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september 14–20, 2012 | boston’s largest weekly | Free The end of newsprinT

Collector’s Edition boston survived 46

years oF the Phoenix, and all you got was . . . well, see page 6!

OccUpy: OnE yEAR LATER On the move, on the streets, and on trial, the 99 Percent keep Boston’s radical flame alive p 8

BOOkS

THE SAURUS & OTHER TALES Bookstores’ strangest stories | p 22

OccUpy BASTILLE

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Marie Antoinette at the ART | p 28


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thephoenix.com | the boston phoenix | september 14, 2012

boston | providence | portland vOL. LXXvIII | NO. 36

stephen m. mindich PUbLISHER + CHAIRMAN

everett FinKelstein CHIEf OPERATING OffICER

peter Kadzis

EXECUTIvE EDITOR

editorial

SepteMber 14, 2012

contents

EDITOR carly carioli MANAGING EDITOR shaula clarK ARTS EDITOR Jon garelicK fILM EDITOR peter Keough MUSIC EDITOR michael marotta STAff EDITORS thomas mcbee, si rosenbaum STAff WRITERS david s. bernstein, chris Faraone EvENTS EDITOR alexandra cavallo LISTINGS COORDINATOR michael c. Walsh EDITORIAL ASSISTANT liz pelly CONTRIbUTING EDITORS carolyn clay [theater], lloyd schWartz [classical] CONTRIbUTING WRITERS marK bazer, matt bors, daniel brocKman, michael bronsKi, William corbett, caitlin curran, ted drozdoWsKi, banning eyre, amy Finch, michael Freedberg, dan Kennedy, mitch Krpata, brian mcFadden, mc slim Jb, tom meeK, brett michel, brett milano, miKe miliard, robert nadeau, rob nelson, James parKer, gerald peary, adam reilly, marcia b. siegel, harvey silverglate, steven starK, Karl stevens, gary susman, matt taibbi, charles taylor, david thorpe, steve vineberg, miKael Wood CARTOONIST david sipress | ASTROLOGER symboline dai

neW media SENIOR WEb PRODUCER maddy myers WEb PRODUCERS cassandra landry, ariel shearer

marKeting/promotions DIRECTOR Of MARkETING AND PROMOTIONS brian appel INTERACTIvE MARkETING MANAGER lindsey mathison PROMOTIONS COORDINATOR nicholas gemelli

creative group DIRECTOR Of CREATIvE OPERATIONS travis ritch CREATIvE DIRECTOR Kristen goodFriend CORPORATE DESIGN DIRECTOR Kevin banKs DESIGN MANAGER, STUff MAGAzINE Janice checchio ADvERTISING ART MANAGER angelina berardi SENIOR DESIGNER Janet smith taylor EDITORIAL DESIGNER christina briggs fREELANCE DESIGNER daniel callahan

advertising sales SENIOR vICE PRESIDENT a. William risteen vICE PRESIDENT Of SALES AND bUSINESS DEvELOPMENT david garland DIRECTOR Of bEvERAGE SALES sean Weymouth SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIvES Of INTEGRATED MEDIA SALES margo doWlearn, hoWard temKin ADvERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER Kevin laWrence INTEGRATED MEDIA SALES COORDINATOR adam oppenheimer GENERAL SALES MANAGER brian russell TRAffIC COORDINATORS colleen mccarthy, Jonathan caruso CLASSIfIED SALES MANAGER matt King RETAIL ACCOUNT EXECUTIvES nathaniel andreWs, sara berthiaume, serpil dinler, christopher gibbs, daniel tugender, chelsea Whitton

circulation CIRCULATION DIRECTOR James dorgan CIRCULATION MANAGER michael Johnson

operations IT DIRECTOR bill ovoian fACILITIES MANAGER John nunziato

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“We’ll still be weekly. We’ll still be free. And you will still be able to find us in those big red boxes all over town.” _Stephen Mi ndi ch, pa ge 6

p 28

p 13

p 32

in this issue

in every issue

6 LETTER FROM THE PuBLISHER _ BY STEPHEN M IN DIC H

A new beginning.

8 FABLES OF THE OCCuPATION

One year later, we take a look back at the legacy of Camp Dewey and Occupy Boston, catch up on the legal fate of arrested protestors, check out a new student power movement, and check in with some familiar faces.

22 READERS SAY THE DARNDEST THINGS _ BY EuGEN IA W IL L IA MSO N

Bookstores are charming — and charmed — spaces. Unless you’ve ever happened to work in one.

26 FILM

Arbitage, Beloved/Les bienes-aimés, Branded, The Cold Light of Day, Detropia, Little White Lies, Shut Up and Play.

28 BOOKS _BY J O HN J . KEL LY

Fire in the Ashes: Twenty-Five Years Among America’s Poorest Children, by Jonathan Kozol.

28 THEATER _BY C A RO LYN C L AY

Marie Antoinette from American Repertory Theater.

30 TELEVISION _BY J O N G A R EL IC K

5 EDITORIAL 5 LETTERS 16 FOOD _ BY A R I E L S H E A R E R

Bootstrap Compost goes to business bootcamp.

17 ON THE CHEAP _ BY M C S L I M J B

A new Korean soup house is a wondrous, fiery addition to Allston’s restaurant stew.

18 PHX PICKS

_ CO M P I L E D BY A L E X A N D R A C AVA L LO

Get off your damn couch.

36 LISTINGS

Clubs, concerts, events, art, theater, and movies.

44 CLASSIFIEDS 46 BACKTALK

_ BY CH R I S FA R AO N E

Todd Gitlin, author of Occupy Nation

Boardwalk Empire on HBO.

30 THE BIG HuRT _BY DAVID TH O R PE

ON THE COvER F PHOTO By AARON SPAGNOlO

The world of YouTube rap spam.

32 MuSIC

Patterson Hood, Bloc Party, Peter Gabriel, Banditas, and album reviews of Cat Power, Dinosaur Jr., Glen Hansard, Band of Horses, and How To Dress Well.

ON THIS PAGE F FOOD PHOTO By DEREK KOUyOUMjIAN F IllUSTRATION By jEF cZEKAj

Finance DIRECTOR Of fINANCE scotty cole CORPORATE CREDIT MANAGER michael tosi STAff ACCOUNTANTS brian ambrozavitch , peter lehar fINANCIAL ANALyST lisy huerta-bonilla TRADE bUSINESS DEvELOPMENT MANAGER rachael mindich

Readers Say the Darndest Things p 22

human resources RECEPTIONIST/ADMINISTRATIvE ASSISTANT lindy raso

oFFices bOSTON 126 brooKline ave., boston, ma 02215, 617-536-5390, advertising dept Fax 617-536-1463, editorial dept Fax 617-859-8201, CLASSIfIEDS 126 brooKline ave., boston, ma 02215 617-859-3300, Fax 617-425-2670 | PROvIDENCE 150 chestnut st., providence, ri 02903, 401-273-6397, Fax 401-273-0920 | PORTLAND 16 yorK street, suite 102, portland, me 04101, 207-773-8900, Fax 207-773-8905 | NATIONAL SALES OffICE 150 chestnut st., providence, ri 02903, 401-273-6397 x232, Fax 401-272-8712 | WEb SITE WWW.thephoenix.com

MANUSCRIPTS should be addressed to managing editor, neWs & Features, boston phoenix, 126 brooKline ave., boston, ma 02215. We assume no responsibility For returning manuscripts. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR send to 126 brooKline ave., boston, ma 02215 | Fax to 617-859-8201 | e-mail to letters@phx.com. please include a daytime telephone number For veriFication. SUbSCRIPTIONS bulK rate $49/6 months, $89/1 year, alloW 7-14 days For delivery; First-class rate $175/6 months, $289/1 year, alloW 1-3 days For delivery. send name and address With checK or money order to: subscription department, boston phoenix, 126 brooKline ave., boston, ma 02215. COPyRIGHT © 2012 by the boston phoenix, inc. all rights reserved. reproduction Without permission, by any method Whatsoever, is prohibited. PRINTED by mass Web printing co., inc., 314 Washington st, auburn, ma 01501 | 508-832-5317

THE PHOENIX MEDIA/COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

CHAIRMAN stephen m. mindich PRESIDENT bradley m. mindich EXECUTIvE EDITOR peter Kadzis SENIOR vICE PRESIDENT Of CLIENT DEvELOPMENT a. William risteen THE PHOENIX NEWSPAPERS | FNX RADIO NETWORK | G8WAvE | El PlANETA MASS WEB PRINTING | STUFF MAGAZINE | PEOPlE2PEOPlE GROUP

ES ONLINE EXCLUSIv m o .c @ thePhoenix

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F bLUE SCREEN! Pop quiz, hot shot: Who directed the scene where the drunk sailor does it with the sand sculpture — A) Neil Jordan, B) Costa Gavras, or C) Paul Thomas Anderson? Nail the answer at thePhoenix.com/ outsidetheframe.

F SEMANTICS! If a politician speaks at an American Legion, and nobody hears him, does he make a sound? David S. Bernstein on Mitty Cents’s baffling relationship with the word “Afghanistan” at thePhoenix.com/ talkingpolitics.

F MASOCHISTS! Sam Ueda reports back from doom metal band Sunn O)))’s epic, cartilage-shaking show at the Coolidge; plus, for a different endorphin jolt, check out our photos of Madonna’s TD Garden show at thePhoenix.com/ onthedownload.

F ON ACID! Chris Faraone is just doing the DNC the way it was meant to be done: on serious drugs. At least we assume that’s how he wound up with a vision of Obama and Tupac on horseback. Get the whole mindblowing rundown at thePhoenix.com/phlog.

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Letter from the Publisher

A new beginning Many reading this edition of the Boston Phoenix already know that after 46 years of publishing as a newspaper, we are changing formats, saying goodbye to newsprint, hello to glossy pages, and folding the content and sensibility of our sister publication, Stuff, into our new pages. The biggest transformation, the most dramatic part of the makeover, is that as of next week the Boston Phoenix will be a magazine, called — not surprisingly — The Phoenix. We’ll still be weekly. We’ll still be free. And you will still be able to find us in those big red boxes all over town. Our aim — simply put — is to make the editorial mix richer: the sharp bead on politics, the smart take on arts and enter-

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tainment, and the unpredictable points of view in reporting trends and events will still be hallmarks. But as you follow along as The Phoenix magazine moves forward, you will see that our depth and breadth have expanded to include fashion and design; coverage of the personalities that give Boston its energy; and even more on dining and drinking and nightlife. Change may be a constant in life, but these days, it has a special imperative. Change is the engine that drives us all. It challenges individuals and institutions alike — not to just keep pace, but to forge ahead. For those of us working at The Phoenix, change has always been something else: a reason to exist. We’ve been many things

over the years, but we have always been on the move. Today’s audience is the most demanding in history. At its fingertips it has the ability the access information in print, online, via tablets and smartphones. Still, one thing has not changed: the demand for quality. Our sense of mission is equally constant: to enlighten, to educate, to entertain, and to challenge. That’s the business we have been in since we first hit the streets as a newspaper called Boston After Dark in 1966. Over the years the Boston Phoenix and Stuff magazine embodied and expanded those ideals. And The Phoenix magazine will redefine them for readers and advertisers old and new, just — I might add — as we are in the process of redefining

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and reinventing online radio at wfnx.com. As the long-standing Publisher and Chairman of the Phoenix Media/ Communications Group, I have had the privilege and good fortune of guiding our enterprise through numerous, almost countless, changes. Our internal metamorphoses, however, pale when compared with the radical evolution of the media at large, which has been existential. Throughout it all, the greatest joy, the fundamental satisfaction of my job has been to work with scores of terrifically talented and fiercely dedicated women and men. Their efforts constitute our past, our present, and — in the pages next week of The Phoenix — our future.

_Stephen M. Mindich


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Flashbacks 1. EARLY DAYS Before he owned the joint, publisher Stephen M. Mindich started at Boston After Dark as a theater reviewer. Later, during a business deal gone sour, he briefly published a weekly called — after Ben Franklin — Boston Occurrences. 2. TWO TYRANTS, THREE DECADES APART B.A.D.’s “Enemy Bombs hanoi” cover came to symbolize an entire era of anti-war journalism; we also weren’t wrong about Dubya’s second term. 3. VOICES OF GENERATIONS in December 1980, the Phoenix literally stopped the presses to cover Lennon’s death. in 1994, on the occasion of Kurt cobain’s oD in Rome, we published WFnx program director Kurt St. Thomas’s interview. Just over a month later, cobain was found dead. 4. THE TIME OF OUR TIME From the Blizzard of ’78 to the fall of the World Trade center towers, the Phoenix covered great tragedy with up-close reportage and wide-ranging cultural contextualization. 5. THE ALTERNATIVE ERA in 1986 and 2006, the Phoenix looked back on the evolution of the city, the culture, the country, and the media.

6. GREATEST HITS in 1972, Boston After Dark broke the blockbuster story of mob connections in Mayor White’s administration. Barney Frank, then an aide to White, was so incensed at the story, he threatened to car-bomb the paper’s editor. (The next week, he offered a snarky written apology.) in 2001, the Phoenix broke the story of the catholic church’s coverup of its clergy’s child sexual abuse — setting in motion the Boston Globe’s Pulitzer-winning followup. 7. GAME ON The Phoenix has published great sportswriters, from Mike Lupica and George Kimball to Michael Gee (seen here in the ’80s) and . . . Spenser author Robert B. Parker? Does Phoenix alum Bill Simmons know about this? 8. LITERARY LIGHTS not pictured: camille Paglia reviewing the Rolling Stones. Trust us, it happened. 9. WEEKLY, WORLDWIDE During the 1970s, the Phoenix empire briefly included an edition in Miami, featuring prominent sightings of UFos and Bigfoot. That stuff would never fly in Boston — except, of course, during the Y2K hysteria of the late 1990s.

For more from the Phoenix archives: ThePhoenix.com/Flashbacks


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Fables oF the occupation aarOn spagnO lO

One year later, the mOvement cOntinues _ By c hris F a ra O n e

It’s been one year since thousands of outraged protesters swarmed Zuccotti Park to demand vast socio-economic changes, but the movement’s aftertremors continue to be felt. This past summer, a group of Occupiers helped expose the Boston police union for its savagely bigoted newsletter and subsequently fostered an overdue public dialogue about diversity in city leadership. The movement’s New York base has been especially active, providing organizational support and peoplepower for efforts including, but hardly limited to, the uphill battle to end “stop-and-frisk” policies. The Midwest and West Coast also rage on, with ongoing arrests in Minneapolis and Los Angeles, while crusaders in towns and cities nationwide do the tedious work of pooling resources to fight foreclosures. Elsewhere, from Bozeman to Baltimore, Occupiers have pushed local officials to divest municipal funds from predatory banks. Meanwhile, the robust Alternative Banking Group of OWS, comprised largely of financial industry ex-pats, is strategizing ways to build lending institutions that are beholden to clients and not shareholders. At the same time, swarms of Occupiers remain on the front lines, protesting Republican vice-presidential nominee Paul Ryan’s trip to the Venetian Las Vegas Casino and disrupting the elephant- and donkey-shows in Tampa and Charlotte.

Finally, there’s the international front, which is symbiotically inspired by stateside activity. Occupy Hong Kong made worldwide headlines in August after pitching tents in the city’s financial district. Like their American counterparts, Chinese activists are primarily concerned with fast-increasing wealth disparity. A continent away, London Occupiers are fielding candidates in local elections. And perhaps most noticeably, young people are rising up in massive numbers from Canada, where several hundred thousand college students are still protesting

high tuition fees, to Chile, where high schoolers have been brutalized for standing up to a corrupt and ineffective privatized school system. For this Occupy anniversary issue, Phoenix reporter Liz Pelly profiles a new uprising of college activism in Boston, inspired by international movements (page 12). As someone who’s been documenting Occupy since the beginning, writer and photographer Ariel Shearer checked in with some familiar characters from the Dewey Square camp (page 14). And I examined the upcoming

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trials of more than 30 Boston Occupiers who were arrested last year (page 10); I also interviewed iconic counter-culture journalist Todd Gitlin, whose new book, Occupy Nation, provides a deeply comprehensive account of how the movement hatched and persevered (page 46). The movement’s encampments are gone, and the media has largely moved on to focus on the presidential rat race. Yet the spirit of Occupy lives in every person who, energized by what they saw in Zuccotti and Dewey, was empowered to teach, volunteer, or leave a soul-crushing career to pay it forward. ^


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10 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

Cops, TenTs, and VideoTape CatChing up with the ongoing trials of oCCupy Boston aCtivists _By Ch ris f a ra o n e aaron spagnolo

At a hearing in Boston Municipal Court last month, attorneys from the National Lawyers Guild received nine DVDs from the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office. The DVDs, turned over as discovery, contained police footage taken last year during two separate raids on Occupy Boston’s Dewey Square encampment. After months of requests, the NLG had secured critical evidence that they believed could exonerate their Occupier clients. Then they tried to play them. No dice. According to NLG attorneys, the discs that they received run exclusively on proprietary cop software. Discouraging as such setbacks sound, they’re par for the course in about 30 Occupy Boston trials that are slogging along, slowly and in relative obscurity, and that will probably continue moving at this pace for some time. None of which surprises NLG lawyers, who are defending all of the Occupiers, and hammering for precedent. “We are going beyond what lawyers usually request,” says Urszula MasnyLatos, executive director of the Massachusetts chapter of the NLG. Though DA spokesman Jake Wark says his office has “complied with all the rules of disclosure,” Masny-Latos says the NLG is still waiting for items such as police call logs and viewable DVDs. She continues: “We don’t approach these cases as only criminal cases. In our view, they are all political cases. Therefore, we are going beyond the scope that you would have with just criminal defendants. We have asked for many documents, and footage, and reports.” The stakes and size of discovery are not the only unusual aspects of these cases. The pre-trial judge, Raymond Dougan, is currently embroiled in a public spat with DA Dan Conley. On the heels of a Boston Globe investigation that labeled Dougan one of the most lenient local robes, this year, Conley mounted a campaign to remove him from all criminal trials. Some defendants are concerned that the situation could impact important pre-trial outcomes, as Dougan faces accusations that he leans to the activist left. There have also been complications over scheduling, and over how the defendant pool should be split up. All this while more than two dozen activists languish in legal limbo, charged with misdemeanors such as disturbing the peace and resisting arrest. So far, more than 100 Occupiers have admitted guilt in exchange for either probation or having the criminal charges reduced to civil complaints. Still, not all of the accused are willing to plead to charges that they roundly consider, in the words of one Occupier, “completely fabricated.”

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‘ScurrilouS’

Occupy Boston squatters took Dewey Square on September 29 of last year. On October 10, police moved in after Occupiers expanded onto a neighboring strip of the Rose Kennedy Greenway. In the scrum, authorities arrested 141 people, and as a result, the incident drew tens of thousands of live online viewers, as well

held up on october 10, 2011 (when this photo was taken), police stormed the occupy Boston encampment and arrested 141 people; a December 10 raid on Dewey square led to even more arrests. now, months later, many occupiers are still tied up in legal battles. as subsequent coverage from nationally recognized news outlets. Two months later, before the cold crack of dawn on December 10, authorities returned in even greater force, this time to disperse campers once and for all. By daybreak, they’d arrested 46 activists who refused to vacate Dewey Square. Among them, protester John Ford was charged with resisting arrest and trespassing — though he and other witnesses claim he peacefully surrendered with his palms up. “Part of me was going to accept the deal,” says Ford. “But I wanted to say out loud the reason that I was accepting the scurrilous charge of resisting arrest, and they wouldn’t let me. When I opened my mouth at the arraignment, the bailiff grabbed me and forced me out of the room. I’m willing to fight this just on a criminal level. I don’t think I was trespassing, and I certainly wasn’t resisting arrest.” Allison Nevitt was also also jailed on December 10, charged with trespassing. Two days before the eviction, she wrote in a blog post on the Daily Kos that she would stand her ground in Dewey Square. “If I can watch people in Syria march when they know that they’re going to be shot at,” Nevitt tells the Phoenix, “then I can’t stand here and let our government tell us that we don’t have the right to assemble in a public space.” “Some people were charged with disturbing the peace, and some were charged with disturbing the peace and unlawful assembly,” says NLG attorney Myong Joun. Joun also notes that only male de-

fendants were charged with resisting arrest. “There’s no real rhyme or reason. In the least, we want to know why were some people charged with unlawful assembly while others were only charged with trespass or vice-versa.”

‘AbSurd’

NLG attorneys initially sought to separate the defendants into two groups — those arrested in October, and those arrested in December. But motions to divide them by arrest dates were rejected, and instead Judge Dougan decided to split Occupiers into groups of about five, effectively removing the possibility of a marquee media trial. The DA’s office welcomed that decision. “The logistics of trying a large number of defendants in one case in one courtroom would make it very difficult,” says spokesman Wark, “not just for the prosecution and defense, but for the logistics of the actual courthouse.” Planning considerations aside, the biggest holdup has been the discovery process. The defense has requested a deluge of data — for example, NLG attorneys are after recordings from a camera on a Big Dig ventilation building with a bird’s-eye view over Dewey Square. After months of asking, though, they were told that the footage belongs to the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority. On top of that, NLG attorneys say they’re having trouble getting city footage. “We still haven’t received some documents, and especially videos,” says Masny-Latos. “The cops claim that some

of this footage has been lost, or destroyed because the law requires them to destroy if it’s not used in a criminal case after 90 days. We know from other FOIA requests that we’ve filed that they don’t destroy everything after 90 days. But when they say that they did destroy footage, we have no way to challenge that.” The DA’s office rejects insinuations that they intentionally wasted recordings. “If you’re saying or quoting someone as saying that anyone in this office would destroy or tamper with evidence to hide something,” Wark wrote in an email to the Phoenix, “my response is that it’s not just reckless and inflammatory in nature but also absurd on its face: it suggests that someone would commit a felony in the pursuit of a misdemeanor conviction.” The NLG hasn’t gone that far — not yet, at least. “Hopefully, we’ll get more [evidence] on Thursday, and after that, I’ll have a better sense as to where we are,” says Masny-Latos. “What I can say so far is that we asked for all video footage that they have, and only got some of it. Other stuff was missing, and we have no way to prove that this is not a true statement. What this shows is that The People don’t have much control, and that police departments and law-enforcement agencies have more powers now than they did some time ago.” ^

Chris Faraone can be reached at cfaraone@ phx.com, or follow him on Twitter @fara1. his book on Occupy, 99 Nights with the 99 PerceNt, is out now.


EXPERIENCE THE GARDNER MUSEUM’S NEW WING AT NIGHT. SOAK UP THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE HISTORIC COURTYARD. LIVE MUSIC. WINE BAR. ARTIST TALKS. GALLERY GAMES.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 5–9 PM

STARGAZING Celebrate the cosmos—wear glitter and sparkle!

RAQS MEDIA COLLECTIVE The Great Bare Mat & Constellation Public Exhibition Opening Specially commissioned conversation – 7 pm gardnermuseum.org/visit/afterhours Box office: 617 278 5156

Thursday evening programming is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Opening year exhibitions are made possible in part by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.. Gardner After Hours media sponsor: The Boston Phoenix.


12 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

OB 201: IntrO tO tuItIOn StrIkeS OCCUpy energy rAmps Up BOstOn’s stUdent pOwer mOvement _By LIz p e L L y On a gray Saturday afternoon in Cambridge, the first meeting of Boston’s new student power movement is assembled in a Harvard auditorium: about 50 students from more than eight Bostonarea schools, working out goals, structures, and values. With this radical new group, some of Boston’s hardest-working student activists are planning to fight increasing tuitions, change the infrastructure of student unions, and get their interests met through collective action. Their short-term goal is citywide tuition freezes at public and private schools; long-term goals include reducing power of administrations and fostering a sense of self-determination among students and workers. If any students in Boston can kick off a citywide movement toward tuition freezes, it’s these: for today’s meeting, there are reps from BU Anti-Authoritarians, Brandeis Students for a Democratic Society, and Tufts Occupiers, plus activists from UMass Boston, Bunker Hill Community College, Boston College, Emerson, Northeastern, and more. Last fall, they were the faces from Students Occupy Boston — a working group with its own general assemblies and a designated tent at Dewey — and the ones who marched and screamed through downtown Boston by the hundreds last Columbus Day. “A lot of students were energized from the Occupy movement and saw how things could be changed,” said Ian Chinich, a BU PhD student, on the day before the meeting, when I met him at BU’s Center for Gender, Sexuality, and Activism. “There’s now an idea that it’s possible to be self-empowered. And I think that has been a huge influence here.” Chinich is one of Boston’s busiest anarchist activists, and a driving force behind the Student Anarchist Federation — another group that grew out of Occupy. He studies political science — “Or as Howard Zinn called it, ‘the department of political silence,’ ” he says — and also works 40 hours a week at Panera Bread to counterbalance his $100,000 in student debt. He was one of several Boston students and many post-Occupiers who attended the Student Power Convergence in Columbus, Ohio, this summer, alongside over 300 students from other US cities plus Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Quebec. (“Student movements start at gatherings like the National Student Power Convergence,” said author Naomi Klein in a video of solidarity sent to the convergence.) “It’s not just about tuition,” Chinich says of the new Boston student coalition. “We want to democratize the schools. We want student input, student power. We want control over policies. It’s about autonomy, and working together with faculty and campuses workers.”

There’s this mindset that going into debt is how you earn an education.” But in order to live in America, a postsecondary education is necessary, Sullivan says. “Whether that’s a privilege or a right, it’s a necessity. For us to get our basic needs met — housing, food, healthcare — we need to go into debt. It’s bullshit.” Quebecois students are coming from a different context, said Chinich. “In Quebec, there’s a history of students having fought every attempt at raising tuition,” he said. “If students have a history of fighting back and winning, they’ll remember it.”

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Rights and PRivileges

To help set the infrastructure for this new movement, experienced student organizers from Quebec have come to today’s meeting to give a presentation and answer questions. Since the beginning of the year, over 200,000 students in Quebec have been on strike, set off by a government proposal to raise annual tuition. These students are currently

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HONOR ROLL “A lot of students were energized from the Occupy movement,” says Boston University’s Ian Chinich about the recent surge of student-power activism. winning: last week in Montreal, the Liberal government scrapped its proposed hike. In comparison to the tuition and debt increases Quebec’s students were facing — the government proposed increasing tuition from $2,168 to $3,793 over the course of 5 years — American (and specifically, Massachusetts) student debt is astronomically higher. According to the Project on Student Debt, the average Massachusetts student leaves college with $25,541 in debt. That number fluctuates from school to school — the average debt for a UMass Boston student is $22,387; for a Boston University student, $31,809. The Canadian students tell the Boston activists about the functions of their interuniversity coalition, CLASSE. Collectively, they say, students can act as a political force.

They share stories of mass mobilizations and administration building shutdowns, and highlight the value of holding general assemblies, organizing departmentally, and coordinating across campuses. Juxtaposed with Quebec, American students are less critical of the education industry. Why? “America’s approach to education is much different than a lot of the world,” says Nicole Sullivan, a 23-year-old student, who pays for her own education at Bunker Hill Community College and was actively involved with Occupy Boston last fall. “If you go to other places, Europe or Canada or South America, education is a right. . . . Here, education is seen as a privilege that can be taken away if you mess up or don’t work hard enough.

