet Golf and Country Club, Commack NY, is offering a limited number of Family Summer Memberships at an incredible price. The Hamlet’s new Family Summer Membership lets you enjoy all the Clubs amenities for one summer season, including golf, tennis, an outdoor pool and the luxurious clubhouse facilities for dining and special events. You can enjoy all of this, and your dues are only $4500. Or with an Individual Eagle Golf Membership play year round on The Hamlet’s 18 hole Championship PGA course. Call for complete details at 631.499.5200 or visit us at HamletGolfandCountryClub.com All promotions are subject to the by-laws, rules and regulations of the club.

COMMACK, NEW YORK


page 32,33 Loris Diran FASHION

3/29/07

10:08 AM

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LORIS DIRAN FASHION SHOW

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Photos by Jason Feinberg


page 32,33 Loris Diran FASHION

3/29/07

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April ~ May 2007

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page 34-39 Clinton kelly

3/29/07

8:20 AM

Page 2

By Tim Sullivan, Photography by Patrick McMullan have spent a lifetime being told what not wear. One of As we waited for our star to arrive, we settled on the couch with a beautiful young woman named Erin who the things my wife says to me most often is “You are not going out dressed like that, are you?” So it was was about to start the final taping for her episode. The only appropriate that I found myself walking onto the three of us chatted, and I was asking about her experience set of the TLC hit show What Not to Wear to spend an afterbefore and after meeting Clinton when his 6’4” frame noon with host Clinton Kelly at The Boulevard’s direction. made a grand entrance. I brought a female colleague named Rachel who told me “Hi! You look awesome! I was, like, who is that hot chick on she was a huge fan of the show and would love be looked the couch?” he says to Erin. Erin has just finished her makeup over by Clinton. Rachel is a powerful, professional woman. and hair and is about to try on some of her final outfits. She is She never appears at work in outfits that make anyone glowing with confidence; she says she feels different already. cringe; she knows how to put herself together. Her I know this woman for all of 90 seconds, but it’s abundantly command of business attire is pretty much on the mark and clear that she is a person who is very happy having a new accentuates her “take no perspective on herself. There is prisoners” demeanor in the a telltale glow of someone office. Rachel dresses to kill, momentarily comfortable in and kill she does. The other her own skin. She is genuinely day as I was tying the knot to appreciative and he is authentimy necktie in my office, cally supportive. This is a really Rachel looked at me and said, good vibe. “Just throw that out!” I did. The For a guy who turns people’s blue paisley tie was put to its lives around by telling them eternal rest in the garbage can how bad they look every below my desk. I told Rachel episode, I certainly wasn’t she was coming with me to prepared for the first thing meet Clinton as I planned to Clinton said as he greeted us hit her with some payback. warmly. “You’ll have to forgive We sheepishly scuttled out how I am dressed,” he says, dead of the elevator and Rachel ran serious. “I was running late and to the three-way mirror where this isn’t really what I planned to several scenes of every have on today. I have been in episode are shot. Rachel was the car since 7 a.m. and dressed in brown dress pants meeting with contractors.” He with slightly wide ankles and was wearing a cashmere a salmon sweater with rows of sweater that looked like one of buttons up to the elbows and my baseball jerseys – only a mock turtleneck. She had cashmere – and designer jeans on brown leather boots with and brown boots with buckles. wide square tips. I thought This self-deprecation by the she was dressed rather well, ultimate fashion police captain but then again, I also once immediately set the tone for referred to waterbeds as “a our visit: warm, humorous and hot new trend.” sincere. Clinton and his co-host

I

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page 34-39 Clinton kelly

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page 34-39 Clinton kelly

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Stacy London have risen to notoriety as household staples that raise the bar for how people present themselves. For a mid-30s guy like myself who still feels a 1983 Journey concert T-shirt is perfectly acceptable weekend attire, I represent exactly the reason Clinton’s show has done so well for four seasons. But the fact that I fight with my wife about owning crushed velvet without shame means I also have a lesson to learn from what Clinton is trying to teach us. “By far my favorite part of doing the show is seeing how people’s lives change for the better,” he says. “When people decide to accept their body the way it is and dress it to their advantage, wonderful things start to happen. Things like weight loss, meeting the man of your dreams, or getting a promotion.” This cause-and-effect relationship seems so simple. If you feel better about yourself, good things will start to happen. Yet, it’s such a novel and unique idea that What Not to Wear has become one of the most popular shows on cable television and has spawned a spinoff program called Mind Your Manners, which Clinton will host in the fall, also on TLC. It takes the subject matter up a notch and explores etiquette and first impressions. If you thought throwing people’s clothes into a trashcan was over the top, I’m sure you can’t wait to see Clinton debrief a dinner guest. Clinton, 38, grew up on Long Island and is a graduate of Comsewogue High School in Port Jefferson Station. Prior to becoming the ultimate arbitor of fashion acceptance, he worked as a magazine editor at the top international women’s magazines Mademoiselle and Marie Claire. He also hosted a program on QVC before he teamed up with Stacy to be the good cop/bad cop duo who trash people’s closets. The issues they deal with are a practical part of all of our lives: weight control, taste and getting older. These hypersensitive touchstones are flashpoints for most conventional relationships - such as when 36

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❧ April ~ May 2007

Clinton Kelly is wear a Tuxedo designed by Oleg Cassini


page 34-39 Clinton kelly

3/29/07

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Clinton Kelly’s Baseline No-No Tips for a Woman at 40: No super mini skirts No platform flip-flops Do not show a lot of cleavage Don’t wear Lycra pants to the supermarket Don’t show a lot of skin – if you are overtly sexual after a certain age, you are trying too hard and that’s the opposite of sexy

Photo by Patrick McMullan

your spouse tells you black socks with sandals will get you banned from a family barbecue, or your officemate makes you throw out your favorite tie. According to Kelly, we can control weight and even taste, but the aging process must be respected as non-negotiable and the quicker we embrace it, the better off we’ll be, as will everyone else in our home and office. “People in our society think that after you’ve hit 21 life is over and at 30 you are a senior citizen,” he says. “When I see a woman who is in her 40s dressing like she is 16 it’s sad, because she no longer portrays an image of confidence. She is trying to compete with younger girls and she will lose every time.” But while the show Clinton and Stacy have developed is funky, sometimes snarky, and all around good fun, the point they are getting across is a little more serious. “We will show people how to dress well and once they see that, they take more pride in their body. They take better care of it, exercise and eat better,” he says as Rachel and I join him on the couches in front of the revealing mirror. People’s lives really do get better, he claims. “I have done about 175 episodes of What Not to Wear and I keep in touch with almost 100 of the guests, so I know what happens.” Kelly says this with delight rather than arrogance. There is a sincere satisfaction that is evident in this man using his keen eye and aesthetic sense to better people’s lives. A reunion episode is planned in the future to follow the story arc of what happens to the guests. We would all love to have Clinton

and Stacy take us shopping in New York City with someone else’s credit card, away from the realities of screaming children, house chores and deadlines that make putting ourselves together somewhat more difficult than life on the show, but most of America just gets to watch the fashionista guru tell other people how to reinvent themselves and are left to fend for themselves. So I asked Clinton a critical question: Since 99 percent of your viewers don’t have you on 24/7 closet duty in their homes, what can they do on their own? Clinton reveals a few issues that should be obvious, but several of which this reporter is chronically guilty. Buying clothes without trying them on is apparently a huge no-no. Clinton recommends browsing through magazines to note what you like about the apparel of your favorite celebrities. People have to educate themselves somehow about how clothes should fit. Kelly is also quick to point out that anyone can buy his book, Dress Your Best: The Complete Guide to Finding a Style That’s Right For Your Body, but the most important piece of advice he will give people is to never compare yourself with anybody else. “Don’t compare yourself to images you see in magazines or billboards – these people aren’t real. The pictures are all touched up and are not natural in any way – any imperfections are photoshopped out, legs are stretched

April ~ May 2007

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page 34-39 Clinton kelly

3/29/07

8:20 AM

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“Don’t compare yourself to images you see in magazines or billboards – these people aren’t real. The pictures are all touched up and are not natural in any way – any imperfections are photoshopped out, legs are stretched and skin is made perfect. Most of the models are starving themselves or smoke like chimneys. When you compare yourself to that you are comparing yourself to a person that doesn’t exist, its not logical.” and skin is made perfect. Most of the models are starving themselves or they smoke like chimneys. When you compare yourself to that you are comparing yourself to a person that doesn’t exist. It’s not logical,” he says emphatically. And the theme of outing the illusion of advertising and the myths of the mass media that pervade our collective subconscious is a deep and personal one for Clinton. While What Not to Wear is a fashion-based television program, the premise is actually a very healthy reality check for America’s psyche: acceptance. In our discussion, Kelly mentions his bewilderment that Americans are very concerned with impressing people they don’t even know or respect. This, he feels, invariably leads to an unhealthy imbalance in what we accept about ourselves versus the residual confidence that remains. “It’s like watching MTV – kids should be watching MTV because it’s funny, not because they think behaving like the kids on MTV is going to get you anywhere in life. It’s not.” And that is what makes Clinton one of the good guys. He is speaking the truth in a gentle and funny way through the filter of a cashmere sweater or Prada handbag. But it’s still truth. Be who you are, put your best foot forward in your presentation, and you’ll be amazed at how your world changes. After a long philosophical softening up about Clinton’s principles and motives for throwing away countless people’s wardrobes, I ask him to look over Rachel and proudly offer up my sacrifice. Rachel looks at me nervously and I fight the urge to scream, “That was my favorite tie!” Clinton jumps off the couch and asks Rachel to stand up. He turns her around several times while the mental textile gears spin and he starts pulling on her sweater to see how far it could go over her waist. “I think the salmon is a beautiful color for you, but the sweater is a little too small. Tops that sit above the tush accentuate the tush. If it covers tush, you just get a whole lot of tush. Of course we could always go half way – that is what I call the divide and conquer – you are cutting the tush at its widest part and it makes a great visual impact.” We all settle on mid-tush for Rachel. As her cheeks turn

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red, Clinton continues and goes after her shoes. “You are wearing the same wide toes that I am and the line of the pants is broken; you should wear pointy shoes and the leg line will be more consistent,” he offers. Rachel protests that pointy shoes are a little too feminine for her, and that a square toe makes her feel more powerful. Clinton tells her that her femininity doesn’t lie in the toe of her shoe, and they banter back and forth about the exact point where podiatry and women’s studies intersect until he finally concedes she is right. Rachel persuasively makes the guru stand corrected. I told you she was a killer. But Clinton counters with a lecture on her neckline and how the high crew of the mock turtleneck sells her short. With the fashion tip score 2-1, I feel the satisfaction and vindication for the traumatic blue paisley cleansing that took place back at my office. My blushing colleague and I say goodbye to our gracious style wizard. After putting Rachel in the hot seat, I looked at her and told her that now we were even for her making me throw out my tie. What I didn’t tell her was that when we got back to the office I was going have her help me throw out a few more.


page 34-39 Clinton kelly

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Behind the Scenes Photographer: Patrick McMullan Photography Assistant: Joe Schildhorn Production: Birch Cooper Production Assistant: George Rippon Stylist: Edwin Pabon Hair: John Barrett Salon Hair Stylist: Bonny Cheung Makeup: Thomas McEntee Transportation: Designer Limo Boulevard Magazine: Angela Susan Anton and Jason Feinberg Location: Oleg Cassini Headquarters, New York, New York Special Thanks to Marianne and Oleg Cassini

Edwin Pabon, Senada Ivackovic, Thomas McEntee, Patrick McMullan, Angela Susan Anton, Clinton Kelly, Jason Feinberg, Dan Foreman, George Rippon, Birch Cooper. Photo by Joe Schildhorn

April ~ May 2007

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page 40 Barrett

3/29/07

8:20 AM

Page 1

THE SALON AT BERGDORF GOODMAN

754 FIFTH AVENUE

212 872 2700

JOHNBARRETT.COM


page 41 Patrick Mullan

3/29/07

9:44 AM

Page 1


page 42,43 Vanty Fair

picture pages

3/29/07

8:21 AM

Page 2

PHOTO GALLERY

VANITY FAIR OSCAR PARTY By Patrick McMullan

Morton’s Los Angeles, CA

Francis Ford Coppola, Eleanor Coppola

Giorgio Armani and Roberta Armani

Beyonce

Jessica Biel

Marisa Tomei

Regina King

Tod Williams

Jon Voight

Sean Penn

Olivier Martinez

Patrick McMullan.com 42

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❧ April ~ May 2007


page 42,43 Vanty Fair

picture pages

3/29/07

8:21 AM

Page 3

Mario Testino

Emilio Estefan Jr., and Gloria Estefan

Giorgio Armani

Jeff Goldblum Royston Langdon and Liv Tyler

Michael Chow and Eva Chow James Franco Giada Cologrande and Willem Dafoe

Regis Philbin and Joy Philbin

George Lucas

Paula Fortunato and Sumner Redstone

Will.I.Am

Patrick McMullan.com April ~ May 2007

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page 44,45 Armani - Elton John Picture Pages

3/29/07

8:24 AM

Page 2

GEORGIO ARMANI PARTY By Patrick McMullan

Beverly Hills, CA

George Clooney, Penelope Cruz, Leonardo DiCaprio and Beyonce Knowles

Roberta Armani

Dita von Teese

Clint Eastwood and Dina Eastwood.

Chris Tucker

Helen Mirren,Al Gore and Tipper Gore

Mischa Barton

Leonardo DiCaprio, Adrien Brody and Elsa Pataky

Patrick McMullan.com 44

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Sean “Diddy” Combs

❧ April ~ May 2007

Katie Holmes, Gabriele Muccino and Roberta Armani


page 44,45 Armani - Elton John Picture Pages

3/29/07

8:24 AM

Page 3

15TH ANNUAL ELTON JOHN AIDS FOUNDATION PARTY TO CELEBRATE THE ACADEMY AWARDS Pacific Design Center West Hollywood CA

Garcelle Beauvais

Petra Nemcova

By Patrick McMullan

Joely Fisher

Elton John

Emmy Rossum

Kelly Osbourne, Ozzie Osbourne, Sharon Osbourne and Jack Osbourne

Sofia Arzhakovskaya

Maria Menounos

Sarah Michelle Gellar Kevin Zegers

Victoria Beckham

Zac Posen

James Blunt

Kiefer Sutherland

Naomi Campbell

Patrick McMullan.com April ~ May 2007

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page 46-47 Max Picture Pages

3/29/07

2:51 PM

Page 2

DR. MAX GOMEX COVER PARTY

Amy Lee, Kristine Quattrone and Jen Howell

Angela Susan Anton, Dr. Max Gomez, Rita Cosby and Tomaczek Bednarek

Dianne Finkle, Joel Finkel , Judy Rockesky, Joe Rockesy and Angela Susan Anton

Ron Claiborne and Amber Gerard

Linda Perotti, Stanley Kreitman, C.B. Whyte and Dr. Barbara Capozzi

Barry Kay, Dr. Max Gomez and Rita Kay

Mitchell Carron, Richard Music, Bonnie B, Robbin Sockwell, Denise Miles and Richard Kearns

Dr. Leonard Freeman, Dr. Max Gomez, Joy Freeman, Marleen Freeman and Angela Susan Anton

Photos by Tina Guiomar 46

Dr. Max Gomex, Angela Susan Anton and Dr. Stephan Greenberg

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â?§ April ~ May 2007

Angela Susan Anton, Herbert Roberts, Laura Codman and Arnold Rosenshien


page 46-47 Max Picture Pages

3/29/07

Carol Clark Higgins and Edda Ramsdell

Ed Cortez, Connie Wasserman and Karen Loesser

2:51 PM

Page 3

Deborah Goldschmidt and Dr. Max Gomez

Tina Guiomar and Amy Lee

Jim Mandler, Dr. Max Gomez and Alan Weiss

Dr.Larry Norton and Dr.Max Gomez

John Connelly, Dr. Ligia Buzon and Michael Wolff

Dr. Max Gomez

Ellen Green, Neil Korenberg and Jason Feinberg

Stanley Kreitman, Dr. Max Gomez and C.B. Whyte

Dr.Zachary Gerut and Dr.Max Gomez Jason Feinberg,Nancy Rocker and Jim Parise

Susan, Carole Westfall, Emory Westfall and Leslie Swinson

Michael Wolff, Dr. Ligia Buzan and Keith Safian

April ~ May 2007

Dan Rosett and Mike Barry

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page 48,49 Grodin- Tiki Barber picture Pages

3/29/07

8:26 AM

Page 2

AN EVENING WITH CHARLES GRODIN HARD ROCK CAFE, TIMES SQUARE, NY BENEFIT WHY, WORLD HUNGER ORGANIZATION

Angela Susan Anton, Tony Guida and Dr. Barbara Capozzi.

Jason Feinberg, Charlies Grodin, Angela Susan Anton and Dr. Barbara Capozzi.

Photos by Tina Guiomar and Jason Feinberg 48

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page 48,49 Grodin- Tiki Barber picture Pages

3/29/07

8:26 AM

Page 3

TIKI BARBER RETIREMENT PARTY

Tiki Barber, Dorothea Bon Jovi and Jon Bon Jovi. Tiki and Ginny Barber.

Muffy Potter Astor, Somers Farkas, Jason and Haley Binn.

Clive Davis and friend.

Photos By Djamilla Cochran, Gary Gershoff, and Stephen Lovekin April ~ May 2007

â?§ The Boulevard

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page 50 Aura

3/29/07

2:55 PM

Page 1

C

ome enjoy the experience of AURA One of Long Islands most exclusive Salons & Day Spas.

