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facebook.com/ProvidencePhoenix | @ProvPhoenix | Providence.thePhoenix.com | the Providence Phoenix | october 17, 2014 5

FirstWorks presents

Contents

Jazz virtuosity from a genius violinist

on the cover F illustration by dale stephanos

ThE final issuE

Sadly, with this issue we call an end to our 36 years of serving the people of the City of Providence and the State of Rhode Island as its Alternative Weekly Newspaper. As we do, we take great pride in knowing that our unique style of covering the rich culture, politics, and lifestyles of our community made a positive difference to its quality of life. Within the pages of this last issue are reminiscences that touch on some of the contributions made by a long list of extraordinary people who editorially made the Providence Phoenix an highly-respected, award-winning publication. There are, of course, many others — the administrative, accounting, marketing, and salespeople who passionately worked in those critical, though less-heralded, positions necessary to not only produce and distribute our publication, but to involve us in the city’s and state’s cultural and political fabric. To all, my enduring respect and gratitude. I am also grateful to the literally thousands of advertisers, most especially our local supporters, who over the years believed in us and invested in our ability to create a publication that would bring their businesses, products, and services to the right people — our readers. And that brings me to the core reason we were able to do what we did — you — our millions of readers who over the decades gave us their time, attention, and loyalty. From all of us who have made up the Providence Phoenix family, thank you, we will miss you — and, after reading thousands of tweets and Facebook postings, we know that you will miss us.

Photo by David Katzenstein

Regina Carter Quintet

OCTOBER 17, 2014

Publisher stePhen M. Mindich

in this issue

p 20 p 22 p 10

ThE providence phoenix, 1978-2014

What will Rhode Island be missing without the Providence Phoenix? We count the ways. Plus, an avalanche of remembrances, tributes, tall tales, and trivia. So long, everybody.

Providence

Providence | PortLand voL. xxvii | no. 41

stePhen m. mindich PubLishEr + ChairMan

everett finkeLstein

ChiEf oPErating offiCEr

offices ProvidEnCE 150 chestnut st, Providence, ri 02903 401.273.6397 | fax 401.273.0920 wEbsitE Providence thePhoenix.com PortLand 65 west commerciaL st, suite 207, PortLand, me 04101 | 207.773.8900 | fax 207.773.8905 subsCriPtions buLk rate $74/6 months, $156/1 year, aLLow 7-14 days for deLivery. caLL 401.273.6397 CoPyright © 2014 by the Providence Phoenix, inc. aLL rights reserved. reProduction without Permission, by any method whatsoever, is Prohibited. PrintEd by mass web Printing co., inc., 314 washington st, auburn, ma 01501 | 508.832.5317

Managing Editor Lou PaPineau nEws Editor PhiLiP eiL Contributing Editors biLL rodriguez, Johnette rodriguez Contributing writErs rudy cheeks, chris conti, greg cook, chiP young Contributing PhotograPhErs nataLJa kent, richard mccaffrey graPhiC dEsignErs andrew caLiPa, Jennifer soares aCCount ExECutivEs bruce aLLen, micheLe camPeLLone, scott hanna, Leah schroeder advErtising oPErations ManagEr adam oPPenheimer dirECtor of adMinistration rachaeL mindich sEnior aCCountant kathryn simoes MEdia oPErations Coordinator ryan mccabe CirCuLation kevin dorgan thE PhoEnix MEdia/CoMMuniCations grouP ChairMan stePhen m. mindich ChiEf oPErating offiCEr everett finkeLstein

“A knockout violinist who leads a knockout band!” —O Magazine

Saturday, October 18 - 8pm RISD Auditorium

Get tickets ($20-$44) first-works.org or 401-421-4281 Season Media sponsors:


6 OCTOBER 17, 2014 | ThE pROvidEnCE phOEnix | pROvidEnCE.ThEphOEnix.COm | @pROvphOEnix | faCEBOOk.COm/pROvidEnCEphOEnix

Phillipe + Jorge’s Cool, Cool World

ancient history headed down memory lane in the wayback machine While we assume most of you have

been following us in the Providence f Phoenix for a while now, we wanted to

let you know about the roots of “Phillipe and Jorge’s Cool, Cool World.” It was a long time and many Pernod and grapefruits ago, but here are our best accounts.