Similarly, in Chile, the country’s history of student protests throughout the past decade has provided a foundation for the massive uprising that began last year — with hundreds of thousands of students striking, marching in the streets, and occupying school buildings, demanding education reform. “In May, it was just occupation after occupation after occupation of different schools,” says a 23-year-old Chilean student named Gabriel Ascui Gac, who has recently been part of student protests in Chile. “Then a lot of marches [and] manifestations. ” Gac was first involved in student protesting in 2001 when, as a 13-year-old, he joined high-school students fighting school bus fare hikes. Since then, he has seen little assemblies of students meet over the years, but in 2011, the movement exploded, making “deeper demands for free education, demands for a new type of student government, a new view of how the state universities and private universities should relate,” said Gac. Chile’s recent political and cultural history has led to a more radicalized and socially critical youth population. “We have historical wounds from the dictatorship that make it a special social context,” said Gac. Romina Akemi, a Chilean-raised PhD student at UC Irvine, agrees. Akemi lived in Boston last fall and was active with Students Occupy Boston and Tufts Occupiers. “There’s a real lack of historical memory [in America],” says Akemi, pointing out that American students are not familiar with the US student protests of the ’60s the way Chilean students are with student protests of the early ’00s. “In Chile, not that long ago, there was a pretty vibrant student movement.” Chinich believes the Occupy movement could provide just the bit of historical memory that the current generation of radicalized students need to start fighting back on campuses this year. “People remember Occupy,” he says. “People have become radicalized. You hear people talking in terms of anti-capitalism, like it’s a normal thing, in ways you didn’t hear 10 years ago. I’m excited. I’m not saying it’s not going to be hard. It’s just gotten so bad that people don’t see a future for themselves if they don’t change the system.” ^

Liz Pelly can be reached at lpelly@phx.com.


inspiRAYtion

September 22, 2012

Featuring Ricky Skaggs, John Scofield, Raul Mid贸n, and Tracy Bonham. Ray Charles is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest geniuses in all of American music. His music lives at the crossroads of all the defining genres of that music: gospel, soul, country, and jazz. InspiRAYtion features performances by guest artists, faculty, and students inspired by the music of the great Ray Charles. This concert is presented as part of the Inspired by Ray symposium at Berklee, September 21 to 23. 8:15 p.m. at the Berklee Performance Center Tickets $35, $25, $15, reserved seating


14 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

Class of 2011 Occupiers then and nOw _intervie w s a n d ph O t O s By ar i el s h e a r er

Camp Dewey thrived between September 30 and December 10 of last year. Through rain and snow, raids and General Assemblies, a motley group of characters built their own alternative community and kept it alive — and I’ve got 6,000 photos to prove it. In recent weeks I tracked down five familiar faces from Occupy Boston to find out where and how they spend their time now, a year after the encampment.

f

NADEEM MAZEN, 28 RolE aT occuPy: MEdia How Has occupy impacted your life — for better, worse, or not at all? “It’s definitely impacted my life for the better. I learned a lot. . . . We’ve learned how movements can arise. And it’s very different to look at something from afar. To look at the Tea Party, or to look at some other movement that grows, or is co-opted, or is corrupted, or fails, or succeeds. It’s a very different thing to be in the thick of it, to really live that day to day — an incredible education, I think, for everyone that came down to Dewey, whether for the day or for a month.”

september 30, 2011, occupy dewey square

august 21, 2012

now F “Here I’m in the nimblebot.com

office working with the other founders, also Occupy participants. Our work has been greatly informed by Occupy — we’ve recently taken two months off from for-profit commercial work in order to create a campaign-advertisement fact-checking app called reactvid.com.”

tHen F “We were beginning to take the square after having decided to gung-ho it at a

series of planning meetings in the Boston Common . . . kind of flying by the seat of our pants, trying to figure out what we’d gotten ourselves into.”

CHERIE KING, 37 RolE aT occuPy: hoMElESS advocaTE How Has occupy impacted your life — for better, worse, or not at all? “I think it gave me back my voice. I’ve always been an activist at heart, just never really able to do anything. It really empowers a person to try to make change, and I think just making taxpayers aware may be as much power as I get — but to me, that’s enough, because taxpayers vote.”

november 14, 2011 | camp winterization

september 5, 2012

now F “I like to go to Starbucks

around 6:30 in the morning when we have to leave the dorm in the shelter. It’s quiet, they treat you with respect. . . . Tomorrow I go to a hearing at Boston Housing Authority to apply for Section 8.”

tHen F “I was holding my tent while he put the Styrofoam down. We were winterizing and making my tent a little warmer. We were trying to get around the police telling us we couldn’t have the pallets.”


ThEPhoEnix.coM | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 15

ALEX INGRAM, 23

FRANK TOSNEY, 44

RolE aT occuPy: MEdia, MEdiaTion, Social cluB

RolE aT occuPy: cook

How Has occupy impacted your life — for better, worse, or not at all? “All three. For worse: I’m a lot more stressed than I used to be. Not at all: I’m still not a political activist, I’m just a guy helping people. For better: I met so many wonderful people to add to my life.”

How Has occupy impacted your life — for better, worse, or not at all? “There’s a good core group of friends that I still have that I met there that I wouldn’t otherwise know. Definitely an intensive communications class you couldn’t pay for anywhere else. Did wonders for my confidence — both mental and physical. Got to work on my rice and beans.”

october 30, 2011 | occupy boston’s one-month birthday party

december 8, 2011 | occupy boston’s self-eviction

tHen F “That was our one-month birthday. . . . [Some of us] thought, ‘You know what would be great for us? If we gave the cops some cake.’ As a peace offering, and also ’cause it’s their birthday, too — of sitting there watching us.”

september 4, 2012

tHen F “I was just clearing up the food tent.

We had to move that big tent. . . . Half the time when I was there, I was joking around, or yelling at cooks.”

now F “I’m in the obr.fm radio station. I spend a lot of time here producing, hosting, and editing shows, and contributing not just to the movement but the world — getting people’s voices out there.”

now F “I’m in Brattle Square selling old jewelry and tchotchkes on the street. . . . I guess you could call me a scavenger salesman — a ramshackle engineer.”

august 28, 2012

ANNE WOLFE, 21 RolE aT occuPy: diREcT acTion, SafETy How Has occupy impacted your life — for better, worse, or not at all? “It’s been a huge shift in my perspective. . . . Being at Tufts, it’s a wonderful school — you learn a lot, you do. But at the same time, you have a very theory-based perspective on life. You are still in a very privileged community. . . . I think [Occupy] really helped me to question a lot of what I was learning.”

september 4, 2012

may 1, 2012 | death of capitalism street theater funeral procession

tHen F “This was the march for the death of capitalism, which was the last event we held on May 1. . . . There were different parts to the march: there was the bird part, and there were also gravestones, there was a part that honored the Haymarket martyrs, and there were devils chasing the free birds that represent this kind of freedom from capitalism.”

now F “I’m back to school — taking classes full time, working on finding an internship to meet the internship requirement for my peace and justice studies major, with a concentration in activism and community development. And then my other major is international relations with a concentration in the region of Latin America.”

ariel shearer can be reached at arielshearer@gmail.com.


16 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

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WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Andy Brooks, founder of Bootstrap compost, gets down and dirty with a customer’s food scraps.

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I’m standing in an alleyway behind American Provisions, a specialty grocery shop in Southie with a cheese display that’s borderline pornographic, watching Andy Brooks shove his hands into a barrel of future compost. He tosses an estimated 50 pounds of brightly colored fruit and veg bits into a transfer tub and slides it back through the store, briefly stopping to chat with his shop-owner client. Out front, I help hoist the bounty into his truck bed. “I usually have gloves for this,” he assures me. He’s also used to lifting that tub on his own. Brooks is the founder of Bootstrap Compost — a local startup business turning Boston’s would-be trash into agricultural gold. Customers get a recycled 5-gallon bucket to fill with biodegradable food trash (organic waste like coffee grounds, eggshells, produce, and tea bags) and schedule a weekly ($32 per month), every-other-week ($18), or once-a-month ($10) pickup. Bootstrap delivers the old food scraps to local farms and gardens for use as fertilizer. A waste-collection service might not seem like the most glamorous, or successful, of startup ideas. But with pressure on to save landfill space, and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection working to ban commercial food waste by 2014, composting has become a mainstream topic of discussion. Bootstrap has found its niche serving the growing number of citydwellers who want to collect compost but have nowhere to dispose of it. In less than two years, Brooks has gained more than 300 clients across greater Boston — from households to green-minded financial firms. “It’s becoming largely residential, and then the rest has been offices,” says Brooks, adding that Bootstrap’s ability to navigate tiny roadways in

downtown neighborhoods like the North End and Beacon Hill is a major advantage. “We’re really nimble. . . . [Big dump trucks] can’t work in these tight spaces. That’s what we’re focusing on, and that’s who’s coming to us.” I arranged to meet Brooks and his business partner, Igor Kharitonenkov, at Brooks’s place in Jamaica Plain. Bootstrap headquarters is currently located between his living room and kitchen, but later this month the office is moving to a new space in Charlestown — part of Bootstrap’s plans for expansion. As Brooks stencils “Bootstrap Compost” on plain white buckets, he explains how he launched Bootstrap by posting flyers throughout Jamaica Plain. Kharitonenkov was one of his first customers. “I signed up for the service and shortly thereafter decided to profile [Brooks] in a little video,” Kharitonenkov says. “I thought the Bootstrap idea was a really great way of tapping into this green consumer base that’s out there — looking to vote with their dollars. They want to see their food waste go to good use.” Kharitonenkov spent months working marketing part-time for Bootstrap, until Brooks offered him a role as vice president. Now operating as a team of six, including Brooks and Kharitonenkov, Bootstrap’s cyclists, drivers, and business administrators divert hundreds of pounds of biodegradable waste from landfills every day. I head out with Brooks to cover his Tuesday pickup route. He points out the Egleston Community Orchard, a compost recipient, as we pass by. We visit customers in Jamaica Plain, the South End, Beacon Hill, the North End, and Dorchester. From stoops, alleys, porches, and courtyards, Brooks gathers full buckets and leaves fresh empties behind.

At the end of the day, Brooks, his bike-cart, and I squeeze into an opulent elevator at a fancy office building in Boston’s Innovation District. In March, Kharitonenkov entered Bootstrap into MassChallenge, an investment contest helping entrepreneurs grow new businesses. Bootstrap earned a workspace here at the MassChallenge hive back in June, when they made it to the final stage of the business bootcamp accelerator competition. Now they are one of 125 finalists. With MassChallenge ready to award over $1 million in grants to this year’s winning startups, Bootstrap is working hard to demonstrate their abilities as a sustainable business with potential for social impact. Tonight, Kharitonenkov gets to practice his presenting skills during a “Minute to Pitch It” event. He’ll have 60 seconds to explain Bootstrap before a crowd full of tech wizards and competitors. Brooks sets up his bike-cart and hides behind a wall near the stage. Bootstrap is one of few companies to bring props. About 40 other MassChallengers deliver pitches before Bootstrap goes on, most pushing high-tech services and digital products. When Kharitonenkov takes the stage, he mentions how Bootstrap uses bikes for a good portion of pickups. Brooks takes his cue and rides through a sea of suits, heels, and collared shirts. Some challengers glare at Brooks as he passes, and a few brows wrinkle in obvious confusion — but most of the audience lights up with smiles. After the presentation, another contestant approaches Brooks and asks about signing up for Bootstrap’s composting service. Brooks hands him part of a cardboard box, hand-stamped with Bootstrap block letters and his contact information. The MassChallenger chuckles. “Even his card is recycled.” Early next month, Brooks and Kharitonenkov will present their final pitch to the MassChallenge judges. On October 23, at the MassChallenge award ceremony, Bootstrap will learn if they’ve won grants or investor funding. But even if they don’t win seed money, Bootstrap will continue expanding on their mission as “Boston’s food scrap go-getters.” Kharitonenkov says the MassChallenge experience has been invaluable for the company. “In some ways, we are a service,” Kharitonenkov says. “In other ways, you could — what would you call us, Andy?” “A lifestyle,” Brooks answers, without hesitation. ^

Ariel Shearer can be reached at arielshearer@gmail.com.


ThEPhoEnix.coM | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 17

On the Cheap KAJU TOFU HOUSE

Dere k kouy oumJ iAn

A nEw KoREAn SouP houSE iS A wondRouS, FiERy AddiTion To AllSTon’S RESTAuRAnT STEw _ By mc Slim J B Boston’s dining scene has its gaps (looking at you, Jewish deli), but as a rule, it’s diverse enough to offer fresh surprises to intrepid diners, especially at the budget-priced end. Allston is especially vital on this score, hosting a un of delicious bargains within a square mile or two. yet despite some respectable neighborhood Korean options, we’ve never had a restaurant specializing in sundubu jigae, spicy soft-tofu soup. consider that another gap bridged with the arrival of Kaju Tofu house, a plain, spotless 40-seat storefront with table service. The smart play at any Asian specialty restaurant is to get the specialty, and that’s what nearly all the customers do here. To order sundubu jigae ($10.99 at lunch, $11.99 at dinner), you specify one of five levels of chili heat for your broth (from the fireless “white” to the molten “extra spicy”) and one of 15 combinations of vegetables, meat, and/or seafood. First to arrive is an assortment of seven banchan (tiny side dishes) to whet your appetite. The assortment varies daily and typically includes kimchi of cabbage, cucumbers, or daikon, little dressed salads, and mounds of chewy dried shredded squid, sliced fish cake, or marinated mushrooms, all of rather above-average quality. next comes rice in a very hot clay Kaju Tofu House, located at 58 pot; your server will scrape it into a separate bowl, leaving a layer behind to form a caramelized Harvard Avenue in Allston, is crust to be loosened with a pour of barley tea (also served as a complimentary hot beverage on open 10 am to 10 pm Monday request). last comes the soup, still boiling in another hot clay pot, into which you crack the acto Friday and 10 am to 10:30 companying raw egg. pm Saturday and Sunday. And what a spectacular soup it is: an umami-bomb broth flavored with dried anchovies Call 617.208.8540 or visit and fish sauce, plus chili flakes, garlic, onions, shiitake, and loads of irregular soft-tofu chunks, kajutofuhouse.com. topped with scallions. The textural mix is marvelous, the tofu like scrambled eggs, the actual egg adding creamy body to the broth, with chewy bits of quick-cooked seafood (like clams, oysters, and purple-edged diced octopus) and more tender beef, pork, or chicken. it’s an incredibly satisfying bowlful, hearty yet somehow light, and alongside rice and banchan, a substantial meal even before you get to that rice crust, which offers the crunch and charry sweetness of barely burnt popcorn. Trenchermen — or two diners with more modest appetites — can opt for a combo ($13.99-$17.99 at lunch, $16.99 to $19.99 at dinner), which adds an entrée, like a plate of Korean barbecue: marinated and grilled slices of beef short ribs, ribeye steak, or chicken. however else you explore the short remainder of Kaju’s menu, don’t pass on that soup. it’s just the thing to soothe a hangover, or warm you from the inside on a chilly new England autumn night. ^

FFOOd & drInK

Here are some of the best foodie-friendly events Boston has to offer this week. For more, head online to bit.ly/PHXfood.

SATURDAY 15

THE BOSTON BEERATHON | If you

like knocking back beers in the company of a few raucous fellows — read: a big-ass crowd that follows you from bar to bar for 12-plus hours — then this event is probably for you. For $25, you can traipse through 26 of our city’s finest establishments for hearty gulps of 26 unique beers, all for charity. That’s less than a buck a beer, folks. | noon | Faneuil hall, 1 Faneuil

hall Sq, Boston | $25 | 617.635.3105 or bostonbeerathon.com OLDE MAGOUN’S SALOON’S PAULANER BIERGARTEN | Locals who can’t make it to the beer tent in Munich this fall can get a taste of a true Oktoberfest with the traveling Paulaner Biergarten this weekend, where Olde Magoun’s is hooking you up with six kinds of Paulaner beer on tap, plus traditional Oktoberfest food to set the mood. | noon

| olde magoun’s Saloon, 518 medford St, Somerville | 617.776.260 or magounssaloon.com THE WRECKING BALL | Kick off the

New England Aquarium’s $17 million, 10-month construction plan to upgrade and improve its signature four-story Giant Ocean Tank — you know, that tank you can’t stop staring at after you finally leave the penguins — with bites from Ming Tsai and an afterparty that will probably make you want to get down with jellyfish every single weekend. | 6 pm | new england

Aquarium, 1 central Wharf, Boston | $75-$150 | 617.973.5200 or neaq.org

MONDAY 17

THE ARRRRRT OF THE COCKTAIL: FUN WITH RUM | Today in things

you didn’t know you needed to know, it’s International Talk Like a Pirate Day. And, because this merits celebrating and Mondays always require a cocktail, kill two birds with one stone and hit up this class at the BCAE (instead of slurring in pirate speak on your own at some random bar). Domingo Martin Barres, the resident mixologist at Market by Jean-George, will show students how to shake up rumbased libations like the “Captain Jack,” “Walk the Plank,” and “Barberry Coast.” Plenty of pirate puns to be had. | 6 pm |

Boston center for Adult education, 122 Arlington St, Boston | $50/ $43 for members / $20 for materials | 617.267.4430 or bcae.org

TUESDAY 18

HIGH & MIGHTY BEER AUTUMN HARVEST DINNER | You felt that

chill in the air this morning. Bring on the sweatahs and scahves people, it’s harvest time. No better way to kick it off than with a little quality time with self-proclaimed beer evangelists and Massachusetts-based craft brewers High & Mighty, who’ve got a bevy of cozy beers on tap to pair with chef Eric Gregory’s smoky, spicy menu. | 7

pm | grafton Street pub and grill, 1230 mass Ave, cambridge | $40 | 617.497.0400 or graftonstreetcambridge.com


A+E 18 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

PAUL AUSTER

S K C I P X PH

ul pen to you . . .” begins Pa “You think it will never hap t), but of hol nry (he l rna Jou ter Win auster’s new memoir, elist — ssential new York city nov course it does. The quinte e turns her — er oth ny ma ong , am author of Brooklyn Follies loss. process of aging, and to his attention, at 64, to the l delivers rna jou r’s ste Au gy, ele nd But rather than a moribu “A cataflavor of the moment — memories rich with the en by a driv one but it, s call as he logue of sensory data,” m every fro ly dom sodes drawn ran sharp narrative urge, epi s inhe’ re. we it as y, bod the y of self period in his life, a histor him w (no t poe g-time Boston troduced by his friend, lon Brattle 40 e, atr The ttle Bra t. bet in Brooklyn), William cor d.com ber 17 @ 6 pm | $5 | harvar St, cambridge | Septem

Paul auster

_C OM PIL ED By AL Ex An Dr A CA vA LL O

M/Bostonfunshit n us at faceBook.co fa d an , er itt tw on unshit follow us @Bostonf More Phoenix Picks:

OCCU-DOC pREMIER TUESDAy | It’s hard to believe that it’s been an entire year since Occupy first grew legs. Commemorate the occasion this evening at the Boston premiere of Dennis Trainor Jr.’s film, AmericAn Autumn: An OccudOc. The rousing documentary — with a soundtrack of kickass music from the likes of Fugazi — was shot on the front lines of Occupy movements in New York, Boston, and DC, and features interviews from activists including Dr. Cornel West. Stick around after the screening for a Q&A with Trainor and Phoenix reporter (author of the Occupy journal 99 Nights with the 99 Percent) Chris Faraone. Brighton family screening room, Paramount theatre, 559 washington st, Boston | 7 pm | free | 617.824.8000

GOT WOOD? F THUrSDAy 13 | We always thought that Monty Python had the final word on lumberjack hilarity. That is, until we heard about LumBerJAcKS in LOVe. Directed by Caitlin Lowans, Lumberjacks tells the story of the title gang, one of whom accidentally orders a mail-order bride. When she arrives out in the forest to meet her burly, ax-wielding husband, all sorts of woodsy shenanigans ensue, told through musical numbers played on everything from ukulele to washboard to tree stump.

GO GREEN F SATUrDAy | Speaking of coming together for a common cause, proponents of decriminalizing marijuana are once again occupying the Common for the MASS CANN BOSTON FREEDOM RALLY. They’ll have the usual vendor tents set up, plus speakers, food, art, hippies, stoners, and — if you’re lucky — a sighting of the fabled Boston Weed Faerie. All that plus two stages of music all day long with local talent including Moe Pope, Grey Sky Appeal, Spiritual Rez, the Shills, Dead Cats Dead Rats, and more.

stoneham theatre, 395 Main st, stoneham | september 13-30; tonight @ 7:30 pm | $44-$48; $42-$40 seniors | stonehamtheatre.org

HOT

TIX

BROTHERLY LOVE

F new found GlorY | December 6 at the Paradise Rock Club, Boston | $27.50 | On sale Thursday, September 13 @ noon | ticketmaster.com

Boston common, Boston | high noon | free | masscann. org

F raY laMontaGne | November 23 at the Orpheum Theatre, Boston | $33.50-$53.50 | On sale Friday @ 10 am | ticketmaster.com

THE ANTI-LENO

F SUnDAy| As if the crazy-good line-up at this year’s Newport Folk Fest wasn’t evidence enough that folk-rock is red hot right now. The AVETT BROTHERS join the ranks of Bon Iver and Delta Spirit as yet another introspective, lyrically-inclined indie-folk band packing the Pavilion. It should come as no surprise, though — the North Carolina sibs have quietly cranked out seven excellent studio albums and are touring tonight behind their second with megaproducer Rick Rubin, The Carpenter.

Bank of america Pavilion, 290 northern ave, Boston | 7:30 pm | $25-$40 | livenation.com

F rihanna | March 10 at the TD Garden, Boston | $52.50-$147.50 | On sale Friday @ 10 am | ticketmaster.com

F MOnDAy | Prepare thyself for the THE ERIC ANDRE SHOW: LIVE TOUR. On the premiere of his Adult Swim talk-show satire, Andre extracted his own tooth, among other feats of physical stupidity in the name of comedy. The show is co-hosted by comedian Hannibal Buress and features often-spontaneous stunts, surprise guest appearances (like one-time action movie star Dolph Lundgren), and off-color sketches the likes of which feature Andre as a black man seeking shelter in a Civil War reenactment.

Middle east downstairs, 480 Mass ave, cambridge | 8 pm | $12 | boweryboston. com

F the swellers + diaMond Youth + PentiMento | November 4 at T.T. the Bear’s Place, Cambridge | $10 | On sale Friday @ noon | ticketweb.com

f


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20 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

FrEE STuFF!

That Book...

F ERIC KESTER | Harvard alum discusses That Book About Harvard: Surviving the World’s Most Famous University, One Embarrassment at a Time | Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Ave, Cambridge | September 13 @ 7 pm | 617.499.2000 F CIRCA 1963 | Reception for exhibit of work from the 1960s | Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | September

13 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm | ves.fas. harvard.edu/ccva.html F DOWNTOWN GLOUCESTER BLOCK PARTY | Live music, vendors, food, and more | Main St, Gloucester | September 15 from 6 to 11 pm | glostablockparty.com F 3RD ANNUAL SOMERVILLE DOG FESTIVAL | Donations accepted! | Trum Field, 541 Broadway, Somerville | September 16 from 10 am to 3 pm | somdogfest.org

F “STAR TREK NIGhT #2” | Second installment of the retro TV screening series | Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave, Somerville | September 17 @from 7 to 9:30 pm | artsatthearmory.org F WORD OF MOUTh R&B ShOWCASE | Performers include Mykel, JPLovesIt, Rey Royale, and more | Good Life, 28 Kingston St, Boston | September 19 @ 9:30 pm | goodlifebar.com

f8 DAYS A WEEK

cRYSTAL-BALLinG ThE BEST UPcoMinG EVEnTS Blackbutton

ThurSDAY 13 AMERICAN SOUNDS | ThE NEW ENGLAND AMERICANA FESTIVAL is one of those annual events

SOUNDTRACK TO hITChCOCK | In Alfred Hitchcock’s early silent movies, nobody can hear them scream. In BlACkmAil (1929), a working girl murders a rakish painter in self defense. Panicking, she tries to cover it up, and a sympathetic detective helps her out. But there was a witness, which is where the blackmail comes in, and it climaxes with a chase in the British Museum, a warm-up for Mount Rushmore in North by Northwest. It screens as part of the Sounds of Silence series, with live music from the renowned Alloy Orchestra at the Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | 7 pm | $23; $20 students, seniors | 617.734.2501 or coolidge.org.

that brings together the city in musical harmony, probably because more than 50 locals acts get in on the action. This year is no different, with a massive bill of bands including Tallahassee, Bow Thayer, Patrick Coman & the Low Fi Angels, Larcenist, Three Day Threshold, the Rationales, Coyote Kolb, Little War Twins, Cask Mouse, and many, many more. This year’s fest kicks off with a two-night stand at Oberon and then spills over into Saturday for open-air afternoon sets in Winthrop Park and after-dark action at Passim, Tommy Doyle’s, and Charlie’s Kitchen. It all kicks off tonight at Club Oberon, 2 Arrow St, Cambridge | 6:30 pm | $15; $35 three-day pass | newenglandamericana.com/tickets.

BIG JOE | JOE LOVANO’S US FIVE,

with its two drummers, might at first glance seem like some kind of stunt or gimmick, but the great jazz saxophonist is never less than serious about his music. The band hit strong with their debut album a couple of year ago and have continued to grow in reach and execution. Us Five generally include star bassist-singer-songwriter Esperanza Spalding in a prominent supporting role, plus the terrific pianist James Weidman, and phenomenal drummers Francisco Mela and Otis Brown III. They have a two-night gig at Scullers in the DoubleTree Guest Suites Hotel, 400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston | 8 pm [$35]+ 10 pm [$30] | 617.562.4111 or scullersjazz.com.

FriDAY 14 DOG DAYS DEFINITELY OVER

| Who could have predicted how massively popular FLORENCE & THE MACHINE would so quickly become? Probably not even Florence Welch herself. Much like Gotye’s unprecedented recent success, Florence & the Machine’s debut album, Lungs, was not exactly what most would deem radio-friendly pop music. And yet . . . Welch is now a pop powerhouse, performing at MTV awards shows and booking massive stadium tours. She stops through town tonight, with fellow Brits, indie-rock outfit the MACCABEES at the Comcast Center, 885 South Main St, Mansfield | 7:30 pm | $20-$42.50 | livenation.com.

SATurDAY 15 WOMEN IN SCI-FI | Can you

name any great woman horror or fantasy filmmakers? For some reason Hollywood just doesn’t let

MonDAY 17

F Catch the return of BLACKBUTTON when the grunge outfit end their hiatus, reuniting in Allston for their first show in almost two years. OTP, DEAD CATS DEAD RATS, and YELLABIRD share the bill when old friends come together again at O’Brien’s, 3 Harvard Ave, Allston | September 15 @ 8 pm | $6 | obrienspubboston.com. the fairer sex bloody their hands with those traditionally macho genres. The ETHERIA FILM FESTIvAL, hosted by All Things Horror, might change their minds. It’s an all-day juried event at the Somerville Theater showcasing horror shorts by talented women. Among them are Australian Rebecca Thomson’s Slashed, in which sexual fantasies cross the digital divide, and American Maureen Perkins’s Laura Keller, a Logan’s Run–meets-The Handmaid’s Tale dystopic fantasy in which the right to reproduction is decided by a lottery. The theatre is at 55 Davis Square, Somerville | 4 pm | $15 festival pass; $10 each Sci-Fi or Fantasy block | 617.635.6700 or etheriafilmfestival.com.

BEER ODYSSEY | In what’s shaping up to be the most epic bar crawl of all time, today marks the first ever BOSTON BEERATHON, a Yelpsponsored crawl during which participants follow a route that includes no less than 26 different bars at which they’ll try to sample 26 unique brews. Talk about dedication. Sounds like you’re going to need to eat your Wheaties before this crawl, if you don’t want to end up dead. And try to remember to drink a lot of H20 between beers — you’re in it for the long haul. The

Beerathon begins, as most things of this nature do, in Faneuil Hall | noon | $25; $20 group rate | bostonbeerathon.com.

REALITY TV STAhDOM | Ever

catch an episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians and think “Dude, I’d be more interesting to watch than these idiots, they should just give me a show”? Here’s your chance to prove it. Sort of. WICKED REAL HOUSEWIvES OF THE MOB BOSTON is an interactive live parody of a reality TV show in which the audience is part of the cast. The premise is that you’re a guest at a “welcome home from prison” party for one of the housewives’ husbands in what’s meant to be the season finale. Tables will surely flip, chaos will ensue, and you’re along for the whole trashy ride. Suck it Kardashians! Get ready for your close-up at the Interactive Playhouse, 100 Warrenton St, Boston | 7 pm doors; 8 pm show | $45-$55 [includes dinner] | wickedrealhousewives.com.

SunDAY 16 SKATE DOC | The kids are skateboarding and acting cool, all right, but as the title of Martin Perseil’s

offbeat documentary makes clear, This Ain’T CAliforniA (2012). It is, in fact, ’70s East Berlin, where three boys rebel against the stringent Marxist regime by imitating Western punks. The years pass and it is suddenly 1989 — the Wall has fallen, the kids have grown up, and now they must redefine their identities. A quirky insight into a key period of 20th century history, it screens as part of the GoetheInstitut Boston film program at the Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | 11 am | $5 | 617.734.2501 or coolidge.org.

UNPLUGGED | Speaking of Gotye,

if you haven’t yet seen the video of Texas-based a cappella quintet PENTATONIX’s cover of “Somebody That I Used To Know,” then get thee to YouTube quick and have a listen. Shit is unreal. These talented vocalists (the dude who beat-boxes all the instruments is kind of our hero) won the third season of NBC’s The Sing Off and have created similarly awesome covers of popular songs by artists from fun. to Nicki Minaj that make one of high school’s geekier club occupations seem all kinds of hip. They’re performing live at Berklee Performance Center, 136 Mass Ave, Boston | 7 pm | $20 | berklee.edu.