Specializig in: • • • • • • • •

First time visit, complimentary consultation AURA Hair Colour Emporium 2870 Merrick Road Bellmore NY 11710 (516) 785-7774

Colour Cutting Styling Manicures & Pedicures Massages & Facials Makeup Hair Extensions Bridal Parties


page 51 Designer limo

3/29/07

8:56 AM

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page 52-55 Chaka Khan PROFILE

3/29/07

2:58 PM

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PROFILE

Chaka Khan: A Day in Nature with the Legend By Tom Albright hen someone invites you to meet a legend, accept the invitation. When it’s your editor, definitely say yes. When the legend is Chaka Khan, call the wife and tell her that you won’t be home all day that Saturday. You’ll deal with the fallout later. It’s Chaka Khan! Tell Me Something Good was one of our early dating songs, so the wife will understand. My wife actually required no further explanation when I informed her that I had the opportunity not just to meet and interview Chaka, but to sit in on a recording session where she was going to lay down vocals for a song in a children’s television program called Sheira and Loli’s Dittydoodle Works. My wife just looked at me and said “Make sure you tell her about ‘our song.’” I obliged – it got me out of the house smoothly and I jumped into Jason Feinberg’s SUV. The Boulevard was off to meet another legend. While generally referred to as an R&B singer, Chaka Khan is easily the most influential female funk artist of all time, with an impact that extends well into the jazz, pop and hip hop genres. She has earned eight Grammys and scored major hits and multiple platinum records in various categories. Her career spans well over 30 years and was very much the backing soundtrack to my life growing up in New Jersey, during the courtship with my wife, and through

W

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page 52-55 Chaka Khan PROFILE

3/29/07

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my professional work in various corners of the music industry. As she sings in one of her biggest hits from the 1980s ain’t nobody does it better! So Jason and I actually find ourselves in a recording studio behind a mixing console, looking at our legend through the glass of a vocal isolation booth. Huge headphones are wrapped around her trademark mane of wild hair as she focuses on the lyric sheet behind the condenser microphone. “Ready, Chaka? Let’s do a practice run through,” calls the producer. “I don’t need a rehearsal…let’s just roll,” says Chaka, smiling that smile. When you are one of the world’s most famous voices and still touring in your 50s, ‘rehearsal’ is a relative concept. She asks the engineer to dump the guide vocal after the second pass and rips into the song for the episode sung by her character, Mother Nature. Sheira and Loli’s Dittydoodle Works is the creation of sisters Sheira and Loli Brayer and a major export of Rogar Studios in Amityville, Long Island. It’s a children’s program for preschoolers in which people and puppets make up a cast that includes the rag doll twins Sheira and Loli and their magical musical factory that produces fun. Chaka Khan was cast as the recurring character Mother Nature in several episodes, and on the day of our taping, Mother Nature is singing a song about the virtues of patience. Patient eyes are fixed on Mother that cold Saturday in February. The award winning and New York Emmy winning show has been on WLIW Channel 21, the local PBS affiliate, since 2000 when it debuted as a series of shorts. It became a half-hour show in 2005 and will be in more than 18 public television markets across the country this year. Dittydoodle Works is also a live stage show, with sundry stops and events planned for 2007. Chaka Khan’s real name is Yvette Marie Stevens and she

broke through in 1974 with her first band, Rufus, later Rufus and Chaka Khan. Tell Me Something Good started a string of hits which included Sweet Thing and Do You Love What You Feel. In the 1960s, James Brown and Sly and the Family Stone christened the ship that would create slap bass, “wah” guitar sounds, and minimal chord changes; the 1970s saw George Clinton lead a sonic barrage of barrierbreaking outrageousness in the bands that surrounded Rufus – Parliament Funkadelic, the Meters, Earth Wind and Fire, the Commodores, and War. Chaka was the woman at the center of the hurricane, working very closely with Stevie Wonder, and through the years maintaining a friendship with the messiah of the foot-stomping infectious groove. “Stevie was a great teacher,” she shared with me. “I love him and we are still in touch.” She left Rufus in 1978 and embarked on a solo career. It was 1984 that would yield her biggest hits with the landmark album I Feel For You sending the title track, a cover of an early Prince B-side, soaring to the top of the pop charts. The song was important on many levels, but its intro by rapper Melle Mel was one of the first early crossovers of a hip hop element into mainstream pop music.

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Often when a major shift in the musical landscape is taking place, it’s very subtle. It’s only later, through reflection, hindsight and years of musical maturation, that you realize specific music that represented certain tipping points. The Beatle’s first record and then Sgt. Pepper, Miles Davis’ Kinda Blue, Stevie Wonder’s Songs in the Key of Life, the Ramones’ first album, Nirvana’s Nevermind - they all represent various earthquakes which spawned entire genres of music, inspired countless copycats, and set a new standard in artistic expression. I Feel For You was one of those records. Hip hop was here. But despite all the musical colors on her palette, it’s hard to get through more than three Chaka Khan songs from any era of her threedecade career and not hear the horns. Inspired by all the expected female luminaries of R & B – Aretha Franklin, Diana Ross and jazz great Billie Holiday - Chaka also told me that horn players were her most influential musical memories as a child. “When I was a little girl the music I remember around the house were horn players and I was very influenced by what they were doing, their sense of melody,” she says, referring to the giants of jazz’s golden age. “Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Stan Getz…all the greats.” As we discussed the various horn players that blew the memorable lines of the last 30 years, I brought up saxophonist Michael Brecker, who recently passed away. Brecker was widely regarded as the successor to Coltrane and he cut numerous sax solos on Chaka Khan records in the 1980s. Jason and I attended his memorial service the Monday after our visit with Chaka. “Michael was a shy, sweet and loving guy and a dear friend. He played on so many of my records and I will miss him,” said

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Chaka. With her love of jazz and exploration of the most academic of her many musical languages, it was no surprise that she cited Be Bop Medley as one of her favorites when I asked her what she considered some of her most impor tant musical numbers. Also not surprisingly, she said that Through the Fire, a hit ballad from I Feel For You, was also particularly important to her. So important, in fact, that she gave her autobiography the same name. Sadly, Michael Brecker isn’t here to play on Chaka’s upcoming record, to be released this summer. Stretching back to her funk roots, the new record is currently being written and will sound more like her very early work with Rufus. Chaka is constantly on tour, but will have a more extensive, more exciting tour for this record and I for one (and Jason for two) won’t miss it. As we talked about her upcoming release, Chaka got very excited. “We have some amazing music that is about to emerge – Chaka Khan is on her 10 year cycle, and of course, we will tour it.” A woman with so much soul in her voice, Chaka has the true soul to back it up. A kind and generous person, she loves performing and she loves philanthropy. She is hard at work furthering the work of the foundation she set up with her management team – the Chaka Khan Foundation – that provides grants in the areas of education and cultural enrichment to underprivileged children, but focuses primarily on autism. The focus is the result of a direct experience in her personal life; a nephew was born with autism. Chaka is very active on the benefit circuit and lends her talent to fundraisers and other charity events as often as possible. Yes, that Saturday was a treat as

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Jason and I sat through overdub after overdub. We could have watched all day or all weekend. The R&B and funk monarch stepped outside her anointed position and was Mother Nature that afternoon. Expertly, she added foundation and depth to the vocal parts, then said, “Just roll this on anoth-

er track and I will give you some parts to choose from.” Chaka sang each line several different ways. All fit. All worked. All were gifts to see and hear. Sheira and Lolis Ditty Doodle Works is on Saturday mornings at 8 a.m. on WLIW. Check your local cable listing for exact channels.

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page 56,59 David Lynch PROFILE

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TM and Its Positive Effect on Mental and Physical Health How Two Icons Are Spreading the Message By Barry Kay t must have been karma when I met Peter Janssen, a young venture capitalist and president of Janssen Partners in Roslyn in the parking lot of Diane’s Bakery in Roslyn. Peter was getting ready to ride home but politely interrupted his journey to answer my questions

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Donovan performs in his classic style: cross-legged on stage, acoustic guitar in hand. Photo by Barry Kay

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about his sensational looking Ducati motorbike. After waxing eloquent about motorbiking in general and the Ducati in specific, we turned our conversation to his venture capital business and his life’s mission to help fund spiritually inclined companies and research that will help our planet and mankind. Our brief but informa-

tive conversation led to an invitation from Peter to attend a unique “invitation only” event at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. David Lynch, award winning director of Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks, Mulholland Drive and Inland Empire, and author of Catching the Big Fish would join legendary singer songwriter


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Donovan, a musical icon of the ’60s, on stage in a concert to benefit the David Lynch Foundation. The extraordinary combination of these two illustrious personalities was nothing short of amazing. Donovan’s persona has always been sunshine and smiles as illustrated in his songs Hurdy Gurdy Man and Sunshine Superman, while David has achieved fortune and fame with a solemn demeanor and deep, dark messages. What could these two possibly have in common? I spent three hours at their joint performance and book signing, along with 500 selected guests and the message was clear. David and Donovan were appearing, on behalf of the David Lynch Foundation, to help humanity, and in particular, children, attain a greater sense of being and greater knowledge, and to overcome emotional problems through Transcendental Meditation (TM). On this special evening at Alice Tully Hall, David read from his new bestselling book Catching the Big Fish. He related how TM helped him formulate the stories and images for his early paintings and motion pictures. TM has also given him the ability to instantly go deep into his own personal ocean, (his subconscious mind), where the very big fish (ideas) dwell and help him formulate award-winning scripts and pictures. After David had spoken with his signature fluttering hand gestures, Donovan came onstage to play acoustic guitar and sing a wide range of songs dating from the ’50s to the present day. The music was mesmerizing and Donovan’s guitar skills in some ways seemed much like that of Latin musical genius Carlos Santana. To understand David and Donovan’s mission, one must go back to 1959 when a very gentle, smiling gentleman from India arrived in San Francisco. Maharishi Mahesh Yogi was there as part of a worldwide program to introduce Transcendental Meditation to the U.S. and the world. Maharishi stayed for two months and during this time spoke to hundreds of people and taught many of them his technique. Maharishi’s message was both simple and direct at that time as it is today. “Life is bliss. Man is born to enjoy. Within everyone is an unlimited reservoir of energy, intelligence, and happiness. The TM technique is both simple and effortless and can be easily learned by anyone of any age, culture, religion and educational background.” When Maharishi arrived in the U.S. there was no other

David Lynch, a man of passion.

Transcendental Meditation teachers, no TM centers. Maharishi became TM’s “evangelist” and took the “word to Los Angeles, New York, England, Germany, Greece and around the world. The TM movement started from the teachings of this slight, clear-eyed, smiling individual, who knew that he had something special to give to mankind. The movement grew steadily and today over five million people worldwide, including more than one million in the U.S. from every profession, age, educational background, and religion, practice his TM technique. According to Maharishi’s own website hundreds of scientific studies at world famous Universities and research institutions show that TM reduces stress, increases

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creativity and intelligence, improves memory and learning ability, increases energy, increases inner calm, reduces insomnia, increases happiness, and self-esteem, reduces anxiety and depression, improves relationships, improves health, and promotes a younger biological age. Transcendental Meditation’s fantastic growth curve came as a result of the enormous worldwide publicity about the charming and wise Maharishi, as well as his high profile celebrity disciples. The Beatles, Mia Farrow, Donovan and David Lynch and numerous movie stars, recording stars and businessmen made their pilgrimage to Maharishi’s home in the mountains of India. Each came away with their own special message and ”mantra” a chant specifically designed to help ease their way into TM. I was able to arrange a phone interview with Donovan the week after the concert, while he was still in New York City. We talked about his life, spirituality, the meaning of his lyrics, and his partnership with David in the Foundation. Donovan wanted me to know that David and he are “karmicly” connected in a number of ways; they both have the same first and last initials (David Lynch, Donovan Leitch), fathers named Norman and both were born in the year 1946.

David and Donovan met when they visited Maharishi in India in the early ’60s and then again in 2002 as a result of Donovan’s appearance on Good Morning New York, teaching adults and children how to meditate. More than 6,000,000 viewers tuned in to this very special show. After the program the David Lynch Foundation gave Donovan an award for his efforts on behalf of humanity and children. David then suggested that the two of them devote time to promoting TM to children through music and film. They have also joined forces with noted scientists John Hagelin and Fred Travis in their efforts to promote Transcendental Meditation. According to Donovan, “TM is the fastest way to deal with life’s external and internal stresses, as well as seeing into one’s self. TM uses mantras as a focus for concentration to achieve a blissful state. Spiritualists realize that the material world is an illusion along with material possessions. All of life as we know it is composed of atoms and particles that come together to give form to our illusions and life. However true understanding of the nature of existence means knowing that there really is no life or death, it is a continuum.” Donovan sang the lyrics to Sunshine Superman to me

David Lynch on set with Jeremy Irons and Harry Dean Stanton.

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and gave a new deeper meaning to his songs of the ’60s. Sunshine Superman, as Donovan explained, is a person who has learned to overcome life’s obstacles and stresses through learning more about his inner self. Donovan considers himself a poet and “shaman” put here on earth to show civilization “signposts” and to give new insight into our own being. Today, David and Donovan are trailblazers for children the world over. It is their hope that as TM’s enlightenment spreads, the grim statistics involving children and students will change in a positive direction. Today 10 million students are dependent on anti-depressants (source-Department of Health and Human Ser vices), four million children are suffering from learning disorders (source-Clinical Pediatrics) and 10 percent of children between the ages of 2 and 5 are beginning to show teenage levels of tension and anxiety and fear (source-National Institutes of Mental Health). Additionally, 44 percent of college students are binge drinkers (source U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), suicide is the third leading cause of death among teenagers (source-American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) and 70 percent of students with mental health problems are not getting the help they need (sourceDepartment of Health and Human Services). The goal of David Lynch,Donovan and the David Lynch Foundation is to raise billions of dollars to spread the knowledge and enlightenment of TM worldwide. Their work, and that of other involved celebrities and citizens, gives new hope for a brighter, more intelligent and kinder world in which our children can thrive and be productive. Thanks to Peter, David and Donovan their message clearly resonated with me.

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Donovan takes a moment to relax.

Photo by Barry Kay

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page 60-61 Kabbalah PROFILE

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Is Kabbalah Hollywood’s Spiritual Salvation?

Rabbi Yehuda Berg

Nancy Berg

Ancient Mysticism Continues to Attract Celebrities By Barry Kay hat do Roseanne Barr, David Beckham, Naomi Campbell, Laura Dern, Goldie Hawn, Mick Jagger, Demi Moore, Barbra Streisand and Madonna have in common? In a word, Kabbalah. Study of the ancient and mystical Kabbalah has become the answer for a growing list of stars and celebrities from the world of art, music and film. In fact, a small but growing and

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dedicated group of people worldwide has found that Kabbalah provides answers for them to many of the critical life questions they have been asking. The resurgence of interest in Kabbalah, and the mystical and sacred writings of the Zohar are all part of a worldwide spiritual rebirth. The Zohar, written in ancient Aramaic (a sister language to Hebrew), employs Hebrew letters, contains commentary on the Bible, and is considered the most impor-

tant work of Jewish mysticism. Historical records show that the Zohar made its first appearance in Spain during the 13th century and was published by Moses De Leon, who some historians believe was the actual author. De Leon, however, claimed that the Zohar was written by second century Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai. Because of oppression by Roman rulers, Rabbi Shimon went into hiding in a cave for 13 years. He studied the Torah with his son during


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their years in isolation, and is said to have been inspired by God to write the Zohar. The Zohar explains the nature of God, the origin of the universe, and contains commentaries on sin, and good and evil. Zohar is a Hebrew word meaning “splendor” or “scintillation.” For many, the Zohar is an unlimited source of brilliant spiritual light. According to kabbalists, simply possessing the Zohar brings power, protection and fulfillment into one’s life. They also believe that by scanning the pages of the Zohar in the original Aramaic language or by reading a translation, a deep connection to the Creator’s light comes into being. Upon gaining intimacy and understanding of the Zohar, our consciousness deepens and expands. Spiritually, we grow and evolve. We become who we need to be, in order to gain the joy and fulfillment that God intends for us. The Zohar serves as a mirror in which we see our own expectations and intentions. Some of the greatest minds in history have found wisdom and enlightenment through the Zohar. From Pythagoras in ancient Greece, to Sir Isaac Newton in the 17th century, to the architects of today’s modern physics and biology … all have been students of the Kabbalah and found startling information and insights. The Kabbalah and the teaching of the Zohar are disseminated through the Kabbalah Centre, which has existed for more than 80 years. Its spiritual lineage extends even further, to Rav Isaac Luria, in the 16th century, and through Rav Luria to Rav Shimon Bar Yochai, who revealed the principal text of Kabbalah and the Zohar more than 2,000 years ago. The Kabbalah Centre was founded in Jerusalem in 1922 by Rav Yehuda Aslag, one of the greatest kabbalists of the 20th century. When he passed on, the leadership of the centre was taken over by Rav Yehuda Tzvi Brandwein. Before his passing, Rav Brandwein designated Rav Philip Berg to continue the lineage of Kabbalah as director of the Kabbalah Centre. Rav Berg, his wife Karen, and sons Yehuda and Michael currently co-direct the centre. Karen Berg first met her future husband when she was 16. She took a job in a New York business owned by the Rav and his brother-in-law where she worked for six

The Kabbalah Centre in Los Angeles.

months. At 17, she left his employ, married him, and had two children. Karen was not fulfilled and the marriage ended amicably. After years of studying spiritual texts, she met the Rav again when she was 24 and Rav Berg, although living in Israel, was visiting New York. He had been studying Kaballah with Rav Brandwein, who had recently passed away. From her years of spiritual readings, Karen had realized that the Kabbalah was the seed of all spiritual teaching. Her relationship with the Rav grew and they decided to marry. Over the next few years, their sons Michael and Yehuda were born and the whole family of six moved to Israel. In 1968, the Rav became director of the Kabbalah Centre in Tel Aviv ... and the rest is the Kabbalah Centre’s remarkable 40-year history. Today Karen Berg, along with Yehuda and Michael, has taken on a greater leadership role in the Los Angeles Kaballah Centre due to the incapacitation of Rav Philip Berg. Rabbi Yehuda Berg is a well-known and accomplished author. His book The Power of Kabbalah, became an international best seller, and his recent published book, The 72 Names of God, is also a bestseller. The study of the Kabbalah and the sacred Zohar is shared by people of all religions and beliefs. According to the centre, “Nothing is required but worthy desire, the certainty of a trusting heart, and an open and receptive mind. The Zohar’s ultimate purpose is to draw light into our lives, and thereby bring fulfillment.”

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page 62,63 London Jewelers PROFILE

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Father Always Knew Best…

How London Jewelers Grew From One Store to National Prominence By Barry Kay harles London left Poland in 1926 for a new life in America. A skilled watchmaker, he moved to Glen Cove and set up a small 300-square-foot shop servicing large grandfather clocks for some of the country’s wealthiest families who made Long Island’s Gold Coast their home. Families like the Whitneys, the Pratts and the Morgans lived on palatial estates in mansions that had as many as 30 rooms, and in many cases, 30 large antique clocks that were on an eight-day schedule and had to be rewound every week. London’s skill at fixing and maintaining these delicate and valuable clocks made him a welcomed presence at the homes of the elite Gold Coast residents. His socialite clientele found him to be earnest, hardworking and trustworthy. They relied on his skill and expertise, and soon began asking him to source jewelry and watches to purchase for their friends and families. So began London Jewelers, a small family business that grew into a family enterprise. Charles’ daughter Fran grew up in the family business, sharing her father’s passion and hard work ethic. Her husband Mayer Udell, a successful entrepreneur in his homeland of Poland, joined the company and eventually bought London Jewelers from his father-inlaw. Mayer and Fran are credited with initiating the dynamic growth of London Jewelers. With Mayer ’s business expertise, it became clear that he needed to differentiate London Jewelers from the nine other independent jewelry stores in the

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Fran and Mayer Udell.

community. They looked to their past and saw the plan for their future. History showed Mayer and Fran that the wealthy families of Glen Cove wanted unique, stylish and distinctive jewelry and watches. They wanted quality, and they could afford to pay for it. Mayer upgraded not only his inventory but also the appearance of his store to cater to a more affluent customer base. Their shop in Glen Cove began to prosper and expand as their sales and reputation grew. I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Mayer, Mark and Candy Udell. All of their stories were fascinating, but I was par ticularly intrigued by Mayer. His unique blend of common sense, wisdom, and calm for thright nature were evident throughout our conversation. Mayer and Fran recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary and are still active and involved in the every-

day affairs of the business. Their two sons, Mark and Ira, watched and learned firsthand how London Jewelers had grown from humble beginnings. Mark virtually grew up in the store in Glen Cove. He always had an entrepreneurial inclination and knew at a very early age that he wanted to be in the family jewelry business. He vividly remembers the times Mayer took him to the jewelr y market during summer vacation. He watched and learned as Mayer sourced watches and jewelry that would appeal to the tastes of his very discriminating customers. This early “hands-on education” helped foster Mark’s love for the business. As sure as Mark Udell was about making the family business his life’s work, his brother Ira was just as sure about a career in medicine. Today, Dr. Ira Udell is the head of ophthalmology at Long Island Jewish Hospital.