YO hO hO | Frankly, we doubt we’d be very good at being pirates. All that pillaging and plundering at sea would likely just make us seasick, and we’re not really up for chores like swabbing the decks. Though all that booty does have its appeal. The gold too. (See what we did there?) But then we remember one of the most important parts of pirate culture — the rum drinking! The BCAE is hosting “THE ARRRRRT OF THE COCKTAIL: FUN WITH RUM” in honor of International “Talk Like a Pirate Day” this evening. Market’s resident mixologist Domingo Martin Barreres teaches the class, in which all you novice scallywags will learn to create a mean rum cocktail that would make Captain James Hook (not to mention Jack Sparrow) proud. That’s at the Boston Center for Adult Education, 122 Arlington St, Boston | 6 pm | $50 | bcae.org. COMMON GROUND | Nobody

has quite the affectless, quirky, frigidly ironic (but always delightful) sensibility of Hal Hartley, except maybe his frequent collaborator, the actor Martin Donovan. The erudite CineCache series at the Brattle Theatre screens Donovan’s directorial debut, CollABorATor (2011), in which a failed playwright and a right-wing former criminal share their differences and similarities. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 8 pm | $10 | 617.876.6837 or brattlefilm.org.

TuESDAY 18 MORE ThAN DRUMS | With the

new The Duality Perspective, drummer RALPH PETERSON’s 20-plusyear-old FO’TET has reached a new peak of ensemble derring-do. Peterson’s latest edition of the Fo’tet includes stars-in-the-

making he’s trained himself in his day job at Berklee: clarinettest Flexi Peikli, vibraphonist Joseph Doubleday, and bassist Alexander L.J. Toth. That’s at Scullers in the DoubleTree Guest Suites Hotel, 400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston | 8 pm | $25 | 617.562.4111 or scullersjazz.com.

DEER JOhN | It’s appropriate that one of the tracks on DEERHOOF’s just-dropped album Breakup Song (Polyvinyl) is titled “We Do Parties” because the Bay Area band’s 11th studio album is far from morose. In fact, it’s one of the outfit’s most upbeat and fun efforts to date. Breaking up isn’t that hard after all, as you’ll find out tonight when Deerhoof headline a show with BUKE AND GASE and MIREL WAGNER at the Middle East downstairs, 480 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 8 pm | $15 | ticketweb.com.

WEDnESDAY 19 ESTEEMED AUThOR | It’s no

real surprise that both of JUNOT DÍAZ’s engagements — at the Coolidge this evening and the Brattle on September 26 — sold out not long after they were announced. Díaz established himself as a literary wunderkind and singularly effective storyteller with his debut collection of short stories, Drown, at the tender age of 26 and has continued to make good on that promise. Lucky for those without tickets, the Coolidge will entertain a standby line (forming at 5:30 pm) outside the theater for tickets unclaimed by their owners (cash only). We recommend you get there early if you hope to hear Díaz discuss his newest collection, This Is How You Lose Her (Riverhead). A book signing at the Booksmith (open to all, tickets or no) follows the event at the Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | 6 pm | sold out | brooklinebooksmith.com.

ThurSDAY 20 BOSTON FILM FEST | It’s had some rocky times, but the BOSTON FILM FESTIvAL is back for its 28th year, this time ensconced in the classy digs of the refurbished Stuart Street Playhouse, reborn as Theatre 1. Among the features scheduled are Head Games, in which Steve James of The Interrupters fame takes on sports head injuries, and Alexia Oldini’s debut feature, To Redemption, about dark family secrets. The Festival runs through September 24 and the theatre is at 200 Stuart St, Boston | call for ticket info | 617. 523.8388 or bostonfilmfestival.org.


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22 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

ReadeRs say the daRndest things BookstorE culturE from thE insidE _By EugE n ia W il l ia m son Bookstores — those endangered spaces perpetually under threat from market forces and the relentless march of technology — trade on charm. Consider the way the afternoon light plays across bountiful rows of colorful dust jackets and the incalculable stores of knowledge contained therein. Delight in the intellectual community that arises — as though by magic! — from mere proximity to so many books. Revel in the knowledge that, like you, the bookseller behind the counter is a reader, a bibliophile, a book nerd, a fellow traveler on the sea of letters, and pleased as punch — perhaps even honored — to assist you in your quest to find the perfect volume to take home. Say the magic words — a carefully considered string of titles, like the combination to a safe or a Masonic handshake — and she’ll open to you like a flower and lead you to her secret stash: an overlooked classic, an unputdownable thriller, an unfairly maligned bestseller that, if you can stomach the hype, is actually all it’s cracked up to be. Or maybe you’re scared of her. Maybe you never did very well in English class; maybe her large glasses and exasperated air remind you of a certain junior-high librarian who, in addition to being over-stern, seemed to judge your predilection for Sweet Valley High when it was no longer age-appropriate. Or maybe you don’t like books very much at all. Maybe you’re just a clueless asshole who thinks bookstores sell pizza or provide free daycare or allow you to photocopy that recipe you wanted for next week’s dinner with your mother-in-law. Weird Things Customers Say in Bookstores (Overlook), a new book compiled by the English bookseller Jen Campbell, takes on the oblivious and the incorrigible. The anecdotes that constitute the British edition, released in April, were culled from Campbell’s own exchanges at a bookstore in London called Ripping Yarns. She posted great blocks of them in installments on her blog; they went viral thanks to an endorsement from the multimillionaire Neil Gaiman. (“So sad,” he blurbs.) For the American version, Campbell turned to American, Canadian, and British booksellers for their best material.

Here’s a representative example from a bookseller in Hollywood: Customer: I’d like a refund on this book, please. Bookseller: What seems to be the problem? Customer: I barely touched it. It’s ridiculous! Bookseller: What do you mean? Customer: I mean, all I did was drop it in the bath by accident. And now, I mean, just look at it: the thing’s unreadable!

f

illustrations By jEf czEkaj

Consider what it really means to act as a culture filter, to serve as the human cheesecloth between literature and the eager masses.

On the surface, this interchange isn’t especially — well, not even remotely — deep. Nor are the others Campbell includes, though most are at least moderately funny. Taken together, however, they stand as the most probing sociological exploration of bookstores since University of Chicago Press released Laura J. Miller’s Reluctant Capitalists: Bookselling and the Culture of Consumption in 2006. Collectively, these anecdotes hold up a mirror to the disappointments, aggravations, and petty resentments inherent in a bookseller’s typical workday, perplexing interactions with the general public caused by and contingent upon class, capital, and the neoliberal global economy. In other words, bookstores aren’t usually all that charming. I should know.

The incredible human culTure filTer

I started working in bookstores in the late ’90s at age 19. The dean of the tiny liberalarts college at which I began my undergraduate education had recently encouraged me to leave, due to my palpable apathy toward the classical curriculum as well as my being obviously stoned all the time. I decided to take a year off. To fill my days, I applied at the bookstore I had frequented in high school, the one at which my dorky friends and I had furtively perused oversized collections of nude portraiture and did not get in trouble for it. Most of the other booksellers were my age or close to it. They either went to art school or to the local community college where I had enrolled in a word-processing class. There was a DJ, a poet, a white rapper, two illustrators, and a closeted LARPer. Together we fit into the definition Scott Timberg, writing

last year in Salon, provides for the clerk class: “hard-working creative types — sometimes, though not always, lacking college degrees or professional connections . . . [who] filter the flow of culture, one customer at a time.” Consider what it really means to act as a culture filter, to serve as the human cheesecloth between literature and the eager masses. Consider culture in all its weight and turpitude, all the different ways tens of thousands of people in a busy tourist district in a large American city might apprehend it, how mad or delighted they’d be when they saw your sulky teenage face standing between them and the object of their worship/horror/spiritual fulfillment/insecurity/moral outrage/aspiration. Sometimes my colleagues and I acted as physical filters: standing at the bookstore entrance with our arms folded in order to prevent latecomers from overcrowding an already-overcrowded David Sedaris appearance; ousting a kid trying to steal porn mags; chasing a mother trying to run away because her toddler had bescumbered the travel aisle. Sometimes culture had nothing to do with it. We moved around the old men who smelled strongly of urine and had colonized the window seats in Fiction. We signaled frantically to each other every time we spotted the angry schizophrenic to whom we had given the inventive nickname Crazy George, the blowhard Porno Dave, and the cheerful old racist known as Dr. Mengele. For a period of months, a young mother left her five-yearold son next to the counter for hours at a time while she went into the adjacent office building, presumably to work. Our manager, the DJ’s mom, bought him cheese fries every day and made sure nobody messed with him. (Will Amazon buy a hungry kid french fries?) Much of the time, we were bored off our tits — you try doing an inventory of Personal Finance. More often than not, though, we were filters of the Timberg variety, people in the strange position of knowing so much more than everyone around us while making a quarter more than minimum wage. Naturally, this made us insufferable. Continued on p 24


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Continued from p 22

We’d snicker at the soccer moms who asked for Oprah’s latest book, roll our eyes at the graphic-novel arrivistes buying Ghost World, sigh mournfully when hipsters couldn’t remember the author of Motherless Brooklyn. We positively howled that time someone asked for a clarification of the difference between novels and biographies. In light of the indignities we suffered on an hourly basis, our condescension felt justified, righteous even. We made nothing, beans, and for these beans we were forced to interact with lunatics, drunks, and galoots. Worst of all were the readers. No, certainly not all of them — I still remember with fondness the high-school English teacher who read everything I suggested because of how heartily he agreed with my staff recommendation of CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. But most of them — ugh! The way they approached the counter, Sunday Book Review in hand, the way they asked for the latest National Book Award winner, or the latest Pulitzer winner, or that book by the author on yesterday’s Fresh Air: in fear, in desperation, in smug triumph. We loved books. We made six dollars an hour. Somehow, these doctors and lawyers and NGO-administrators in this affluent, liberal suburb had forced us into the role of their judges, their priests. More specifically — at least it always seemed to me — they used us as a bellwether for the opprobrium or scorn of the wider reading public. If, for instance, they were proud to have read the latest David Foster Wallace and felt this gave them entrée into an elite circle of readers of difficult fiction, they’d be sure to share this information with us when asking for a recommendation worthy of their time. If, however, they hadn’t kept up with the New Yorker for a while and were just catching wind of a striking and popular new literary voice, they’d approach us hesitantly, voice atremble. Genre fans were a different story altogether, evenly divided between monomaniacs and those with a studied, wry indifference to any potential judgment of their tastes. Even in affluent suburbia, even in the ’90s, readers were so spare and scattered that college kids seemed like the whole literary world. How did this make us feel? Did I mention: we made six dollars an hour. We didn’t own houses, and some of us didn’t even have our own apartments. Our cars were shitty and we shopped at thrift stores. And yet, at least once a day, a real, self-actualized adult would come in and sigh wistfully about the joys of working in illustrations By jEf czEkaj

a bookstore. “How wonderful to be around all these books,” they’d say, tears forming in the corners of their eyes. You don’t know the half of it, you idiot, I’d think. Try to imagine other wage slaves who might inspire respectable, well-paid professionals to fawn all over them. (Did you hear the one about the lawyer and the gas-station attendant? No?) Even though we were lowly cultural filters, our mere association with the literary sphere was enough to arouse envy. Clueless envy, envy entirely divorced from the banal reality of low-wage customer-service work, but envy nevertheless. A year after my hire, I started making $6.25. More than a decade later, the bookstore has been replaced by a fast-food chain that serves sub sandwiches and milkshakes.

a difficulT TransacTion

(A couple approaches the desk.) Bookseller: Can I help you find something? man: Yeah, we’re looking for a vocabulary book. It’s either called The Soars or The Sars. Bookseller: Let me look it up and see what we have. Woman: Oh, it’s okay, I made a note of the title. (Customer pulls a napkin from her purse and lays it down for the bookseller to read. Written on it is: “The Saurus.”) A few pages into Weird Things Customers Say in Bookstores, you may start to realize that most of its humor derives from customers being way dumber than the booksellers helping them. These chuckles rely on the underlying anxiety present in every encounter between a bookseller, the fleeting arbiter of cultural authority, and the customer, her supplicant. Out in the world, the customer may be extremely well-compensated at her job in upper-management, but in here, she’s only as good as her knowledge of books. Meanwhile, the bookseller resides at the low end of wage-earners — a rather obvious black mark in a consumerist, capitalist nation — but in here, she’s the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. This role-reversal can be so unnerving that it can induce vertigo. Is it any wonder they’re sometimes enemies? Of course, transactions fraught with socio-cultural anxiety aren’t limited to bookstores. Visit one of the country’s remaining record shops — or just watch High Fidelity — and you’ll see what I mean. However, bookstores alone carry the cultural weight of the US educational system, and of literature itself (a very anxious-making art form if there ever was one), and of 50-plus years of tumult in the publishing sphere — books, the ones

We signaled frantically to each other every time we spotted the angry schizophrenic to whom we had given the inventive nickname Crazy George, the blowhard Porno Dave, and the cheerful old racist known as Dr. Mengele.

printed on paper, are perpetually embattled, and the places that sell them have faced just as many threats. And for the last decade at least, some booksellers have become standard-bearers for fair business practices and consumer politics of the farmer’s-market variety. Anyone who has ever worked in an independent bookstore will have encountered at least one customer who blubbers with gratitude at her store’s existence, or who loudly declares that she always shops locally, that she doesn’t believe in Amazon, and that it’s worth it to spend the extra money for such wonderful service and selection. For these customers, the bookseller must do a dance of gratitude in kind, for without these generous souls who find it deep within their hearts to buy novels at a 33 percent markup, the bookseller would not have her low-paying bookstore job and be forced to work at Trader Joe’s. These are the good ones. The bad ones let their kids shit on the floor. The bookseller, for her myriad burdens, must perform a crucial balancing act: she must divorce the frequently despicable ways the general public acts around books from the books themselves. She must maintain her love of reading while being constantly reminded that the business of books is both rotten and unfair. She graduated with an English degree too, and if her parents could just have afforded to subsidize her rent while she took an unpaid internship at Knopf, she wouldn’t have to deal with these slobs. No, she’d be tucked away in an immaculate turret, surrounded by manuscripts, buoyed by a sense of discovery and the rapier wit of her fellow editorial assistants as they drank away their $30 thousand salaries in some glittering Greenpoint bar. But when emissaries from Manhattan alight upon her bookstore — touring writers, publicists, the occasional editor — they don’t sense her, a smile spreading to their eyes as they recognize her as one of their kind. They don’t whisk her away to a cocktail party, let slip some gossip about James Franco’s ghostwriter. She’s lucky if they can remember her name. Little wonder, then, that the bookseller — a butterfly trapped in the wheels of commerce, alienated from product and consumer alike, the strange result of too much knowledge and too little pay — can start feeling bitter. Maybe that place in her heart that feels sympathy for the functionally illiterate will freeze up, and leave in its wake a person who laughs openly at Twi-Hards. You cannot blame her. I cannot blame her. The Saurus. Ha-ha. ^


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Music at the MFA Zammuto Friday, September 28 7:30 pm The co-creator of The Books pairs a full band with videos that are “tours de force of editing” (The New York Times). Purchase tickets today at www.mfa.org/concerts. This year’s performances also include Boston String Players, So- Percussion, and more!

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26 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

DeTROPIA This sobering look at the Motor City offers at least a ribbon of hope.

film FShort Takes

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its picturesque parkways causing multiple traffic accidents, sometimes at the same time! Yes, even if you’re an Ugly American (constantly yelling “English!” at the natives is a perfectly suitable substitute for not speaking Spanish) who’s accused of gunning down a policia. Will (Henry Cavill, the next Man of Steel) hasn’t shot anyone, of course, but he is on the run from whoever kidnapped his vacationing family, headed by his crabby dad Marty (Bruce Willis), who’s — surprise! — an undercover spook. Who knew! Well, a shady CIA cohort named Carrack did. As played by Sigourney Weaver, she’s the only one having any fun — and that includes the audience.

100 MinUTES | BoSTon coMMon + fEnwAY + SUBURBS Enough of all this whining about the millions of regular people ruined by the financial collapse of 2007 — how about a movie sympathizing with one of the unfortunate guys responsible? Come to think of it, just about all the movies made about this debacle, from Margin Call to Cosmopolis, have been from the rich guys’ point of view, but then they have such nice houses, cars, and clothes. Like financial mogul Robert Miller (Richard Gere), leaving his lavish 50th birthday party to make a quick stop at his mistress’s gallery. The good life, right? But things go from bad to worse as a loan that would save him from bankruptcy falls through, he gets embroiled in a possible homicide, and his nagging wife (Susan Sarandon) starts to suspect something’s up. On his case is Detective Bryer (Tim Roth), a charmless Colombo. He’s no fun, and if first-time director Nicholas Jarecki refrained from moralizing, he’d recognize that Miller is the guy he’s really cheering for.

_Peter Keough

XXW BElovEd/lEs BIEn-AImés 145 MinUTES | KEnDALL SQUARE For the musical drama Beloved, writerdirector Christophe Honoré’s melodramatic excesses are tempered by the subtle performances of his leading ladies. Chiara Mastroianni plays Vera, introspective daughter of middle-age sexpot Madeleine (her real-life mother, Catherine Deneuve). Over a span of 40 years we meet the men they love and the men who love them. In early scenes, the youthful romance between hooker Madeleine (Ludivine Sagnier) and the Czech doctor who’ll become Vera’s father is a colorful but strained imitation of Umbrellas of Cherbourg. More original and profound is a melancholy song in which Vera wishes she had her mother’s light heart instead of her own heavy one. Mastroianni and Deneuve trade lines and, with imperfect but sincere singing voices and affectionate glances, propel the lyrics beyond clever wordplay. When the plot gets to be a slog — Honoré shoehorns in tragedies such as September 11 — the sweetness of that familial bond helps you hang in there.

_Betsy Sherman

W BRAndEd 106 MinUTES | BoSTon coMMon + SUBURBS It’s the American Dream, transposed to a new capitalist Russia: a smart kid works his way up to the top of a

_Brett Michel

XXX dETRoPIA 90 MinUTES | MUSEUM of finE ARTS

XXXW shuT uP And PlAy ThE hITs 105 MinUTES | BRATTLE For those in their 20s who worship dance and Internet culture with equal voracity, LCD Soundsystem was a “generation defining” band, and this documentary detailing their 2011 farewell concert is their Stop Making Sense. Even if you’ve never heard LCD’s music, Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads concert film is a worthy point of comparison. LCD combine the best aspects of ’70s punk, ’80s new wave, and ’90s rave, and directors Will Lovelace and Dylan Southern acutely capture their maniacal live presence, with the grandiose Madison Square Garden as the backdrop for the landmark concert that was equal parts celebration and mourning. The film’s true core, though, lies between the sequences of live concert footage, as James Murphy takes part in a candid interview with author Chuck Klosterman wherein they weigh the potential perils involved with bowing gracefully out of the game at one’s prime.

_Michael C. Walsh

Detropia is word play for “dystopia,” and that’s the overview here of the crumbling, crime-ridden, largely unemployed phantom of a Michigan city, which has lost half its population since 1955. This documentary by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, the filmmakers of Jesus Camp, makes a telling case that Detroit has gone beyond recession to a full-blown Depression, just like the 1930s. The difference, of course, is that there’s no FDR to bail the city out, nor an America that believes its our national duty to help. The sadness here is softened a bit by a host of appealing on-stage locals — a union president, a blues-club operator, etc. — who somehow still love their town. And there’s a tiny ribbon of hope: young artists from everywhere moving in, attracted by the impossibly low prices for housing.

_Gerald Peary

XXX lITTlE WhITE lIEs KEnDALL SQUARE

marketing empire. But then things get strange and somehow monsters manifest themselves onto people loyal to brand-name products. Jamie Bradshaw and Aleksandr Dulerayn’s Branded is nothing more than a freshman’s first term paper for Sociology 101. There are grandiose ideas about the enslavement of humanity to unbridled capitalism and marketing, but then the movie turns around and kills a cow because that’s what a dream told main character Misha (Ed Stoppard) to do. And like an under-thought essay, mistakes abound — like forgetting to explain how marketing affects people and the paradox of fat-shaming a population addicted to fast food. Borderline offensive and overly dense, the movie makes a lecture on Marx more enjoy-

able, though it is unsure of what it wants to be: a sci-fi thriller or a socialist parable. Jeffery Tambor and Max von Sydow are inexplicably drawn in, but they can shed no light on the film’s twisted logic.

_Monica Castillo

XW ThE Cold lIGhT of dAy 93 MinUTES | BoSTon coMMon + fRESh PonD + SUBURBS What I learned from the latest movie from Mabrouk El Mechri (JCVD): Madrid’s police only work during the daytime, when they’re everywhere (in the morning, they seem to be the only people on the streets). But at night? Why, feel free to shoot up the city with semiautomatic weapons and speed through

Filmmaker Guillaume Canet’s followup to his very popular noir Tell No One is an old-fashioned, enjoyable, The Big Chill-style romp by the seaside featuring, as vacationing Parisian yuppies, a stellar cast of French actors — Francois Cluzet, Marion Cotillard, etc. — having relationship issues. Obsessed by their problems, they’ve somehow forgotten their pal Ludo (The Artist’s Jean Dujardin), back home in a hospital after a severe motorcycle accident. Canet’s extremely engaging film, both funny and tender, is marred by a schmaltzy, fake concluding act. But the long-take opening sequence? Marrying Scorsese and Orson Welles, it’s amazingly choreographed and shot, ending in shock.

_Gerald Peary


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28 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

Books

Theater

digging for fire

Heads off

JONAthAN KOzOL RetuRNs tO the sCeNe Of the CRime

Marie antoinette RuLes At ARt _ BY CAR OLYN CLAY

_BY JOhN J. Ke L L Y In 1985, with President Ronald Reaof philanthropists who took them out of gan boasting of “Morning in Amerthese schools and put them into some of ica,” and no end in sight to the inequalithe best prep schools in New England, ties in America’s public schools, educator, the kind of schools that rich kids go to. activist, and writer Jonathan Kozol travSo suddenly, instead of having 35 or more eled from his hometown of Newton, Maskids in the class, they would have only 15. sachusetts, to New York’s South Bronx, And their teachers weren’t terrorized by statistically the poorest neighborhood this national madness of obsessive stanin the country. Kozol had been a leading dardized testing. Instead, they took time voice for racial equality in public schools to listen to the children and excite them ever since he published Death at an Early Age, about learning.” his account of teaching in a Boston school, Kozol still believes public school ofin 1967. Now he wanted to meet and get ficials are out of touch with our failing to know the African-American and Hisschools. Yet he remains hopeful. panic children and families barely surviv“I think the quality of teachers in our ing in crumbling, drug-infested tenements public schools is extremely high right and attending schools in overcrowded now,” says Kozol, “especially here in Masclassrooms. The resulting book, Amazing sachusetts. But the obstacles are huge and Grace, looked at schools in that neighborwe still have cities like Lawrence, Massahood as well as other American cities. chusetts, all over America, where we have Twenty-five years later, after losing virtually absolute racial isolation. And track of many of these youngsters, Kozol the only way it’s ever going to change is if returned to the ”scene of the crime,” the we have a national leader who has a proSouth Bronx, to find out what had become phetic vision. And I pray President Obama of the children he met and wrote about. makes it a priority in a second term.” His follow-up reporting has created perMeanwhile, the “kids,” as Kozol likes to haps his finest book to date, Fire in the Ashes: call them, stay in touch and close to his heart. Twenty-Five Years Among the Poorest Children in “Many of them are my closest friends. America (Crown). They are my equals now. . . . And I think “I believe this book is quite hopeful,” the greatest reward I’ve received is to see Kozol told me in a recent phone interview, this lovely turnaround, where the kids that “because so many of the kids I got to know I helped when they were little are now there found a way to pull through somehow and to help me, in my later years of life.” ^ won real victories. Sadly, there were others who were so badly battered by abysmal JONATHAN KOZOL | Memorial Church, schooling and by the temptations of the 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge | September 19 @ streets that they really never could recover. 7:30 pm | free | 617.661.1515 or harvard.com One of them took his own life with a bullet to his brain, another died of an overdose of heroin, and a third teen killed himself while ‘subway surfing,’ or riding on top of the train under the tunnels of New York. I mourned with their mothers then, as I mourn with them today.” This powerfully moving book paints a portrait of a nation unwilling to address overcrowding and continued segregation in its public schools. In addition to condemning school officials for their failure to enact reform, Fire in the Ashes is a testament to children who overcame nearimpossible odds. “These kids had gutsy, extremely strong personalities,” Kozol said. “They GOOD LISTENER A longtime critic of the “racial isolation” of are my ‘fire in the America’s economically disadvantaged schoolchildren, Jonathan ashes.’ But they were Kozol finds hope in his new book. also beneficiaries

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BAAA! David Adjmi’s Marie antoinette negotiates hairpin turns among satire, low comedy, surrealism, and dark night of the soul before delivering a haunting wake-up call. Last year, dramatist David Adjmi raised a stir with a site-specific tea party called Elective Affinities, in which fourtime Tony winner Zoe Caldwell held court in an Upper East Side townhouse, spinning a small audience into her web of entitlement. Adjmi is at it again, focusing this time on a less perceptive if better-known representative of the one percent, the Austrian-born child bride of Louis XVI. Marie Antoinette, in a world premiere co-presented by American Repertory Theater and Yale Repertory Theatre (at the Loeb Drama Center through September 29), is a mash-up of satire and sympathy, techno and classical, splendor and ash, at the center of which is the famously ice-cream-coiffed proponent of cake. It’s a wild ride toward the chopping block in which the mood darkens as both Marie’s hairdo and her bubble deflate. The play begins in grand style with Marie, as puffy and trembly as a soufflé, and her coterie lined up beneath towering wigs that look like looming white cacti (and are affixed to wires as if they were puppets). Before set designer Riccardo Hernandez’s chameleonic, Versailles-inspired walls, a stiff trio of servants dispenses heavily frosted sweets as the women’s chat runs from Marie’s somewhat sanitized passion for Nature to the suffocating aspects of being perpetually on display. When one companion complains of her kids’ penchant for pastry and rebellion against a healthy diet, the titular royal airily admonishes — well, you can guess what she says (even if she never really said it). Then, boom, the party’s over and the wigs rise heavenward as their wearers sink into a hole in the floor. Marie, at least, will fall farther — into prison, a sea of despond, and an afterlife in which, despite the tutelage of a Robespierre-invoking guard and a talking sheep, she remains a bit bewildered by what she did to piss the masses off. It doesn’t take a social historian to point

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out the catalytic parallels between the boilup to the French Revolution and the economic outrage that spawned today’s Occupy movement. Clearly Adjmi’s play, which he penned in 2006, was ripe for production — even if it hadn’t scored one as theatrical as the history-hopping combination of elegy and flash rocking the ART. Directed by Rebecca Taichman, with bristling choreography by Karole Armitage to cover Marie’s numerous changes of dress, the staging negotiates the play’s hairpin turns among satire, low comedy, surrealism, and dark night of the soul before delivering a haunting wake-up call. Adjmi, though he paints Louis as an abstracted boob, does not demonize Marie, whose insular upbringing, limited education, and indoctrination into the divine right of kings did not prepare her to be anyone else than, in Brooke Bloom’s feisty rendering, a naïve but not mean-spirited child diva with hints of Lucille Ball and Lady Gaga. As the play progresses from court intrigue to staged pastorale to life on the lam and in the big house, she downsizes from a gilded to a dirtier cage while struggling to comprehend everything from Rousseau (the inspiration for her turn as a shepherdess tending perfumed sheep) to her scurrilous rep. But it’s the system, not the woman being pushed and prodded into Gabriel Berry’s inventive costumes, that’s the villain here. Marie Antoinette’s pulsing first act is better than its more straight-faced and political second — which finds the royals sentimentalized as they are brought low. There is, however, the hallucinatory return of David Greenspan’s quizzically instructive sheep, sans the adorably woolly body the actor slyly manipulated before intermission. And there is an eerie coda in which the queen dies into the lasting light of her celebrity. It’s an effective denouement to a work that navigates a tricky path between seriousness and send-up. ^


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30 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

TV

The Big hurt

BullieS

Straight talk

Boardwalk EmpirE enTers anoTher BlooDy, TenDer season

youTuBe rap spam _By D av iD Thor p e If you read the comments of any major rap video on YouTube, you’ll always see some authentic hustle shining through the racist bickering and Illuminati accusations. Aspiring rappers, dazzled by YouTube success stories like Soulja Boy, believe that fame is just a few dozen spam comments away. Rap spam ranges from cocky promo blurbs to weepy pledge-drive pleas; most are ignored, some are marked as spam, and one or two get some charitable thumbs-ups. Do these comments really work? Are Kanye fans eager to explore the newest tracks by no-name YouTubers? Are A&R suits constantly scouring YouTube for undiscovered amateurs? I doubt it, but it’s worth a closer look. Let’s check out a few examples captured in the wild.