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It was as a student at the University of Miami that Mark Udell met and fell in love with Candy. After graduation, Mark fulfilled the dreams of both his father and himself when he joined the family business and married Candy. Mark’s passion for the business and his entrepreneurial nature were the foundation for his own vision for the growth of London Jewelers. Mark brought the business to the next level when London Jewelers began carrying the renowned prestige brand, Rolex. This new association with Rolex represented a tremendous investment for the Glen Cove store and part of the inventory included a very expensive 18kt gold men’s watch. Anxious about how long it would take to sell the watch, they placed it in a prominent spot in the store window. A gentleman buying coffee at a nearby store saw the watch and, within ten minutes, the watch was sold. With the success of the Rolex brand, London Jewelers began to carry Patek Philippe, then Cartier, and luxury watches became a core part of London Jewelers’ business. In 1980 Mark and Candy Udell met Frank Castagna. London Jewelers was growing and Castagna’s newly constructed Wheatley Plaza soon became the home of their second store. Their hard work and dedication garnered great success and became the impetus to open yet another location, this time at Castagna’s Americana Manhasset. The store did so well that expansion was soon necessary and they moved to a larger and more prominent space at the prestigious shopping destination. As their business grew, so did the number of stores, with openings in East Hampton and South Hampton. Mark’s keen business sense has led London Jewelers to a position of prominence in the industry

London Jewelers in Glen Cove.

where he is admired for his innovative spirit. In fact, London Jewelers was the first independent jeweler to create in-store boutiques for brands such as Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, and David Yurman. The success of this venture has become a milestone in their rich history. The growth of London Jewelers continues with a major expansion and renovation project under way at the Americana Manhasset location. They will be taking over two floors of what once was Barney’s and creating a standalone watch store on the main level with a specialty jewelry and gift salon above. This new expansion will also include renovations to the existing London Jewelers’ store to create a bridal and diamond salon. Mark and Candy love and live their business every day and have built longstanding relationships as friends and business associates with the owners and top management of the world’s finest jewelry and watch companies. They divide the responsibilities of running this ever-growing business; Mark handles the financial side of the business, and Candy, the buying, merchandising and design. More than 80 years after Charles London opened up his small watch repair shop, London Jewelers now employs more than 130 employees in five locations. The Udells remain committed to each of the communities they serve. Mark and Candy generously give time and money and help fundraise for numerous worthy charities throughout Nassau County. They also support Nassau County Cancer Hospitals as well as the Children’s Medical Fund, the founding fundraising arm of Schneider Children’s Hospital of the NS/LIJ Health System. Before I left the Glen Cove store, Mark showed me a specially designed watch made for Arnold Schwarzenegger. It was oversized, quite heavy, made of platinum and was displayed in a jewelry box big enough to hold a small radio. The price: a mere $53,000. London Jewelers was allocated one piece of this very limited edition watch and it was already sold by the time it arrived at the store. The success of this family jewelry “empire” is a tribute to three generations of ambitious, hardworking families who knew what their customers wanted to buy, and how to sell it to them! The fourth generation of family is now active in the business, as Mark and Candy’s son Scott and daughter Randi bring their own energies and visions to London Jewelers.

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page 66-68 Chicks who rock PROFILE

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Chicks Who Rock By Tom Albright hen I was 17 years old I snuck out of my parent’s basement and into a waiting friend’s car to go down to the Continental Airlines Arena (then the Brendan Byrne Arena) in Rutherford and see Heart in concert. They were touring the Bad Animals album and I knew they were chicks who rocked, but I really didn’t know what I was in for. I was 17, so I was reacting to a lot of things in ways I didn’t understand – but my reaction to Ann and Nancy Wilson I understood full well. They ripped across the stage in their flowing costumes. Annie was sexy then but it was her sister shredding on her guitar that really caused the pistons to fire. They wailed with their sisterly harmonies while lights and pyrotechnics launched every arena rock cliché this mullet-wearing 17-yearold cut his teeth on. Then they did the unthinkable – they smashed into a few Led Zeppelin covers! I was in love! Chicks rocked, and I felt it was my own personal discovery. Since then I have had somewhat of a fetish for female fronted bands. I played in several with female lead

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Jennifer Arroyo of “Suicide City ” rocking out on bassguitar.

singers and whenever I went out to see live music if a woman sang, or wailed, or, God forbid, played guitar… she commanded my undivided atten-

Sarah Vasil on drums.

tion. Nothing ever really compared to the dizzying hormonal rush of seeing Heart for the first time, but I spent my next 17 years looking for that elusive XX chromosomal electricity. I found it in a theater on McDougal Street this past January. I went with fellow Boulevard staffers Jason Feinberg and Heather Muhleman and what we saw will change the musical landscape in New York City this summer. Rock in the city will have a woman’s touch. It will also have a woman’s blistering guitar solo, a woman’s thundering drum solo, a feminine bass line attack and several Venuses on vocals. The Boulevard was invited to the exclusive pilot of the musical Rock Chicks, a rock opera written by prior Boulevard feature and indie sensation Lourds Lane. Lane, with partner and executive producer Frank Russo, conceptualized a show in which all band members would be female and a revolving cast of frontwomen would

Photos by Jason Feinberg


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Meg Wolf of “New York No Stars”.

Julia Preotu of “Me Talk Pretty”.

Lourds Lane - guitar and electric violin.

add variety and flavor to a theatrical rock extravaganza with old school arena production values. Think the epic-length canons of the Who, Pink Floyd and Queensryche. It’s as if the Trans-Siberian Orchestra was cast solely with beautiful women and erupted with the force of a buzz saw. “Rock Chicks features strong, charismatic women who truly rock out. It’s that simple,” said Lane. “All these ladies will wow you with their musical abilities. I wanted to give talented women an opportunity to express themselves in a forum with energy - extreme energy. Women so often are either forced through perception or reality to hold back – Rock Chicks is the place for their unbridled passion to blast through.” Rock Chicks picks up where the Lilith Fair left off. The first of its kind, the Lilith Fair was a touring show of female singer songwriters, folk artists and other pop acts who, while talented, never really pushed the envelope. They paid homage to the troublemakers like Joni Mitchell and Janis Joplin with a few subdued cover songs, collected their ticket money

and moved on to the next amphitheater. Today’s Rock Chicks are the next generation of troublemakers. They are the real thing and they are a force to be reckoned with. “I knew that there was a market for this because I had watched the Medusa Festival [a yearly festival of hard-hitting female fronted rock bands created, produced and hosted

by Lane] for years” said Russo. “I knew there was so much female talent and I wanted to put it all on the same stage. To me, these women are so captivating and talented, it was a nobrainer that the show would be a success if we just got a few of the right people in the door. This summer will be very exciting and the interest in the show will be enormous.”

Rachel Tricarico of “Do you See the Dark” on lead guitar.

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Sonia De Los Santos.

And to his credit, Russo’s hunch has proven correct. Investors and backers have signed a deal for Rock Chicks to have a run at the off-Broadway Player’s Theater, with options for a touring show in other venues once it proves successful. The show will run in the summer. Opening night is currently undetermined, but it will be on The Boulevard website as soon as it’s scheduled. According to Lane, the show she is building will be “over the top,” and the template for the eventual Broadway

Joey Sagarese/bass.

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production. The cast will also expand, with several tri-state area casting calls and open mics to find the most impressive female musical talent around. “The pilot we put together was to present the look of the show with the all-star, all-female band and rotating frontwomen. The entire cast are authentic rock chicks who live the life of rock and roll with their own working and touring bands. For the first off-Broadway production, we played songs from each of the frontwomen’s perspective bands. The summer run will be stepped up with a completely original score; much more musical peaks and valleys; many more musicians and singers who will be showcased at some point in the production; drum, string and horn ensembles, and a grand finale with all the rock chicks in the cast wailing on stage. Plus I’m on the hunt to find the youngest and oldest rocker girls who dominate their instrument. If I can find an octogenarian granny who’s the jam on the drums, that would be amazing!” Lane paused for a breath. As we asked about her vision for the show, Lane made sure that I

Jessie Wagner of “Envy”.

understood this was a work of art which happened to feature all women and not a feminist war chant. “My hopes are that young girls will find inspiration in all the talented singers and musicians on the stage and will feel that same passion toward music that I have. But there’s no question that the boys out there would love to see a cast full of talented and gorgeous girls rocking out... and we want that. The show is built for everyone to enjoy — boys, girls, moms, dads, little kids — everyone.” And if the show The Boulevard staff previewed was any indication, Russo and Lane will be the next big producer/director team about town. They offer a theatrical and business sensibility and acute understanding of what an audience needs to feel before it leaves the theater. I know this to be true because 17 years after I felt that surge of adrenaline I first felt as a 17-year-old, I felt it again. Chicks who rock cause it to happen in me. And these women do.


page 69 Bentley

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page 70,71 Michael Brecker PROFILE

3/29/07

9:55 AM

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Michael Brecker’s Final Pilgrimage By Tom Albright he staff of The Boulevard was led in Buddhist chant by Herbie Hancock when the packed theater at Town Hall was united in solemn serenity to remember the late saxophonist Michael Brecker and mark the end of an era in jazz. Paul Simon sang Still Crazy After All These Years as Hancock accompanied him on a Fender Rhodes. James Taylor gave a tearful video testimonial. And Randy Brecker, Michael’s equally influential trumpet-playing brother, eulogized the other half of the Brecker Brothers in a way so moving that the underlying feeling among the crowd was that jazz will be different from this day forward. “I remember when John Coltrane died and myself and Michael were standing around with other horn guys just thinking ‘What are we gonna do now?’ That’s how it feels now,” said Randy Becker. Randy captured this reporter’s and most jazz fans’ feelings exactly – there was Coltrane and then there was Michael Brecker. End of story. But there is a lot more to the story than that and it begs pause for tribute. Chances are that if you own a jazz, rock or pop record from the last 30 years with a sax part on it, it’s Michael Brecker. He played on more than 525 side projects and albums by the most renowned and successful recording artists of all time. He won 13 Grammys. He earned titles such as Jazz Man of the Year, Best Soloist of the Year, and Jazz Album of the Year by critics. But it’s widely agreed that Brecker was the most influential tenor sax player in the history of jazz. His early work with Randy as simply the Brecker Brothers had a profound influence on me as a young musician. Older musicians frequently talk about the first time they heard Coltrane and how their life changed forever afterwards. I really tried with Coltrane, but it took me a while. It was the Brecker Brothers landmark 1974 album – and specifically the track Sneaking Up Behind You that changed my life. That record took every detail and sonic element that I loved from classic funk groups like Tower of Power, Weather Report and Average White Band and packaged them together to provide a demonstration of how jazz funk should sound. For me, the Brecker Brothers represented the epitome of groove jazz led by horns. “Michael was the first person to cross over from jazz to pop without shame,” said David Liebman, a soprano sax

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player. “Michael knew something early that we have learned over time – in the end, music is music and if it’s excellent it doesn’t matter.” Out of respect for Michael, no other saxophones were played on stage that evening, even during Michael’s famous Midnight Passage. Liebman played a small flute and echoed a beautiful melody that Michael had written during one of their sessions. Brecker brought his signature excellence to pop music in multiple styles and genres. His sax is heard on legendar y hits by Herbie Hancock , Chick Corea, Aerosmith, Eric Clapton, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Steely Dan, Frank Zappa, Jaco Pastorius, Chaka Khan, James Taylor and, of course Paul Simon, with whom he toured extensively. Brecker’s career is a profile chart of the evolution of an entire musical era. He founded the breakthrough group Dreams in 1970. In 1974 his collaboration with Randy as the Brecker Brothers was easily the most innovative and successful jazz fusion bands of the decade. The brothers owned the famous downtown club, 7th Avenue South, where many of the most famous jazz musicians either were discovered, came of age or performed world-changing music. With legendary drummer Steve Gadd, Brecker


page 70,71 Michael Brecker PROFILE

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formed the group Steps Ahead which rose to worldwide acclaim with their seven-album discography. But it was Michael’s solo work that noted him the most awards and critical praise. Grammy after Grammy followed his 1987 self-titled debut and a coronation of “best ever” status or its equivalent in every major jazz publication. In preparation for this memorial tribute, it was 1997’s Tales from the Hudson that held the most sway for me. Maybe it was the time of year or my New York roots – but the instrumentation on that record captures what the Big Apple is like on a cold afternoon. When you can form a mental image with the sound of a saxophone, or feel your other senses give you an experience of being somewhere – you are then familiar with how Michael Brecker’s playing affects you. Tales from the Hudson is a good place to start. Brecker, Hancock and Pat Metheny had a longstanding musical collaboration that dates back decades. These three icons are probably the most studied instrumentalists in music schools throughout the world today. As a young guitar player, Metheny was my jazz universe’s Benevolent Being. His profound respect and love for Brecker anointed Michael a prophet to myself and my young bandmates. “The most dangerous place in the jazz world was on stage having to play a solo after Mike,” said Metheny. To hear a collective of the most important musicians in the world say that your playing created a space of anxiety for them in a song may be the highest tribute one could ever receive in the jazz world. But most amazing about Brecker’s legacy is the work he did with bandmates Pat Metheny, Herbie Hancock, bassist John Patitucci, Jack DeJohnette and Brad Mehldau in the year leading up to his passing on

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January 13 from leukemia. I sat and listened to that album alone in my car on a freezing March night and was treated to some of the best work Brecker has ever done. The album, Pilgrimage, will be released in May and proves that music transcends our physical condition and exists on a spiritual plane that only cer tain gifted people can access. Michael recorded the album as he was fighting his debilitating illness. As tough as this time was for him, his art and his language were on a level that still shone through and gave us some of the most beautiful playing of his life. Herbie Hancock articulated it by saying, “Michael’s music was a way of dealing with the four unavoidable sufferings of everyone’s life experience: bir th, aging, sickness and death.” Pilgrimage is Michael’s final gift to the world to help navigate the human condition. His last record is his first record to consist entirely of his own compositions. At the memorial service, Metheny played a song he had written for Michael called Every Day I Thank You. We at The Boulevard couldn’t say it any better. We thank you, Michael, and we will miss you.

Pat Metheny

Susan Becker

Simon and Hancock

Photos by Tina Guiomar

April ~ May 2007

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page 72,73 Margaret Cho PROFILE

3/29/07

3:01 PM

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Philosophy and Discipline Define Margaret Cho …Not to Mention Bawdy and Brilliant Humor By Tim Sullivan ife can be brutal. Sometimes things are so difficult or painful, the only way to talk about them is in the context of humor. In those moments, truth and healing are found in the fragile, vulnerable place that makes the standup comic our modern day philosopher. Margaret Cho is the Socrates of our age. I recently had the pleasure of burning an afternoon with Margaret in the lounge of the W Hotel on 40th Street. She greeted me exactly as one would expect after seeing her live standup act – she was casual, familiar, friendly. But under her cordial nature is a brilliant and slicing comedic wit with a brutally honest approach to telling it like it is and just how she feels about it. I’ve been watching Margaret for years. Certain comediennes have a way of making you think. Their humor serves as constructive social commentary – insight without the constrictions of formality, politeness and, in Margaret’s case, obscenity laws. I have always found her uproariously funny and have found myself agreeing with many of her observations and political points of view. I’ve found myself quoting her in discussions with friends and colleagues. I’ve always wanted to meet her and find out how she is able to say what everyone is thinking and frankly, what I have never heard a woman say before. “I have a process,” she shared with me when I asked about her muse. “When I get up in the morning, before I eat breakfast or do anything, I have to write a joke. I force myself. They don’t all become jokes in my act, some spring off into other things, but it’s a discipline that works for me.” That discipline has made her one of the most popular and prolific comediennes of the last 10 years. She headlined Carnegie Hall and turned out a live album. She has released four major DVDs, written and starred in a feature film, directed another, acted in her own sitcom, and written and starred in her own one-woman show. “It’s very hard for a woman in comedy,” she tells me. “It’s hard for women to be bold and not care what anyone, particularly men, think. Maybe that is why so many women comics are lesbians.” We both laugh. To say Margaret is really funny would be only telling a

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Photos by Austin Young

fraction of the story. Margaret has always hit her audience with very challenging material. She reacts to news of the day and points out the obvious absurdities to which we as a culture have grown so desensitized. As a fellow news junkie, I asked her what was bothering her that particular afternoon. “Ann Coulter.” She snaps immediately and jumps in her seat as if poked with a fork. “Do you believe what she said about John Edwards? I think I am upset this woman gets any attention for such hate-filled rhetoric when she obviously has some issues.” We both laugh again. Margaret started standup comedy in the early ’90s in California; it was the beginning of her climb to superstardom. She toured incessantly at colleges, clubs and then


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bigger and bigger venues. She was a smash on late night television (Arsenio, Leno, Conan, etc.) and finally on a Bob Hope primetime special. She broke and she broke big. A sitcom about an Asian American family followed, and after its collapse, Cho used the experience as material in her one-woman show called I’m the One That I Want. The show was also a book and a film, and was an unprecedented success. Her next two DVDs, Notorious C.H.O. and Revolution, continued Margaret’s march into uncharted territory for a woman comic. The topics were so over the top – gross sexual acts, body functions and the signature “mommy” character that satirizes her Korean mother. Margaret lays three issues out in her material: She is a woman. She is a Korean-American woman. She is a Korean-American bisexual woman. Watch out. You might think you’re watching an entertainer make fun of all three categories, but you’re actually watching a champion of civil rights. “One of my favorite gigs was when I played for the Gay Games at Soldier Field. It was so moving and I was so proud because there were thousands of people who were celebrating being out and I was honored to be a part of that event,” she reminisced. “That stood for something.” Margaret doesn’t just address issues, she physically fights for them. She plays various advocacy events, benefits and fundraisers for causes that are important to her. “When I first started in comedy I was trying to be funny and make it,” she reflected. “But after a while you realize that you care about certain things and you have to talk about what bothers you. A comic can’t not talk about what’s bothering them.” So Cho plowed onward with the irreverent revolutionary image – not just metaphorically but in her material: pictured on DVD box covers dressed as Che Guervara and titling a book I Have Chosen to Stay and Fight. I think most people enjoy comics that position themselves as ballbusters, but there was always something a little smarter under what Margaret was saying. This was authenticated by her autobiographical material surrounding her dieting issues and her struggles with drugs and alcohol.

“I had this terrible body image and I was struggling with it. I do a lot of belly dancing now and that is a way of me exercising through acceptance,” she explains. “But once I was on this horrendous diet and I lost a lot of weight quickly and I went into kidney failure. Coming through that I had the epiphany that I just didn’t have to do that to myself. It was so awful. So I write about it because if I can clean up something painful for me then maybe someone else can learn from it.” I told Margaret that a person very close to me who is a therapist knew I would be seeing her that afternoon. She had made me swear to tell Cho that she uses her bit about the famous diet injuries with her patients struggling with bulimia and anorexia. I told her. She looked genuinely pleased. Margaret’s feature film Bam Bam and Celeste will premiere in New York City this summer. She wrote, directed and starred in the movie, which is a coming of age tale about two teens that leave their small town and head for New York. In typical Cho fashion, both characters have myriad “issues” to sort through. As our afternoon progressed I pressed her for more impressions from the news of the day and she immediately brought up Anna Nicole Smith. “I was just really sad when Anna Nicole died,” she said as her eyes misted. “She was a nice person, and she made a very huge impression on me many years ago. I never forgot it. And to see her sadly die so quickly and now, how the story is developing is just a bummer. I have been writing down my thoughts about it but I haven’t found anything funny to say yet. ”And with that our discussion turns to celebrity. After a half-hour of chatting with Margaret, I felt as if I were talking with a familiar friend, an officemate or someone I know really well. Margaret, while gracious, isn’t trying to win anyone over. She has nothing to sell. For someone so opinionated and vulgar, those qualities give her absolution and make hanging with Cho an afternoon well spent. Margaret travels without pretension. She walks amid her fame and notoriety oblivious to the gilded snow globe insulation that can be so cancerous to a person’s enlightenment. Instead, she remains normal, sort of. “I make it a point to remain immune to the stifling insulation of celebrity,” she says with disdain. Frankly, she is either too smart or too irreverent. Maybe both. Definitely both.

April ~ May 2007

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page 74 Mary Magdalene PROFILE

3/29/07

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Redefining Mary Magdalene By Dagmar Fors Karppi he New Testament story of Mary Magdalene is making news. Dan Brown, author of The DaVinci Code, put up the flame under a pot already simmering in scholarly circles since their discovery and translation of the Gnostic Gospels. The ancient papyrus manuscripts were discovered by a farmer in Upper Egypt in 1945, where they were buried for nearly 2000 years. The Gnostic Gospels could transform Mary Magdalene into a pivotal figure of early Christianity, and reveal new information about the struggle for power that arose after Jesus’ death. The story of Mary Magdalene as mentioned in the New Testament is enhanced with information from the Gnostic Gospels in a DVD, the Secrets of Mary Magdalene, directed by awardwining filmmaker Rob Fruchtman and narrated by Marisa Berenson, with Stuart B. Rekant as executive producer. The film is based on the nonfiction book of the same name, written by bestselling authors Dan Burstein and Arne De Keijzer. The documentary, available from Koch Vision is a two-part program that provides the up-to-date information on one of the world’s most controversial religious figures. It reveals the flesh-and-blood woman who served as Jesus’ foremost apostle and maybe leader of his church. Secrets of Mary Magdalene takes an enlightening look at the apostle of apostles - from her role in Early Christianity and place of importance among the Christians of Medieval France, to the 20thcentury discovery of the ancient texts that shed new light on this mysterious woman. Most worthwhile is the second part of the DVD, a roundtable discussion by six women scholars, experts in their fields who each offer their personal interpretation of the importance of Mary Magdalene. It is a story for which the time is ripe. Today, in a world where a woman is running for president, former first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton; Condoleezza Rice is the US Secretary of state; and another woman, Nancy Pilozi, is the speaker of the house – two heart beats away from the presidency - the world may be ready for a more important place in religion for Mary Magdalene. All this new interest just goes to show that “The Greatest Story Ever Told” keeps getting better and better as scholars open up the curtains on history.

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The statue of Mary Magdalene in Carcassonne, France. Copyright Hidden Treasures Productions.

The DVD Secrets of Mary Magdalene is based on the nonfiction book of the same name, written by bestselling authors Dan Burstein and Arne De Keijzer.


page 75 Dreams PROFILE

3/29/07

10:14 AM

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Celebrity Dreams By Lauren Lawrence

Paris Hilton “When I was too young to drive I had this recurring dream where my sister and I took my parents’ car in San Francisco. I was driving and we were going up and down all these huge hills and all these little puppies were in the back seat, and I was afraid that we would crash or hurt someone because I couldn’t stop the car, and I was also afraid that the police would come after us because I had no license.” Being in the driver’s seat of a car symbolizes the spunky, underage dreamer’s wish to take charge of her life and to establish her own direc tion. There is the sense of independence, the wish to go places without restrictions. There is an acknowledgment of the dangers

and risks, the ups and downs, the hilly terrain of living in the fast lane. The dreamer recognizes that sometimes one must stop in one’s tracks to stay out of harm’s way. The little puppies take a backseat to the ebullient personality seated up front and symbolize another side of Paris. Brought along for the ride, the puppies represent Paris’ wish to retain a par t of her childhood innocence and sensibilit y. The unstoppable car reveals that Paris’ motor is always running. Her ceaseless drive is strong enough to override an anxiety over where it will lead her. To the extent that Paris cannot brake, she is unbreakable or resilient. Fearing a crash is nothing more than the wish for confrontation - even self-confrontation. That’s hot!

Photo by Patrick McMullan


page 76 BLVD Ad

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page 77 Gurneys TOWNS

3/29/07

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AROUND THE TOWNS

Cupid Drew Back His Bow... Again At Gurney’s Inn and Spa By Barry Kay ur Valentine’s Day plans were very different this year than in the past. My wife Rita and I were going to journey to Gurney’s Inn in Montauk for a renewal of our wedding vows, as well as a cable TV interview for Rita on The American Dream Show. Our friends and children thought that we were romantic but very foolhardy in light of the grim weather forecast for our planned weekend. All the meteorologists had predicted a major snowstorm for Long Island with high winds, and frozen roads. Ever the optimists, we packed up and set out on our journey amid snow, sleet and freezing rain. As a frequent and year round Hamptons/Montauk visitor, I knew that the winter weather is usually a lot less severe the closer you get to the Atlantic Ocean. As luck would have it, the weather changed part of our schedule when The American Dream Show was cancelled due to the treacherous roads. However, at 5 p.m. on Valentine’s Day, a small group of brave, sentimental and lovesmitten couples of all ages gathered in the dining room at Gurney’s to begin their renewal journey. We were pleasantly surprised when we were introduced to a couple who would actually be wed that evening, for the first time. We learned that the vivacious bride-to-be had two children from a previous relationship and had met a hardworking, ambitious young man and fallen in love. Reading in the local papers of Gurney’s Valentine’s Day renewal ceremony, the bride-to-be called Ingrid, Gurney’s marketing and P.R. director. She told Ingrid her love story and the detours

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Valentines Day Decorations at Gurneys.

Kissing contest winners at Gurney’s on Valentines Day.

and “curves in the road”she had encountered in life and asked if Gurney’s would help her and her new husband have her lifelong dream of a “formal wedding ceremony.” Without their help, the couple’s current financial situation made her dream seem impossible. Her sincerity, courage and emotional life story touched Ingrid, who then spoke on her behalf to Gurney’s management. They decided to make her wish come true and gave the young couple a fully paid wedding ceremony with close friends and family in attendance. We were all moved by this young couple’s story, as well as their optimism and courage. When they walked down the aisle with her daughters as flower girls, there were few dry eyes in the audience. It was then time for the Renewal of Vows ceremonies. Each couple was rejoined in matrimony by a Justice of the Peace in a simple but beautiful ceremony. We all celebrated with a champagne toast, wedding cake, photos, and warm and friendly conversation. The festivities continued in Gurney’s beautiful ocean-view dining room where we dined on a gourmet wedding dinner fit for a king and queen. Gurney’s provided each table with a bottle of fine imported champagne, a bag of chocolate hearts and a single long-stemmed rose to take to our luxurious rooms. Rita and I laughed, cried, and reminisced about our original wedding, the great years, the sad years, and now the best of years, as we realized we had survived and thrived as friends, lovers, husband and wife, parents, grandparents and soul mates. We drove back from Montauk with memories we will never forget!

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page 78 NCMA TOWNS

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Upcoming Exhibitions and Events at NCMA four-part series. Each series is strictly limited to 25 participants so advance reservations are absolutely required. For information call 516-484-9338, ext. 42 or e-mail brookedelappi@nassaumuseum.com.

Celebrity Lecture The Fascination of Printmaking Saturday, April 14 at 3 p.m. Donna Moran, Pratt Institute’s chair of fine arts, discusses the latest innovations in printmaking and the modern history of prints and gives a hands-on demonstration. Admission is $15 (museum members, $10).

Around the World With Music

James Rosenquist’s Flowers and Females.

Rembrandt To Rosenquist: Masters Of Printmaking Through May 13 From the extraordinary etchings of Rembrandt and Goya to the exciting multi-technique prints by 20th century artists such as Warhol and Rosenquist, this exhibit will show the dynamic changes in printmaking techniques that have been developed by European and American artists.

Twenty-First Century Prints Through May 13 Twenty-First Century Prints features this era’s hottest contemporary artists working in print media, among them Lisa Yuskavage, Elizabeth Peyton, John Currin, Kara Waller and others.

Curator’s Choice: New York Galleries and Museums Four-part Thursday series Series A: 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., April 26, May 10 Series B: 1:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on April 26, May 10 Series C: 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on April 12, May 3 and 31 Series D: 1:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on April 12, May 3 and 31 Chief curator Franklin Hill Perrell guides participants through art adventures at selected New York City galleries. Admission is $260 (museum members $220) for any of the

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Sunday, April 15 at 3 p.m. Presented by the New York Performance Arts Society. Children’s Orchestra Society, conductor and music director Michael Dadap. Sponsored by The Roslyn Savings Foundation An afternoon of music will be performed by the Children’s Orchestra Society. Admission is $15 (members, $10).

Private Tea & Tour of the Exhibition Wednesday, April 18 at 2:30 pm A behind-the-scenes private tour of the current exhibition introduced by museum director, Constance Schwartz, followed by tea, sandwiches, scones and sweets in the Museum Café. Space is limited; reserve early. Admission is $30 (museum members, $25). Advance registration is required for all programs at Nassau County Museum of Art. . Reservations may be made online up to three business days prior to the event at nassaumuseum.com or by mailing a check to Events; Nassau County Museum of Art; One Museum Drive; Roslyn Harbor, NY 11576. Call 516-484-9338, ext. 12 for information. Free Docent Led Exhibition Tours, Tuesday-Sunday at 2 p.m. Free Family Walk-Throughs, Sundays at 1 p.m. Nassau County Museum of Art is located at One Museum Drive (just off Northern Boulevard, Route 25A, two traffic lights west of Glen Cove Road) in Roslyn Harbor. Hours are 11 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission to the main building, the Arnold and Joan Saltzman Fine Art Building, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors (62+) and $4 for children 12 and under. Weekends only there is a $2 parking fee. Free docentled tours of the main exhibition are offered at 2 p.m. each day. Meet in the lobby; no reservations are needed. The Museum Shop and Red Room Gallery are open all museum hours. Call 516-484-9337 for current exhibitions, events, days/times and directions or log on to nassaumuseum.com.


page 79 NCMA Honorees TOWNS

3/29/07

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Michael Mazzei Is Honoree at NCMA Annual Ball

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he Nassau County Museum of Art Ball is one of the splashiest events on the North Shore calendar, attracting a crowd from Long Island’s social and business communities. This year’s ball will honor Michael Mazzei, owner of nuBest, the hair salon and spa that is a mecca for well-coifed women from throughout the metropolitan area. Assuring that the 2007 ball is one of the most memorable ever are talented co-chairs, pictured from left, Angela Susan Anton of Anton Community Newspapers, Lisa Eastman and M. Patricia Janco-Tupper of the Citibank Private Bank. So clear your calendar for June 9 and call 516-484-9338, ext. 25 for an invitation. This is one event you won’t want to miss!

NCMA Ball co-chairs, from left, Angela Susan Anton, Lisa Eastman and M. Patricia Michael Mazzei of nuBest Salon and 5604Museum IAFH Social Ad 3/21/07 1:23 PM Janco-Tupper. Page 1 Spa, Ball honoree.

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page 80 Tilles Center TOWNS

3/29/07

10:07 AM

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Upcoming Events at Tilles Center

Revelations from the Alvin Ailey Family Show.

Alvin Ailey Presents Family Performance The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater returns to the Tilles Center with a special one-hour family performance on Saturday, April 21. The 2 p.m. performance is part of Stage Two: The Arts Start Here, a series for children of all ages. On the program are Ailey’s signature work, Revelations, and Love Stories, Judith Jamison’s dynamic collaboration with hip-hop pioneer Rennie Harris and modern dance maverick Robert Battle set to music by Stevie Wonder. Tilles Center presents a Family Workshop at 1 p.m. which offers hands-on art activities related to the performance. Admission to the workshop is $5 per person; there is no charge for those who hold family memberships. Tickets to the dance performance are $35 and $22.

An Evening with Bill Maher

Bill Maher

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Bill Maher is making a one-night-only appearance on the East Coast at Tilles Center on Saturday, April 14. The 8 p.m. performance is in Tilles Center’s North Fork Hall. Ticket prices range from $45 to $85 in the 2,242-seat North Fork Hall.

❧ Around The Towns

The Shanghai Quartet

Shanghai Quartet at Hillwood The Shanghai Quartet returns to Tilles Center for the Performing Arts’ Music at Hillwood Recital Hall on Sunday, April 22. The 3 p.m. concert, also features pianist Caroline Stoessinger. On the program are Schubert’s Cello Quintet in C Major and two works by Schumann: Fairy Tales for Viola and Piano and Piano Quintet in E Flat, Op. 44. Tickets for the Shanghai Quartet’s appearance are $40. Tickets for all shows are available on the Internet, at Tilles Center’s box office, through TillesCharge or by fax. For information or TillesCharge orders, call 516- 299-3100. For Internet orders, visit tillescenter.org. There is a service charge for telephone and Internet orders. Faxed orders should be sent to 516- 299-3817. Group tickets are on sale now. All ticket sales are final; no returns or exchanges. The box office and TillesCharge are open Monday-Saturday, 1-6 pm. For mail orders, write to Tilles Center Box Office; P.O. Box 570; C.W. Post Campus; Greenvale, NY 11548-0570. Visit Tilles online at tillescenter.org for current information and updates. The Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, consisting of North Fork Hall and Hillwood Recital Hall, is located on the C.W. Post Campus, Route 25A in Brookville.


page 81 WLIW TOWNS

3/29/07

10:15 AM

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Tuning In with WLIW21 New York Public Television WLIW21 New York’s diverse programming schedule is a destination for viewers of all ages, featuring public television favorites from PBS KIDS to celebrity chefs in the kitchen, enhanced by a rich local public affairs lineup. Here are just some of this month’s highlights.

Lidia’s Italy

Fat: What No One Is Telling You Thursday, April 26 at 9 p.m. As the number of obese Americans climbs to frightening levels, obesity experts strive to find answers to the complex human puzzle that is driving this epidemic and creating so much personal pain in a society that worships “thin.”

Mondays at 8 p.m. beginning April 9 Lidia Bastianich debuts a new series based on recipes she tasted during her travels to Italy. Featured areas include Friuli, Maremma (Tuscany), Naples, Padua and Treviso, Piedmont, Puglia, Sicily, Istria and Trieste. Everyday Food (8:30 p.m.), Jacques Pépin (9 p.m.), Mark Bittman (9:30 p.m.), Master Class at Johnson & Wales (10 p.m.) and Food Trip with Todd English (10:30 p.m.) round out WLIW’s delicious three-hour Monday night Lidia Bastianich brings you a cooking “menu.” taste of Italy.

The Lion Man Wednesdays at 8:30 p.m. beginning April 4 New Zealander Craig Busch brings viewers up close and personal with the world’s most endangered big cat species at his Zion Wildlife Gardens, a sanctuary for lions and other big cats.

Wild Chronicles Wednesdays at 8 p.m. Boyd Matson, formerly of National Geographic Explorer, hosts this weekly magazine-style series covering news from nature, adventure and exploration. National Geographic’s Crittercam field research tool lets viewers see the world from the point of view of wild animals.

Beyond the TV set: WLIW21 has your chance to see some of public television’s favorite performers live. Visit wliw.org and click on “pledge online” for tickets in support of your local PBS station. Patrizio - The Italian singer praised as “The New Voice of Romance” comes to Avery Fisher Hall on Sunday, April 22. Tickets are available through WLIW21 for orchestra level seating while supplies last. Shop21 Online - Shop for public television favorites on DVD, VHS and CD including WLIW21’s original production Gold Coast Mansions, on sale at wliw.org. Great ideas for Mother’s Day!

From The Top: Live From Carnegie Hall Sundays at 4:30 p.m. Beginning April 8 A showcase for America’s best young classical musicians ages 8 to 18, this series, based on the phenomenally popular NPR radio series, also features appearances by well-known artists such as Joshua Bell, Béla Fleck and Denyce Graves. Celebrated pianist Christopher O’Riley hosts and interviews the young performers, including 17-year-old trumpeter Conrad Jones from Sayville, Long Island.

Boyd Matson and National Geographic’s Crittercam lets you see the world through wild animals’ eyes.

April ~ May 2007

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page 82 Science Museum TOWNS

3/29/07

10:16 AM

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Science Museum of LI Gala Honors Entomologist Dr. Mark Moffett

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ark W. Moffett, PhD, Harvard graduate, entomologist, journalist and nature photographer for National Geographic will be honored with the 2007 SMLI Science Achievement Award at the Science Museum of Long Island Annual Gala on April 26 at the Swan Club in Glenwood Landing. Five of Moffett’s images have made it into the “100 Best Nature Pictures” special edition of National Geographic magazine. He is an associate in entomology at the Smithsonian Institution and has also served as a Harvard associate in anthropology and a researcher in residence at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California at Berkley. The Explorers Club honored him with the 2006 Lowell Thomas Medal for Exploration, a prestigious award named for the renowned journalist and awarded to those who have distinguished themselves in the field of exploration. Moffett was recognized for the work he does in the rainforest canopy. He is currently writing a book for Har vard University Press. Moffett lectures around the country on tropical ecology, treetop exploration and teamwork under extreme conditions and the love of nature and conservation. “You haven’t lived until you’ve seen Mark imitate the courtship displays of a jumping spider or preying mantis…the way Jane 2007 SMLI Science Achievement Award recipient entomologist Dr.Mark Moffett. Goodall looks at chimpanzees is the way Moffett looks at bugs and ants and rainforest canopy, he has spent countless hours hanging spiders,” said Mary G. Smith, senior assistant editor of from nylon ropes or clinging to slippery branches National Geographic magazine. observing the activities of rainforest denizens from The Harvard University Gazette notes, “Some of Mark orangutans to mites.” Moffett’s job skills bear little resemblance to those found The public is invited to join in this evening of dinner, on a typical academic résumé: a love of arboreal music, auctions and professional casino games to benefit existence, an apparent immunity to tropical diseases, the museum. All tax-deductible donations will benefit the rock-steady hands and the ability to place his ankle preservation and expansion of SMLI children’s programs. behind his head. Fortunately, Moffett has discovered the For information and tickets please call Ronni Graf at 627singular occupation that brings together this exotic 9400, ext. 11. Tickets are $95 each. collection of talents. As a biologist interested in the

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page 83 Robert Scott

TOWNS

3/29/07

10:16 AM

Page 1

Students Need More Than Liberal Arts By Robert A. Scott, President Adelphi University e in higher education keep hearing laments about the dangerous trend toward the “professionalization” of undergraduate education. Scholars and government officials call upon colleges to return to the purity of earlier days, when the liberal arts held sway. As the graduate of a liberal arts program and president of a “liberal arts” university that prides itself on the infusion of the liberal arts throughout all courses of study, I have a sense of satisfaction with these urgent pleas. I agree that the humanities are necessary, useful, and beautiful. But I must confess to a certain nagging feeling that the liberal arts, while necessary for the preparation of educated citizens, are not sufficient for a complete baccalaureate education. Advocates of pure liberal arts often ignore three factors that I consider essential: • Study in the liberal arts can be just as profession-oriented as study in a professional field. Histor y, for example, is often described as one of the pure liberal arts that every educated person should study. It is said that studying history, philosophy, and literature is what the liberal arts are all about. Unfortunately, at many colleges, the courses offered to freshmen and sophomores as “liberal arts” are the same courses used as steppingstones toward the major, which is after all a form of a professional preparation. Those who advocate the pure liberal arts should take a look at the elective courses offered in history, philosophy and other subjects to make certain that students are being introduced to the subject as a liberating experience and not only as preparation for graduate school.