_ By Jon G a re l ick

Tk Tk T Tk k TTkTk

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Posted by enzzscrillaMusic on Kanye West’s “Mercy” video:

IF YOU ACTUALLY GIVE A DAMN? AND READ ALL OF THIS, THEN THANK YOU! i work my ass off hoping to one day make it in the music biz, but its impossible to make it if nobody ever hears you, and its hard to get heard when you have no exposure. I dont have money for amazing music videos or big youtube advertisements . . . so all im left with is spam [. . .]You dont have to like me, just give me a chance to be liked. Thx I appreciate EnzzScrilla’s honesty and his everyman grind. He admits he’s spamming, but without the big bucks and boutique VEVO channel, he’s left stranded in an industry ruled by cash. Plus, he gets credit for humility: he’s not asking for you to fall at his feet, he just needs a chance to be liked. Some points are deducted for the slightly aggro opener, which may have readers feeling accused before they reach the meat of the plea.

Posted by jW1ggs on Wiz Khalifa’s “no sleeP” video:

If you guys get a minute please just listen to my song called Kid. It’s my most meaningful song and I want the world to hear it. Thank you I’m all for brevity, but this is a pretty lightweight pitch. Who cares if it’s some guy’s most meaningful song? I don’t know you, jw1ggs; you’ve got to work for it. (I checked out the track, and it’s a maudlin white teen complaining that his dad doesn’t take his rappin’ seriously.) phoTo illusTraTion By ch risTina BrriGGs

If you have not yet seen seasons 1 or 2 of the Prohibition-era, Atlantic City–set HBO drama Boardwalk Empire (whose new season begins Sunday at 9pm), then stop here and get thee to HBO OnDemand or, better yet, the brand-spanking new season 2 DVD/Blu-ray package. I can not be responsible for spoilers herein. Now then, as you’ll recall, season 2 was bloodier and also more dramatically cohesive than season 1, the passages of pungent characterization alternating with spasms of graphic violence. The violence really did reach a fever pitch that is difficult to characterize. Here in the midst of the parfor-the-course gang-related rub-outs and revenge killings we witnessed Jimmy Darmody (Michael Pitt) literally fuck his mother (in flashback) and later kill his father while his GETTING PERSONAL There’s nothing to like about mother (Gretchen Mol) cheered nucky Thompson, really — except for steve Buscemi’s him on (“Finish it!”). Is that expert performance. Jacobean or Sophoclean? Well, you be the judge. What really mattered was the prolonged intensity of cent, including the young Al Capone. Lordthe patricide, and the heaping thud dad ing over them all is New York gambling took to the floor. kingpin Arnold Rothstein (a suave Michael There were also evocative episodes of Stuhlberg), barely escaping prosecution for disturbing poetic lyricism. Richard Harfixing the 1919 World Series. row (Jack Huston), the WWI sharpshooter Fortunately, these characters are still and assassin with half a face, sets out on years away from entering the history Memorial Day to go hunting in the woods, books (Rothstein wasn’t murdered until in “casual” hunting tweeds, necktie, and 1928), so the script can still play fast and cap, having carefully packed a lunch. He loose with their lives. But, hey, was the wants to end it all. But, with the barrel mob really into heroin traffic as early as of the gun in his mouth, a stray dog in1923? Just wondering. tervenes, and Richard finds himself with No matter. In the weird moral universe a pair of genial if vaguely threatening of fictional drama, we find ourselves sushobo-like strangers barbecuing “tree rat.” pending the occasional disbelief and rootSomewhere in the midst of their gnomic ing for really bad guys. What, after all, is exchanges with Richard — as translucent there still to like about Nucky Thompson — insects flit about in the sunlight around who proves more cold-blooded with each him among the dark trees — he changes episode — aside from Buscemi’s expert his mind. Richard leaves this weird, deperformance? Even Stephen Graham’s Canuded New Jersey Forest of Arden somepone — yet another homicidal sociopath what transformed. with poor impulse control — is sympaRichard is back this season, seeking thetic. Yes, he exacts bloody revenge for bloody vengeance. Jimmy was offed in the a brutalized, “defenseless” colleague, but season 2 finale by his own surrogate father he also shows a wrenching tenderness for (Steve Buscemi, as Atlantic City boss Nucky his young deaf son, trying to teach him Thompson). And you might wonder where how to stand up for himself against the that leaves us — the triangle of Jimmy, schoolyard bullies. Nucky, and Dabney Coleman’s Commodore And there’s yet another new, invented was the little engine that drove the plots. character, Gyp Rosetti (Bobby Cannavale), But fear not, there’s plenty going on. It’s whose hair-trigger irrationality will put 1923, and Nucky is still trying to retain his you on the edge of your seat every time he grasp of a thriving bootlegging business, appears onscreen. Boardwalk Empire, maybe supplying New York gangsters. like all gangster tales, is about bully Nucky is a fiction “based” on a real power, the bully power of the American character, but there are plenty of historic marketplace. It’s all business, but as Ropersonages going by their own names: setti argues, how can you not take things mobsters Charlie “Lucky” Luciano, Meyer personally? “Everyone’s a person, though, Lansky, and a young, hysteric Ben “Bugsy” right? So how else could they take it?” Siegel. These are legendary goons in the asHey, that’s what I wanna know too. ^

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Posted by youngsoulja462 on ca$h out’s “cashin’ out” video:

THUMBS UP IF YOU LIKE MY CASHIN IN (CASHIN OUT RMX) BETTER THAN THE ORIGINAL. APPRECIATE EVERYBODY THAT DOES CHECK IT OUT ON MY CHANNEL #KUSHSOCIETY KUSH IT OR PUSH IT! After ceaseless radio bombardment, I like everything better than the original “Cashin’ Out” — if Drake’s “The Motto” weren’t lingering in rotation, it would be running unopposed for most irritating rap song of the moment. Despite hitching his wagon to a shitty beat, youngsoulja’s comment is a gem: it’s bursting with all-caps enthusiasm; it’s built around a tangible call to action; it avoids treacle and self-pity; it closes with a catchy motto and a tweetable stoner hashtag. The thumbs-up is well earned.

Posted by ozredfoxx on KirKo bangz’s “dranK in My cuP” video:

Man I work my ass off, like seriously all day; not trying to give a sob story here but i spend hours burning new mixtapes to pass out for free, networking on so many websites, getting shows booked and chasing my DREAM. [. . .] There’s no other way to network on sites other then being annoying, all rappers went through this at one point; so PLEASE feel free to check out my music, and if you’re just gonna hate then i rather you keep to yourself. thanks for your time! It’s superficially similar to EnzzScrilla’s plea, but the slightest variation in tone turns a winning formula into a dud. RedFoxx seems exasperated, even hostile, practically berating the reader for failing to recognize his hard work. Worse, he ends by shutting out criticism and accusing us of being potential haters — the loathed bogeymen of the rap universe. It stinks of desperation, an odor incompatible with hip-hop fame. ^

DAVID THORPE | dthorpe@phx.com


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32 september 14, 2012 | the boston phoenix | thephoenix.com

MUSIC

rock drive-by slowly PAttErSON hOOd SIdEStEPS hIS trUCKEr MOUth _BY NICK A . Z A IN O III Rock and roll once saved Patterson Hood’s life. Now it’s his biggest thrill — and also the day job that keeps him away from his family for months at a time. Hood, known these days as a founding member of the Drive-by Truckers, has come a long way from those early, desperate times, and the contrast plays out in his third solo album, Heat Lightning Rumbles in the Distance (ATO). Having time on the road to write last year, Hood began a novel that would alternate between narrative chapters and song lyrics written by the lead character, loosely based on Hood’s younger, troubled self. At that point, in the early ’90s, Hood’s band and his marriage broke up, he was estranged from his family, and he’d moved to Memphis, far from his native Alabama. He says he was nearly a member of the infamous 27 Club. “It’s such a cliché, but being suicidal at 27 is just a great rock-and-roll cliché,” he says, speaking by phone. “That was one of the things in the book, that it was kind of a cliché. I didn’t sit there with a gun in my mouth or anything, but I was well aware of where it was, and I probably spent more time acknowledging that to myself than

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was healthy. It was probably more like me to off myself by living extremely dangerously.” Then he started writing songs. And kept writing. He puts the count at 500 songs or so from 1991 to 1993. “My songwriting was kind of the thing that kept me going. I didn’t have anything else really working properly in my life. But I was writing pretty good stuff at that time. I wrote extremely prolifically. And by living through it, making it through it, I came out the other side a much better writer.” Not long after that, Hood and Mike Cooley would form the Drive-By Truckers and stake their claim as one of the best bands in America. His life got hectic, and better. “All hell broke loose, and I’ve been busy as hell,” Patterson says. “I’ve been happier. I’ve been pretty productive. We’ve been probably prolific to a fault at times.” Hood abandoned the book after a couple of months, but new songs and new themes came quickly. He finished the album around the time he had scheduled to start it, with the help of most of his fellow Truckers: his bass-playing dad David Hood, alt-country chanteuse Kelly

SELF STARTER “If I made it a trucker record, these songs would be out there competing with big rock songs in a great big room with people who came to hear big rock songs,” says Patterson hood. Hogan, and Centro-matic’s Will Johnson and Scott Danbom. “I went in to demo a couple of things, and I ended up with several finished songs,” he says. “Next thing I know, I had the whole thing cut.” Releasing Lightning means touring and being away from his family again, quashing his desire to take some time off and concentrate on being a dad. That’s the crux of songs like “Leaving Time,” balancing his fatherly duties with his job. The reward is getting onstage; the job is the constant travel. “It’s not a very rock notion, I guess,” he says, “singing about your kids freaking out at your suitcase being at the door, but it’s real and it happens and it weighs heavy.” The album is intimate and autobiographical, the music earnest and ornate, which is

why Hood made this a solo record instead of presenting it to the Truckers, and why he’s touring playing smaller rooms. “If I made it a Trucker record, these songs would be out there competing with big rock songs in a great big room with people who came to hear big rock songs,” he says. “I kind of wanted this to be a more slowed-down type of thing. There’s stories that come with some of them. I just wanted it to be a very differently paced experience than what the Truckers’ show is.” ^

PATTERSON HOOD AND THE DOWNTOWN RUMBLERS + HOPE FOR AGOLDENSUMMER | Paradise Rock Club, 967 Comm Ave, Boston | September 18 @ 7 pm | 18+ | $20 | 617.562.8800 or thedise.com

Four, squared BLOC PArtY rEgAIN thEIr POSt-PUNK EdgE When Bloc Party announced in 2009 that they were taking a break, the band’s future was a big question mark. In fact, at the time, drummer Matt Tong told the BBC, “Hopefully, if we do reconvene at some point in the future, we’ll be refreshed and have so many ideas to bring to what it is we do.” The group’s reformation prospects seemed even dimmer when all four members subsequently scattered to disparate side projects — including touring with Ash (guitarist Russell Lissack), electronic-driven solo releases (frontman Kele Okereke), and a bracing post-hardcore band (bassist Gordon Moakes’s Young Legionnaire). But as it turns out, time away from Bloc Party was just what the quartet needed to revive their passion. That’s immediately obvious from the guitars-forward Four (Frenchkiss), which is possibly the band’s best record: abrasive but meticulous, it makes room for post-punk hammering (the Fugazi-like “Kettling”), thrashing punk (“We Are Not Good People”), chattering math rock (“Octopus”), nimble dance rock (“V.A.L.I.S.”) and even a dreamy Britpop ballad (“The Healing”). “Having had the two-year break — being able to exhale and to view what we’ve achieved with a certain amount of distance — it just

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felt right,” Okereke says, calling before Bloc Party headlines a show in Ibiza. “The only real proviso if we were going to make a record [was that] it needed to sound like it was the four of us in a room together. And that’s what all it’s about, really — what the four of us do achieve as musicians.” Four certainly feels more live-sounding and streamlined than 2007’s A Weekend in the City and 2008’s Intimacy, both of which juxtaposed harsh textures (drilling riffs, bristling synthpunk) with lush, delicate sounds (yearning pop, electronic ambience). Part of this cleaner, immediate sound stems from how the songs were written; Okereke says Bloc Party “made a concerted effort to write the songs in the studio as we were going to record them” and knew it didn’t want to “rely” on overdubs. However, working with producer Alex Newport (Polysics, At the Drive-In), known for coaxing rich, nuanced sounds out of bands while preserving their live energy, also helped. “We’ve never worked with someone like Alex before,” Okereke says. “He has such a keen ear and such a keen sense of how things work.” Okereke also admits that his solo work

KA tE MAr LEY

_BY AN N IE Z A L E S KI

SOUND THE ALARM After a brief hiatus, Bloc Party have once again asserted themselves as one of the UK’s finest rock bands. was just as illuminating to Four’s creative process. In fact, he calls making 2010’s The Boxer an “existential experience. I had never written songs outside of Bloc Party. My frame of reference as a musician, as a singer, was something that had been very sheltered. I had only ever been in this band. When I worked with Alex Epton to make The Boxer and then [2011 EP] The Hunter, it was like holding a mirror up to myself. He comes from a very different musical background — he was constantly challenging me on things, like phrasing and what I was doing in terms of songwriting. It forced me to think differently about myself as a musician and as a singer.” Okereke’s desire to apply this heightened perspective to Four is indicative of his relentless creativity. But it’s also a reflection

of Bloc Party’s fearless ethos — which might explain how the group survived even something so potentially fatal as an uncertain hiatus. “From the get-go, we’ve made it clear to people that Bloc Party is about taking risks and about pushing into uncharted territory,” he says. “And I feel very pleased that with Four, although a lot of people are saying it’s a more guitar-oriented record, I feel the way we’re playing and the way everything is coming together, it’s like nothing we’ve ever done before. I like that, four albums in, we still feel like a new band.” ^

BLOC PARTY | House of Blues, 15 Lansdowne St, Boston | September 14 @ 7 pm | All Ages | $27.50-$35 | 617.693.2583 or hob.com/boston


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_BY d aNIe L B r O CKMa N In the annals of rock/pop history, 1986 is often an underappreciated year. Many of the tropes we associate with “The ’80s” had already come and gone, and the slow mainstreaming of underground trends was a thing of the future. Which might explain why a record like Peter Gabriel’s So seems so utterly unattached to the time it was made or the period in which it exploded as a multiplatinum pop success. “I think the record sort of came together in a way that fitted the mood of the times,” Gabriel explains from his country home in Wiltshire, UK, where he’s preparing to perform So in its entirety on his upcoming “Back to Front” tour. “But then, I always SLEDGEWORK The 25th anniversary of So finds Peter think that being a pop Gabriel performing it in its entirety on his upcoming star is . . . a really fun “Back To Front” tour. thing to do but a lousy place to live.” Perhaps. But Gabriel, realizing he a human-rights watchgroup, and the had to live there, found a way to do Global Elders, a group dedicated to some redecorating when he upturned finding peaceful conflict resolution, the priorities of the role of the global which is chaired by Desmond Tutu and mega music star in the late ’80s. So’s counts Nelson Mandela and Kofi Ansuccess was largely predicated on the nan among its members. “I’ve always hysterical reception of the groundbeen quite pig-headed in some ways,” breaking videos for Stax-y singles like says Gabriel, “in wanting to follow the “Sledgehammer” and “Big Time,” but things that interest me, whether it was it was also the culmination of Gabriel’s activism or world music or whatever. It transformation from a shining star of led me to a lot of places I wanted to go ’70s progressive rock, fronting Genesis, but wasn’t sure how to.” into a singular voice for social justice While Gabriel has 1986 and So on his and the then-burgeoning “world mumind lately, he was at first hesitant to sic” movement. The theatricality of Garevisit the album. “Well, first I thought briel’s video persona was nothing new: it might be a bit of a pain, but I have to with Genesis in the ’70s, Gabriel walked say I’ve quite enjoyed it.” Part of what onstage in outrageous costumes, sporthe is enjoying is looking back on mateing fox heads and bat wings, singing rial that the public really took and made fantastical sci-fi prog epics. But solo Gatheir own: Exhibit A is the enduring briel embraced the MTV era with a guslegacy of slow-dance single “In Your to that eventually paid off handsomely. Eyes.” Written as an ode to the way that “I was very enamored of all things spirituality can bring us back, through video,” Gabriel explains, “but then instinct, from our selfish desires, its again, So was also just a more playful use in a pivotal scene of the 1989 film album, in ways that lent themselves to Say Anything transformed the song into a the mood of the videos.” symbol of teen love for a generation and beyond. “It’s amazing to me how many If the record contained levity, Gabripeople living today owe their creation el was dead serious not just about his to that song. Or at least it was a backmusic, but in finding a way to make ground track, or a useful pickup tool. his success work for his other passions. Sometimes someone will say to me that His 1980 single “Biko,” with its stark a track of mine, which maybe for me is gated-drum impact, foregrounded Gaassociated with some really strong spiribriel’s dedication to social justice, and tual moments, was a wonderful song it corresponded with his co-creation for getting laid to. So you know, music of the international arts festival sehas many faces!” ^ ries WOMAD. With the success of So, Gabriel used his showbiz heft to help out several Amnesty International–asPETER GABRIEL | TD Garden, 100 Legends sociated tours, shows, and projects. Way, Boston | September 24 @ 8 pm | He also aided in the creation of a All Ages | $50-$170 | 617.624.1000 or number of nonprofits like WITNESS, ticketmaster.com

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34 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

MP3 of the week

BfSTONS ACCENT

SPf 5000, ‘ElEcTRic SuMMER cloSEouT Mix’ one of Boston’s finest party starters is taking on the role of closer next week as we wrap up our Electric Summer music series at the w hotel’s descent nightclub. To get us all worked up proper for their live performance September 20, Somerville electro-funk trio SPF 5000 have created an exclusive 38-minute mix just for the party, linking up a batch of their own remixed and reloaded dance tracks — from the throbbing sizzle of “white hot fantasy” to house banger “doorknockers” — as well as their own bootleg of Jogyo’s “Thundacat,” which will soon get released on dither down Records. it’s a sexier and more tribal turn from the sweaty purveyors of summertime grooves, a perfect beat-driven antidote for the seasonal swing and the right way to close out our downtown dance party series. grab the entire mix at thePhoenix.com/onthedownload, then head underground to descent on Stuart Street as we put a fancy-pants bow on our Electric Summer. _michael marotta

oM nEw MuSic fR ThE BEST ofw and gl En nE aRound

EASy ridEr THe SimpLe pLeASureS Of BANDiTAS _BY JONA T HA N DO N A L D S O N Simplicity is not always easy, but sometimes it’s the surest path to style and clarity, especially when we’re talking about three girls, three instruments, three singers, loads of reverb, no solos, basic blues beats, high-and-lonesome harmonies, and killer songs dying for a smoke. On Save the Rats, the debut album from Boston trio Banditas, garage-rock simplicity is done right. And with the homespun, spirit-driven country and girl-group harmonies that are coming out of these hollows, I’m not sure what could be wrong with this picture at all. In fact, the only thing that might be wrong is that it will not be legally possible to smoke cigarettes in the basement of the Cantab Lounge during Banditas record release party next Saturday night. Got a light? No one is more fired up about the release of this record than Banditas songwriter/ guitarist Hayley Thompson-King herself, who was as effervescent as her fizzy lemonade when telling me about her songs and the vision she shares with bassist Molly Maltezos and drummer Candace Clement (also of Northampton’s Bunny’s a Swine). A Viking-blonde Floridian who moved to New York to study opera at NYU in her late teens, Thompson-King has way more optimism and warm fuzzies about the world of rock and roll than you’d expect from someone with her life experience. For years, Thompson-King tended bar at the Middle East, witnessing night after night of the best, worst, and most mediocre that nightlife has to offer. Nevertheless, as she moved

f

FOUT

further away from her passion in opera (she continued her studies at New England Conservatory), the singer began to sink deeper and deeper into the comfy cushions of rock and roll. Whereas opera was about serving the composer and nailing the performance, Thompson-King (who also sings for Major Stars) found the individual catharsis that she was seeking through Banditas’ three-chord hymns to the street. Self-help through better rocking. “I’m not all that interested in me in my normal life,” says Thompson-King, musing on the idea of her stronger, more badass alter-ego that she finds in Banditas’s songs. “I’m really vulnerable and sensitive, which all of my bandmates will tell you from all my various bands.” Tracks like “Harmony Glass” and “Mine To Lose” take the boy-meets-girl back-porch melodrama of early Everly Brothers songs (like “Bird Dog” and “When Will I Be Loved”) and gives the genders a spin: good girls worry about what their bad boys are doing while planning violent revenge against men-stealing women. These songs aren’t necessarily all about individual melodramas, though. “Virginia” highlights how the Banditas ladies’ voices twine together as one and intersect (“cross-voicing,” jokes Thompson-King) in some sort of twilight, street-corner Alan Lomax affair. “When I’m with Banditas, I like it when we all kind of stand in a line and there’s no one of us. People ask, ‘Who is the lead singer?’, and I say, ‘All of us.’ ”

AROUND THE CAMPFIRE “i’m really vulnerable and sensitive, which all of my bandmates will tell you from all my various bands,” says Banditas singer/guitarist Hayley ThompsonKing (center) with candace clement (left) and molly maltezos. Save the Rats is the culmination of years of desire to jump headfirst into the rockand-roll game. Everything from the cover photo (an old Polaroid of Thompson-King and friends being “wild women” in a Williamsburg loft) to the choice of producer (Mr. Airplane Man’s Margaret Garrett) to the fact that the entire record was done in analog (for sumptuous warmth) speaks to Thompson-King’s attention to the small details. There is a past here that led up to this present — her moment. There were people who inspired her along the way, from whom she learned how to get it done without compromise. “The great thing

about it is that this is what I always wanted it to sound like,” Thompson-King says. “That’s it. I can’t believe what we did.” Maybe it has something to do with this analog recording process, or maybe it has to do with Thompson-King’s chutzpah. Maybe it’s yet another cosmic case of right place/ right time. But however it happened, Boston’s Banditas have made one of the most enjoyable albums of the year. ^

BANDITAS + BIG DIGITS + THE WHITE PAGES + THE TITANICS | Cantab Lounge, 738 Mass Ave, Cambridge | September 22 @ 9 pm | 21+ | $5 | 617.354.2685 or cantab-lounge.com

ciRcuS of ouR STaRS

ONe NigHT BAND fLexeS BOSTON’S muSicAL muScLe — AND DexTeriTY _BY JONA T HA N DO N A L D S O N

if the theme of last year’s one night Band was fun, the theme this year was star power. The four-year-old musical match-maker’s 24-hour creations (in which 40 musicians are randomly paired into eight quartets with a day to write new songs) leapt over walls to find a balance between their newfound diamond-studded band mates. Some at the Middle East Saturday night did it better than others. grandfather Time Bomb rocked exquisitely but couldn’t get out of singer walter Sickert’s grimy goth-and-shock shadow. The walls, driven by aaron Perrino (the Sheila divine, dear leader), Mariam Saleh (fat creeps), and astounding drummer Kyle Rasmussen (Phantom glue) did a better job of finding a balance, but their spools of delay and classic-alt leanings sounded a lot like

N Der eK KOu YOu mJiA

f

NIGHT MOVES Sir-Vix-a-Lot were one of many highlights of Saturday’s One Night Band.

a Perrino project. “for me, that’s my guitar sound, Kyle definitely plays how we play,” says Perrino, hinting towards how scrambling musicians must rely on their innate skills. “we all just did what we do while trying to write within everyone’s abilities.” in the special-interest department, Big head Big Ears cooked up a conceptual alien/cat-themed set that found keyboardist/singer Peter Moore (count Zero) speaking in mock-german, guitarist Eric Edmonston (full Body anchor) fronting a Queen-esque ballad, and guitarist/vocalist candace clement (Bunny’s a Swine) fronting a Miley cyrus cover that she won’t soon forget. “You kind of just go with the moment,” clement said, “even if the moment comes out of nowhere.” The highlight was the all-female Sir-Vix-a-lot,

who brought together the “fuck it, let’s party” attitude of sax/drums/singer Melanie Bernier (fagettes) and the balls-out (breasts out?) vocal-chops of Call of Duty-celeb Elena Siegman (BrownBoot). while self-consciously invoking both the uniqueness and awesomeness of being the first all-female band at one night Band (girl’s Rock camp Boston shares a charity donation with ZuMix from the evening’s proceeds, which this year came in at more than $3000), Sir-Vix-a-lot delivered on a shambolically delicious cover of “Blister in the Sun” and songof-the-evening/romantic lover’s plea, “Baby Turn Your dick down.” with a drum machine and twin saxes blowing a low-fi disco groove straight out of “funky Town,” what really could go wrong? ^


thephoenix.com | the boston phoenix | septembeR 14, 2012 35

Lupo’s 79 Washington st, providence

Album reviews

XXX | DINOSAUR JR. | I BET ON SKY | Jagjaguwar records | It’s

george clinton

stop at any time,” but hopefully only a catastrophic meteor strike could beget Dinosaur’s extinction the second time around.

god J Mascis, the original iteration of the band imploded in the late ’80s, then astonished fans by reuniting in 2005. Although I Bet on Sky presents fewer applications of the guitar fury and immolating noise that characterized the early work, here the punk scramble and six-string shred that fans crave is bottled into the uptempo scorcher “Pierce The Morning Rain.” The set also contains pleasant elements of déjà vu: the piano embedded in brilliant opener “Don’t Pretend You Didn’t Know” recalls spectacular moments from the acclaimed 1993 set Where You Been. And, hewing to a tradition that harks all the way back to 1988’s Bug, Sky closes with “See It on Your Side,” a long brooder supporting formidable cascades of blaring lead guitar. In July, Mascis told NME “I’m ready for [the band] to

_Jay breitling

ONCE/TWICE XXX | GLEN HANSARD | RHYTHM & RESOSE | Anti records | The Frames’ Glen Hansard

AustiN CoN ro y

hard to believe, but Dinosaur Jr. released their debut 27 years ago. To put that in perspective, that same distance into the Rolling Stones’ career, the Brits were between the nevertalked-about Steel Wheels and the not-this-one-either Voodoo Lounge. By contrast, legendary Amherstspawned indie-rock trio Dinosaur Jr. continue to create terrific, visceral albums, like this, their tenth. Fronted by laconic guitar

lupos.com

friday, september 28

off the record JR. MINT

complete schedule at

kITTy ’S P R I D E

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releases Rhythm & Repose, his first solo album, having created an unusual juggernaut with Once. The indie movie was a box-office success and won an Oscar for Best Original Song with the hit “Falling Slowly.” The musical, currently playing on Broadway, won eight Tony awards. This was all mostly due to Hansard’s achingly romantic songwriting and his emotional performing style. He is a raw nerve, quivering to the frequency of love’s last chance. And of course, in Once he has a compelling love story, one mirrored by his troubled romance with his Swell Season partner, Marketa Irglova. Hansard gave himself a hard act to follow, but he pulls it off with Repose. He doesn’t shun the sound that made the Once soundtrack a hit, but he does expand his palette and show off the breadth of his songwriting prowess. He sounds like the guy from Once (“High Hope,” “Bird of Sorrow”), but also evokes dreamy ’70s McCartney (“Maybe Not Tonight”) and Van Morrison (“Love Don’t Leave Me Waiting”). Lyrically, many of these songs sound like the emotional aftermath of Once, especially “What Are We Gonna Do,” a ballad about fading love and enduring friendship sung as a duet with Irglova, who appears on two tracks. Hansard has a talent for stripping a song down to its resonant core.

_Nick A. Zaino iii

GLEN HANSARD | Berklee Performance Center, 136 Mass Ave, Boston | September 18 @ 8 pm | All Ages | $35 | 617.747.2261 or berkleebpc.com

matador

Mental illness, bankruptcy, heartbreak, sonic impotence: Chan Marshall has suffered through her share of crises since her last album of original material, 2006’s highly praised The Greatest. Most songwriters use that kind of personal turmoil as a boot up the ass, creatively speaking — often as a means to exorcise their demons through song. It wouldn’t have been a surprise, either: after all, soul-baring has always been Marshall’s bread and butter. But on Sun, her frustratingly vacant ninth album, Marshall swallows all of that angst, channeling her emotions into bland, quasi-political lyrics and zonked-out, dead-end textures. You have to hand it to mixer Philippe Zdar — dude uses every tool at his disposal to beef up these skeletal tracks. Every bass-drum hit explodes like a firecracker, and every buzzy synth drills straight into your brain. When Marshall’s songs themselves are as engaged and lively as the sounds, Sun can be thrilling: opener “Cherokee” sets a haunting precedent that the rest of Sun fails to match, with a dozen or so Marshalls harmonizing over dizzy hip-hop drum breaks and a ghostly piano riff. “Ruin” suffers from on-the-nose lyrical preachiness (“Some people ain’t got shit to eat,” Marshall ruminates at one point. For real?), but from a musical standpoint, it’s top-shelf stuff, with winding layers of samba piano looped over funk bass and pounding drums. Elsewhere, certain textures float above the murk. (The Auto-Tune/marimba outro on “3,6,9” is far more interesting than the repetitive, schoolyard patty-cake nonsense that precedes it.) But Sun constantly squanders its potential. Which leads us to “Nothin But Time,” a plodding, 10-minute snoozefest with an atrocious Iggy Pop cameo (is there any other kind of Iggy Pop cameo?), a gratuitous false ending, and the Katy Perry–esque mantra “Your world is just beginning/It’s up to you to be a superhero.” The sentiment apparently fell deaf on her own ears.