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• The skills and attributes associated with the liberal arts are almost all related to long-term intellectual and professional development. Students, however, also need assistance in the transition to the first job or

The liberal arts alone are not sufficient to prepare citizens for a changing world. advanced study after graduation. Guidance about this transition will help ensure that students take a constructive next step and do not close off options for future career advancement. Liberal arts advocates often give too little attention to this need.

• The pure liberal arts are usually classroom-oriented and do not give adequate acknowledgement to outof-class activities. These other activities can include cooperative education, internships, involvement in extracurricular activities on and off campus, campus employment, and any other means for students to exercise their talents and apply their learning. A college is more than a group of classrooms, and students don’t simply lease seats in a history class. All the facilities should be marshaled for the development of sound educational programming for the liberal arts and beyond. The liberal arts are good and necessary for all who aspire to become educated citizens. But these subjects alone are not sufficient to prepare citizens for a changing world.

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page 84 OWG TOWNS

3/29/07

10:16 AM

Page 2

Old Westbury Gardens Welcomes Spring April Events

Children’s Concert: Apartment to Let

Old Westbury Gardens will be open the weekend of April 7 - 8. Regular schedule, house and grounds open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day except Tuesdays, begins April 14. Special discounted April admissions: general admission: $8, over 62: $5, children 7-12: $3, members and children 6 and under: free.

Live piano and flute is interspersed with the narration of this classic Israeli children’s tale in a charming, interactive performance for children 8 and under. April 22, 3 to 4 p.m.

Dog Days Bring your leashed canine pal for an invigorating walk through designated areas of the grounds. Donations of canned or dry food will be gratefully accepted for area animal shelters. April 7 - 8, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Arbor Day Tree Dedication Join family and friends who have contributed to the Tree Funds in memory of loved ones as a new tree is dedicated. April 29, 1:30 p.m. Tree walk: 2:30 p.m.

May Events May admissions: general $10; seniors $8; children 7-12 $5; children 6 and under and members: Free

Dog Demonstrations and Exhibits

Plant Sale

Canine obedience tests, agility demonstrations, Easter egg hunt and other games. Area animal welfare and rescue groups will be on hand. April 7, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Purchase select annuals and perennials. Enjoy children’s crafts, including making dried flower arrangements for Mother’s Day. May 3 - 6, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Planting projects for children, May 5 - 6, 1 to 3 p.m. Gardens’ horticulturists, members of ARS NY, and master gardeners of the Nassau County Cornell Cooperative Extension will be on hand to answer questions and to test samples of dry soil, May 4 - 6, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Taste of Spring A food and wine tasting and silent auction for new and renewing members in Westbury House. Enjoy sampling appetizers, entrees, desserts, and wines provided by some of Long Island’s finest restaurants, caterers, and wineries. Contact Jana Ryan for more information and reservations at 516-333-0048 ext. 309 or email jryan@oldwestburygardens.org. April 21, 6 p.m.

Porsche Show Vintage to current model Porsches will be on view during judging. May 6, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Poetica Musica: Faces of France The chamber group performs on May 12 with guided tour at 6:45 p.m., pre-concert talk at 7:30 p.m., concert at 8 p.m., followed by a meet-theartists reception. $25 ($20 members, seniors, and students).

Gardeners’ Fair Dinner dance and auction to benefit Old Westbury Gardens. May 19, 7 p.m. Contact Raena Blumenthal at 516-333-0048, ext. 308.

Young Musician’s Concert May 20, 3 to 4 p.m.

Chairman Mary Phipps at last year’s Gardeners’ Fair. Photo by Chuck Gosline, Artisan Photography

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Old Westbury Gardens is located at 71 Old Westbury Road, Old Westbury, NY 11568. For more information call 516333-0048 or visit us at www.oldwestburygardens.org


page 85 FOTA TOWNS

3/29/07

10:16 AM

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Kevin Mahagony Trio Performs In Oyster Bay

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he Kevin Mahogany Trio will perform at the final concert of the Très Cabaret at Café Doubleday series presented by Doubleday Babcock and Friends of the Arts and sponsored by Marge and Fritz Coudert. The Los Angeles Times called Kevin Mahogany “one of the first truly gifted male vocalists to emerge in years.” Over the course of Mahogany’s extraordinary career, he has made significant breakthroughs in style and sounds that redirected, redefined and even reinvented jazz. January 2005 began a new chapter in the career of Kevin Mahogany with the release of his CD, Kevin Mahogany Big Band, which hit No. 3 on the charts. The performance will be held at Doubleday Babcock, 45 Main Street, Oyster Bay, Saturday, May 19 at 8 p.m.; doors open at 7. Tickets are $40 each. There is very limited seating, so order tickets early. Light food and beverages are available for sale - no outside food or beverages, please. Valet parking is available. To order tickets, or for more information, visit www.FOTApresents.org or call 516- 922-0061.

Kevin Mahogany

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April ~ May 2007

The Boulevard

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page 86 Planting Fields TOWNS

3/29/07

10:54 AM

Page 1

Planting Fields Arboretum April 1 - September 30 is tour season for the Coe Hall historic house and museum. Guided tours are offered daily from noon to 3:30 p.m. Docents will guide visitors through the furnished first and second floors of Coe Hall. Admission: $6.50 adults; $5 senior citizens; $2 children 12 and younger. Groups of 10 or more should make advance reservations by calling the group tour coordinator at 516-922-8670. For an additional fee of $3 per person, depending on good weather and staffing, garden tours may be available. Purchase tickets the day of your visit at the Museum Reception at Coe Hall. There is much to see in April. Peak viewing of more than 30,000 daffodils, more than 80 varieties of magnolias and other spring bulbs in bloom. The Main Greenhouse will dazzle visitors with its lovely display of Easter lilies. Planting Fields will celebrate Arbor Day with a weekend-long festival on Saturday April 28 and Sunday April 29 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., $5 adults and $1 children 12 -2. There will be activities and enter tainment for children and adults. Hydrangeas, lilies, foxglove and delphiniums await. Everywhere bursts into bloom in the month of May, and Planting Fields is no exception. Most azaleas and rhododendrons bloom this month. The seasonal display in the Main Greenhouse will feature hydrangeas, foxglove, delphiniums and Martha Washington geraniums. The Long Island Gesneriad Society and Saintpaulia Society will host a joint flower show in the Horticulture Center on Saturday, May 5 from 1 to 4 p.m. and Sunday, May 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit online: www.gesneriadsociety.org. The New York Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will host a flower show in the Horticulture Center on Sunday, May 20, open to the public from noon to 4 p.m. Competition. Many varieties of azaleas and rhododendron on display. For more information visit online: www.nyrhododendron.org Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park is located at 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay, NY 11771. Park is open daily from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. $6 parking Tree climbing is fee weekends and holidays only until Memorial Day (May 28); then just one of the charged daily until Labor Day. enjoyable activities Call for special events and other park information 516-922-9200 planned for Arbor Day. or visit www.plantingfields.org.

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page 87 Family&Children TOWNS

3/29/07

10:17 AM

Page 1

Bernie Kennedy Elected Chair Of Family and Children’s Board

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amily and Children’s President and CEO James J. Harnett announced the election of Bernard P. (Bernie) Kennedy, Esq., as chairman of the board of trustees of Long Island’s leading human ser vices agency. Kennedy succeeds Daniel E. Brown, who completed three years as board chair. According to Harnett, “Family and Children’s is privileged to have Bernie assume this pivotal role. His reputation as a leader in the business and nonprofit sectors will be invaluable as we continue to forge new relationships and foster our mission throughout the region.” A par tner in the law firm of Kennedy & Gillen of Garden City, Bernie has been a member of Family and Children’s Board since 2002, and

he was honored at the agency’s 2006 Golf & Tennis Tournament. Bernie also serves as a board and executive committee member of the Little Flower Children and Family Services of New York, and is chairman of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Volunteer Lawyers, which provides pro bono legal counseling to residents and former residents of substance abuse rehabilitation programs. According to Kennedy, “In following such prestigious past board chairs as Dan Brown, Scott Treiber, Charlie Strain and Carol Wessel, my goal as Family and Children’s new board chair is threefold: continue to secure superior board leadership, to attract people with a passion for our cause as volunteers and investors,

Bernie Kennedy

and to advance our mission which is to protect and strengthen Long Island’s most vulnerable individuals and families.”

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page 88-89 JCC Auction EVENTS

3/29/07

10:58 AM

Page 2

EVENTS

Sid Jacobson JCC Auction Nets Record $1 Million Social Service Programs to Benefit

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ore than 730 guests attended the 12th Annual Auction for Excellence to lend support to Sid Jacobson JCC’s social service programs. A record $1,056,000 was raised through live and silent auctions; the amount represented more than a 27 percent increase over last year! The JCC was transformed into an old western town and celebrity auctioneer Mike Greenberg, co-host of ESPN’s popular Mike & Mike In the Morning, took the stage and, with professional auctioneer Robert Strauss, auctioned off some truly unique items.

Auction for Excellence Co-chair David Levy starts the bidding.

JCC Board President Jon Held and Board Member Susan Held.

JCC Board Member Denise Silverberg and Angela Susan Anton.

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Angela Susan Anton, JCC Board President Jon Held and JCC Executive Director Susan Bender.

Committee Chairperson and JCC Board Member David Levy and Mike Greenberg.

Auction PR Committee Member Lisa Rabinovich, Mike Greenberg and Phil Rabinovich.


page 88-89 JCC Auction EVENTS

3/29/07

10:58 AM

Page 3

Committee Co-chairs Donna Halperin and Jodi Horowitz.

JCC Board President Jon Held; Committee Member Adam Haber; JCC Board and Committee Member Doreen Peykar; Committee member Andrew Peykar, JCC Board Member and Chair of Auction PR Committee, Renee Haber.

Town of North Hempstead Supervisor Jon Kaiman and wife, Kim (c) with JCC Executive Director Susan Bender.

Andrew Winakor, chairperson and JCC Board Member Tracy Levy and Jennifer Winakor.

Auction for Excellence Committee did excellent work!

April ~ May 2007

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page 90 harrison-inn EVENTS

3/29/07

10:18 AM

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Harrison’s Heart Foundation Raises $100,000 at Gala Funds Benefit Infants With Heart Disease

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arrison’s Heart Foundation held its second annual Gala Fundraiser for research into congenital heart disease in children, on Friday, Feb. 2. The 250 guests helped raise in excess of $100,000 to support research into the causes of congenital heart disease in children currently being done at Stony Brook University Hospital by Dr. Eli Hatchwell and his staff. The inspiration behind the creation of Harrison’s Heart Foundation was Harrison Tull, who passed away at the age of 14 months after struggling with a complex combination of cardiovascular problems since birth.

Honoree John J.Tunney III, Mimosa Jones and Pam and Clark Gillies. Restaurateur John Tunney was honored for his generosity and support of more than100 charitable organizations as well as hosting and donating resources from his properties Besito,Blue Honu and American Burger Company.

Richard Tull, HHF trustee and Dr. Eli Hatchwell, research scientist at Stony Brook University Hospital for HHF.

John J. Tunney III with Helen and Richard Tull, Harrison’s parents and trustees of HHF. All photos by Kathleen Wickham

INN to Host Annual INNkeepers’ Ball

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he Interfaith Nutrition Network (INN) will be holding its 20th annual INNkeepers’ Ball on Thursday May 10 at the Long Island Marriott. The evening will benefit the INN’s soup kitchens, emergency shelters and long-term housing efforts throughout Long Island. Pictured from left are Chair Rob Kammerer, Honorary co-Chair Constance Cincotta, Honoree Risa Pulver, INN Executive Director Jean Kelly, Honoree David Fenton, Honorary co-Chair Alexander Phillips and Chair John Brennan. For reservations of information call Rob Kammerer at the INN at 516-486-8506, ext. 190.

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page 91 american heart gala EVENTS

3/29/07

10:19 AM

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American Heart Association Hosts Heart of New York Gala

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he American Heart Association hosted its 15th Annual Heart of New York Gala at the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Funds raised will benefit the association’s research, health education and community programs in the New York metropolitan area. Former President Bill Clinton was a special guest at this very special event.

Gil Bashe, chairman of the New York City Board of Directors of the American Heart Association in New York City; former President Clinton; Ralph Sacco, M.D., president of the New York City Board of Directors of the American Heart Association in New York City; Richard Stein, M.D., president of the Heritage Affiliate Board of Directors of the American Heart Association.

Honoree Craig R. Smith, M.D.; Dr. Max Gomez and former President Clinton.

Event honoree Craig R. Smith, MD, Calvin F. Barber Professor of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Chief, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center with former President Bill Clinton.

Former President Clinton and honoree Fred Hassan.

William C. Weldon, chairman of the board and CEO of Johnson & Johnson chaired the dinner; Fred Hassan, chairman and CEO of Schering-Plough Corporation and one of the evening’s honorees, and event emcee Dr. Max Gomez.

April ~ May 2007

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page 92 Mercy Ball EVENTS

3/29/07

10:19 AM

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Mercy Ball Raises $150,000 For New Radiology Suite

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he 70th annual Mercy Ball recently raised $150,000 for a new radiology suite in the Mercy Medical Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Express Care Center. Some 500 people attended the glittering black-tie event sponsored by the Friends of Mercy. The ball was dedicated to the memory of Regina Brancato who supported the Medical Center for more than 30 years.

Most Reverend Paul Walsh, DD, Auxiliary Bishop, Diocese of Rockville Centre is pictured with Kathleen McCaffrey, RN, recipient of the Sister Mary Nadine Casey, CIJ Award (right of center) and members of the Congregation of the Infant Jesus.

Most Reverend Paul Walsh, with Dr. Lori H. Pollack, Mercy Medical Center director of obstetrics and gynecology and 2006 president of The Friends of Mercy Medical Center at left and Mercy Ball Chair Couple Marie Murphy and Dr. Daniel G. Murphy, Mercy Medical Center director of emergency medicine.

Ann M. Barbaccia, MD, recipient of the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council Theodore Roosevelt Award, dances with her father, lifetime Mercy Medical Center physician Anthony J. Barbaccia, MD.

Mercy Medical Center President Dr. Alan D. Guerci (c) with wife Leslie; Robert Vizza (r) and Dr. Ronald Brenner, director of psychiatry at Mercy Medical Center.

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Mr. and Mrs. Stephen McLoughlin, 2007 president of The Friends of Mercy Medical Center, with tablemates Mr. and Mrs. Rick Myatt, Mr. and Mrs. Brian Joesten and Dr. and Mrs. Sal Palazzolo.

George P. Dunn, recipient of the Bishop John R. McGann Lifetime Achievement Award, is flanked by Mercy Medical Center board member Francis X. Murray at left, and Andrew E. Healey, past president of The Friends of Mercy Medical Center.

Ann M. Barbaccia, MD, receives the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council Theodore Roosevelt Award from Sister Bernadette Downes, CIJ.

From left are Mercy Ball Chair Marie Murphy, Sister Anne Reekie, SR, CIJ and Ann Cella, RN, senior vice president for Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer of Mercy Medical Center.


page 93 mental health EVENTS

3/29/07

10:20 AM

Page 1

MHANC Honors Professionals And Philanthropists At Miracle Makers Ball

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he Mental Health Association of Nassau County held its 2006 Miracle Makers Ball which was attended by close to 300 leading professionals throughout Long Island and raised more than $220,000 for the Mental Health Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Programs and Services. The event featured a gourmet cocktail hour, silent auction, dinner and dancing.

Steven Greenfield; Miriam Milgrom; Honoree Laura Powers Swiggett, board member of the MHA; Honoree Brian Madden of Liberty Title Agency; Honoree Amy Hagedorn of the Horace & Amy Hagedorn Fund and Patrick Smalley of the Garden City Hotel, who served as event chairperson.

Patrick Smalley, Susan Weshler, Lisa Wilens, Tammie Squitieri and Daniel Flynn.

Patrick Smalley and Dr. Steven Salvatore.

The Hon. David Denenberg, Brian Madden, Laura Swiggett. Amy Hagedorn and the Hon. Howard Weitzman.

2006 Miracle Makers Ball Seasons of Hope at Garden City Hotel.

April ~ May 2007

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page 94 dri EVENTS

3/29/07

10:20 AM

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Long Islanders Host Fundraiser for DRI Foundation Funds to Help Find Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

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tate Senator Carl Marcellino, Glen Cove Mayor Ralph Suozzi, Judge Richard McCord and honoree Dr. Yelena Nicholson, a pediatric endocrinologist, at Winthrop University Hospital, topped a list of whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who at the 4th Annual Cooking for a Cure Dinner at Page One Restaurant in Glen Cove. Senator Marcellino added to the excitement by announcing he had secured a grant for the DRI Foundation.

Allan Pashcow, chairman, LI Region, Diabetes Research Institute Foundation; Mayor of Glen Cove Ralph V. Suozzi and Madelyn Fugazy, LI regional manager, Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

Mrs. Carl Marcellino and Judge Richard McCord.

Former Mayor of Glen Cove the Hon. Donald DiRiggi with his daughter Delia DiRiggi-Whitton.

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Cooking for a Cure co-chairs Delia DiRiggi-Whitton and Mary Hall.


page 95 ccfa spring-pink EVENTS

3/29/07

10:20 AM

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Maurer Foundation to Kick Off 2007 Pink Diamond Ball

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he Maurer Foundation will host its most elegant affair and largest fundraiser of the year on Saturday, April 28 at 7 p.m. at The Pierre, Fifth Avenue at 61st Street. Entertainment at the Pink Diamond Ball will be provided by pop diva Donna Summer in a special guest appearance. The countdown to the fourth annual Pink Diamond Ball began with a cocktail party at the Long Island residence of Maurer Foundation Board Chairman Niki Gregory. For more information on the Pink Diamond Ball, contact Raquel Singh at 516-883-6377.

Dr. Virginia Maurer with Joe and Niki Gregory, Maurer Foundation board chairman.

Ed and Pat Travaglianti.

Frank and Rita Castagna and Steven with Rebecca Hollander.

CCFA to Honor Peter Cosentino as Man of the Year Balboni, DiNapoli to Receive Awards

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he Board of Trustees of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc. (CCFA), Long Island Chapter, is proud to announce that Peter Cosentino, managing partner, PJ Venture and Cosentino Brothers Development LLC, will accept its 2007 Man of the Year Award at the Chapter’s 17th Annual Spring Gala, Friday, May 11, in the Grand Ballroom of the Garden City Hotel. NYS Deputy Secretary for Public Safety Michael A.L. Balboni and New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli will receive the Community Champion, Friend and Advocate Award in recognition of their steadfast advocacy on behalf of CCFA. For information about the gala and the commemorative gala journal, call the Long Island Chapter at 516-222-5530.

Peter Cosentino

Thomas P. DiNapoli

Michael A.L. Balboni

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page 96 make a wish EVENTS

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Make-A-Wish Celebrates Volunteer Recognition Lehman Brothers Earns Corporate Partnership Award

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he Make-A-Wish Foundation Metro New York 2006 Volunteer Recognition event took place at the Citibank Building in Long Island City. In addition to celebrating the outstanding work of dedicated volunteers, the foundation also announced Lehman Brothers as the recipients of the annual Corporate Partnership Award.

Make-A-Wish volunteers and employees Darien DaCosta, Caitlin Cheney, Shawn Kurshuk, Richard Cavutto, Meagan Hinchliffe, Cathy Atria, Melissa Ferrao

Wish Brother Kyle Pena dancing the night away with Make-A-Wish Volunteer Resource Coordinator Norma Blank.

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Make-A-Wish Foundation of Metro New York President and CEO Pat Clemency with Outstanding Volunteer Rookie Honoree Rachna Vishaubhakat. Also pictured are Wish Kid Charlie Pena with brothers Michael and Kyle. Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wish was to be head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles for a day.

Outstanding Volunteers 2006: Karen Mason, Roberta Wasserman, Sami Steigmann, Binta Christopher, Howard Pavane, Rachna Vishnubhakat and Make-A-Wish Volunteer Resource Coordinator Norma Blank.


page 97 american heart go read EVENTS

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Go Red for Women Luncheon Is Great Success

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ore than 800 people, mostly women recently attended the hugely successful American Heart Association Go Red For Women Luncheon. The Go Red movement encourages everyone to love their hearts, and share lifealtering and life-saving information with women they know. The color red was everywhere, and the event was a sellout, raising more than $350,000 for the American Heart Association.

Pictured from left are Cheryl Korman, Esq., vice-chair, Go Red For Women Luncheon; Nancy Magrini, stroke survivor; 2007 Go Red For Women Honorees Karen Pearse, Sharon Grosser and Sophia Hall and 2007 Luncheon Event Chair Carol LaRoque.

The 2007 Go Red For Women Luncheon keynote speaker was Dr. Mehmet Oz, MD, FACS, vice-chair and professor of Surgery at Columbia University Department of Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia.

Pic tured are Dr. Mehmet Oz and Angela Susan Anton, publisher of Anton Community Newspapers.

2007 Go Red For Women Luncheon Honorees: Karen Pearse, CEO Innovative Stone; Sharon Grosser, executive director of the Roslyn Savings Foundation; and Sophia Hall, Long Island Correspondent-WCBS Radio 880 AM.

Pictured are the more than 800 attendees at the 6th Annual American Heart Association Go Red For Women Luncheon

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page 98 UJA EVENTS

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UJA and Public Officials Recognize Excellence in Service Programs for Developmentally Disabled Honored

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tate and local officials joined UJA-Federation of New York in acknowledging the outstanding programs and services for Long Islanders with developmental disabilities at the Long Island Legislative Reception. New York State Senator Dean G. Skelos was recognized as Legislator of the Year, the J.E. & Z.B. Butler Foundation received the Foundation of Excellence Award and four UJA-Federation agencies were recognized for excellence in services for the developmentally disabled: the Barry and Florence Friedberg Jewish Community Center, F.E.G.S. Health and Human Services System, the Sid Jacobson Jewish Community Center and the Suffolk Y Jewish Community Center.

From left, Senior Vice President for Agency and External Relations Louise Greilsheimer; UJA-Federationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Legislator of the Year, New York State Senator Dean G. Skelos; Long Island Regional Director Stuart Tauber; and Long Island Government Relations Chair Lawrence C. Gottlieb.

From left, New York State Assemblyman Harvey Wesisenberg and Fred Richman, president of the Barry and Florence Friedberg Jewish Community Center.

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Nassau County Executive Thomas R. Suozzi presents the Foundation of Excellence Award to Bruce Doniger and Pat Goldman of the J.E. & Z.B. Butler Foundation.

From left, Gerald Monter, first vice president of the Suffolk Y Jewish Community Center; Andrew Levy, president of the Suffolk Y Jewish Community Center; and Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy.

From left, Kathy Rosenthal, F.E.G.S. Long Island vice president; New York State Senator John J. Flanagan; and Gail Magaliff, F.E.G.S. Health and Human Services System chief executive officer.

From left, Michael Rosenbaum, director of the Sid Jacobson Jewish Community Center, and New York State Assemblyman Charles D. Lavine. Photos by Gene Lesserson


page 99 hospice-epilepsy EVENTS

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Epilepsy Foundation To Host Night at the Opera Fundraiser Carlyle on the Green,April 20

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n Friday, April 20, the Epilepsy Foundation of Long Island will host its annual dinner dance at Carlyle on the Green at Bethpage State Park. Proceeds from this event, the theme of which is A Night at the Opera, will be used to support the foundation’s residential homes, day programs, clinic services and community education efforts in Nassau and Suffolk counties. Pictured from left are Don Luneburg, dinner co-chair; Jonathan and Jeff Blattmachr, honorees; Grace Luneburg, dinner co-chair; Sebastian Avolese, MD, honoree; Betsy Blattmachr, honoree; and Henry Klosowski, honoree. The dinner dance is the Epilepsy Foundation’s largest fundraiser. For further information, call 516-739-7733, ext. 155.

Hospice Care Network Honors John King

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ohn King was honored at this year’s 13th Annual Hospice Care Network’s Crystal Ball Casino Night. The event was attended by more than 250 guests and raised over $148,000 for Hospice Care Network’s (HCN) Children’s and Family Bereavement programs and the Hospice Inn. Mr. King was honored for his years of dedication and service to HCN, where he sits on the board of trustees and previously served as chairman of the board. Guests of the black tie event enjoyed dinner, dancing and games of chance.

Casino Night committee members. First row: Romayne Kovach, Mary Jane Belt, Lindsay Doyle, Linda Feldman, Chris Court, Rita Tull. Second row: Carol Wessel, Jan Davenport, Dorothy Greene, a Vegas Girl, Pat Mulholland and Emma Dailey.

Hospice Care Network Crystal Ball Gala Honoree and Board Trustee John King pictured with Hospice Care Network CEO Maureen Hinkelman.

Maureen Hinkelman is pictured with Crystal Ball Co-Chair and HCN Board Trustee Carol Wessel, HCN Board Trustee Michael Nolan and Crystal Ball Gala Event Co-Chair Mary Jane Belt.

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The Young Symphonic Ensemble that will be performing at Carnegie Hall.

COS to Perform at Discovery Gala at Carnegie Hall Society Celebrates 38th Year

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he Children’s Orchestra Society (COS) celebrates its 38th year at its 13th Discovery Gala benefit in the Stern Auditorium at Carnegie Hall on Friday, June 1 at 7:30 p.m. The Young Symphonic Ensemble will collaborate with renowned artists Jaime Laredo and Sharon Robinson in performing Brahms’ Double Concerto in A Minor. COS 2007 Discovery Competition winner, 17-year-old flutist Sara Aomori will perform George Hue’s Fantasie for Flute & Orchestra. Other works on the program include Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 1 and the New York premiere of Celebration by noted composer Chen Yi. Michael Dadap will conduct. Tickets are $20, $30 and $50. Call Carnegie Hall directly at 212-247-7800 or call the Children’s Orchestra Society at 516-869-9696 for ticket and gala reception info. You can also visit www.childrensorch.org.

Guest artists Sharon Robinson and Jamie Laredo

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Conductor Michael Dadap

Sara Aomori


page 101 Abilities

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page 102-103 ccfa toast EVENTS

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Third Time Is Charming as CCFA Raises $160,000 Diane and Barry Ganz Honored With Community Champion, Friend and Advocate Award

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he third annual Toast to Tomorrow benefit strolling dinner party, hosted by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA), Long Island Chapter, was a resounding success, welcoming 300 guests to Morton’s The Steakhouse and raising more than $160,000 for CCFA.

Chuck Ramos with Michael Goldstein, Toast to Tomorrow committee member.

From left: Chapter Trustee Anthony Gerrato, who served as the event’s auctioneer, Anthony Nastasi, Dr. Max Gomez, Long Island Chapter President James A. Pappas and Bill DiConza.

Bruce Cohen with Alan Meiselman.

Ralph Ventura with Ron Berkowitz.

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Lisa Pappas, Long Island Board Trustee, at center, with Irene and Peter Pappas, Jr. (far left and far right) and Mina Newman and her husband.


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Long Island Chapter Board Trustee Bruce Rabiner with friends Lawrence Yudess, at left, and Michael Laub, center.

Roz and Harvey Cook with Elaine Goldstein, Toast committee member, at right.

Publisher Angela Susan Anton; Rita Kay, CMF executive director; and Dr. Barbara Capozzi.

Michele and David Cooper with Richard Reubenstone, Toast committee members.

Mitchell and Deborah Rechler are pictured (at top) with Rabbi and Mrs. Marc Gellman.

Edda Ramsdell, regional executive director, CCFA, Long Island Chapter presenting the CCFA Award to Diane and Barry Ganz.

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page 104 NOVO Wine Dine

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WINE & DINE

Novo, a Bistro to Revive the Senses, Latin Style Fonda Latina Cuisine and Ambiance By Venus Quintana ithin the confines of Manhattan’s bleak Hudson Square neighborhood sits a sunny oasis called Novo. The Latin style bistro was created by restaurateur Brian Bellefeuille and partner Chef Alex Garcia, one of the nation’s leading Latino chefs. Chef Alex also helped create the menu at Calle Ocho, a high energy, Cuban-inspired restaurant on the upper west side. Influenced by the beaches of Latin America, Novo’s décor of wood, granite and marble, with water trickling down copper sheets, has created an almost alfresco experience. The long, narrow space, with its subdued earthy tones, gives way to a world of sights and sounds and flavors. The main dining area has a cozy, communal feel thanks to small, gleaming tables set in clean linearity. As its name promises, Novo refreshes the palate, revives the senses and reinvents flavor with innovative ‘fonda Latina’ cuisine. The refresca bar is a fabulous cocktail retreat, with thirst-quenching limonadas (fresh fruitinfused limeade) and aguas frescas (water sweetened with tropical fruits). For a more indulgent start, choose from the impressive list of sangrias that are sure to satify! The tapas-style menu offers single items priced accordingly, or the option to choose four plates from each section of the menu (ceviches, platos frios and calientes) for one price. This particular night we were offered a special menu that included some of the dishes being created for the upcoming new menu. Though rather limited, every dish ordered was most memorable. For starters, the ceviche atun (raw tuna) was bursting with flavor in a lime/soy marinade, while the gamba ajillo (garlic shrimp) packed a punch with a seasoning of pepper flakes and parsley. Entradas (entrees) included paella, a traditional

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dish of succulent seafood engulfed in soft rice and filete de pescado, a tender Dover sole filet resting on a mountain of chipotle mash with a saffron creme sauce. For dessert, sweet treats are complimentary, and each month brings something different, such as flan drizzled with caramel sauce and besitos de coco (coconut macaroons). Along with its great cuisine and sleek decor, Novo boasts a cutting-edge event space. The restaurant is equipped with a state-of-the-art audio-video system along with a full DJ station, with a capacity of up to 150 people. The space is available for private and corporate events. Novo, Fonda Latina is located at 290 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013. Please call 212-989-6410 or visit www.novonyc.com.

Photos by Tina Guiomar


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San Fruttuoso Zabaglione By Bob Ronzoni o, it is not a new Italian sports car, but a rich creamy dessert with a touch of liquor. It is easy to make and fun to serve. The following recipe comes from my family’s hometown in Northern Italy, San Fruttuoso, a small seaside village nestled in the crevice of a rocky hillside. For hundreds of years the village has not changed and retains the simplicity and beauty of an earlier time. When I last visited, I had lunch at one of the two restaurants and topped it off with a delicious dessert of fresh strawberries with a Zabaglione sauce that I thought was out of this world! I have had Zabaglione sauce in some fancy restaurant with the traditional Zabaglione ceremony of stirring and whipping, but if I was able to get a recipe from my grandfather’s hometown, that would be the best! I told the restaurant owner I needed to have the recipe. He asked who I was and I told him my grandfather was born in the village in the house behind the chapel. He sent for an older woman to verify my story. She knew of my grandfather and remembered stories of him her mother had told her. That was the clincher! I became an honorary paesano, had another glass of wine, and they willingly shared the ingredients and the method of preparation for their Zabaglione. I realized the ingredients are not any different than we commonly use here in the States. The only element that enhanced the flavor was the surroundings. I hope you will enjoy this unique dessert and one day have the opportunity to visit San Fruttuoso and enjoy this very special place. Enjoy!

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Zabaglione The ingredients list is very simple but the proportions and the method of preparation is most critical. A double boiler must be used, as the mixture cannot be cooked over direct heat. The top of the double boiler should be thick, as it will hold the heat during the cooking phase. 4 egg yolks 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1/2 cup of Marsala Beat the egg yolk and sugar in the upper part of the double boiler with a wire whisk until the mixture is pale and thick. In the bottom part of the double boiler, heat the water to a simmer. Do not boil the water, as you want the mixture to cook slowly. Place the top with the mixture over the simmering water. Add the Marsala and continue to beat the mixture continuously until it is foamy and smooth. The mixture will continue to swell and will be ready when it forms soft mounds. Spoon the mixture into clear glasses or champagne glasses and serve immediately. As an alternative, since Zabaglione is a rich dessert, it can be used as a topping over fresh berries. Serves 4.

CELEBRATING A CENTURY OF FINE DINING

Much more than a fine restaurant, Rothmann’s Steakhouse is a dining landmark with a rich and storied history dating back to 1907. Over the years, its culinary excellence, stately décor and impeccable serr vice have attracted a large and loyal following, including socialites and notable politicians such ass Theodore Roosevelt. Come experience the grandeur of Long Island’s famed Gold Coast for yourself – where prime dry-aged steaks and exceptional wines have become a tradition.

6319 NORTHERN BLVD, EAST NORWICH, NY (516) 922-2500 • WWW .R OTHMANNS S TEAKHOUSE . COM


page 106 21 club-Wine tasting Wine Dine

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21 Club Still the Place to Be for Fare and Atmosphere From Prohibition Speakeasy to Elite New York Restaurant By Barry Kay he 21 Club has its origins in Greenwich Village in 1922, when it was owned and managed by cousins Jack Kreindler and Charlie Berns. At that time the club was a speakeasy called the Red Head. In 1925, the club moved to Washington Place and was renamed the Fronton. Eventually, the club achieved its true notoriety, along with an elite exclusivity, when it was relocated to its current location at 21 West 52nd Street and renamed Jack and Charlie’s 21. The club was infamous for serving bootleg booze and yet was never “busted” during the prohibition years in spite of numerous raids. Jack and Charlie managed to stay one step ahead of the law through their own unique engineering sophistication. The club was built with a series of signals, buttons, levers and chutes to help rid the premises of all damaging evidence of empty or full whiskey bottles whenever there was a hint of a raid. By the time the police arrived, the damaging evidence was on its way to the city sewer system. The club bar included a hidden wine cellar with a secret two-ton door built into a brick wall where a hidden treasure trove of special liquors and wines could only be opened by a special meat skewer key. My own history with the 21 Club began during the booming economy of the 1980s when I entertained family, friends and business associates at the club. During the ’80s and early ‘90s I celebrated each of my son’s 21st birthdays, five wedding anniversaries, and had many a memorable office/Christmas party. I also was one of the first members of the relatively short-lived 21 Breakfast Club, where industry titans met for power breakfast upstairs. There were many unforgettable days and nights seated near then-Mayor Koch, The Donald, Elizabeth Taylor, Steffi Graff and Jimmy Connors, and celebrities and socialites too numerous to mention. I will never forget a number of very special sommelierguided tours of the hidden 21 Club wine cellar. The wine cellar had separate compartments for the wines of the rich and famous celebrities who frequented the club such as Presidents Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon, Elizabeth Taylor, Hugh Carey, Ivan Boesky, the Nordstrom sisters, Sammy Davis Jr. and many others. To this day the wine cellar remains a unique and very special tourist attraction and

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has its own dining room for celebrities, famous executives, and politicians. There is something deliciously wicked about dining at the 2l Club with its infamous heritage of mobster and celebrity patronage. The 21 has always been more than a place to eat; its décor and ambiance has the unique ability to make its guests feel that they are at a very exclusive club of their own, with all the trappings of wealth and elegance. According to local legend, 21 was also famous for its highly publicized power seating. The dining room is set up in a horseshoe arrangement with three disparate sections. The first section was reser ved for “A” list socialites and celebrities; the second section, in the virtual center of the dining room with tables and banquettes, faces the bar and was reserved for politicians, lesser celebrities, and 21 Club regulars. The third section (on the far right of the dining room) referred by some gossip columnists as “Siberia” was usually reserved for tourists and unknowns. The club has always had a tradition of fine and courteous service, from its doormen, managers and maitre d’s to its well-groomed waiters, busboys and bathroom attendants. I still enjoy being greeted by some of the original staff of 20 years ago. The food was always very good at the club and aside from gourmet dishes, and fabulous desserts, for years 21 served the world’s most expensive hamburger. This mouthwatering mound of prime meat was unconscionably expensive and outrageously delicious. During a recent Restaurant Week in January, I had the opportunity to revisit my old friends at the 21 Club. The special threecourse prix fixe meal, at the affordable price of $26 per person, was delicious, the club’s ambiance still fabulous and capable of evoking memories of great days and fabulous nights. The club décor inside and out has been maintained, with its famous exterior black steel gates, ceramic jockeys, gold entrance door and uniformed doorman. The dining room ceiling is still filled with miniature airplane models and the walls with vintage prohibition-type signs. The food, ambiance, service and of course, the secret wine cellar, are what make 21 stand out among great New York restaurants. The club remains a fabulous New York experience whether you are famous, infamous or just regular people.