_ryan reed

CAT POWER | House of Blues, 15 Lansdowne St, Boston | October 24 @ 7 pm | All Ages | $34.50-$45 | 617.693.2583 or hob.com/boston

SEASONAL XXX | BAND OF HORSES | MIRAGE ROCK | Columbia |

Mirage Rock kicks off with an oddly agreeable “wooo-ooo” from singer/guitarist Ben Bridwell on “Knock Knock,” a fun and energetic opening song for this mostly gentle album. Mirage Rock might as well be the name of a new airy-rock subgenre, with luscious, echoey story-tunes rolling in like a soft mirageinducing mountain fog. Tunes like “A Little Biblical,” “Long Vows,” and “Heartbreak on the 101” are imbued with confident patience and autumnal comfort, perfect for this (essentially) early-fall album. Bridwell’s darkly poetic songwriting shines bright, the swirling wordplay matching his intricate harmonies. Having perfected the damp, woodsy

vibe — as on “Slow Cruel Hands of Time,” Mirage Rock’s finest autumnal offering — the band offer a refreshing shift with “Feud” and the middle section of the snarky “Dumpster World,” both of which emphasize their punkrock side and suggest the feel of the band’s live shows. They wear their influences proudly — rocking out like the Wallflowers or Ryan Adams on “How To Live,” flashing some Dylan skills on “Slow Cruel Hands of Time” and whispering like CSNY on parts of “Dumpster World” — but then they’ll float away like the fog they rode in on, reminding us they truly are the bearded Band of Horses.

_sean Corbett

& parliament funadelic Wednesday, october 3

tickets at LUPOs.cOM, F.Y.e. stORes & LUPO’s

LOOKING SHARP XXX | HOW TO DRESS WELL | TOTAL LOSS | Acephale | To the

casual ear, there might not be a dramatic difference between Tom Krell’s debut album (2010’s Love Remains) and Total Loss, his potent new collection of ethereal hymns. But the close listener will hear some significant distinctions between the two. Their commonalities are apparent: Krell’s fondness for ’80s and ’90s R&B slow jams, his appreciation of “witch house” (for lack of the better term we all hoped would come along by now) production techniques, and, of course, his voice. But whereas Krell’s keening, pleading falsetto dominated Love Remains, Total Loss finds him granting the rest of his sonic palette more prominence. The eggshell falsetto is still here — without it, Total Loss would tragically embody its name. But Krell’s primary departure is in production. Love Remains attracted — and repelled — listeners with its pointedly lo-fi sound. The album’s vocal levels often peaked and distorted as they breached the microphone’s comfort zone, creating an impression of instant, inevitable decay and fragility. This distinctive characteristic is conspicuous by its absence; with its sturdier vocals and more evened-out arrangements, Total Loss feels less enticingly vulnerable than its predecessor. There are more prominent divergences too. In its lyrics and vocal melody, “& It Was U” is straight-up NKOTB, while the repetitive piano pattern in “Say My Name” brings Steve Reich overtly into the mix. And “Running Back” has HTDW getting . . . jiggy? One certainly can’t fault an artist for growing or changing. But Krell’s initial impact carried fantastic breadth and weight, while simultaneously sounding desperate to soar above the clouds. Filing down some of those very rough edges that made for such a thrilling paradox is a perplexing choice — and likely to be as polarizing as his initial decision to leave them in the mix the first time around.

See Why We Are the Most Popular Tour in Town!

_Andrew Graham

HOW TO DRESS WELL + O F F LOVE | Brighton Music Hall, 158 Brighton Ave, Boston | October 7 @ 8 pm | 18+ | $12 | 617.779.0140 or brightonmusichall.com

Coupon valid for your entire party. Offer valid only at our tickets booths. Not valid on phone or internet orders. BDT Code: C-STUFF. STUFF. Valid through 11/23/12. STUFF


36 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

Listings

SEP 27 – OCT 07

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SEP 20 – 23

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BEEHIVE | Boston | 9:30 pm | Eric Bloom & The R&B Express BRIGHTON MUSIC HALL | Allston | 9 pm | Tribal Seeds + Ballyhoo! BULL RUN | Shirley | 7 pm | Royal Southern Brotherhood CAFÉ 939 | Boston | AJ Rafael CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 8 pm | Kara Kulpa + Olinde Mandell + Mark Lipman COLONIAL INN | Concord | John Fitzsimmons & Friends CURE LOUNGE | Boston | 10 pm | “Cure Thursdays” with DJ Hectik + DJ JC DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN | Boston | Elevation Theory DISTRICT | Boston | “In Thursdays” ESTATE | Boston | 10 pm | “Glamlife Thursdays” with Chris Harris + Rafael Sanchez GOOD LIFE | Boston | 10 pm | “Velvet” with DJ Thami Mattola + DJ Sture GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9 pm | Perhaps + Art Decade + Supervolcano HOWLING WOLF TAQUERIA | Salem | 10 pm | System Soul IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 8:30 pm | Firewater + Grownups! LIZARD LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9:30 pm | The Macrotones MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | And I Am Not Lying [Adam Wade,Jeff Simmermon,Brad Lawrence,Cyndi Freeman] MIDDLESEX LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | “Make it New” with Mike Swells MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 8 pm | Fireking OM RESTAURANT & LOUNGE | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | “Late Night Lounge” with DJ Pensive PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 7:30 pm | Owl City + Action Item P.A.’S LOUNGE | Somerville | The Relevant Elephants + Not Bothered + The Mirror Neurons + Happy Time Harry PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “Elements” with Crook & Lenore

RADIO | Somerville | 8 pm | Tavonna Miller + Bassel & The Supernaturals + Dan & The Wildfire + Whiskee RAMROD | Boston | 10 pm | Place for bears, cubs, and their friends| Bear Cave RUMOR | Boston | 10 pm | “Hi Frequency” with Ju Lee + Burak Bacio + Kia Mazzi RYLES | Cambridge | 8:30 pm | Greg Hopkins Nonet SCULLERS | Cambridge | 8 pm | Joe Lovano SHOWCASE LIVE | Foxborough | .38 special SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 8:30 pm | Reverend Raven & the Chain Smoking Alter Boys TOMMY DOYLE’S AT HARVARD | Cambridge | 10 pm | Charlie Christos + Maarten Swan ZUZU | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | “Holy Calamity Straight Up Hip Hop Dance Party: Final Installation” with Big Digits

FRIDAY 14

ALL ASIA | Cambridge | 6 pm | Kevin Griffin + The Reactive + DJ Danny Satori ALLEY BAR | Boston | “Fur & Gold” with DJ Brent Covington + DJ Taffy BATTERY LOUNGE-FAIRMONT BATTERY WHARF HOTEL | Boston | The

Michael Summer Quartet BEEHIVE | Boston | 10 pm | Pablo Bencid Latin Jazz Quintet BRIGHTON MUSIC HALL | Allston | 9 pm | Firewater + Skeleton Key + Mighty Tiny BULL RUN | Shirley | 8 pm | Caravan of Thieves BURREN | Somerville | Cover Up CAFÉ 939 | Boston | 8 pm | Pyyramids + Eytan and the Embassy CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | Dirty Blonde CANTAB LOUNGE DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | 9 pm | Triple Thick + The Thick Shakes + Jack of Hearts + The Monsieurs CANTINA LA MEXICANA | Somerville | 8:30 pm | The Twangbusters CHURCH OF BOSTON | Boston | 8 pm | Lanned Fall + The Midnight Renewal + Tommy Dempsey &The Big Picture CURE LOUNGE | Boston | 10 pm | “VIP Fridays” with DJ Erik Velez

DANTE’S OF MARLBOROUGH AT FIREFLY’S | Marlborough | Groove Doctors DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN |

Boston | Carlos Averhoff Group GAY GARDENS’ | Allston | 9 pm | Thunderhole + Royal Wedding + Microwaves + Gondoliers + Guerilla Toss GOOD LIFE | Boston | 9:30 pm | Fred Falke + Mr. McNeill + Brek.One GREAT SCOTT | Allston | “The Pill” with DJ Ken + DJ Michael V GYPSY BAR | Boston | 10 pm | DJ Dera HOUSE OF BLUES | Boston | 8 pm | Bloc Party + Ceremony HOWLING WOLF TAQUERIA | Salem | 10 pm | The Dejas IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 7 pm | Garland Jeffreys + Ray Mason JOHNNY D’S | Somerville | 7:30 pm | Bottom Dollars + The Hollows | 10 pm | Pressure Cooker + The Agents LILY PAD | Cambridge | 7 pm | Mark Dresser + Joe Morris + Matt Delligatti Trio + Nick Sanders Trio LIVING ROOM | Boston | “House, Top 40, House & Dance Music” LIZARD LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | Goli + Sarah Rabdau & Self-Employed Assassins + Petaluma Vale MIDDLE EAST CORNER | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | Malabar MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | MassCann Freedom Rally Battle Of The Bands Finals MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | Beware the Dangers of a Ghost Scorpion + The Outfits + St.Ripper + The Electric Street Queens MIDDLESEX LOUNGE | Cambridge | Frank White MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 6 pm | “Hippie Hour” | 8 pm | Dead Nobodies + Spot Mary + The Museum Direktors + Lo-Fi Shamen

MILKY WAY | Jamaica Plain | 9 pm | Jah-N-I Roots Reggae Band + Satellite Rockers NORTHERN NIGHTS | Lynn | 8 pm | With DJ Jay Ine| Madonna Fridays O’BRIEN’S | Allston | 8 pm | Elder + The Swan King + Bridesmaid + Finisher OM RESTAURANT & LOUNGE | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | “Pachanga Night” PALLADIUM | Worcester | 6:30 pm | “10 Years Of Perseverance Tour” with Whitechapel + All Shall Perish + Deez Nuts + Hatebreed PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 9 pm | Casey Desmond + Dragonette + The Knocks P.A.’S LOUNGE | Somerville | Hollow Cross + The Tenafly Vipers + Wrought Iron Hex + Bedroom Rehab Corporation PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “PYT” with DJ Vinny PLOUGH & STARS | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | The Woggles + Muck & the Mires PRECINCT | Somerville | Otis Grove + Akashic Record RADIO | Somerville | 8 pm | The 360’s + Pop Gun + A Terrible Beauty + Cooling Towers RALPH’S DINER | Worcester | 9 pm | Oh The Humanity + Los Bungalitos + Jukebox Romantics + Progress REGATTABAR | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | Beausoleil Avec Michael Doucet RISE | Boston | “Wonderland” | 1 am | Revolvr + Kia + Wyllys ROYALE | Boston | 10 pm | Paul Oakenfold RUMOR | Boston | 10 pm | “Hush Fridays” with DJ Hectik + DJ Dres + DJ Lus RYLES | Cambridge | 9 pm | The Mark Zaleski Band SALLY O’BRIEN’S | Somerville | 6 pm | Radioactive Rustlers | 9 pm | Hillbilly Holiday + The Vivs SCULLERS | Cambridge | 8 pm | Joe Lovano SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 9 pm | Gracie Curran & the High Falutin Band TOAD | Cambridge | 10 pm | The Burners TOMMY DOYLE’S AT HARVARD | Cambridge | 10 pm | Duppy Conquerors + DJ Skitz T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | Cambridge | 9 pm | The Spring Standards + Spirit Kid UMBRIA PRIME | Boston | 10 pm | “VIP Fridays” ZUZU | Cambridge | 10 pm | “Solid!” with DJ Durkin

SATURDAY 15

ALL ASIA | Cambridge | 6 pm | The Two

Tones

BATTERY LOUNGE-FAIRMONT BATTERY WHARF HOTEL | Boston | The

Peter Smith Trio BEEHIVE | Boston | 10 pm | Toni Lynn Washington BURREN | Somerville | Red Square CAFÉ 939 | Boston | 8 pm | The Shills + Strange Changes + Bear Language CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | The Soul Drivers CANTAB LOUNGE DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | 9 pm | Faebotica + Melt + Misprence + Kelly Spyglass CHURCH OF BOSTON | Boston | 7:30 pm | School for Robots + The Coward Flowers + Come on Pilgrim + The Hidden Complex CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 10:30 am | Trad Kids + Shannon Heaton | 7 pm | The 2012 New England Americana Festival CURE LOUNGE | Boston | 10 pm | “Saturdays at Cure” with rotating DJs Hectik + 7L + Brek.One + Theo A + Frank White

DANTE’S OF MARLBOROUGH AT FIREFLY’S | Marlborough | Scattershot DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN |

Boston | Lenny Stallworth & Friends DISTRICT | Boston | 10 pm | “Liquid Saturdays” with DJ Liquid Ice ESTATE | Boston | 10 pm | “VIP Access Saturdays” GOOD LIFE | Boston | 9:30 pm | “Middle School Dance: Back to School Edition” with DJ Ghostdad + DJ Poke Smot + Deathstar DJs GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9 pm | Deke Dickerson + The Raging Teens + Roy


SCULLERS PHX Sept 13_SCULLER ThEPhoEnix.coM | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 37

CLUB DIRECTORY ALL ASIA | 617.497.1544 | 334 Mass Ave, Cambridge BEEHIVE | 617.423.0069 | 541 Tremont St, Boston BRIGHTON MUSIC HALL | 617.779.0140 | 158 Brighton Ave, Allston BULL RUN | 978.425.4311 | Rte 2A, Shirley BURREN | 617.776.6896 | 247 Elm St, Somerville CAFÉ 939 | 617.747.6038 | 939 Boylston St, Boston CANTAB LOUNGE | 617.354.2685 | 738 Mass Ave, Cambridge CANTINA LA MEXICANA | 617.776.5232 | 247 Washington St, Somerville CHARLIE’S KITCHEN | 617.492.9646 | 10 Eliot St, Cambridge CHURCH OF BOSTON | 617.236.7600 | 69 Kilmarnock St, Boston CLUB CAFÉ | 617.536.0966 | 209 Columbus Ave, Boston CLUB PASSIM | 617.492.7679 | 47 Palmer St, Cambridge COMEDY STUDIO | 617.661.6507 | 1236 Mass Ave, Cambridge CURE LOUNGE | 617.695.2250 | 246 Tremont St, Boston DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN | 617.536.1100 | 604 Columbus Ave, Boston DICK’S BEANTOWN COMEDY VAULT AT REMINGTON’S | 617.482.0110 | 124 Boylston St, Boston DISTRICT | 617.426.0180 | 180 Lincoln St, Boston

EMERALD LOUNGE AT REVERE HOTEL | 200 Stuart St, Boston ESTATE | 617.351.7000 | 1 Boylston Pl, Boston GIGGLES COMEDY CLUB | 781.233.9950 | at Prince Restaurant, 517 Broadway, Saugus GOOD LIFE | 617.451.2622 | 28 Kingston St, Boston GREAT SCOTT | 617.566.9014 | 1222 Comm Ave, Allston GYPSY BAR | 617.482.7799 | 116 Boylston St, Boston HOUSE OF BLUES | 888.693.2583 | 15 Lansdowne St, Boston IMPROV ASYLUM | 617.263.6887 | 216 Hanover St, Boston IMPROVBOSTON | 617.576.1253 | 40 Prospect St, Cambridge JOHNNY D’S | 617.776.2004 | 17 Holland St, Somerville KOWLOON KOMEDY | 617.248.9700 | 948 Broadway, Saugus LILY PAD | 617.497.0823 | 1353 Cambridge St, Cambridge LIVING ROOM | 617.723.5101 | 101 Atlantic Ave, Boston LIZARD LOUNGE | 617.547.0759 | 1667 Mass Ave, Cambridge THE MET | 401.729.1005 | 1005 Main St, Pawtucket, RI MIDDLE EAST | 617.864.3278 | 472-480 Mass Ave, Cambridge

Sludge + The Alrighters + DJ Easy Ed GYPSY BAR | Boston | 10 pm | DJ Mario HOUSE OF BLUES | Boston | 7 pm | Circa Survive + Touche Amore + Balance And Composure HOWLING WOLF TAQUERIA | Salem | 10 pm | Noe Socha Trio IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 10 pm | Aer + Yonas + David Dallas JOHNNY D’S | Somerville | 7 pm | Wreckless Eric & Amy Rigby | 10 pm | High Hopes Band + Dubbest LILY PAD | Cambridge | 7 pm | Abby Brown + The Space Bums + Big Ghost + The Beauty Way + Black Out Mafia + The Cannibal Ramblers LIVING ROOM | Boston | “House, Top 40, House & Dance Music” MIDDLE EAST CORNER | Cambridge | 10 pm | Barrett Anderson Trio MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | DinoRADJA + Howling Boil + Flywalker + Fresh Baked + Everything & Everyone + Of The Monarchs MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | A Wish For Fire + The Fatal Flaw + The Year Million + The Lights Out | 1 pm | “Green Day vs. Weezer” with School of Rock MIDDLESEX LOUNGE | Cambridge | DJ Kon MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 4 pm | The Jukebox Romantics + The Down And Outs | 8 pm | Hope & The Husbands + Adam PC + Empty Vessels + Meghan McNealy MILKY WAY | Jamaica Plain | 10 pm | “Mango’s Latin Saturdays” with Lee Wilson NAGA | Cambridge | “The Low Down” wit DJ Knife O’BRIEN’S | Allston | 8 pm | OTP + Blackbutton + Dead Cats Dead Rats + Yellabird OM RESTAURANT & LOUNGE | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | “Saturdays @ Om” OUTPOST 186 | Cambridge | 8 pm | Mark Chenevert + Pero Malaver Duo PALLADIUM | Worcester | 9 pm | “Foam N’ Glow: America’s Largest Foam Party” PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 9 pm | Addison Groove Project + Wyllys P.A.’S LOUNGE | Somerville | No Rescue + Surefire + Voluptuaries + Bedford Davis PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “Boom Boom Room” PLOUGH & STARS | Cambridge | 4 pm | David Aaronoff | 10:30 pm | John Powhida & International Airport PRECINCT | Somerville | “Oh Snap! 80’s 90’s DJ Dance Party!” RADIO | Somerville | “Videodrome Discothéque” with DJ Craig MacNeil | 7:30 pm | Jonny Pape + Greg Kasabian + Keith Pierce + Billy Brown REGATTABAR | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | Aaron Goldberg Trio

MIDDLESEX LOUNGE | 617.868. MSEX | 315 Mass Ave, Cambridge MIDWAY CAFÉ | 617.524.9038 | 3496 Washington St, Jamaica Plain MILKY WAY | 617.524.3740 | at the Brewery, 284 Armory St, Jamaica Plain NAGA | 617.661.4900 | 450 Mass Ave, Cambridge NICK’S COMEDY STOP BOSTON | 617.482.0930 | 100 Warrenton St, Boston O’BRIEN’S | 617.782.6245 | 3 Harvard Ave, Allston OUTPOST 186 | 617.876.0860 | 186 1/2 Hampshire St, Cambridge PALLADIUM | 978.797.9696 | 261 Main St, Worcester PARADISE ROCK CLUB | 617.562.8800 | 967 Comm Ave, Boston P.A.’S LOUNGE | 617.776.1557 | 345 Somerville Ave, Somerville PHOENIX LANDING | 617.576.6260 | 512 Mass Ave, Cambridge PLOUGH & STARS | 617.576.0032 | 912 Mass Ave, Cambridge PRECINCT | 617.623.9211 | 70 Union Sq, Somerville RADIO | 617.764.0005 | 379 Somerville Ave, Somerville RALPH’S DINER | 508.753.9543 | 148 Grove St, Worcester REGATTABAR | 617.661.5000 | 1 Bennett St, Charles Hotel, Cambridge RISE | 617.423.7473 | 306 Stuart St, Boston

RISE | Boston | “RISE Saturdays” | 1 am | Richie Santana + Wil Trahan RUMOR | Boston | 10 pm | “Rumor Saturdays” with DJ Roger M + DJ JC RYLES | Cambridge | 9 pm | Lance Martin SALLY O’BRIEN’S | Somerville | 6 pm | Josh Lederman & the CSARs | 9 pm | One Thin Dime SHOWCASE LIVE | Foxborough | Warrant + Firehouse SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 9 pm | Shirley Lewis Band TOAD | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | Katrin | 10 pm | Hayley Jane & the Primates TOMMY DOYLE’S AT HARVARD | Cambridge | 7 pm | New England Americana Festival + DJ Special K T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | Cambridge | 9 pm | William Elliot Whitmore + Samantha Crain | 10 pm | “Heroes” ZUZU | Cambridge | 11 pm | “Soul-le-luh-jah” with Brobots

SUNDAY 16

BRIGHTON MUSIC HALL | Allston | 9 pm | Mono + Chris Brokaw BURREN | Somerville | 8 pm | Shawn Taylor + Paul Wilmet + Jodie Levinson CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | “Candy’s Blues, Jazz, & Rock Jam” CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 8 pm | Chris O’Brien CURE LOUNGE | Boston | 10 pm | “Industry Sundays” DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN | Boston | Nat Simpkins Group GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9 pm | Willy Mason + DJ Carbo HOWLING WOLF TAQUERIA | Salem | 6 pm | Steve Spungin IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 7 pm | Beausoleil Avec Michael Doucet LILY PAD | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | Kevin Harris Project MIDDLE EAST CORNER | Cambridge | “Karla’s Bellydance Night” MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | The Hood Internet + Body Language + My Gold Mask + Oscillator Bug MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | 1 pm | “Green Day vs. Weezer” | 7 pm | Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers + Sean Rowe MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 4 pm | La Armada + Disaster Strikes + More Beer Please + Wide Eye + Islam85 + Mister Ian King O’BRIEN’S | Allston | 8 pm | Blind Tigers + Suns OUTPOST 186 | Cambridge | 8 pm | Elan Asch + Rakalam Bob Moses PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 8 pm | Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti + Phedre + Bodyguard

RIVER GODS | 617.576.1881 | 125 River St, Cambridge ROYALE | 617.338.7699 | 279 Tremont St, Boston RUMOR | 617.422.0045 | 100 Warrenton St, Boston RYLES | 617.876.9330 | 212 Hampshire St, Cambridge SALLY O’BRIEN’S | 617.666.3589 | 335 Somerville Ave, Somerville SCULLERS JAZZ CLUB | 617.562.4111 | 400 Soldiers Field Rd, at Doubletree Hotel, Boston SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | 617. 254.5227 | 351 Washington St, Brighton STORYVILLE | 617.236.1134 | 90 Exeter St, Boston TIKI HIDEAWAY AT HOWARD JOHNSON | 617.267.3100 | 1271 Boylston St, Boston TOAD | 617.497.4950 | 1920 Mass Ave, Cambridge TOMMY DOYLE’S AT HARVARD | 617.864.0655 | 96 Winthrop St, Cambridge T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | 617.492.2327 | 10 Brookline St, Cambridge UMBRIA PRIME | 617.338.1000 | 295 Franklin St, Boston UNDERBAR | 617.292.0080 | 275 Tremont St, Boston WONDER BAR | 617.351.2665 | 186 Harvard Ave, Allston ZUZU | 617.864.3278 | 474 Mass Ave, Cambridge

PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “The

Drop”

PLOUGH & STARS | Cambridge | 5 pm | The Natural Wonders | 10:30 pm | Frank Morey Band PRECINCT | Somerville | Eytan & The Embassy RADIO | Somerville | 4 pm | Roy Sludge | 7 pm | Pomps + Forthrights + NATA + DJ Generoso RYLES | Cambridge | 10 am | Harvey Finstein SALLY O’BRIEN’S | Somerville | 8 pm | Paul Ahlstrand Quartet SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 7 pm | Geoff Bartley w/ Special Guests SURFSIDE 5 | Salisbury | 4 pm | Hot Like Fire TOAD | Cambridge | 3 pm | Andrea Gillis + Tim Gearan + Asa Brebner + Anitua Suhanin + Andy Plaisted + Freddie Griffeth + James Rohr + Jeremy Curtis UNDERBAR | Boston | 10 pm | “Hot Mess Sundays” with DJ Richie Ladue ZUZU | Cambridge | 10 pm | Ruffneck Fashion

Monday” with Voyager 01 + DJ Uppercut PLOUGH & STARS | Cambridge | 10 pm | Mental Fatigue RAMROD | Boston | 10 pm | Retro, 90s, glam, and more from DJ Kuro| “The Attic” SALLY O’BRIEN’S | Somerville | 10 pm | Marley Monday SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 7 pm | Nick Moss & the Flip Tops TOAD | Cambridge | 8:30 pm | The White Owls | 10 pm | Andrea Gillis Band T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | Cambridge | 10 pm | Bahamas ZUZU | Cambridge | 10 pm | The Migs + The Freeways + So Sol

TUESDAY 18

BEEHIVE | Boston | 9 pm | Julian Shore Band CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 8:30 pm |

Flatt Rabbit + The Wabash Cannibals CHURCH OF BOSTON | Boston | 8 pm | The Phreaks [Phish tribute] CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 8 pm | Caitlin Canty + Ellie Buckland DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN | Boston | Reggae Night GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9 pm | The Young Leaves + The Fake Boys + Mercy Case + The BF’s + Billy Raygun HOUSE OF BLUES | Boston | 8 pm | “Dayglow: Life in Color” IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 7 pm | Paper Bird + Hawk & Dove JACQUE’S CABARET | Boston | 10:30 pm | Karaoke hosted by Mizery| Mizery Loves Karaoke LIZARD LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | Tall Heights + Aunt Martha MACHINE | Boston | 9 pm | All EDM music with Stevie Psyclone| Psyclone Tuesdays MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | Deerhoof + Buke and Gase + Mirel Wagner MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | Pepe Sylvia + Ette + The Brightest Lights + Steak MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 8 pm | “The Rolling Roots Revue” O’BRIEN’S | Allston | 8 pm | Cordaro + Giles & Stronge + Ricer + Trespasser + Vegans PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 8 pm | Patterson Hood & The Downtown Rumblers + Hope for Agoldensummer PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “Elecsonic”

RUMOR | Boston | 10 pm | “Rumor Tuesdays” with DJ Roger M RYLES | Cambridge | 8:30 pm | Celia Slattery SALLY O’BRIEN’S | Somerville | 8 pm | “Panda Bar” SCULLERS | Cambridge | 8 pm | Ralph Peterson SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 7:30 pm | Sweet Willie D. + Mike DiBari + Eddie Scheer’s Tuesday Night All- Stars TOAD | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | Miriam + Amy Fairchild | 10 pm | The Blue Ribbons T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | Cambridge | 9 pm | Scale the Summit + Trioscapes + Protean Collective

sCullers jazz Club BOSTON’S #1 JAZZ CLUB!

Thurs. & Fri., Sept. 13 & 14 8pm & 10pm

JOE LOVANO “US FIVE”

Feat. James Weidman, Esperanza Spalding, Francisco Mela & Otis Brown III

Tues., Sept. 18

8pm

RALPH PETERSON

CD release special

Weds., Sept. 19 Continued p 38Sept 13 _Metheny Sep Methenyon PHX

8pm

Thurs., Sept. 20

8pm

FRED HERSCH

Scullers, in association with H.T. Productions, presents

PAT METHENY UNITY BAND w/Chris Potter, Antonio Sanchez & Ben Williams

JEREMY PELT QUINTET

Fri. & Sat., Sept. 21 & 22

8pm & 10pm

JANE MONHEIT Weds. & Thurs., Sept. 26 & 27 8pm & 10pm HIROMI & STANLEY CLARKE DOUBLETREE SUITES BY HILTON BOSTON Storrow Dr. & Mass Pike Exit Call for Tickets & Info at: 617-562-4111

Dinner/Show Packages Available. Also In-Club menu

Order on-line at www.scullersjazz.com

Berklee Perf. Center Sun., Oct. 14 7PM

Tickets on sale now: Box Office, www.berkleebpc.com 617-747-3161

MONDAY 17

ALL ASIA | Cambridge | 9 pm | “Mikey Mondays!” AN TUA NUA | Boston | 9 pm | “CeremonyGoth Night” BEEHIVE | Boston | 9 pm | Javier Rosario Band CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 10 pm | Jack Williams CHARLIE’S KITCHEN | Cambridge | 8 pm | BattleHouse + Geoglyphs CHURCH OF BOSTON | Boston | “Motivate Mondays” CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 7 pm | MassMouth Story Slams GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9 pm | Alt-J + JBM + DJ Carbo HOUSE OF BLUES | Boston | 8 pm | “Dayglow: Life in Color” IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 7 pm | Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers + Sean Rowe LILY PAD | Cambridge | 8 pm | Jerry Bergonzi Group + The Fringe MIDDLE EAST CORNER | Cambridge | 10 pm | Bryan Laurier + Michael Maloney + Ben Tyree MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | The Decent Lovers + Stereo Telescope + Personal Finance MILKY WAY | Jamaica Plain | “Milky Way Mondays with Live Funk” PALLADIUM | Worcester | 7 pm | Kamelot + Nightwish PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 8 pm | Stephen Marley PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “Makka

09.13.12 thu Perhaps • Art Decade Supervolcano 9pm • 18+ • $8 09.14.12 Fri The Pill • 10pm • 21+ • $5 The Gas 7pm • 18+ • $5 09.15.12 sat Deke Dickerson • The Raging Teens Roy Sludge • The Alrighters (Reunion!) DJ Easy Ed 9pm • 21+ • $12 adv | $14 d.o.s. 09.16.12 sun The Fenway Recordings Sessions Willy Mason • DJ Carbo 8pm • 18+ • $10 adv. | $12 d.o.s. 09.17.12 mon The Fenway Recordings Sessions • Alt-J JBM • DJ Carbo • 8PM Doors • 18+ • $12

SEPTEMBER 28

09.18.12 tue Hardwick Booking • The Young Leaves The Fake Boys • Mercy Case The BF’s 8 Billy Raygun • 9pm • 18+ • $7.00 09.19.12 wed The Fenway Recordings Sessions Hundred Waters • Mutual Benefit DJ Carbo 9pm • 18+ 8 $10 adv. / $12 d.o.s.