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Breaking the Glass Ceiling With Fruit of Local Vines LI Wines Come Into Their Own By Heather Muhleman amazing. California won in both the red ne tends to think of the and white category. Thirty years later, in an anniversary tasting, the Long Island world of wine as overwines won out over their competitors. whelming and elitist. But Not surprisingly, France refused to I learned otherwise in a compete. recent trip to Vintage Wine Cellars in In our tasting, we tasted light whites Manhattan, thanks to my gracious and heavy reds and every glass host and sommelier at the worldpassed our standards of what makes a renowned 21 Club, John Ciambrano, good wine. The advice Ciambrano whose passion for the fruit of the gives is simple: Try a lot of wines. If vine was quite apparent. you find one you like, it’s a good wine. According to Ciambrano, Long The only opinion that counts is one’s John Ciambrano taking a sip of wine at Island wines are giving Napa Valley Vintage Wine Cellars in Manhattan. own. Cheers to good wine! wines, touted as the best in the US, a run for their money. The first Long Island vineyard opened in 1973 and John Ciambrano’s suggestions for spring wines from Long Island: the industry has expanded to more 2005 Lieb Pinot Blanc Reserve – A crisp white wine with a taste of citrus and than 30 wineries with 3,000 acres of green apple. vines. “Long Island has done in 30 2004 Lenz Gewurztraminer – A dry wine with a perfect blend of fruit and spice. years what it took France 500 years to 2004 Jamesport Cabernet Franc – A soft smoky flavor with hints of red fruits. perfect, ” said Ciambrano adding that 2004 Schneider Syrah – A rich wine with chocolate, spices and a long finish. he believes that France is held to a higher standard because of its history. This “glass ceiling” in the trade has had sommeliers and wine connoisseurs alike looking down their noses at wines made on Long Island. Ciambrano is out to change perceptions. In 1976, he said, the “Olympics” of wine tasting, known as the Judgment of Paris, was held in that city. It was widely believed – and assumed – that French wines would age better than California wines and were just better overall. Judges blindly ranked wines from France and California Label shot of 2004 Label shot of Label shot of 2005 according to taste, nose and Jamesport 2004 Lenz Label shot of 2004 Lieb Pinot Blanc Cabernet Franc. Gewurtztraminer. Schneider Syrah. color. The outcome was Reserve.

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page 108 Chamber of Comm

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page 109 roses lollypops

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SPECIAL EVENTS, WEDDING PLANNING, HOLIDAY HOME DECOR AND FLORAL DECOR Call toll free: 1.800.445.9230 or 631.979.0520. | www.rosesandlollypops.com


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Rethinking Easter … And Looking to the Future By Dr. John Loret ver since the first recorded visit by the Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen on Easter Sunday, April 5, 1722, Easter Island has been a fascination and mystery to the outside world. Located in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, Easter Island is the most remote occupied landmass on earth, noted mostly for its giant monolithic statues (moai), some weighing up to 100 tons. Our most recent trip was our 10th study expedition sponsored by the Science Museum of Long Island since

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1996; my first visit to Easter Island was in 1955 when I sailed with Dr. Thor Heyerdahl’s expedition as a young crewmember. Our objectives for the 2007 expedition were twofold. We wanted to create a baseline for measuring erosion for a sample number of the thousands of petroglyphs, or rock art figures depicting animals, birds and sea life. Many of the sites of these art forms are exposed to wind and rain as well as the trampling of wild horses and loose cattle. Petroglyph sites are located near ancient platforms in caves and major occupation and ceremonial centers. Sites were cleaned of debris and locations fixed using GPS (global position system), measured and photographed. We obtained screen rubbings for each figure and measured and recorded the depth of the figures carved in as our baseline erosion. We constructed a wall around the petroglyphs at ground level to keep horses and livestock out. When Europeans discovered Easter Island in the 1700s they found it to be completely void of trees. Easter Island natives, the Rapanui, had no timber to build homes or move statues and were burning grass as fuel for cooking. In the 19th century, under the dominion of Chile, the entire island was used as a sheep Angela Anton with moai, 2004. Hemm and Loret at Tongariki, 1996.

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farm. Plants that were not consumed by the Rapanui people were susbsequently eaten by sheep. In the early 20th century, some efforts were made to plant eucalyptus trees, which were not indigenous to the island. What was the original forest on Easter Island like before man arrived? Since 1955 researchers analyzing pollen and seeds from the lakebeds of volcanic craters have been able to identify species of plants that existed on Easter Island long in the prehistoric past. Based on these findings, and through the efforts of archeologist Sergio Rapu and others, several species of indigenous young plants have been imported from Chile and eastern Polynesia to the island for transplanting. A second focus for our group was to have our botanists and expedition members work with Chileans and Easter Islanders, planting young trees in the wild in order to reestablish the islands’ original flora and attempt to turn back serious erosion occurring on Easter Island’s most eastern headland, called the Poike. We managed to plant ten different trees and shrub species, several of which were nitrogen-fixing plants that assist in replacing nutrients to the impoverished soil. We met with visiting plant ecologist Sonia Hara, a student of ancient agriculture techniques. Sonia has planted several

original tree species in private garden areas on the island. Many of the plants are large enough to produce seeds, but planting in the wild is not yet feasible, due to poor soil conditions, trampling horses, rampant graying, and fires set by ranchers. The gardens Sonia established have been extremely successful. A visit feels like a cool, lush and moist tropical forest. These gardens will serve as a source of future seeds for planting indigenous plants in the wild. For years, experts have debated theories accounting for the destruction of Easter Island’s advanced culture and ecosystem. New evidence suggests that man alone may not have been responsible for the ecocide that occurred on the island. Recent work by archaeologists has de-emphasized human impact alone and named the Pacific rat, which eats seeds of palms and other plants, as co-conspirator in the destruction of the island’s once magnificent forest. At the turn of the 19th century, the Chilean government introduced the Chimango Caracara, a hawk from Patagonia, to control the rat population. Unfortunately, while it succeeded in that aspect, the Caracara fed on the eggs and young of sea birds, preventing any recolonization. Today the only surviving sea birds on the island are the Frigate bird and an occasional Sooty Tern. On this most recent expedition we came to realize how complex a task it will be to restore the ecosystem of Easter Island. However, looking back to my first visit to the island 51 years ago, I see we have succeeded in obtaining a great deal of information over the years. Hopefully, this will help to educate children globally, as well as future generations of local Easter Islanders, and encourage restoration and conservation of some of the Islands’original natural environment. In an effort to encourage scientists and students to continue studies on Easter Island, we are privately providing funding to construct a resident lodge for researchers and students to stay at little or no cost. We plan to offer another expedition in early 2008. For further information, contact Dr. John Loret at 516-6279400, ext. 13 or email smli@optonline.net.

Birdman petroglyphs, Orongo.

Aerial view of east coast, 1998.

Marcelo Mendez filming from top of Rano Raraku, 1997

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Planting indigenous trees, 2007.

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Documenting petroglyphs, 2007.

Kitin Munoz reed boat expedition, 1996.

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page 114-117 Brandywine colorback TRAVEL

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The Brandywine Valley… A Showcase of the du Pont’s Extraordinary Legacy By Jennifer Dunlop he rolling countryside of the Brandywine Valley combines the counties of southeastern Pennsylvania with northern Delaware. It is exceptionally picturesque and chock full of historical as well as cultural interest. While the area’s earliest immigrants hailed from Sweden, William Penn, an Englishman, crossed the pond to accept Pennsylvania as his land grant, but it was the du Ponts from northern France whose enduring legacy makes a trip to the Brandywine Valley so special. In addition, the Wyeth family, all three generations, house their personal collection at the Brandywine Museum, sharing wall space with the most complete collection of Brandywine Valley art. History in the form of the du Pont legacy, along with the cultural and artistic richness that developed in the area, has preserved for travelers and students alike some of the country’s finest examples of

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architecture, fine art, decorative arts, interior design, landscape design and formal gardens, all subjects of interest to the readers of The Boulevard. A good place to start is the Hagley Museum, a 240-acre du Pont estate along the banks of the Brandywine River, part of the original 1800-acre site of Eleuthère Irénée (E.I.) du Pont. Although a trained botanist, E.I. du Pont’s wealth was launched with the manufacturing of gunpowder. The museum provides a portrayal of life at the site (a gun powder mill) and of the 19th century in general. It’s hard to believe that such industrious and dangerous work took place on this serene riverbank setting. The family home is a well-preserved Georgian-style residence circa 1803. The house with its furnishings reflects the period, and the beautiful French-style garden created by E.I. du Pont established the family’s devout interest in horticulture. As the family’s fortune grew their estates reflected that wealth. The 300-acre Nemours Mansion and Gardens is a magnificent property. Alfred I. du Pont named it after the family’s ancestral home in France. The vista of the French gardens, a miniature Versailles, extends one-third of a mile from the Louis XVI-style chateau circa 1910. The gardens are among the finest examples of French landscape design in the United States. The opulence of the gardens well prepares the senses for the interior of the 100-room chateau. Imagine 23-carat gold leaf on dining room walls, marble The French gardens of the 300-acre Nemours Mansion, a miniature of Versailles. The gardens are considered one of the finest in the nation.

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William Penn received a land grant from the British crown and called it Pennsylvania! Photographs By M. Cyril Morris

flooring, exquisite European antiques, rugs, tapestries and paintings. The du Ponts, like many wealthy Americans, shopped abroad. Two gates guard the estate; one belonged to Catherine the Great, the other Wimbledon Manor in England. Other extravagances include a bowling alley, a maze and a half-dozen vintage cars in running condition. The two most popular properties in the du Pont legacy are the 1,000-acre Longwood Gardens and the 983-acre Winterhur Museum, Garden and Library. Henry Francis du Pont was born at Winterhur, named after a village in Switzerland. His life’s work was the intentional collecting of early American decorative arts and horticulture. Displayed in 175 rooms are 89,000 plus items covering the years between 1640 and 1860. Your best bet is the 45-minute highlight tour of completely furnished period rooms, in particular the Chinese wallpapered sitting room, an elegant Chippendale and Sheridan dining room, one devoted to Empire furniture, a display of china belonging to the White House during George Washington’s presidency, and on and on. Note also the fabulous spiral staircase. Don’t be intimidated by the volume, it really requires several visits. A collection of this magnitude has generated graduate degrees in conjunction with the University of Delaware in Early American Culture, Art Conservation and the History of American Civilization. The grounds of the estate developed by Henry Francis, a Harvard graduate, were enhanced by his expertise and enduring love for his land. The rolling hills, streams, meadows and forest are festooned with plantings, plus exotic specimens from around the world. Arranged in lyrical color combinations, all are carefully orchestrated

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The Longwood Garden’s seasonal fall exhibits we visited featured these Japanese geishas composed entirely of chrysanthemums.

throughout the year. Significant local events include an annual spring Pointto-Point race and a fall crafts show. Longwood Gardens’ huge glass conservatory is a delight of seasonal displays as well as the facility ’s research and seed nursery. Pierce Samuel du Pont’s horticultural efforts rose from a conservationist’s action. He bought a deteriorating arboretum and started using the circa 1760 brick house on the property as a weekend retreat. As he endeavored to restore the arboretum, he soon envisioned a public garden and conservatory for all to enjoy. With a brilliant mind for business, he personally planned every aspect of Longwood Gardens as we see it today. The majestic and powerful fountains were inspired by a visit he made to Villa d’Este. Illuminated in many colors and designs, the water displays are by far the greatest crowd pleaser. The original house with its furnishings can be viewed, and throughout the year there is a cavalcade of events and activities too numerous to mention. We visited in the fall for the chrysanthemum display and again in spring for the tulips and wisteria. The most popular season, we were told, is Christmas, when poinsettias abound. The Brandywine Museum in

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Chadds Ford, PA is of architectural interest. The former civil war-era gristmill on the banks of the Brandywine River retained its massive original beams. By adding walls of glass the tranquility of the site was captured. The original red brick exterior, cobblestone courtyard and grinding wheels imbedded in pathways add interest. Best known for the Wyeth family’s collection, the

museum also features work by Howard Pyle, the illustrator who taught N.C. Wyeth. The broad original floorboards creak as visitors meander past the Wyeths’ collection which includes: N.C. Wyeth originals illustrations from the children’s classics to Andrew Wyeth’s haunting landscapes and his son Jamie’s famous life size “Pig.” While there are restaurants in the vicinity of the Brandywine Museum and Winterthur, a good place to stop for lunch is in the historic town of Centerville. Buckley’s Tavern is the place for local color and a short block away the Frederick Country stores offer a collection of interesting antique and craft shops. These attractions are within a 10mile radius of Wilmington. The best

Centerville’s antiques shops are sure to please.


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Longwood Garden’s fountains are fashioned after Villa D’Este in Italy. The du Pont’s frequently incorporated European treasures in their splendid estates. Photographs By M. Cyril Morris

hotel in the city is the Hotel du Pont. Pierre S. du Pont commissioned the elaborate Italian Renaissance-styled hotel that opened in 1913 to serve the expanding commerce connected with the du Ponts burgeoning industries, the traveling public, as well as to enrich the cultural life of the city. A Playhouse Theatre established in the hotel assisted with the vision. A $40-million renovation in the mid’90s ensured its continued success as a cultural icon. The French neoclassic Gold Ballroom features sgraffito technique scenes, and 20 carved medallions of famous women in history circle the coffered ceiling. The Brandywine Room, richly paneled, displays its collection of hotel-owned Wyeths and offers gustator y American food. The elegant Green Room serves continental cuisine with an innovative flair. Generations of locals flock to its Sunday brunch. While appetizers and dessert are buffet-style one’s entree is ordered and served at the

table...that’s my type of brunch. The hotel’s grand public rooms are defined by soaring ceilings, chandeliers and rich wood paneling. Guestrooms and suites (217 of them) carr y on the luxur y theme with Queen Anne and Chippendale furnishings and extra spacious marble bathrooms with both shower and Jacuzzi tubs. The hotel’s legacy of serving bank barons, royalty and presidents continues today.

Downtown Wilmington offers a number of fine restaurants. Try the Deep Blue for superb seafood. Trolley Square also has a few good choices. The Grand Opera House is America’s finest example of cast-iron architecture and worth a visit. It is home to the Delaware Symphony Orchestra. Not to be missed is the Delaware Art Museum’s premiere collection of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. The collection represents all major artists and as such is the prime source for scholars of that genre. Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber has visited, and personally owns a large collection. Time permitting, there are two interesting colonial towns, Odessa and New Castle, a short drive from the city. Wilmington is between two and-one-half and three hours from Long Island, making it an ideal weekend or midweek sojourn.

The Brandywine Museum in Chadds Ford on the Brandywine River houses the Wyeth family of artists’ personal collection. Bronze farm animals (see pig in foreground) dot the museum’s landscape.

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Cruising the South China Sea …Visiting Vietnam By Christina D. Morris ruising has never been more popular than it is today with more exotic destinations, levels of luxury, exceptional value, as well as time-span options. Travel professionals and those in the know agree that making the right choice in cruise offerings is what separates the exceptional from the good, the bad and the ugly. According to cruise aficionados we spoke with, the wrong choice can include

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all of the above while the right choice will change you into a “cruiser,” those travelers who exclusively respond to the call of the sea. The Yachts of Seabourn are among the smaller cruise ships by design, only 208 passengers with a one-to-one ratio of staff. The size allows these ships to access harbors, bays and lagoons out of the range of larger passenger-mega ships. Their destinations are fabulous, and in our case, took us to places we wanted to visit, while providing us luxurious shipboard living. We wanted to visit Southeast Asia’s exotic capital cities and found a match with Seabourn’s Spirit, offering a 14-day cruise that included Singapore, Bangkok, Ko Kood Island, Vietnam and Hong Kong, as well as several days at sea for just relaxing. The Spirit is one of three Seabourn Yachts; the others, Pride and Legend, are in the luxury category of cruise ships. All-suite cabins, many with balconies, are equipped with every amenity possible including a stocked bar, fruit basket and fresh flowers replenished daily. A young, attractive crew is professionally trained to accommodate one’s ever y wish. Diverse language skills are necessary since on this par ticular sailing, passengers included Americans, Brits, French, Australians, Asians, Italians A day at the beach on Ko Kood Island near Thailand including swimming to the seafood and champagne bar set up by the ship’s crew in the surf!

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The must-see in Bangkok is the circa 1792 Royal Grand Palace covering 60 acres. Mosaics, precious and semiprecious stones, gold leaf work is all extraordinary. The Thai royal family is revered, hence, this dazzling display of palaces, statues and temples.

This 16th century wooden bridge in Hoi An, a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site, was built by the Japanese to control entrance to their section of this once vibrant 17th century international seaport. Photographs By M. Cyril Morris

and Dutch, all I might add, sophisticated travelers. Repeat Seabourn “cruisers” have their own club and many passengers were proud members. Every detail for enjoyment, comfort and sybaritic pleasures is thoroughly appraised prior to presentation by this cruise line. On our cruise, lectures by university professor Roy Willis, an erudite expatriate Brit living in San Francisco, were given prior to each land destination and included historical as well as cultural background, not dwelling on where to find souvenirs or bargains. His knowledge of Southeast Asia was extraordinary. Other popular activities on board were the spa services, yoga classes, bridge classes, a competitive trivial pursuit team and musical/cabaret shows, current films and a casino. Food preparation and presentation

was top-notch. The choice of dining alone or being seated with others was a personal decision, and for us, after a long day of touring, room service took on a decidedly luxurious appeal. Menus were delivered daily with the chef ’s choices and wine selections. Each course arrived exactly as it would in the dining room. We enjoyed the in-room ser vice frequently and got to know Armand, a very professional young man from South Africa. While on the subject of food and wine, I should add that an enjoyable activity was wine tasting and cooking demonstrations by the chef. Ethnic dining and buffet-style dining was offered in the Veranda restaurant. It was ideal for breakfast and lunches since it offered outdoor seating and specialty evenings such as a Thai, Vietnam, Singapore and

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steak night. There were three formal nights, several “elegant casual” (men needed jackets) and a number of casual nights. A special culinar y experience took place in the huge kitchen adjacent to the main dining room. Counters and tables were laden with a variety of foods, buffet style, with the kitchen help serving and providing information on their offerings. From a seafood bar to a vegetarian extravaganza to a roast

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meat spread that included a suckling pig, it was one of the liveliest and most enjoyable epicurean experiences for all on board. Prior to each tour, Robin Noble, tour manager, provided guests with an informative and often humorous talk about what to expect in each destination. Our first port of call was Bangkok, a popular tourist destination where splendid palaces, temples and architecture, both

ancient and modern, demanded one’s admiration. It’s a crowded city and traffic is clearly a problem. Our two-day visit made us yearn for more time to see this lovely city and its handsome people. Others spent most of their time having suits and dresses made, shopping for fabrics, especially silk, lacquer ware and rubies. Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, confirmed Noble’s warning about crowded and dangerous street crossings. She likened it to a game of chicken as one attempts to cross in the face of thousands of motor scooters moving in all directions. We enjoyed cocktails and entertainment by a folk dance group at the popular Rex Hotel known as a gathering spot for international war correspondents. The city’s market is a bedlam of activity and is a striking contrast to the modern skyscrapers and upscale shops, a result of the city’s dynamic economic growth. The 7,500-mile long Mekong River flows through China, Burma, Laos, along the Lao-Thai border, through Cambodia and into Vietnam. The Mekong Delta literally feeds the country with rice as well as abundant tropical fruits. The contrast between this rural area and that of the frenetic Ho Chi Minh City is remarkable. Danang is a city in transition. Three tours were offered; two of them were all-day trips. We opted for a half-day trip and spent the remainder in the city. We visited a rural village unchanged by many generations who have preserved lifestyle and culture in a timeless way. Water buffalo Water taxis ply the canals on the Mekong Delta where roads are few and so narrow one can easily suffer claustrophobia winding through jungle overhang. Photographs By M. Cyril Morris

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The president’s house in Ho Chi Minh (Saigon), not in use as the city is no longer the capital.

work the rice paddies divided by unpaved roads, barely wide enough for the bus. A school built 10 years ago and a small black-and-white TV were the only signs of modernity. Hoi An is a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site. This attractive riverside town was an important international trading port from the 16th century and survives as a living museum of the turbulent and diverse Vietnamese history. Remnants of past inhabitants include Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, Dutch and Brits. It was a highlight of the trip. Hoi Gai was the final Vietnam port and the gateway to Hanoi, the capital as well as the former French capital during French colonial rule. The French left their broad boulevards, stately colonial architecture and large landscaped parks along the Red River. Economic growth has given the city some modern structures. Admirers of Ho Chi Minh make pilgrimages to his impressive mausoleum. The old city’s narrow streets with names like Broiled Fish Street derive from the 15th century craft guild; each craft established itself on one of the short lanes. Our arrival in Hong Kong brought to a conclusion our very special travel experience, one we highly recommend. When you want only the very best, you need look no further than the Yachts of Seabourn.