1222 Commonwealth ave allston, ma 02134 617-566-9014

w


38 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

RYLES | Cambridge | 9 pm | Rogerio Souza Quartet

Listings 472-480 MASSACHUSETTS AVE CENTRAL SQ., CAMBRIDGE (617) 864-EAST

mideastclub.com | zuzubar.com TIX at www.ticketweb.com DOWNSTAIRS THU 9/13 - 7PM DOORS COLUMBIA HOUSE BENEFIT WALTER SICKERT BRENDAN BURNS • MOLLY ZENOBIA

FRI 9/14 FREEDOM RALLY BATTLE OF THE BANDS FINALS SAT 9/15 HOWLING BOIL FLYWALKER/FRESH BAKED SUN 9/16 LEEDZ ROCK ON! CONCERTS PRESENT: THE HOOD INTERNET BODY LANGUAGE MON 9/17: ADULT SWIM PRESENTS: THE ERIC ANDRE SHOW LIVE HANNIBAL BURRESS TUE 9/18: ALL AGES ROGUE PRESENTS: DEERHOOF • BUKE AND GASE WED 9/19 THE SHEEPDOGS BLACK BOX REVELATION

UPSTAIRS THU 9/13: WBUR PRESENTS: AND I AM NOT LYING THE BOSTON TYPEWRITER ORCHESTRA FRI 9/14 BEWARE THE DANGERS OF A GHOST SCORPION THE OUTFITS • ST.RIPPER THE ELECTRIC STREET QUEENS SAT 9/15 & SUN 9/16 MATINEE SHOWS SCHOOL OF ROCK (THE MUSIC OF) GREEN DAY VS. WEEZER • ALL AGES 1PM SAT 9/15 - NIGHT SHOW A WISH FOR FIRE (CD RELEASE) THE FATAL FLAW, THE YEAR MILLION THE LIGHTS OUT SUN 9/16/12 NICKI BLUHM & THE GRAMBLERS • SEAN ROWE MON 9/17 THE DECENT LOVERS STEREO TELESCOPE TUE 9/18/12 PEPE SYLVIA WED 9/19 THAT NOBLE FURY /mideastclub /zuzubar @mideastclub @zuzubar

Continued from p 37 WONDER BAR | Allston | “Music Ecology” ZUZU | Cambridge | 10 pm | “Zuesday” with

DJ Leah V + Justincredible

WEDNESDAY 19

BEEHIVE | Boston | 8 pm | “Coltrane

Birthday Tribute” with George Garzone BRIGHTON MUSIC HALL | Allston | 9 pm | Wye Oak + Callers CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 8:30 pm | Houston Bernard + Dave Samarco Band CHURCH OF BOSTON | Boston | 7 pm | Perpetual Groove CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 8 pm | “Revival Revisited” with Meg Hutchinson + Alastair Moock + Jake Armerding COLONIAL INN | Concord | Jimmy Mazzy & the Last Minute Men DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN | Boston | Ellen O’Brien Group DISTRICT | Boston | “Classic Wednesdays” with DJ Tanno GOOD LIFE | Boston | 9:30 pm | “Word of Mouth RNB Showcase” with Mykel + Jplovesit + Rey Royale + Jahmal Brown + M.A.R Quise + JTronius + Genevieve GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9:30 pm | DJ Carbo + Hundred Waters + Mutual Benefit HOUSE OF BLUES | Boston | 7:30 pm | Ed Sheeran + Passenger + Selah Sue IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 8:30 pm | Vetiver + Sarah Lee Guthrie + Johnny Irion + Big Search JOHNNY D’S | Somerville | 8 pm | Mike Henry & The Revolutionarys LIZARD LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | The Deadly Gentlemen MIDDLE EAST CORNER | Cambridge | 9:30 pm | Bitch Please MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | The Sheepdogs + Black Box Revelation MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | That Noble Fury + Cold Chocolate + Jon Menard + Hot Sauce MIDDLESEX LOUNGE | Cambridge | “Team Friendship” with the Goddamn Draculas MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 8 pm | Jagga Movements Intl. + StarTym MILKY WAY | Jamaica Plain | 9 pm | “Murdock Manor Acoustic Songwriting Showcase” with Jim Bouchard [The Beauty Way] + Daydreams + Matt Dalton + Ryan Garvey + Low Key Confusion + The Read Letters OUTPOST 186 | Cambridge | 8 pm | Charlie Kohlhase’s Explorer’s Club Trio PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 8 pm | Michael Kiwanuka + Marcus Foster + Foy Vance PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “Re:Set” PLOUGH & STARS | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | Alameda Band + Ray Raposa RAMROD | Boston | 10 pm | With DJ Victor spinning only rock ‘n roll| Rock Wednesdays RIVER GODS | Cambridge | 9 pm | “Primitive Sounds” ROYALE | Boston | 7 pm | Vibesquad + Opiuo RUMOR | Boston | 10 pm | “Latin Night” with DJ Boatslip + DJ Maryalice + DJ Adilson

SCULLERS | Cambridge | 9 pm | Fred

Hersch Trio

SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 7:30 pm

| Noe Socha + Steve Chaggaris + Alizon Lissance STORYVILLE | Boston | 9 pm | “MySecretBoston presents Dub Apocalypse”

TIKI HIDEAWAY AT HOWARD JOHNSON | Boston | The David Ehle

Guitar Trio TOAD | Cambridge | 7 pm | Fandango | 10 pm | Baker Thomas Band T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | Cambridge | 9 pm | Jason Anderson + Streight Angular + Ette ZUZU | Cambridge | 10 pm | “Penguin Club” with DJ Infinite Jeff

THURSDAY 20

BRIGHTON MUSIC HALL | Allston | 9 pm |

DIIV + Wild Nothing + Blonds BURREN | Somerville | Scattershot CAFÉ 939 | Boston | 8 pm | Barnaby Bright + Brad Byrd + Suzie Brown CANTAB LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9 pm | The Chicken Slacks CANTAB LOUNGE DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | “Plectrum Entertainment’s Singer Songwriter Showcase” CHURCH OF BOSTON | Boston | 8 pm | Perpetual Groove CLUB PASSIM | Cambridge | 8 pm | Yaeko Miranda COLONIAL INN | Concord | John Fitzsimmons & Friends CURE LOUNGE | Boston | 10 pm | “Cure Thursdays” with DJ Hectik + DJ JC DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN | Boston | Elevation Theory DISTRICT | Boston | “In Thursdays” ESTATE | Boston | 10 pm | “Glamlife Thursdays” with Chris Harris + Rafael Sanchez GOOD LIFE | Boston | 9:30 pm | “Mirror Shades” with Soappy + Dusty Digital + DJ Bobby Dirtza GREAT SCOTT | Allston | 9 pm | Skeletonwitch + Havok + Early Graves + Razormaze HOUSE OF BLUES | Boston | 8 pm | seether + Sick Puppies + Kyng + Young Guns HOWLING WOLF TAQUERIA | Salem | 10 pm | Michael Fioretti + Chris Noyes IRON HORSE MUSIC HALL | Northampton | 10 pm | Friends of Yours + Braids JOHNNY D’S | Somerville | 7:30 pm | Wayne Krantz Trio + Keith Carlock + Nate Wood LILY PAD | Cambridge | 7 pm | Ben Cosgrove + Grand Fatilla + David Maxwell LIVING ROOM | Boston | 8 pm | DJ Snow White LIZARD LOUNGE | Cambridge | 9:30 pm | The Summer Villains + Sam Reid & the Riot Act MIDDLE EAST CORNER | Cambridge | 9:30 pm | Sarah Borrello MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | Cambridge | 9 pm | Vetiver + Here We Go Magic + Big Search MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS | Cambridge | 9 pm | Laetitia Sadier + Orca Team + Gullermo Sexo MIDDLESEX LOUNGE | Cambridge | “Make It New” with Max Cooper + Baltimoroder + John Barera MIDWAY CAFÉ | Jamaica Plain | 8 pm | Mob Music MILKY WAY | Jamaica Plain | 9 pm | Mike Pinto + Michael Bernier + Don McCloskey O’BRIEN’S | Allston | 8 pm | Life and Limb + Gypsyblood + Great Lakes USA OM RESTAURANT & LOUNGE | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | “Late Night Lounge” with DJ Pensive PALLADIUM UPSTAIRS | Worcester | 10 pm | “Neon Party” with DJ E-Marce + Texas Mike PARADISE ROCK CLUB | Boston | 9 pm | Antibalas + Debo Band + Uhuru Afrika P.A.’S LOUNGE | Somerville | Baltic Sun PHOENIX LANDING | Cambridge | “Elements” with Crook & Lenore PLOUGH & STARS | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | Pete Golan [Waltham] + Gary Hedrick [Kicked In the Head] PRECINCT | Somerville | Lyle Brewer RADIO | Somerville | 8 pm | Soft Pyramids + Velah + The Dying Falls + Sinnet RAMROD | Boston | 10 pm | Place for bears, cubs, and their friends| Bear Cave REGATTABAR | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | The John Scofield Trio ROYALE | Boston | Beats Antique RUMOR | Boston | 10 pm | “Hi Frequency” with Ju Lee + Burak Bacio + Kia Mazzi RYLES | Cambridge | 8:30 pm | Natraj SALLY O’BRIEN’S | Somerville | 7:30 pm | Bluegrass: The Band SCULLERS | Cambridge | 8 pm | Jeremy Pelt SMOKEN’ JOE’S BBQ | Brighton | 8:30 pm

| Hubcaps TOAD | Cambridge | 7:30 pm | Melvern Taylor & his Fabulous Meltones | 10 pm | Faces for Radio T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE | Cambridge | 9:45 pm | Frontier Ruckus + Chamberlin WONDER BAR | Allston | 10 pm | “Top 40/ House Thursdays” with DJ NRG ZUZU | Cambridge | 10:30 pm | Nighttime Gallagher & Mello

MONDAY 17

DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7 pm |

“Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 3” | 9 pm | “Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 4” MIDDLE EAST DOWNSTAIRS | 9 pm | Adult Swim presents “The Eric Andre Show”

TUESDAY 18

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | “Mystery

COMEDY See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses.

THURSDAY 13

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | Sean Sullivan

Lounge!”

DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7 pm |

“Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 5” | 9 pm | “Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 6” IMPROV ASYLUM | 8 pm | “House Teams”

WEDNESDAY 19

+ Jimmy Anicet + Ryan Darmody + Wes Hazard + Langston Kerman COMIX AT FOXWOODS | 8 pm | Al Madrigal IMPROV ASYLUM | 8 pm | “Nostalgsick” | 10 pm | “B.U.M.P.” IMPROVBOSTON MAINSTAGE | 8 + 10 pm | “Harold Night” IMPROVBOSTON STUDIO | 9:30 pm | “SketchHaüs” NICK’S COMEDY STOP - BOSTON | 8:30 pm | “Nick’s Nickel Night” NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE | 8 pm | “Loren & Wally Comedy Show with Dom Irrera”

Lauletta’s Big Gay Comedy Buffet” IMPROVBOSTON MAINSTAGE | 8 pm | “Comedy Lab” | 10 pm | “The Hump Slot”

FRIDAY 14

THURSDAY 20

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | Ken Reid +

Rich Gustus + Matt Kona + Cam MacNeil + Pat McLoud COMIX AT FOXWOODS | 8 pm | Al Madrigal DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7:30 pm | “Boston’s Funniest Media Personality” | 9:30 pm | “Funny “Shorts” Movie Night” FOX THEATER AT FOXWOODS | 8 pm | Kathleen Madigan GIGGLES COMEDY CLUB | 8:30 pm | Artie Januario + Kelly MacFarland + Mitch Stinson IMPROV ASYLUM | 8+10 pm | “Nostalgsick” IMPROVBOSTON MAINSTAGE | 8 pm | “ImprovBoston MainStage” | 10 pm | “This Improvised Life” | 11:30 pm | “Nightcap” IMPROVBOSTON STUDIO | 7:30 pm | “Studio 40” | 9 pm | “CageMatch” KOWLOON KOMEDY | 8:30 pm | Paul D’Angelo + Steve Bjork + Sal Votano NICK’S COMEDY STOP - BOSTON | 8:30 pm | Corey Rodrigues + Shawn Carter + Lue Avent + Chris Pennie SHOWCASE LIVE | Sue Costello + Jimmy Walsh + Taylor Connelly WILBUR THEATRE | 7:30 pm | Sebastian Maniscalco

SATURDAY 15

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | Rick Jenkins

+ Steve Macone + Alingon Mitra + Brian Moote + Mike Pincus COMIX AT FOXWOODS | 8 + 10:30 pm | Al Madrigal DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7 pm | “Jimmy Tingle’s American Dream: Live On Screen & Stage” | 9 pm | Andy Kindler GIGGLES COMEDY CLUB | 7:15 + 9:30 pm | Artie Januario + Kelly MacFarland + Mitch Stinson IMPROV ASYLUM | 4 pm | “Afternoon Delight” | 8 + 10 pm | “Nostalg-sick” IMPROVBOSTON MAINSTAGE | 6 pm | “Family Show” | 8 pm | “ImprovBoston MainStage” | 10 pm | “Face Off” | 11:30 pm | “Nightcap” IMPROVBOSTON STUDIO | 7:30 pm | “Studio 40” | 9:30 pm | “Sketch CageMatch” KOWLOON KOMEDY | 7:30 + 9:45pm | Paul D’Angelo + Steve Bjork + Sal Votano LOTS OF LAUGHS COMEDY LOUNGE | 9 pm | Chris D + PJ Walsh + Freddie Stone NICK’S COMEDY STOP - BOSTON | 8:30 pm | Corey Rodrigues + Shawn Carter + Lue Avent + Chris Pennie WILBUR THEATRE | 7 pm | D.L. Hughley

SUNDAY 16

BELLA LUNA | 7 pm | “Comedy with

Wings”

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | Matt

Aramando + Steve Halligan + Kevin John + Ben Keefe + Kofi DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7 pm | “Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 1” | 9 pm | “Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 2” IMPROV ASYLUM | 8 pm | “Lost in Boston” IMPROVBOSTON MAINSTAGE | 7 pm | “The Jam” | 9 pm | “People’s Show”

BURREN | 8 pm | Mark Riccadonna +

Tony V. + Kelly MacFarland + DJ Hazard

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | Mike Bain

+ Nick Chambers + Dan Crohn + Steve Cronin + Alana Eisner DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7 pm | “Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 7” | 9 pm | “Stand Up Contest Preliminary Round 8”

DICK’S BEANTOWN COMEDY VAULT AT REMINGTON’S | 8:30 pm | “Jim

885 Main St, Mansfield | $30.50-$151 | 800.745.3000 or livenation.com

TUESDAY 18

”YOUTH IS SERVED” | With the Jesse

Combs Band | 8 pm | Amazing Things Arts Center, 160 Hollis St, Framingham | $5-$6 | 508.405.2787 or amazingthings. org

WEDNESDAY 19

JOE JACKSON |8 pm | Wilbur Theatre, 246 Tremont St, Boston | $69 | 617.248.9700 or thewilburtheatre.com

THURSDAY 20

ART GARFUNKEL | Wilbur Theatre,

246 Tremont St, Boston | $59-$79 | 617.248.9700 or thewilburtheatre.com METRIC + HALF MOON RUN | 7:30 pm | Orpheum Theatre, 1 Hamilton Pl, Boston | $30-$35 | 617.482.0650 SESSION AMERICANA | 8 pm | Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | $20$25 | 617.876.6837

CLASSICAL THURSDAY 13

BURREN | 8 pm | “Cheap and Dirty

JUDITH CONRAD | Works for clavichord by Juan Bautista Cabanillas | 12:15 pm | First Church in Boston, 66 Marlborough St, Boston | Donations welcome | 617.267.6730 or firstchurchbostonmusic. org

COMEDY STUDIO | 8 pm | Jason Cordova

FRIDAY 14

Show”

+ Chris D. + Kate Ghiloi + Tesha Kondrat + Erika Kreitzinger COMIX AT FOXWOODS | 8 pm | Ralph Harris DAVIS SQUARE THEATRE | 7 pm | “Stand Up Contest Semi-finals 1” | 9 pm | “Stand Up Contest Semi-finals 2”

DICK’S BEANTOWN COMEDY VAULT AT REMINGTON’S | 8:30 pm | “Women’s

Show”

GRANITE GRILL FX | 8 pm | Harrison Stebbins + Brian Clark + Annette Pollack + Pat Galligan IMPROV ASYLUM | 8 pm | “Nostalgsick” IMPROVBOSTON MAINSTAGE | 8 + 10 pm | “Harold Night” IMPROVBOSTON STUDIO | 9:30 pm | “SketchHaüs” KOWLOON KOMEDY | 8 pm | Bob Marley NICK’S COMEDY STOP - BOSTON | 8:30 pm | “Joe Devito’s Comedy Hypnosis Show”

POP CONCERTS THURSDAY 13

BON IVER + ANAIS MITCHELL | anais

mitchell + Bon Iver | 7:30 pm | Bank of America Pavilion, 290 Northern Ave, Boston | $30-$34.50 | 617.728.1600 or ticketmaster.com MARTY EHRLICH | Jordan Hall, 30 Gainsborough St, Boston | Free | 617.585.1260 or necmusic.edu

FRIDAY 14

FLORENCE & THE MACHINE + MACCABEES | 7:30 pm | Comcast Center,

885 Main St, Mansfield | $20-$42.50 | 800.745.3000 or livenation.com

THE KENNEDYS + JON MCAULIFFE | 8 pm | Amazing Things Arts Center, 160 Hollis St, Framingham | $9-$18 | 508.405.2787 or amazingthings.org ROCKAPELLA | Berklee Performance Center, 136 Mass Ave, Boston | $21-$31 | 617.266.7455

SATURDAY 15

JIM WEIDER’S PROJECT PERCOLATOR | 8 pm | Amazing Things Arts Center, 160 Hollis St, Framingham | $13-$25 | 508.405.2787 or amazingthings.org DAR WILLIAMS + JILL SOBULE | 7:30 pm | Somerville Theatre, 55 Davis Square, Somerville | $30 | 617.625.5700 or somervilletheatreonline.com

SUNDAY 16

THE AVETT BROTHERS | 7:30 pm |

Bank of America Pavilion, 290 Northern Ave, Boston | $25-$40 | 617.728.1600 or ticketmaster.com KENDRICK LAMAR | 8 pm | Wilbur Theatre, 246 Tremont St, Boston | $35 | 617.248.9700 or thewilburtheatre.com

KISS + MOTLEY CRÜE + THE TREATMENT | 7 pm | Comcast Center,

ANNE HARLEY AND CHRISTINE SOUTHWORTH | Selection of works

for solo soprano and electronics | 7 pm | Killian Hall at MIT, 160 Memorial Dr, Cambridge | Free | web.mit.edu/music SEPTEMBERFEST | Selection of works by Virgil Thomson, Jean-Baptiste Forqueray, John Coltrane, and David Mullikin | 8 pm | Longy School of Music, 1 Follen St, Cambridge | Free | 617.876.0956 or longy.edu

SATURDAY 15

INTERMEZZO | Jake Heggie’s At the

Statue of Venus, with Kristen Watson; Hugo Weisgall’s The Stronger, with Janna Baty; Dominick Argento’s Miss Havisham’s Wedding Night, with Barbara Kilduff | Sat 8 pm; Sun 4 pm | Modern Theatre, 525 Washington St, Boston | $20-$40; $10 students | 617.899.4261 or intermezzoopera.org SEPTEMBERFEST | Selection of works by Bernstein, Enescu, Ives, Aaron Jay Kernis, and Lori Laitman | 8 pm | Longy School of Music, 1 Follen St, Cambridge | Free | 617.876.0956 or longy.edu

SUNDAY 16

BOSTON MUSICA VIVA | Selection of contemporary chamber music by Gandolfi, Froom, Sierra, Donatoni, Greene, and Hoffer | 12:30 pm | Carroll and Sons, 450 Harrison Ave, Boston | Free | 617.354.6910 or bmv.org GRAND HARMONIE | Mozart’s Serenade in C minor, K.388; Divertimento from Martin y Soler’s Una Cosa Rara; Salieri’s Trio in G for two oboes and bassoon; Beethoven’s Octet in E-flat, Op. 103 | 2:30 pm | Old South Church, 645 Boylston St, Boston | $15 | 617.425.5159 or grandharmonie.com PAULA ROBISON AND PAAVALI JUMPPANEN | Roussel’s Joueurs de

flûte, Op. 27; Boulez’s First Piano Sonata; Debussy’s Syrinx, L. 129; Boulez’s Sonatine for flute and piano; Poulenc’s Sonata for flute and piano | 1:30 pm | Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, 280 the Fenway, Boston | $27; $24 seniors; $12 students | 617.566.1401 or gardnermuseum.org INTERMEZZO | See listing for Sat

MONDAY 17

MUSIC FOR FOOD | Selection of works

for piano, voice, and strings by Dvorák and Chausson | 8 pm | Brown Hall, 30 Gainsborough St, Boston | Donations welcome | 617.585.1122 or necmusic.edu

TUESDAY 18

MARKUS PLACCI, RHONDA RIDER, AND JONATHAN BASS | Haydn’s Piano

Trio No. 39; Brahms’s Piano Trio in B; Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 | 8 pm | Seully Hall, 8 the Fenway, Boston | Free | 617.912.9222 or bostonconservatory.edu

WEDNESDAY 19

NAHO BESSHO | Works for piano by

Chopin, Liszt, and Mendelssohn | 5:30


ThEPhoEnix.coM | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 39

pm | Church of St. John the Evangelist, 35 Bowdoin St, Boston | Free | 617.227.5242 or stjev.org

THURSDAY 20

ASAKO TAKEUCHI, ANDREW ARCECI, AND PAUL CIENNIWA | Selections

from Johann Jacob Froberger’s Duets for violin and viola da gamba; Marin Marais’s Sonnerie de Ste-Geneviève du Mont-de-Paris | 12:15 pm | First Church in Boston, 66 Marlborough St, Boston | Donations welcome | 617.267.6730 or firstchurchbostonmusic.org

DANCE SATURDAY 15

SOKOLOW DANCE FOUNDATION |

Black & White: Sokolow’s Everything Must Go, Homage to Rachmaninoff, and From the Diaries of Franz Kafka | 8 pm | Boston University Dance Theater, 915 Comm Ave, Boston | $22; $18 students, seniors | 800.838.3006 or brownpapertickets.com

LIT EVENTS THURSDAY 13

DAVID KAISER | How the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival reading | 7 pm | Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Free | 617.661.1515 or harvard.com GRETCHEN RUBIN | Happier at Home reading | 6 pm | Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St, Brookline | 617.566.4948 or coolidge.org

FRIDAY 14

ERIC JAY DOLIN | When America First Met China: An Exotic History of Tea, Drugs, and Money in the Age of Sail reading | 7 pm | Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Free | 617.661.1515 or harvard.com NICOLE TEREZ DUTTON & PAUL LEGAULT | Poetry readings | 7 pm |

Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard St, Brookline | Free | 617.566.6660 or brooklinebooksmith.com ALASDAIR ROBERTS | America’s First Great Depression: Economic Crisis and Political Disorder After the Panic of 1837 reading | 3 pm | Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Free | 617.661.1515 or harvard.com

SATURDAY 15

FOUND MAGAZINE 10TH ANNIVERSARY WITH DAVY & PETER ROTHBART | 7 pm | Iron Horse Music

Hall, 20 Center St, Northampton | $10$13 | 413.586.8686 or iheg.com

SUNDAY 16 ERIKA ROBUCK

| Hemingway’s Girl reading | 3 pm | Concord Bookshop, 65 Main St, Concord | Free | 978.369.2405 or concordbookshop.com

MONDAY 17

PAUL AUSTER | Winter Journal reading | 6 pm | Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | $5 | 617.876.6837

TUESDAY 18

LINDA H. DAVIS & GISH JEN | Granta 120: Medicine discussion | 7 pm | Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.495.9400 or harvard.com JOHN EDWARD | Fallen Masters reading | 6 pm | Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | $20 | 617.876.6837

THE FIRST AND LAST WORD POETRY SERIES: ANDREY GRITSMAN, WENDY DREXLER, & MICHAEL ANSARA | Various poetry readings | 7 pm | Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave, Somerville | $4 | 617.718.2191 or artsatthearmory.org

WEDNESDAY 19 FRANS JOHANSSON

| The Click Moment: Seizing Opportunity in an Unpredictable World reading | 7:30 pm | Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Free | 617.489.0519 or harvard.bkstore.com ROBERT SULLIVAN | My American Revolution reading | 7 pm | Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.661.1515 or harvard.com

THURSDAY 20

TY BURR | Gods Like Us: On Movie Stardom and Modern Fame reading | 6 pm | Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St,

Brookline | 617.734.2500 or coolidge.org WILLIAM H. CHAFE | Bill and Hillary: The Politics of the Personal reading | 7 pm | Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Free | 617.661.1515 or harvard.com LUCIA GREENHOUSE | fathermothergod: My Journey Out of Christian Science reading | 7 pm | Porter Square Books, Porter Square Shopping Center, 25 White St, Cambridge | 617.491.2220 or portersquarebooks.com PAMELA POST-FERRANTE | Writing & Healing: A Mindful Guide for Cancer Survivors reading | 7 pm | Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Free | 617.489.0519 or harvard.bkstore.com

EVENTS FRIDAY 14

GRAND OPENING OF BU BAND ROOM | Ceremony followed by cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, entertainment by the BU Band, and a screening of a short documentary | 6 pm | Boston University Band Room, 300 Babcock St, Boston | Free | bu.edu/bands/rsvp GREAT HOUSE TOUR | See listing for Thurs

SATURDAY 15

BOSTON IS BURNING: A DAY AT THE BOSTON FIRE MUSEUM | Launch of

Obscura Society Boston, with a special look at some of the city’s worst disasters | 1 pm | Boston Fire Museum, 344 Congress St, Boston | $7 | 617.338.9700 or obscurasociety.com

SUNDAY 16

GREATER BOSTON COLLEGIATE GOLF DAY | Golf tournament for the

average college student golfer, with lunch, giveaways, and prizes | 10:30 am | Newton Commonwealth Golf Course, 212 Kenrick St, Newton | $50 | 617.630.1971 or collegegolfpass.com

MONDAY 17

MASSCHALLENGE INTERNSHIP AND JOB FAIR | Showcase for potential

interns, hires, or volunteers | 4 pm | MassChallenge, 1 Marina Park Dr, 14th floor, Boston | Free | 617.863.0845 or internjobfair2012.eventbrite.com

TUESDAY 18

BEHIND THE CURTAIN | Backstage

tour and VIP tickets to the Huntington Theatre Company’s performance of Good People | 7:30 pm | Boston University Theatre, 264 Huntington Ave, Boston | $65 | 617.267.4430 or bcae.org

WEDNESDAY 19

MARSHALLS FABULOUS FOUND FASHION TOUR | Double-decker bus

featuring a virtual dressing room, popup fashion shows, “Fabulous Found” merchandise displays, and more | 11 am-7 pm | Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St, Boston | Free | 617.236.3060 or facebook.com/marshalls