The Rex Hotel became famous as the headquarters of the war correspondents during the Vietnam War. The rooftop restaurant provides a panorama of the city.

Street vendors in Danang.

Sailing on Halong Bay, these mysterious rock out-croppings are largely uninhabited.

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Two New Additions to the Spa Enthusiasts Repertoire By Irvina Lew wo decidedly decadent destination spas opened last summer within a three-hour drive from Nassau County. For spa aficionados each offers all the essential elements: indoor and outdoor fitness activities and classes (including morning walks, hikes and kayaking; yoga, Pilates and dance classes), deliciously wholesome meals, pleasure pampering and beauty treatments plus info-tainment on such topics as nutrition, wellness or art sessions. Both boutique-size properties pre-schedule treatments and classes before arrival and offer amenities that other top destination spas lack: aqua-toning classes in fabulous indoor, heated swimming pools and computer access.

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The Lodge at Woodloch Ginny Michel-Lopis M.A. and John E. Lopis Ph.D. have long enjoyed stellar reputations as designers, program developers and operators of major luxury spa resorts. They opened their soaring, wooden-beamed, window-walled dream destination spa, the Lodge at Woodloch, on a pristine, 75-acre, wooded, lakeside parcel, in Hawley, PA, in June 2006. The entire hotel/spa structure — including the atrium-enclosed indoor pool where their signature hydromassage waterfalls soothe your shoulders while you sit in hot tubs — is within one light-filled, open-to-the view, handicapped accessible building. Reminiscent of an Adirondack lodge, its huge windows, dramatic stone walls and floors, oversized couches by the fireplace and cozy library, its ambiance invites nature inside. There are also meeting rooms and an art room. Tree, the elegant 100-seat dining room, houses a tapas bar with live music nightly (alcoholic beverages are a la carte) and a glass-enclosed demonstration kitchen where the chef offers cooking classes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The organic a la carte and buffet dishes, both available at breakfast and lunch, were exceptionally tasty and included many comfort food items: hash, smoothies, fresh homemade breads, spring rolls and pot stickers, real and veggie burgers. When the lodge isn’t fully booked, nonresident guests who have at least one spa treatment are welcome to dine a la carte in the dining room. An art-lined gallery leads to one tri-level wing where 58 guest rooms offer custom-designed furnishings, a balcony with a lake or rock garden view. Marble bathrooms are

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The outdoor Jacuzzi at the Lodge at Woodloch.

well-equipped, but no bathtub. The three-story spa wing reflects the Lopis’ expertise. It features a spa boutique, salon and reception area that leads to separate locker rooms. From here, there’s access to the indoor pool, outdoor hot tub and deck as well as to the 27 serene treatment rooms and the Whisper Lounge on the lower level. The top floor houses a superbly equipped and windowed cardio weight training studio, home to treadmills, recumbent and upright bikes, cross-trainers as well as designer machines. Three exercise studios overlook the lake. A juice bar and lounge overlook the glass-walled Garden Hall entry, the meeting place for activities. The centerpiece of the entry is a butternut wood pedestal displaying three Chakra bowls that symbolize the spa’s theme: Awakening. Accommodations, all meals and activities start at $575 per person daily or $450 per person double occupancy. Rates include a $115 credit toward a daily spa service. Call 570-685-8500 or visit www.TheLodgeAtWoodloch.com.


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The Mayflower Inn and Spa

The Mayflower Inn And Spa

with a non-alcoholic beverage, an amuse, terrifically spiced edamame and an appetizer Adriana and Robert Mnuchin preceded by a choice of three transformed a dilapidated main courses. Our group of boarding school building near five met at the bar before Litchfield, CT, into The Maydinner and enjoyed a “spa” flower Inn, an elegant gourmet pour of wine with the meal. getaway that opened in 1992. Lunch is buffet style in an Last May, Adriana and the impressive dining room. The couple’s daughter, Lisa Hedley, salad bar is the same each day: added an extraordinary spa fresh greens, edamame, hearts building on the 58-acre, 5-star, of palm, berries, tempeh, nuts Relais & Chateaux property. and dried fruits. Entrees, such This sublime contemporary One of the bedrooms The Mayflower Inn and Spa offers. as grilled scallops or a wrap, version of a classic New England change daily. For dessert, the cottage (in the Newport or 75-calorie apple crisp is a winner. Nantucket use of the word) functions as a destination spa for a Spa guests reside in any of 30 accommodations at the inn maximum of 28 guests from Sunday night until after lunch on or in one of the cottages that replicate the inn’s farmhouse Friday. The facility is available to inn guests, who pay a la carte design and extravagant décor. Allerton, a guest cottage just for access and services on weekends. across the driveway from the spa offered us a lounge and The beige, natural and white palette soothes, especially four bedrooms on the main floor and two - bedroom/living in the Garden Room where guests await spa services while room suites upstairs. Guest rooms are exceptional with relaxing on chaises overlooking the Blue Heron Pond or entry hall, bedroom with gas fireplace, four-poster kingfacing floor-to-ceiling bookcases and De Kooning’s sized beds draped in lush textiles. A secretary houses a desk brilliant painting: Untitled XII. Iridescent glass mosaic tiles and flat-screen TV and there’s an outdoor balcony. The embellish the showers and whirlpool area. The thermal bathrooms are deluxe with heated floors, sunken tub in sanctuary is blissful in pale green and white marble. Of the wall-to-wall marble with a window above offering a view. eight spacious treatment rooms, two are couples suites Without a doubt, The Mayflower experience is personal with soaking tubs and double showers, all have heated and indulgent. The three-night minimum stay costs $4,500 floors. Four exercise studios include a fitness room with a per person and includes room, meals, gratuities and as pair of treadmills and a Pilates’ room with a reformer. many spa services and treatments as can fit into the spa There’s an additional exercise studio at the inn. day, which, unfortunately, ends at 6 p.m. For more informaBreakfast and dinner are served in a private room off the tion visit www.mayflowerinn.com or call 860-868-9466. main, open-to-the-public, dining room at the inn. Housemade granola or oatmeal, fresh berries and juices plus an Irvina Lew specializes in writing about spas and has contributed to Fodor’s Healthy Escapes and Spa magazine. egg dish made to order launch the day while dinner begins

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page 124 Skin Deep HEALTH

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HEALTH

Skin Deep By Deborah S. Sarnoff, M.D.

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n today’s competitive world, it’s important to look and feel our best. Aging, sun damage and heredity can cause frown lines and wrinkles and despite the Dr. Deborah Sarnoff. claims made by manufacturers of creams and moisturizers, studies show that even the best-performing wrinkle creams only reduce the depth of wrinkles by less than 10 percent – a magnitude of change barely visible to the naked eye. And while there has been a dramatic rise in cosmetic procedures, there has also been a rise in people not wanting to “go under the knife” to look better. So what can women and men do to enhance their facial appearance – quickly, safely and cost effectively?

Injectable 101 Over the past several years, the use of injectable products to turn back time has increased exponentially. In the skilled hands of a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon, Botox and a wide array of hyaluronic acid fillers, such as Restylane, Juvéderm, Hylaform and Captique, can be used to temporarily eliminate wrinkles and restore fullness to the skin. Hyaluronic acid fillers can replace lost volume; however, they cannot stimulate your own dermis to produce collagen. There is one filler that I find to be particularly effective for long-lasting results, Radiesse – it is safe, convenient and produces an extremely natural look. Radiesse is an FDA-approved dermal filler that restores a long-lasting, youthful look. It is a gel composed of calcium-based microspheres, similar to the mineral in bone, which is injected into the skin through a minimally invasive procedure. Many skin creams feature calcium as a key ingredient; however, it is not able to penetrate into the dermis to produce a noticeable effect. Radiesse works with your body and stimulates the growth of collagen. Over time, the microspheres break down and are absorbed by your body –rebuilding your

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skin’s foundation to restore a more youthful look. A single treatment of Radiesse can improve the appearance of smile lines and folds and wrinkles around the nose and mouth. If you are considering a treatment of Radiesse or any other type of injectable product, be sure that it is administered by an experienced, board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon, and allow for a few days of possible swelling and bruising (easily covered with makeup). As we age, the face loses its youthful, triangular shape and becomes more rectangular looking. Radiesse is often used “off label” to globally sculpt the face. The Liquid Lift is a new technique in which Radiesse is strategically injected throughout the facial area and under the eyes. The Liquid Lift smoothes out wrinkles, restores volume, enhances facial contours and produces a youthful, chiseled appearance. It provides the woman or man who is tired of looking tired with an effective, less invasive alternative to the traditional facelift. Radiesse is long-lasting; results last approximately 18 months, with a range of one to two years. For information please call 484-9000.

Radiesse restores a long-lasting, youthful look.


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page 126 Health Watch HEALTH

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Health Watch By Dr. Suzzanne Steinbaum Director, Women and Heart Disease Heart and Vascular Institute Lenox Hill Hospital, New York

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am clearly the outcome of a revolution. I am the next generation. I am part of the result of the women’s lib movement. Oddly enough, I wouldn’t exactly call myself a true women’s libber. I know that sounds strange, considering I’m a cardiologist. But, it is true. I love being a woman and never really wanted to be a man at all. And to me, and many of my generation, the liberation movement consisted of burning bras and growing armpit hair. And I am all about Victoria’s Secret and the world of the day-spa. But now, the world is a different place. And I do appreciate women’s liberation and the fact that I was able to attend medical school, and that nothing about that is peculiar. But, truly, when I was in college, I thought that saving the world was my calling, even if it meant one person at a time. And that had nothing to do with women’s lib or the movement in general. I was just being true to myself. As a woman, I am part of the subset that has infiltrated the workplace who are mothers, caretakers, persons who may take out the garbage, buy the groceries, open the door, cook the dinner, pay the bills, put on lipstick, fix our hair. We span the full spectrum of femininity. And, yes, that is thanks to our predecessors. Yet, I am afraid that the movement of liberation has left us devoid of the point. The point is empowerment. However, as women in our newfound state of liberation, we have taken to alienating each other and ourselves, when in fact, we need to bond together more than ever. At the root of it all, we are women. And, as women, we are different, as a whole, whether we stay home and take care of the kids, go to work all day, or if we choose to make a life alone. One of my favorite things to do in the world is skiing. Going up the gondola is like a religious experience. It is a bubble in the sky which carries you to the top of the mountain, keeps you warm and allows you the opportunity to meet interesting people. On my last trip, my father and I hopped on ready to enjoy our 18 minutes of serenity when we saw that we were joining another couple. We were about to begin our usual repartee with these people, when the woman, in her early 40s, glared at me and turned her vision away, to direct it at the dark-haired man, in his early 40s, who looked like he was her latest prey. She went in for the kill, and we started to hear her enticing seductions directed like arrows in his direction. They were direct, forward and

clear in their intent. The prey, a male New York City professional, was a bit uneasy, but said he would call her after dinner, and that, yes, he would keep her warm that night. She glared at me like I was the enemy and she won. I swear I almost saw her licking her mittens. I was in shock by her macho aggressiveness, but decided to pretend it all wasn’t happening. And, here she was, just a woman, like the rest of us. But she somehow believes that she is fighting the fight, and the fight is another woman. We call this liberation? I propose that we move towards empowerment. That we need to come together as a unit, to understand that ultimately the fight needs to be for our lives. OK, maybe that sounds dramatic, but we are getting neglected. I mean that in the most serious of ways. When statistics are looked at as to how many gynecologists know that heart disease is the number one killer of women, only one-third are aware. When women need stents to prop their arteries open, or defibrillators to shock their hearts out of sudden death, or medications to prolong their lives, they are not getting it. I spent February running around NYC, lecturing and writing, speaking and alerting, all on the topic of women and heart disease. I recited statistics of how heart disease is the number one killer of women and how women aren’t being treated the same as men. I explained how little women were represented in large medical studies and major trials on heart disease. In fact, in many medical studies on heart disease, which were large and huge trials, with millions of dollars and tons of medications used, none specifically focused on women. All this despite the fact that the liberation movement was enacted because of how repeatedly we’ve been told how different we are. I suppose that the movement gave us the option to be the aggressor in a relationship, take control, get what we want. That is fine. That is our choice and part of the journey. I recently was invited to the birthday party of my friend’s baby. It was adorable. I was surrounded by other moms and their kids, filled with screams and songs, hugs and ice cream. It was really great. And not something I usually get to do on a weekday, or even on a weekend. It was before my son was born, and I was asked right to my pregnant belly when I was going to go back to work. I explained that my maternity leave was about six to eight weeks, depending on the delivery, but that I anticipated six weeks. My answer was

received with a scowl and a scolding. Mothers need to be home with their children, I was told, and the workplace was no place for a new mother. Really, I needed to understand that my child and I would both suffer. She, in fact, left her position as a successful lawyer because she could not do that to her child. I left with pregnant belly and heavy heart. She was fighting a fight, a new battle that the liberation movement gave us without resolution, but one that caused a new debate and a new rift among us. So we have come out of the movement with a new breed of women. Accomplished, independent, intelligent and diplomatic. We have seen women glow with those qualities previously considered insidious to the masculine gender, and we have seen them flourish with others: selfishness, self-absorption, aggressiveness, thoughtlessness. We now are the next generation. I propose a new movement. The women’s empowerment movement, where statistics are understood, and women bond together. Because, we are all daughters, or mothers, or caretakers, or lovers, or somebodies who, in this new generation need to be thought of just a little differently. We are different, just as we have been told. So, as this next movement unfolds, let’s empower ourselves. Ultimately, let our differences, and our divergences from each other bring us together. With women’s lib in mind, did we reach a point where women are in the workforce, paying the bills, being the aggressor, taking on the roles of men but not really reaping the benefits? Let’s face it, we really don’t have “equality” when it comes to everything. Wouldn’t “women empowerment” be a better cause? I mean, it might help to all sit on the same side of the fence for a while, become part of a team. Fight together. I don’t know, maybe it will make a difference. We are different, we are special and we need to be addressed as such. We are not just part of the studies on men. We need to be separate and individual. We don’t need to be men. You see, we all are the same. We are all trying to have it all. To be loved, to make an impact, to be beautiful, to feel beautiful, to make a mark and to be heard. Power is in numbers, though. Sticking together helps. Maybe I am a women’s libber after all. Call it whatever you want. So here I sit, progeny of all that the women’s movement provided for us - tired, stressed, and not spending enough time at home. I have developed the complaints of a man, coupled with the job of a woman, no matter how much lipstick I wear or how fabulous my shoes. There you have it - I have trespassed on testosterone soil, as unintentional as it was. As long as I am here, I am going to make a difference. I am a woman and I need to help those just like me to be heard. One woman at a time. Roar.


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Cosmetic Surgery Corner By Stephen T. Greenberg, M.D.

Bringing Up The Rear

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udos to anyone who has lost a large amount of weight (say more than 75 pounds)! You have accomplished a difficult goal. Now your years of struggling and failed diets are behind you. Perhaps you did it through weight loss surgery. Or, perhaps it was the more traditional way, through diet and exercise. However you did it, you deserve a new body as a reward for all your hard work. Following substantial weight loss, you will typically have multiple areas of significant excess skin — including the breasts, upper arms, abdomen, back and thighs. Areas can be tightened and redundant skin can be removed in the form of a breast lift, upper arm lift, tummy tuck, lower body lift or thigh lift. You may also be a candidate for facial cosmetic surgery including neck recontouring and facelifts. Due to the large amount of excess skin to be removed, usually from several different areas, it is common to require at least two or three procedures to achieve the best results. After your weight is gone, you may be left with a lot of extra hanging skin, which may cause you to be embarrassed or self-conscious. The loose skin does not respond to diet or exercise. Only body contouring surgery will reduce the often extreme degrees of skin excess that develop with massive weight loss. Thigh, body, and arm lifts all aim to lift and tighten the skin for a smooth appearance. As the number of Americans having weight loss surgery increases, so does the number of individuals

undergoing plastic surger y to reshape their bodies after they’ve lost massive amounts of weight. Lower body lifts will address the thighs, buttocks, abdomen, waist and hips all in one stage. The added benefits are an overall improvement in dimpling and cellulite, as well as an elevation of the public areas to a more youthful status. Body lifts may also be performed after previous liposuction. If there is excess skin after fat removal, a thighlift, abdominoplasty, or lower body lift may be performed to reduce the amount of loose tissue. The body lift is considered an extension of an abdominoplasty; it reduces the excess skin and fat deposits of the central body region, including abdomen, hips, thighs and buttocks. Quick facts about body lifts: – The number of patients seeking platic surgery for body contouring after dramatic weight loss has risen by at least 20 percent (according to the ASPS) – Body lifting procedures should not be undertaken until your weight is stable – After bariatric surgery, it may take six months to a year before you can have a body lift Stephen T. Greenberg, MD, is a wellknown, board- cer tified plastic surgeon practicing in Woodbury, LI and on Park Avenue in Manhattan. A sought-after media expert, Dr. Greenberg has been featured on ABC’s 20/20, Inside Edition, New York Times, Newsday and many others. Call Dr. Greenberg’s office for a consultation at 516-364-4200; email www.greenbergcosmeticsurgery.com.

Private e Customerr

Hair Coloring

Hair coloring, for both men and women, is a private affair as Judy Edelman does her magic - one customer at a time. Judy at Townsend, is now located in Roslyn. She still pampers her customers, one hour at a time. It will be a stress free hour as she tends to your needs: coffee, tea, juice, fruit or a sandwich are the perks. Judy does hair coloring for skin tone, eye color and for life style as well as highlights and low lights. Prices are $40 and up for single process color and $120 and up for highlights, and low lights, glazes and belliagé (a French technique of hair painting with botanical hair color). She excels at correcting color mistakes.

To reach Judy to set up an appointment,

please call 625-4488.


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The Boulevard April 2007