BLOCK PARTY | Outdoor dining, shopping, five stages of music, kids’ entertainment, and street performers | 6 pm | Downtown Gloucester, Main St, Gloucester | Free | glostablockparty. com NEW DAYS 2012 CONFERENCE | Gain knowledge on the energy of life and the power of thought with speakers focusing on personal and professional development | 8:30 am | Bridgewater State University, 131 Summer St, Bridgewater | $150 | 800.685.2942 or newdayevents.com THE BIG E | See listing for Fri

SUNDAY 16

THE BIG E | See listing for Fri

FRIDAY 14

THE BIG E | Super Circus, Avenue of

States, Storrowton Village Museum, animals, competitive exhibits, rides, shopping, crafts, a daily parade, and more | Sun-Fri 8 am-10 pm; Sat 8 am11 pm | Eastern States Exposition, 875 Memorial Ave, West Springfield | $12 | 413.737.2443 or thebige.com

SUMMER STREET MARKETS ARTS AND CRAFTS | Original, handmade

works, including jewelry, glassware, woodworks, photography, sculpture, clothing, accessories, and more | Fri + Wed 11 am-4 pm | Summer Street in Downtown Crossing, Summer and Washington Sts, Boston | Free | 617.482.2139 or bostonbid.org

SATURDAY 15

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED ART HARVEST PARTIES | Connecting three

local artists directly to buyers by selling a limited number of shares in a unique line of artwork | noon | Davis Square, Day + Herbert Sts, Somerville | Free | 781.893.8222 or ccae.org/csart

DOWNTOWN GLOUCESTER

with a photo booth, costume contest, open bar, and more | 8 pm | Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, 38 Ash St, Boston | $40 | 617.635.5129 or bcnc.net

HOGS FOR HOPE TO BENEFIT THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SIDS RESEARCH | Bike run and pig roast |

1:30 pm | Fifty’s Lounge, 168 Mendon St, Bellingham | $10-$20 | 508.330. 0087 or fiftyslounge.com

MULTIPLE MYELOMA RACE FOR RESEARCH TO BENEFIT THE MULTIPLE MYELOMA RESEARCH FOUNDATION | 5K walk and run, with

THE BIG E | See listing for Fri

warm-up and cool-down exercises, awards ceremony, and more | 7:30 am | Carson Beach, 165 Day Blvd, Boston | $30 | 617.727.8865 or themmrf.org

TUESDAY 18

SUNDAY 16

MONDAY 17

THE BIG E | See listing for Fri

ALLSTATE LIFE INSURANCE BOSTON

13.1 MARATHON TO BENEFIT AUTISM SPEAKS | Walk or run 13.1 miles | 7

am | Suffolk Downs, Suffolk Downs Pk, East Boston | $100 | 617.567.3900 or 131marathon.com

WEDNESDAY 19

CLOTHING AND COIN DRIVE TO BENEFIT SECOND CHANCES |

Donate clothing, shoes, accessories and loose change, meet Second Chances staff and volunteers, and learn more about their work | 5 pm | Somerville Community Growing Center, 22 Vinal Ave, Somerville | Donations welcome | 617.666.2969 or thegrowingcenter.org

THURSDAY 20

HAPPY HOUR TO BENEFIT FLASHES OF HOPE | Music and silent auction,

with all tips being donated | 5:30 pm | Julep Bar, 200 High St, Boston | No cover | 617.261.4200 or flashesofhope.org

WEDNESDAY 19

THE BIG E | See listing for Fri SUMMER STREET MARKETS ARTS AND CRAFTS | See listing for Fri

THURSDAY 20

THE BIG E | See listing for Fri

GAY & LESBIAN THURSDAY 13

BEAR CAVE | Place for bears, cubs, and their friends | 10 pm | Ramrod, 1254 Boylston St, Boston | Free | 617.266.2986 or ramrod-boston.com JACQUES’ ANGELS | Hosted by Kris Knievil with performances from Melinda Wilson and special guests | 10:30 pm | Jacque’s Cabaret, 79 Broadway, Boston | $6 | 617.426.8902 or jacquescabaret.com

FRIDAY 14

MADONNA FRIDAYS | With DJ Jay Ine | 8 pm | Northern Nights, 649 Lynnway, Lynn | $5 | 781.595.1900 or northernnights.net SHOW ME YOUR STUFF | Drag night with Kris Kneivil behind the bar and host Violencia | 10 pm | Machine, 1256 Boylston St, Boston | 617.536.1950 or machine-boston.com

SATURDAY 15

MISS-LEADING LADIES | See listing

for Fri

SUNDAY 16

BACK 2 BASICS TEA DANCE | With

DJ Harrison spinning disco and retro from the 70s and 80s and top 40 dance remixes | 4 pm | Club Café, 209 Columbus Ave, Boston | No cover | 617.536.0966 or clubcafe.com LEVEL 12 | New wave, hip-hop, funk, soul, disco, house, reggae, Top 40, and whatevs with DJ Sterling Golden | 10 pm | Ramrod, 1254 Boylston St, Boston | Free | 617.266.2986 or ramrod-boston.com

MONDAY 17

FAIRS AND FESTIVALS

FUNDRAISER TO BENEFIT THE BCNC YOUTH CENTER | 90’s themed,

THE ATTIC | Retro, 90s, glam, and more

from DJ Kuro | 10 pm | Ramrod, 1254 Boylston St, Boston | Free | 617.266.2986 or ramrod-boston.com

TUESDAY 18

MIZERY LOVES KARAOKE | Karaoke hosted by Mizery | 10:30 pm | Jacque’s Cabaret, 79 Broadway, Boston | No cover | 617.426.8902 or jacquescabaret.com PSYCLONE TUESDAYS | All EDM music with Stevie Psyclone | 9 pm | Machine, 1256 Boylston St, Boston | Free | 617.536.1950 or machine-boston.com

THURSDAY 20

BEAR CAVE | See listing for previous

Thurs

JACQUES’ ANGELS | See listing for

previous Thurs

BENEFITS SATURDAY 15

BAMBOO CIRCLE DANCE PARTY

Thu 9/13 swamp Blues

jInX BRoTheRs BasTaRd sons

FRI 9/14: 7:30pm pop

BoTTom dollaRs hollows

10:00pm Reggae/ska

pRessuRe cookeR The agenTs

saT 9/15: 7:00pm Rock/pop

wReckless eRIc & amy RIgBy 10:00pm Reggae

hIgh hopes Band duBBsTeR

sun 9/16 jaZZ BRunch 8:30 am - 2:30 pm open Blues jam 4:00pm - 7:00 pm

Boston at Nite OpEN 24 hr

! n o o s g n i m o C BOSTON AT NITE

mon 9/17 Team TRIVIa - 8:30 pm $1.50 hoT dogs 6 - 10 pm Tue 9/18 ResTauRanT/BaR open (no Bands) wed 9/19: hIp hop/R&B

mIke henRy & ReVoluTIonaRys Thu 9/20 ImpRoV jaZZ/Rock

wayne kRanTZ wITh keITh caRlock & naTe wood FRI 9/21: 7:30pm pop

coRIn ashley QuaRTeT RIchaRd daVIes oF caRdInal 10:00pm ameRIcana

gIRls, guns & gloRy saT 9/22: 4-6pm

school oF Rock BosTon TRIBuTe To 80’s haIR meTal Bands

gazine! New Ma ontent ! New C ibution! r New Dist

9:30pm (BeaTles)

BeaTlejuIce

eat ads Sam+e gmrore !

STArTINg

9/21

kEEp AN EyE OuT fOr ThE NEw BlAck BOxES ThAT wIll cArry Our NEw NIghTlIfE ANd AdulT puBlIcATION!

CoMINg SooN: 9/26 elIZaBeTh waRRen TRIVIa nIghT FundRaIseR 9/27 hanggaI (FR. mongolIa & chIna) 9/28-29 playIn dead (10pm) 9/29 (7pm) amy Black 10/3 james mcmuRTRy 10/4 BRonZe RadIo ReTuRn 10/7 peRFume genIus/dusTed 10/10 TIFT meRRITT/The pInes 10/13 wanda jackson 10/19 mIlo Z

www.johnnyds.com InFo: 617-776-2004 conceRT lIne: 617-776-9667 johnny d’s 17 holland sT daVIs sQuaRe someRVIlle. ma 02144

343 Western Ave, Cambridge Reggae, Latin & Jazz

Thursday 09/13

WEDNESDAY 19

ROCK WEDNESDAYS | With DJ Victor spinning only rock ‘n roll | 10 pm | Ramrod, 1254 Boylston St, Boston | Free | 617.266.2986 or ramrod-boston.com

R E S TA U R A N T & M U S I C C L U B

43 Years of great Music

hoT springs reggae Call for info

Place your ad today!

617-450-8799 www.BostonAtNite.com

friday 09/14

funk friday live Bands Call for info

saTurday 09/15

reggae revival live reggae MusiC FOR INFO 617-492-7772

www.westernfront.com


40 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

Play by Play opening AFTeR THe ReVoLUTion | The Gamm Theatre presents Amy Herzog’s play about a liberal NYC family celebrating their youngest daughter’s graduation from college. Then, news of an upcoming controversial book about the late Grandpa Joe — a famously blacklisted Marxist — sends the family into an inter-generational tailspin. Tony Estrella directs. | September 13 Through Oct 14 | Gamm Theatre, 172 Exchange St, Pawtucket, RI | $26 | 401.723.4266 or

gammtheatre.org

gooD peopLe | Johanna Day stars as

single mom Margie Walsh who has just been let go from yet another job and now must find a new way to make ends meet in David Lindsay-Abaire’s contemporary tragicomedy about family and the recession. Kate Whoriskey directs the Huntington Theatre production. | September 14–October 14 | Boston

University Theatre, 264 Huntington Ave, Boston | $30-$95 | 617.266.7900 or huntingtontheatre.org

King LeAR | Trinity Rep joins forces

with the acclaimed Dallas Theater Center to stage the Bard’s tragedy of regret. Brian McEleney stars as Lear, under the direction of Kevin Moriarty. | September 13–October 21 | Trinity Repertory Company, 201 Washington St, Providence, RI | $28-$34 | 401.351.4242 or trinityrep.com LUMBeRJACKS in LoVe | Stoneham Theatre stages Fred Alley & James Kaplan’s new musical about five lumberjack bachelors who live 200 miles from society . . . and from women. When one of the men accidentally receives a mail-order bride, the group dynamic suddenly changes. Plus, it turns out one of the five men has been a cross-dressing woman all along. Caitlin Lowans directs, and Kelli Edwards choreographs. | September 13-30 | Stoneham Theatre, 395 Main St, Stoneham | $44-$48 | 781.279.2200 or

stonehamtheatre.org

THe MoTHeRF**KeR WiTH THe HAT |

SpeakEasy Stage presents Stephen Adly Guirgis’s 2011 Tony Award-nominated comedy about an ex-con who hopes to turn his life around with a new job and a new girlfriend . . . until he finds a mysterious hat that sets him back on the path to mischief. David R. Gammons directs. | September 14– October 13 | Roberts Studio Theatre at the

Boston Center for the Arts, 527 Tremont St, Boston | $25-$52 | 617.426.5000 or speakeasystage.com

no RooM FoR WiSHing | Danny Bryck stars in his one-man play, which was compiled from interviews and live recordings during the occupation of Dewey Square in Fall 2011. Bryck plays dozens of real-life characters in this Company One staging, under Megan Sandberg-Zakian’s direction. | September 13-October 9 | Black Box Theatre at

Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont Street, Boston | $25 | 617.933.8600 or companyone.org

pARiS CoMMUne | ArtsEmerson

stages Steven Cosson and Michael Friedman’s musical depicting Europe’s first socialist revolution which took place in 1871 among working-class Parisians. This world premiere of the production features Brooklyn-based theater company The Civilians. | September 20-23 | Paramount Center

Mainstage online, 219 Tremont St, Boston | $25-$65 | 617.824.8000 or artsemerson.org

  f

THe pRoVinCeToWn TenneSSee WiLLiAMS THeATeR FeSTiVAL | Mu-

sic is this year’s festival theme, and the first show on the docket, The Glass Menagerie, sets the theme: “In memory, everything seems to happen to music.” Alabama actress Celeste Burnum stars, under Will York’s direction. David Kaplan helms The Tennessee Williams Songbook, featuring the vocal talents of the Tony-nominated Alison Fraser. Jackie Davis directs the world premiere of Gift of an Orange, a musical inspired by Williams’s short story Gift of an Apple. Davis Robinson heads up Ten Blocks on the Camino Real, a fantasy play set to virtuoso guitar music. Jef Hall-Flavin and Susan Grilli co-direct Williams’s mother-son drama Auto-daFé, starring Cristine McMurdo-Wallis. Fred Abrahamse’s company from Cape Town brings their production of Williams’s Kingdom of Earth to America for the first time. Nick Potenzieri helms Williams’s reality-bending tragicomedy I Never Get Dressed Till After Dark on Sundays, featuring Jeremy Lawrence as The Playwright. Alessandra Ingoglia and Maria Teresa Galati present This Property is Condemned: i Blues di Tennessee Williams, a unique play that fuses four Williams shorts with live music performances. Venues include the Provincetown Theater, the High School, the Town Hall, the Wa Garden, Gifford House, VFW Hall, Surf Club, Waters Edge Cinema, and Sage. | September 20-23 | Provincetown Theater, 238 Bradford St., Provincetown | $20$600 | 508.487.7487 or twptown.org

noW pLAying CAR TALK: THe MUSiCAL!!! | This

co-production of Underground Railway Theater and Suffolk University isn’t exactly an adaptation of the longrunning NPR show Car Talk; it’s more in the nature of a high-school variety show that uses the voices of Tom and Ray Magliozzi as touchstones for a rambling plot pumped up with dream ballets that parody songs from wellknown musicals. Almost everything about it — Michael Wartofsky’s music, Michelle Chassé’s choreography, and especially the book, lyrics, and direction by Wesley Savick — is amateurish and self-indulgent. The story centers on Rusty Fenders (Scott H. Severance), a middle-aged, overweight fellow whose failing car is a metaphor for his stalled life. He has his eye on a sexy sports car, represented by a siren named Miata C. LaChassis (Tiffany Chen), when he should be settling down with his friend and co-worker, Sheila B. Goodfew (Leigh Barrett), who drives a sensible, reliable vehicle. The plot is — very roughly — a retrenched version of The Wizard of Oz, with the Car Talk duo voicing an outsize puppet called the Wizard of Cahs. The puppet, designed by David Fichter, is the best thing in the show. | Through September 16 | Central Square Theater, 450 Mass Ave, Cambridge | $20-$50 |

866.811.4111 or centralsquaretheater.org

CRiMeS oF THe HeART | Set in

Hazlehurst, Mississippi, in 1974, five years after Hurricane Camille ravaged the region, Beth Henley’s comedy swirls around three sisters headed not for Moscow but, seemingly, for spinsterhood, slutdom, and the slammer. But what do you expect from grown-up orphans not the same since Mama hanged herself and the family cat, leaving her offspring to the

pLAy By pLAy For our complete weekly listings, from ART to Zeiterion, scan the code — or visit bit.ly/PlayByPlay for full theater listings.

Museums + Galleries mismanagement of Old Granddaddy, now a hospitalized heap of popped blood vessels and feeding tubes? Twenty-four-year-old Babe Botrelle, née Magrath, plugs her politician husband in the stomach, ostensibly because she “didn’t like his looks.” This bit of mayhem pushes sensible big sis Lenny into a hand-wringing frenzy that has her summoning home troublemaking blues singer and femme fatale Meg. Liz Hayes is a feisty, ultimately liberated drudge of a Lenny, McCaela Donovan a tough, sexy Meg who nails her laughs the way she nails her men. As Babe, Melody Madarasz is a stellar naïf, as free of harsh judgments as she is of good sense. Carmel O’Reilly helms a fast-paced, wide-eyed Gloucester Stage production that taps into the manic innocence at the heart of a comedy where crimes, whether of the heart or against the law, are more like misdemeanors. | Through September 16 | Gloucester Stage Company, 267 East Main St, Gloucester | $40; $35 students, seniors | 978.281.4433

or gloucesterstage.com

HoMeSTeAD CRoSSing | Merrimack Rep stages William Donnelly’s play about two very different couples stuck in a house together, waiting out a storm. The four begin to discuss their different approaches to life, love, and relationships, leading to a long night of debate. Kyle Fabel directs the staging, which premiered earlier this summer at Berkshire Theatre Festival. | Through September 23 | Merrimack Repertory

Theatre, 50 East Merrimack Street, Lowell | $15-$47 | 978.454.3926 or mrt.org

iT’S A LoVe THAng | New Urban

Theatre Lab stages two one-act plays: The Delicate Art of Customer Service by Cliff Odle and Gift of An Orange by Charlene Donaghy. Both plays are love stories: the first describes two customer service reps falling in love on the job. The second play is a musical set in Louisiana, inspired by Tennessee Williams’s short story, Gift of an Apple. | Through September 16 | Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, 949 Comm Ave, Boston | $25 | 866.811.4111 or nutl.wordpress.com THe KiTe RUnneR | New Repertory Theatre stages the New England premiere of Matthew Spangler’s theatrical adaptation of Khaled Hosseini’s 2003 best-selling novel. Elaine Vaan Hogue directs the drama, which follows boyhood friends Amir and Hassan in 1970s Afghanistan and the tragic events that drive the two of them apart. | Through September 30 | Charles Mosesian Theater, 321 Arsenal St, Watertown | $28-$58 |

617.923.8487 or newrep.org

MARie AnToineTTe | Brooke Bloom

stars as the cake-loving queen in the world premiere of David Adjmi’s timely comedy about materialism and economic disparity. The staging is a coproduction by the American Repertory Theatre and Yale Repertory Theatre. Rebecca Taichman directs. | Through September 29 | Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle Street, Cambridge | $25-$55 |

617.547.8300 or americanrepertorytheater.org | Carolyn Clay’s review page 28

THe MiKADo | Spiro Veloudos directs

Gilbert & Sullivan’s most famous comic opera about three young school girls, a traveling minstrel, and a haughty government official. One of the three girls falls in love with the minstrel, but alas, she’s betrothed to the government official. Jonathan Goldberg handles the musical direction for this Lyric Stage production. | Through October 13 | Lyric

Forrest Solis, Sleep, Chapter IV

fQUIDLEY AND COMPANY GALLERY | 617.450.4300 | 38 Newbury St, Boston | quidleyandco.com | Tues-Fri 10 am-6 pm; Sat 10 am-5 pm | Sept 20Oct 20: “Narrative Fragments”

open STUDioS SoUTH enD open STUDioS | Studios

and galleries at various locations throughout the South End Arts District | useaboston.com | Sat-Sun 11 am-6 pm |

200+ artists and galleries displaying painting, photography, sculpture, bookbinding, ceramics, and clothing and jewelry design

openingS ART MARKeT pRoVinCeToWn |

508.413.9090 | 148 Commercial St, Provincetown | artmarketprovincetown.com | Mon + Wed-Sun 10 am-9 pm | Through Sept 30: Dez DeCarlo: “Twin Flames” | Di-

ane Bonder: “Films” | John Pusateri: “I Really Can’t Say” | Mo Ziochouski: “MOZeum” | Pam Nicholas: “Secret Toy Surprise” | Paula Lawrence: “Reflect” | Shari Kadison: “Across The Bay” | Shez Arvedon: “Shore Thing” | Sue Metro: “What Peeks Out” | Reception Sept 14: 6-9 pm

BRooKLine ARTS CenTeR | 617.566.5615 | 86 Monmouth St, Brookline | brooklineartscenter.com | Mon-Fri 9 am–4:30 pm | Sept 14-Oct 10:

Lois Swirnoff: “Natura Viva: Visions of the Muddy River”

CARpenTeR CenTeR FoR THe ViSUAL ARTS AT HARVARD UniVeRSiTy |

617.495.3251 | 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | ves.fas.harvard.edu | Mon-Fri 10 am-5 pm; Sat-Sun 1 pm-5 pm | Sept 13-Oct 7: Jesse

Stage Company of Boston, 140 Clarendon Street, Boston | $27-$62 | 617.437.7172 or lyricstage.com

Aron Green: “Paranoia Places Its Faith In Exposure” | Michael Wang: “Differentiation Series” | Reception 5:30-6:30 pm

American premiere of Kevin Rice’s theatrical adaptation of Russian writer Ivan Goncharov’s 1859 satirical novel. Oblomov is a young nobleman who is incapable of making decisions; he cannot even decide whether or not to get out of bed each day, much to the chagrin of his servant, Zakhar. | Through September 22 | Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater, 2357 Route 6, Wellfleet | $10-$25 | 508.349.9428 or what.org

| 516 East Second St, Boston | distilleryboston.com | Mon-Sat 9 am-5 pm | Sept 20-Oct 26: “Elsewhere” | Reception Sept 20: 7-9 pm

oBLoMoV | Daisy Walker directs the

DiSTiLLeRy gALLeRy | 978.270.1904

DTR MoDeRn gALLeRy | 617.424.7001 | 167 Newbury St, Boston | dtrmodern.com | Mon-Fri 10 am-6:30 pm; Sat 10 am-7 pm; Sun noon-6 pm | Through Oct 26: Hunt Slonem | Reception Sept 14: 6-8 pm iSABeLLA STeWART gARDneR MUSeUM | 617.566.1401 | 280 the Fenway,

Boston | gardnermuseum.org | Wed-Mon 11 am-5 pm | Admission $15; $12 seniors; $5 students with ID; free for ages under 18 | Sept 20-Jan 7: “The Great Bare Mat & Constellation”

MooSe HiLL SAnCTUARy |

781.784.5691 | 293 Moose Hill St, Sharon | massaudubon.org | Daily 10 am-4 pm | Sept

13-Nov 19: Diane Chester-Demicco, Laurie Simko, and Jesse Thomas: “Interplay: Merging Light and Texture in Unexpected Ways” | Reception Sept 20: 6-8 pm

pAnopTiCon gALLeRy | 617.267.8929

Through Oct 7: “From Russia With Art Autumn Exhibit”

DAnFoRTH MUSeUM oF ART | 508.620.0050 | 123 Union Ave, Framingham | danforthmuseum.org | Wed-Thurs + Sun noon-5 pm; Fri-Sat 10 am-5 pm |

Admission $11; $9 seniors; $8 students; free to youth under 17 | Through Nov 4: Catherine Kernan: “Caught in the Current” | “Cruel Sea: Law of the Fishes” | Elizabeth Awalt: “Cascade and Other Work” | Jand Lund: “Home Body” | Jane Goldman: “Tidal Pools” | “Picture This!” | “Selections from

| 502c Comm Ave, Boston | panopticongallery.com | Tues-Sat 10 am–5:30 pm and by appointment | Sept 14-Oct 30: Harold Feinstein: “A Retrospective” | Reception Sept 14: 5:30-7:30 pm

the Permanent Collection” | Susan Heideman: “Proteanna” | Thaddeus Beal, Ilana Manolson, Adrienne Der Marderosian, and Rhonda Smith: “Fragile Navigation”

South St, Waltham | brandeis.edu/rose | Tues-Sun noon-5 pm | Admission $3 | Sept 20-Dec 9: Dor Guez: “100 Steps to the Mediterranean” | Reception Sept 20: 5-8 pm

Boston | griffinmuseum.org | Tues-Wed + Fri 11 am- 6 pm; Thurs 11 am-7 pm; Sat noon- 5 pm | Through Sept 28: Roger Tory Peterson

RoSe ART MUSeUM AT BRAnDeiS UniVeRSiTy | 781.736.3434 | 415

SoUTH SHoRe ART CenTeR |

781.383.2787 | 119 Ripley Rd, Cohasset | ssac.org | Mon-Sat 10 am-4 pm; Sun noon-4 pm | Sept 14-Nov 4: “Women 360” | Reception Sept 14: 6-8 pm

ToWne ART gALLeRy AT WHeeLoCK CoLLege | 617.879.2219 | 180 the Riv-

erway, Boston | wheelock.edu/art | TuesThurs 1-5 pm; Sat 2-5 pm | Sept 18-Oct 18: John Burkett and Joe Wallace

gRiFFin MUSeUM By DigiTAL SiLVeR iMAging | 617.489.0035 | 4 Clarendon St,

inSTiTUTe oF ConTeMpoRARy ART |

617.478.3100 | 100 Northern Ave, Boston | icaboston.org | Tues-Wed + Sat-Sun 10 am–5 pm; Thurs-Fri 10 am–9 pm | Admis-

sion $15; $10 students, seniors; free for ages under 17; free after 5 pm on Thurs | Through Oct 14: Josiah McElheny: “Some Pictures of the Infinite” | Through Nov 25: Dianna Molzan | Through Nov 25: Os Gêmeos

MiT WoLK gALLeRy | 617.253.7334 |

77 Mass Ave, Cambridge | Mon-Fri 9 am–5 pm | Through Dec 28: William Wurster: “Frames for Living”

ongoing

WASHingTon STReeT ART CenTeR

CenTeR MAKoR | 617.771.4870 | 1845 Comm Ave, Brighton | centermakor.org | Sun-Thu 11 am-7 pm; Fri 11 am-5 pm |

  f

| 617.623.5315 | 321 Washington St, Somerville | washingtonst.org | Sat noon-4 pm | Through Sept 29: Sarah Coyne, Megan Creamer, Alex Feinstein, and Lauren Leone: “The Dream Team”

ART’S noT DeAD Here’s the shortlist of highlights from the area’s museums and galleries. To see more, scan the code — or visit bit.ly/ArtsNotDead for complete art listings.


thephoenix.com | the boston phoenix | septembeR 14, 2012 41

NOW PLAYING

Film Boston Boston CoMMon 175 Tremont St | 617.423.3499

Please Call to ConfirM Bookings and for tiMes BaCHelorette finding neMo 3d resident eVil: retriBUtion resident eVil: retriBUtion 3d 2016: oBaMa’s aMeriCa tHe aPParition Branded BraVe BraVe 3d tHe BoUrne legaCY tHe CaMPaign Celeste and Jesse foreVer tHe Cold ligHt of daY tHe dark knigHt rises diarY of a WiMPY kid: dog daYs tHe eXPendaBles 2 HoPe sPrings laWless Moonrise kingdoM tHe odd life of tiMotHY green ParanorMan ParanorMan 2 tHe Possession PreMiUM rUsH rUBY sParks sParkle ted tHe Words

Boston PUBliC liBrarY

Copley Square, Boston | 617.536.5400 | Free admission tHe Bostonians | Mon: 6

fenWaY

201 Brookline aVe | 617.424.6266 Please Call to ConfirM Bookings and for tiMes finding neMo 3d resident eVil: retriBUtion resident eVil: retriBUtion 3d tHe aPParition tHe BoUrne legaCY tHe CaMPaign tHe Cold ligHt of daY tHe dark knigHt rises tHe eXPendaBles 2 HoPe sPrings laWless tHe odd life of tiMotHY green ParanorMan ParanorMan 2 tHe Possession PreMiUM rUsH tHe Words

MUseUM of fine arts

11 am | Mon: 4:30 | Tues-Thurs: 4:15 | Mon-Tues: 10:20 santa sangre | Fri-Sat: midnight

soUnds of silents: BlaCkMail [WitH alloY orCHestra] | Mon: 7 nt liVe: tHe CUrioUs Case of tHe dog in tHe nigHt | Tues: 7

CaMBridge Brattle

40 Brattle St, Harvard Square | 617.876.6837 sHUt UP and PlaY tHe Hits |

Fri-Sun: 5, 7:30 | Fri-Sun, Tues: 10 | Sat-Sun: 2:30 | Tues: 8 | Wed: 8:30, 11 CollaBorator | Mon: 8

fresH Pond

168 Alewife Brook Parkway | 617.661.2900 finding neMo 3d |12:45,3:10, 5:35, 8 resident eVil: retriBUtion |

1:05, 5:40, 10:10

resident eVil: retriBUtion 3d | 3:25, 7:55

tHe BoUrne legaCY | 7:15, 10:15 tHe Cold ligHt of daY | 7:20, 9:40 tHe dark knigHt rises | 10:10 HoPe sPrings | 1, 3:25, 5:40 iCe age: Continental drift | 12:45, 2:55, 5:10

laWless | 1, 4, 7, 10 ParanorMan | 12:55, 3:05, 5:15 tHe Possession | 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:35,

9:55

tHe Words | 12:50, 3:05, 5:20, 7:35,

9:55

HarVard filM arCHiVe

| Sun: 1

kUMarÉ | Fri: 6 | Sat: 3 | Sun: 11 am Planet of snail | Fri: 4 | Sat: 1 | Sun: 3:15

CHina HeaVYWeigHt | Wed-Thurs: 6

detroPia | Wed: 8 | Thurs: 4 WHat tiMe is left | Thurs: 8

Brookline Coolidge Corner

290 Harvard St | 617.734.2500 arBitrage | 12:10 [no Sun], 2:20

[no Tues-Thurs], 4:40, 7:20 [no TuesThurs], 9:30 | Sun: 11:45 am | TuesThurs: 2 | Tues: 7 | Wed-Thurs: 7:30

searCHing for sUgar Man |

noon [no Sun], 2:20, 4:30 [no Mon], 7:10, 9:20 for a good tiMe, Call... | 12:20 [no Sun], 2:40, 5, 7 [no Tues], 9:20 sleePWalk WitH Me | noon [no Fri], 2:30 [no Sun], 4:40 [no MonThurs], 7, 9:40 [no Mon-Tues] | Fri:

dedHaM

Community Theatre, 580 High St | 781.326.0409

Celeste & Jesse foreVer | 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15 | Fri-Sat: 9:15 intoUCHaBles | noon, 2:15, 4:40, 7 | Fri-Sat: 9:10

lPf stUdio CineMa

296 Cabot St, Beverly | 978.969.2476 Blade rUnner | Fri-Sat: 7, 9:30 |

Sun: 7:15 | Mon-Tues: 7:30 trainsPotting | Thurs: 7:30

neWton

West Newton Cinema, 1296 Washington St | 617.964.6060 arBitrage | 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:35

Beasts of tHe soUtHern Wild | 3:45, 8:25

tHe Best eXotiC Marigold Hotel | Sat-Mon: 10:20 am HoPe sPrings | 6:20 tHe intoUCHaBles | 1 [ no Mon],

3:35 [no Fri], 6:10, 8:30 it’s no dreaM | 1:20, 6:25 [no Thurs] QUeen of Versailles | 1:10, 6:20 roBot & frank | 3:40, 8:25 [no Thurs] sleePWalk WitH Me | 1:30, 4:05, 6:35, 8:35

tHe Well digger’s daUgHter | 3:30

folloW Me | Sun: 11 am iCe age: Continental drift | Sat-Mon: 10:50 am

MadagasCar 3: eUroPe’s Most Wanted | Sat, Mon: 11:05 am tHe MatCHMaker | Sat-Mon:

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | 617.495.4700 | $9: $7 students, seniors: free for ages 8 and under BARSAAT | Fri: 7 Mera naaM Joker | Sat: 7 Jagte raHo | Sun: 4 satYaM sHiVaM sUndaraM |

10:45 am

sUnrise | Wed: 7

resident eVil: retriBUtion |

Sun: 7

10:35 am

MonsieUr lazHar | Sat-Mon:

soMerVille tHeatre

55 Davis Square | 617.625.5700

4:30, 7, 9:30 | Sat-Sun: 2

kendall sQUare

tHe BoUrne legaCY | [no Sat

Please Call for tiMes arBitrage Beasts of tHe soUtHern Wild BeloVed Celeste and Jesse foreVer tHe iMPoster little WHite lies Moonrise kingdoM saMsara searCHing for sUgar Man sleePWalk WitH Me

tHe CaMPaign | [no Sat shows] 8:15 CoMPlianCe | 9:45 [no Sat] | Sat-

1 Kendall Square | 617.499.1996

shows] 4:20, 7 Sun: 1:45

tHe dark knigHt rises | [no Sat shows] 5 | Sun: 1:45

laWless | 4:30, 7, 9:30 | Sat-Sun: 2 oslo, aUgUst 31st | 5:20, 7:40, 9:45 | Sat-Sun: 3

WaltHaM

Embassy Cinema, 16 Pine St | 781.736.7852 tHe BoUrne legaCY | 3:40 | Fri-Sat:

6:50 | Sun-Thurs: 7:10

465 Huntington Ave, Boston | 617.369.3300 | $9: $8 students, seniors

Marina aBraMoViC: tHe artist is Present | Fri: 8 | Sat: 10:45 am

tHe Words | 5:10, 7:40 | Fri-Sun: 9:50 | Sat-Sun: 12:40, 3

tHe CaMPaign | 4:20 | Fri-Sun: 1:25

sUBUrBs arlington

Capitol, 204 Mass Ave | 781.648.4340 2016 | 7 | Fri-Sun: 9 finding neMo 3d | 4:55, 7:10 | Fri-

Sun: 9:20 | Sat-Sun: 12:20, 2:30 HoPe sPrings | 5:20, 7:30 | Sat-Sun: 1, 3:10 | Fri-Sun: 9:40 ParanorMan | 5| Sat-Sun: 12:30, 2:45 ted | 7:30 | Fri-Sun: 10 | MonsThurs: 5 to roMe WitH loVe | 4:50, 7:20 | Sat-Sun: 2:15 | Fri-Sun: 9:45

f

| Fri-Sat: 7:30, 9:45 | Sun-Thurs: 7:50 | Mon-Thurs: 1:20

Celeste and Jesse foreVer |

4:10 | Fri-Sun: 1:20 | Fri-Sat: 7:20, 9:30 | Sun-Thurs: 7:40 | Mon-Thurs: 1:15 tHe dark knigHt rises | Fri-Sun: 1, 4:30, 8 | Mon-Thurs: 3:30, 7 laWless | 3:50 | Fri-Sun: 1:05 | Fri-Sat: 7, 9:35 | Sun-Thurs: 7:20 | MonThurs: 1

Moonrise kingdoM |

4 | Fri-Sun: 1:15 | Fri-Sat: 7:10, 9:25 | Sun-Thurs: 7:30 | Mon-Thurs: 1:10 rUBY sParks | Fri-Sun: 1:10 | Fri-Sat: 9:40 | Mon-Thurs: 1:05

Unless otherwise noted, all film listings this week are for Friday September 14 through Thursday September 20. As always, it’s best to call the theater before heading out.

SCREEN GEMS DAVIS FILMS/IMPACT PICTURES (RE5) INC. CONSTANTIN FILM INTERNATIONAL GmbH PRESENT A CONSTANTIN FILM INTERNATIONAL GmbH/DAVIS FILMS/IMPACT PICTURES (RE5) INC. PRODUCTION A FILM BY PAUL W.S. ANDERSON MILLA JOVOVICH MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ “RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION” KEVIN DURAND SIMUSICENNA GUILLORY SHAWNBASEDROBERTS ARYANA ENGIASSOCIATENEER COLIN SALMON JOHANN URB WITH BORIEXECUTIVE S KODJOE AND LI BINGBING UPON COBY TOMANDANDY CAPCOM’S VIDEOGAME “RESIDENT EVIL” PRODUCER HIROYUKI KOBAYASHI PRODUCER VICTOR HADIDA PRODUCER MARTIN MOSZKOWICZ PRODUCED WRITTEN AND BY JEREMY BOLT PAUL W.S. ANDERSON ROBERT KULZER DON CARMODY SAMUEL HADIDA DIRECTED BY PAUL W.S. ANDERSON

STARTS fRiDAY, SepTembeR 14 iN THeATeRS iN

,

CHeCK LOCAL LiSTiNGS fOR THeATeRS AND SHOWTimeS

, 3D AND 2D


42 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

OUR RATING MASTERPIECE GOOD OKAY NOT GOOD STINKS

CAPSuLE REvIEWS

Film ARBITRAGE | 2012 | Peter Keough’s

review is on page 26. | 100m | Kendall

A

Square + Coolidge Corner + West Newton XXXX ARSENIC AND OLD LACE

| 1944 | Frank Capra’s classic Halloween film has Cary Grant as drama critic Mortimer Brewster, who on his wedding day discovers what’s in the elderberry wine that his aunts Abby (Josephine Hull) and Martha (Jean Adair) are serving to lonely old men. And as if there weren’t enough bodies in the cellar of the ladies’ Brooklyn house, Mortimer’s brother Jonathan (Raymond Massey) shows up with one in his trunk. | b&w | 118m | BPL: Thurs

X THE APPARITION | 2012 | Visit

thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 88m | Boston Common + Fenway

+ suburbs

★★★H”

–ROGER EBERT, Chicago Sun-Times

B

“ENTERTAINING!

XXW BABETTE’S FEAST | 1987 |

Echoes of ‘THE BIG CHILL’. Marion Cotillard and François Cluzet lead a sparkling ensemble.”

Derived from an Isak Dinesen story, this quaint film may be the ultimate yuppie art-house movie — it’s about food as artistic expression, as emotional liberation, as salvation. Two devout spinster sisters (Birgitte Federspiel and Bodil Kjer) live a life of pious quietude. Then their maid (Stéphane Audran), a French political refugee, insists after years of service on treating her employers and their Lutheran circle to a grand-style French banquet. The irony is that the guests, considering sensual delight ungodly, vow not to enjoy the meal but do so in spite of themselves; loosened up, they begin behaving in

– Michael Rechtshaffen, The Hollywood Reporter

François

Marion

Benoît

Jean

Laurent

Gilles

CLUZET

COTILLARD

DUJARDIN

LAFITTE

MAGIMEL LELLOUCHE

LITTLE WHITE LIES A Film by Guillaume Canet

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF THE SMASH HIT ‘TELL NO ONE’

BOSTON - PHOENIX 1/24th pg - 1 col (1.5”) x 3” FRI 9/14

FOR A GOOD TIME, See the comedy that

has everyone raving... BOUNDARY-BREAKING! “

THE NEW YORK TIMES

HILARIOUS AND FULL OF HEART!” “ EXHILARATING!” “ ★★★★!” ACCESS HOLLYWOOD

ELLE

MSN MOVIES

XXXX XXX XX X Z

a truly Christian fashion for the first time. Yet the film is stingy with its sensual pleasures: the rhythm is slow, the photography is stolidly picturesque, and the acting is either inexpressive or broad in a folksy, operetta style. Directed by Gabriel Axel. | Danish + French | 102m |

ArtsEmerson: Fri-Sun

XXXW BACHELORETTE | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 91m | Boston Common + suburbs BARSAAT | 1949 | After getting stranded in the Indian countryside when their car breaks down, Pran and Gopal (Raj Kapoor, also directing here, and Prem Nath) venture to the closest village where they meet a pair of nice lady companions (Nargis and Nimmi). Gopal, being the womanizer he is, doesn’t think much of his fling, but Pran is far more sensitive and quickly gets wrapped up in his newfound romance. | Hindi | b&w | 171m | HFA: Fri

XXXW BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/ movies for a full review. | 91m | Kendall

Square + West Newton

beloved/les bien-aimÉ Ludivine Sagnier casts a come-hither glance at Rasha Bukvic in Christophe Honoré’s melodrama.

BELOVED/LES BIEN-AIMÉS | 2011 |

Betsy Sherman’s review is on page 26. | French + Czech + English | 139m | Kendall

Square

XXW THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD

The filmmaking team of director James Ivory and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala don’t dramatize James’s tantalizing ambiguities, and only Vanessa Redgrave escapes their over-refined treatment, conveying the self-lacerating horror of a fractured, alienated personality. | 122m | BPL: Mon XXW THE BOURNE LEGACY | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 135m | Boston Common +

HOTEL | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/

movies for a full review. | 124m | West

Newton: Sat-Mon

XXW BLACKMAIL | 1929 | Alfred

Hitchcock’s final silent film is about a young woman (Anny Ondra) who kills a man who’s trying to rape her, then is caught between her boyfriend, who is the investigating detective, and a blackmailer. The most famous sequence is a chase through the Egyptology section of the British Museum. Watch for pudgy young Alfred doing a sedentary “walk-on”: he’s bothered by an obnoxious child while he sits on a train. | b&w | silent |

Kendall Square + Embassy

XX BRAVE | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.

THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY | 2012 | Brett

com/movies for a full review. | 100m |

Boston Common + suburbs

James’s atypically gritty novel about feminism in 1870s Boston becomes a dry and cautious film. The tormented heroine (Vanessa Redgrave) is a fanatic reformer who vies with her chivalrous Southern cousin (Christopher Reeve) for the affections of a beautiful young feminist orator (Madeleine Potter).

2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 91m | Boston Common +

BRANDED | 2012 | Monica Castillo’s review is on page 26. | 106m | Boston Common + suburbs

84m | Coolidge Corner: Mon

XX CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER |

CHINA HEAVYWEIGHT | 2012 | Documentary highlighting a duo of rural teenagers living in China’s Sichuan Province and training for the forthcoming Olympics. Together, they team up with former boxing champion Qi Moxiang to battle the weight of potential failure that arrives tenfold when living in a country like China. Yung Chang directs. | Chinese | 94m |

Fenway + Fresh Pond + Somerville Theatre + Chestnut Hill + Embassy + suburbs

XX THE BOSTONIANS | 1984 | Henry

+ Somerville Theatre + Embassy + suburbs

C XX THE CAMPAIGN | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 85m | Boston Common + Fenway

“★★★★ A JUICY, JOLTING 1/ 2

FINANCIAL THRILLER.” -PETER TRAVERS,

“A VANITY FAIR STORY COME TO LIFE.” -MICHAEL HOGAN,

“A CRACKLING THRILLER!”

MFA: Wed-Thurs

Michel’s review is on page 26. | 93m | Boston Common + Fresh Pond + suburbs

COLLABORATOR | 2011 | Robert

Longfellow is a playwright (Martin Donovan, also making his directorial debut) who is down on his luck, having had his most recent effort bomb on Broadway and his marriage take a nosedive. Returning home to visit his mother, Robert has a chance encounter with Gus (David Morse), his old neighbor who also happens to be a right-wing ex-con. A series of unfortunate events leads to Gus holding Robert hostage at gunpoint and the two learning a lot more about one another than either ever wanted. | 87m | Brattle: Mon LA COMMUNE (PARIS, 1871) | 2000 | Historical re-enactment shot in the style of a documentary from director Peter Watkins, this film tells the story of the Paris Commune, a government that briefly ruled the city for a couple months during 1871. Watkins’s film runs over five hours and was shot over the course of 13 days, using mostly non-professional actors. | b&w | French |

DOUBLE TIDE | 2009 | Sharon Lockhart’s documentary set in Maine and following a clam digger during a day of rare occurrence, with two daytime low tides, occurring at dawn and again at dusk. | 99m | HFA: Mon

E XW THE EXPENDABLES 2 | 2012 |

Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 102m | Boston Common +

Fenway + suburbs

F FINDING NEMO 3D | 2003 | Brett

Michel’s review is on page 26. | 100m | Boston Common + Fenway +

Fresh Pond + Chestnut Hill + Arlington Capitol + suburbs XXW FOLLOW ME: THE YONI NETANYAHU STORY | 2012 | Visit

thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 87m | West Newton: Sun XW FOR A GOOD TIME, CALL... | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 85m | Coolidge

Corner

H XXW HOPE SPRINGS | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 100m | Boston Common +

Fenway + Fresh Pond + Chestnut Hill + West Newton + Arlington Capitol + suburbs

345m | ArtsEmerson: Sat

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XXX COMPLIANCE | 2012 | Visit

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DETROPIA | 2012 | Gerald Peary’s

review is on page 26. | 90m | MFA:

DRIFT | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.

com/movies for a full review. | 94m |

Fresh Pond + West Newton [Sat-Mon] + suburbs

XXXW THE IMPOSTER | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 99m | Kendall Square XXXW THE INTOUCHABLES | 2011 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | French | 112m | West

Wed-Thurs

Newton

DAYS | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/

OF THEODOR HERZL | 2012 | Visit

XW DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG

movies for a full review. | 94m | Boston

Common + suburbs

XXW IT IS NO DREAM: THE LIFE thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 97m | West Newton


ThEPhoEnix.coM | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 43

J JAGTE RAHO | 1956 | Raj Kapoor

produced and stars as a poor peasant who arrives in a big city looking for some work. Viewed as an outcast by the locals and on the run from those attempting to banish him, he observes many shady undertakings throughout the city that make him second guess his original stance that the city was going to be an improvement over his previous lifestyle. Amit Moitra and Sombhu Mitra direct. | Hindi | b&w |

138m | HFA: Sun

K XXW KUMARÉ | 2012 | Visit

thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 83m | MFA: Fri-Sun

benevolent shrink Dr. Jaquith (Claude Rains) and then blooms under the romantic attention of Jerry Durrance (Paul Henreid), a married man she meets on a cruise. At the end, she returns him to his miserable marriage, preferring to love him indirectly, through his daughter Tina (Janis Wilson), whom she’s ensconced in her mansion and redeemed from the kind of loneliness and depression she herself felt as a child. “Don’t let’s ask for the moon,” Charlotte cautions Jerry in the celebrated fade-out, “when we have the stars.” Davis brings so much conviction to her masochistic role, it’s hard not to be caught up in the lushness of the romantic sentiment. The movie’s most famous flourish is Henreid’s way of offering Davis a cigarette: he places two between his lips, lights them both, and hands her one. Irving Rapper directed. | b&w | 117m

| South Boston Branch Library: Tues

and uproarious. | 118m | Honan-Allston

Branch Library: Wed

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION | 2012

| Fifth installment of the film series from director Paul W.S. Anderson. Alice (Milla Jovovich) awakens in the heart of the Umbrella Corporation’s operations facility and delves further into the past of the company responsible for unleashing the deadly T-virus upon the general population. | 95m | Boston Common + Fenway + Fresh

XX LAWLESS | 2012 | Visit

thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 116m | Boston Common +

Fenway + Fresh Pond + Somerville Theatre + Embassy + suburbs

LITTLE WHITE LIES | 2010 | Gerald Peary’s review is on page 26. | French | 154m | Kendall Square

LOST HORIZON | 1937 | Frank Capra’s

film concerns a group of civilians who crash-land their hijacked plane in the Himalayas and are rescued by the people of Shangri-la. Unfortunately, they’re quick to learn that the miraculous utopia isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Starring Ronald Colman, Jane Wyatt, and Sam Jaffe. | b&w | 132m |

ArtsEmerson: Sat

M XXW MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S

MOST WANTED | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 85m | West Newton: Sat + Mon

XXXW MARINA ABRAMOVIC: THE ARTIST IS PRESENT | 2012 | Visit

thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 106m | MFA: Fri-Sun XXX THE MATCHMAKER | 2010 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | Hebrew | 112m | West Newton:

Sat-Mon

MERA NAAM JOKER | 1970 | Story

of Raju (Raj Kapoor, also directing), whose father was considered the best circus clown of all-time. Despite a tragic accident in which his father dies during a performance, Raju opts to follow in his footsteps, encountering a number of trials, tribulations, and heartbreaks along the way. | Hindi |

184m | HFA: Sat

XXXW MONSIEUR LAZHAR | 2011 |

Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | French | 94m | West Newton:

O XW THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY

GREEN | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/

movies for a full review. | 125m | Boston

Common + Fenway + suburbs

XXXX OSLO, AUGUST 31ST | 2010 |

Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | Norwegian | 95m | Somerville

Theatre

P XXX PARANORMAN | 2012 | Visit

thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 93m | Boston Common +

Fenway + Fresh Pond + Arlington Capitol + suburbs

XXXX THE PHILADELPHIA STORY

| 1940 | The perfect sophisticated romantic comedy. Katharine Hepburn is the society girl everyone’s after, James Stewart is the gossip columnist trying not to get into his story over his head, and Cary Grant is C.K. Dexter Haven, the divorced husband who just keeps hanging around. George Cukor directed this film version of Philip Barry’s play with unerring timing and pace. It’s a sublime comedy of manners, perhaps the finest film of its kind. | b&w | 112m | South Boston Branch

Library: Thurs

PLANET OF SNAIL | 2011 | Story

XXX ROBOT & FRANK | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 89m | West Newton XXX RUBY SPARKS | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 104m | Boston Common +

Embassy

S

XW PREMIUM RUSH | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 91m | Boston Common + Fenway

+ suburbs

XXXX MOONRISE KINGDOM | 2012 |

Common + Kendall Square + Embassy

N XXXX THE NEW BABYLON | 1929 | A Russian silent by avant-garde directors Grigori Kozintsev and Leonid Trauberg, this glittering expressionistic masterpiece focuses on the 1871 revolt of the Paris Commune. As the Parisian laborers and the bourgeoisie face off, a sultry clerk (Elena Kuzima) in a department store called the New Babylon emerges as the symbolic link between the two classes. But when she steps out from behind the counter to join the Communard fray, she discovers the price of standing up to the non-revolutionary middle class. As if the decadent visuals and rah-rah patriotism weren’t heady enough, this mesmerizing study of social collapse further enriches its textures with a breathtakingly intricate score by Dmitri Shostakovich. | b&w | silent | 80m

| ArtsEmerson: Fri

XXX NOW, VOYAGER | 1941 | A shrine to the Hays Code. Spinster Charlotte Vale (Bette Davis) is released from her mother’s domination by

| In town on business, Rajeev (Shashi Kapoor) is a dashing engineer who meets and instantly falls for Roopa (Zeenat Aman). It isn’t until the two are married though that Rajeev realizes that the half of Roopa’s face that she always keeps covered is severely disfigured from an accident she had as a child. This realization sends Rajeev into a sharp downward spiral, questioning his rash decision to wed this woman before he really got to know her. Raj Kapoor directs. | Hindi |

Coolidge Corner

Fenway + Fresh Pond + suburbs

q XXX THE qUEEN OF VERSAILLES |

2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 100m | West Newton

R XXX THE REPLACEMENTS | 2000 |

In a parallel NFL universe, it’s late in the season and the players have gone on strike. Never-was QB “Footsteps” Shane Falco (Keanu Reeves) is recruited by new Washington Sentinels head coach Jimmy McGinty (a wily Gene Hackman) to lead a bunch of misfit “replacement” players and keep the franchise’s playoff hopes alive. Director Howard Deutch’s colorful cast of scabs includes gangsters, gamblers, inmates, and a berserk SWAT officer (Jon Favreau of Swingers and Friends fame). The normally unaffecting Reeves is dutiful and square-jawed in his Cinderella shoes and has a perky, cute Sandra Bullock clone to fall for (Brooke Langton as the head cheerleader). The result is underdog-rooting infectious, and the ass-slapping antics of the “replacement” cheerleaders from the Pussycat Lounge are at once titillating

Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 112m | Arlington Capitol Z 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 89m | Boston Common

W XXX THE WELL DIGGER’S

DAUGHTER | 2011 | Visit thePhoenix.

com/movies for a full review. | 107m |

West Newton

WHAT TIME IS LEFT | 2012 |

Director Dakin Henderson’s study of growing old and the fears that come along with the process. For his documentary, he turned the lens on his two grandmothers in their mid80s, one suffering from dementia, the other still sharp-witted and healthy, as they weigh the value and consequences of dependence on family. | 64m | MFA: Thurs XW THE WORDS | 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 96m | Boston Common +

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XXX SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN

| 2012 | Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 86m | Kendall Square +

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XXXX SUNRISE: A SONG OF

TWO HUMANS | 1927 | F.W. Murnau’s

Video Production

gorgeous, poetic melodrama is one of the abiding masterpieces of cinema, perhaps the greatest silent film of all. It’s impossible to tell that the film was shot in America at the Fox studio: Sunrise is so, so German, directed in the fluid, elaborate Expressionist manner. The story tells of a happily married villager (George O’Brien) who is seduced by a conniving city girl (Margaret Livingston) into trying to drown his devoted wife (the heartbreakingly beautiful Janet Gaynor). Exquisite photography by Charles Rosher and Karl Struss, and perhaps never on the screen has marriage seemed so sacramental. | b&w | silent | 100m | HFA: Wed

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T found Super-8 footage, half re-enacted scenes, Marten Persiel’s coming-ofage tale follows a trio of kids as they discover their love of skateboarding in East Berlin. The film follows them from their childhood in the ’70s to

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMPBER 14

BOSTON PHOENIX

XXW SPARKLE | 2012 | Visit

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XXW THE POSSESSION | 2012 |

Visit thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 92m | Boston Common +

XX TO ROME WITH LOVE | 2012 |

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thePhoenix.com/movies for a full review. | 102m | Kendall Square XXW SANTA SANGRE | 1989 | The “Cinema of Excess” is the polite description for filmmaker Alejandro (El Topo) Jodorowsky’s anything-goes surrealism, in which every scene will have as much blood, and as many weirdly dressed extras, as possible. This one was shot in Mexico, and it’s about a guy sitting on a tree perch in a loony bin (Axel Jodorowsky) who thinks back on his mad life growing up in a circus, in which he ends up, after many macabre, violent episodes, serving as the arms for his crazed, armless, Medea-raging mother. If only he can locate his deaf-mute girlfriend, who looks like a mini Anaïs Nin. Jodorowsky is a Fellini without the talent or the intellect. But, yes, Santa Sangre is kind of fun. Highlight: an elephant funeral in which the mourners break into the casket for elephant meat. | 123m |

of a blind and deaf man who communicates with his wife using finger Braille, a system by which they tap the words into each other’s hands. Seung-Jun Yi directs. | Korean | 88m |

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46 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 | ThE BoSTon PhoEnix | ThEPhoEnix.coM

back talk

Q&A with todd Gitlin

“The identity of the [Occupy] movement that sprang up was a brilliant exercise in social innovation. It deserves an entrepreneurship award.”

Volcanic Todd GiTlin lookS aT occuPy _By Chr is FA rA one Most aficionados of progressive politics probably knew that Todd Gitlin would write a book on Occupy even before he did. The chair of the Columbia journalism PhD program has essentially prepped for such a project throughout his career. In addition to mastering the art of insider movement journalism with such age-defining works as The Sixties, he also authored the 1980 media critique The Whole World Is Watching, the ’60s-era title of which became a go-to chant in the Occupy playbook. With Occupy Nation: The Roots, the Spirit, and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street (It Books), Gitlin offers the most learned account yet of the spontaneous Stateside revolution that took place last fall. I asked him how he managed to write the new protest bible in a mere few months.

f

wHat were your initial intentions upon arriving at occupy wall street? I didn’t have any grand intention when I first went down there. I just wanted to scope it out, because the reports I’d read didn’t give me a feel for how substantial it was and what kind of patterns there were. The day I really learned something was the day of the first big march from Zuccotti Park to Foley Square. What was evident was the difference between the people who’d been camping out and the people who were coming along for the march. That was when I first saw a discrepancy between the demand-less people in the camp, and the demand-ful people who I’d come to call the outer movement.

tr il l u s

A t io n

m B ZAm By ro

ArCh

i

wHen did you decide tHat tHis would be a book? Early on, in early October, I got

contacted by the [New York] Times, who asked me to write an op-ed piece about how this was or wasn’t like the Tea Party. . . . Several weeks after that, I happened to have lunch with my agent, and she asked me when I was going to write a book. I hadn’t thought about it yet, but I’d written three or four pieces and had the feeling that I was in the groove. I didn’t need to be taught the alphabet, but I knew enough to know that what I was looking at was a mammal and not a bird. At the same time, I didn’t know enough to feel smug. I had a necessary balance of pre-knowledge about social movements and also a curiosity. I felt like the farmer who watched a volcano rise in his field. You can imagine his astonishment, even if he knows that the land was prone to volcanoes. I knew that something might materialize, but I had no idea how or when. The fact that it was surprising drove me to figure out what was distinctive about it.

How different was tHe process of writing tHis book from tHat of writing sometHing like The SixTieS? I started writing

the book in the middle of November, and I finished it in the middle of January. It was an exhilarating experience, and I have to say that I’d always wanted to do something like that. I wrote this in a fever — every day for two months. It was the single most thrilling writing experience that I’ve ever had. My deadline had been the end of January, but I beat it. In a way, this is book-writing as blogging. I have a different relationship with the Occupy movement than I had with the New Left, but I felt like I could get into the gestures, and the sort of smells and sounds. In this book, also, I change locations and voices. I’m trying to be fair to all of the parties, whether I agree or not, and I’m trying to plunge into all of the positions and then make my pontifical declarations of how I think things ought to be.

wHat’s especially unique about occupy? The identity of the movement that sprang up was a brilliant exercise in social innovation. It deserves an entrepreneurship award. It created an institution — the encampment — where people of the countercultural inclination, from anarchists to people with a deep longing for an assembly community, can feel at home. There was this brilliant blend of the two styles, which was always somewhat delicate, but it did succeed for a couple of months.

i Have to ask tHe big, annoying question — wHat’s next? The old model does not

look sustainable anymore — that’s not a value judgment, it’s just my appraisal. The police won’t permit it, the media have moved on, and the presidential campaign makes it all the more difficult. Presenting the old character again is not thrilling. It’s not marketable. It just doesn’t have the momentum that it did before. So if there is to be a continuation, it’s going to have to look different. And in some ways it is — some people want to continue with demonstrations against forecloses, some people want to campaign for constitutional amendments, some people are trying to organize a functional financial institution. . . . Personally, I have a rough hypothesis. If Obama wins, then I think what’s been demonstrated is that his move toward the equality agenda and away from the bipartisanship farce opens a door for something inspired by Occupy. Some people call it the “99 percent movement,” but whatever you want to call it, it might be possible for those networks to mobilize and actually produce some results. ^


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The Boston Phoenix | September 14–20, 2012