Jorge remembers: When the Phoenix came to toWn

“Phillipe and Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” began in 1979 at the Providence Eagle. Chip Young and Rudy Cheeks (Phillipe and Jorge, respectively) had mentioned the idea to Ty Davis, publisher of the alternative print news outlet, the NewPaper, but Ty didn’t think it would work. When the Eagle came to Providence (carpetbaggers from Connecticut), one of the first things they did was put a personal ad in some of their early editions asking “Rudy Cheeks to please contact the office.” When I saw this, I took a stroll over to Steeple Street where they had set up shop next to the building that now houses New Rivers restaurant, and I met with the owner/publisher, Vin Suprynowicz, who told me what he had in mind for the paper. He had worked at the Hartford Advocate and envisioned that same sort of “full service alt-weekly.” At that time, the NewPaper was more heavily weighted towards arts and entertainment coverage. I was willing to give these new people a chance and asked if they had a sports writer or movie critic. They said “no” to both. I suggested they contact Les Daniels to be the movie critic and Chip could write sports. I told them about the “Phillipe and Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” column idea and also said I would like to write an additional humor column called “That Proves It,” named for one of my favorite lines in Plan 9 from Outer Space. They said “yes” to it all. The first years at the Eagle were pretty good days, especially after Caroline Knapp, a recent graduate of Brown University, joined the staff. Her desk was next to mine at the office and she was a wonderful person and talented writer. (Note: Look up Drinking: A Love Story by the late and beautiful young lady.) After a few years, though, things started getting weird. Suprynowicz denied that there were any problems with cash flow at the Eagle, despite the fact that many staffers couldn't cash their checks the day they were issued due to “insufficient funds.” Ty Davis, who remained a good friend, would occasionally talk about having us come to the NewPaper. “Phillipe and Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” had proven to be a popular column. Finally, in the summer of 1985, we had had enough at the Eagle and decided we’d take Ty up on his offer and go to the NewPaper. However, we didn’t tell Suprynowicz right away. On a Friday evening, the WLNE-Channel 6 news team showed up with lights and cameras at an Eagle staff party on Smith Hill and we announced our intentions to them. It was a slow news day and this led the news at 11 that evening.

Suprynowicz saw this on TV and responded by running down to the Secretary of State’s office the following Monday morning to “copyright” the names “Phillipe & Jorge” and “Cool, Cool World.” He had had nothing to do with their creation, of course, and, according to our understanding of copyright law for freelancers, we owned the content of our “work for hire.” We didn’t know about the copyright ploy until the next week when a phantom “Phillipe & Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” column appeared in the Eagle while the real one appeared in the NewPaper. The Eagle column sucked and that pissed us off so we filed suit in Superior Court for a temporary restraining order against the Eagle. (Thank you always to our pro bono — and we don’t mean Sonny Bono — attorney, Gary Berkowitz). Eventually, the whole matter was resolved with Chip and I retaining all rights to the column. And, as we had predicted to the Providence Journal, the Eagle went out of business within about six months. The IRS closed them down and I never saw my wonderful desk at the Eagle again. There was also an incident involving Suprynowicz allegedly discharging a shotgun into the ceiling of his office while confronting an unpaid employee, but we won’t bore you with the details. So we moved over to Washington Street where the NewPaper office was at the time.

jen sorensen

Within a year or so, the Phoenix organization, headquartered in Boston, made an offer to Ty Davis that he couldn’t refuse and they bought the NewPaper. The deal was brokered by Phoenix employee and former Journal reporter, Peter Kadzis, who happened to be living in the attic of a house I shared with a between-jobs Phillipe and another roommate. There was a rebellion by some of the NewPaper staff who didn’t support the sale and they broke off and created the NicePaper, which lasted for a few years — a different story for a different time. Phillipe & Jorge stuck with the Phoenix and found founder and publisher Steve Mindich to be a good and visionary leader. After a few years as the Phoenix’s NewPaper, we finally became the Providence Phoenix.

and PhilliPe sez:

Phillipe and Jorge began — philosophically, at least — before the column was ever published. At the time, the mid-1970s, a late, legendary bar named Leo’s existed on Chestnut Street in Providence, a few blocks away from the Phoenix’s current office space. The locale was across the street from what was a down-and-out alky palace, the Met Café (the genesis of the current cult music space in the Bucket). It became a spot where recent Brown and RISD grads came together in a bizarre cross-fertilization petri dish that eventually reeled in

Providence Journal reporters. One ink-stained wretch called Leo’s the “Providence Night School of Journalism.” A worker upstairs from Leo’s, the late Barbara Conway, who knew Rudy from her days as the amazing dancer, Simone Cuc, in his band, the Fabulous Motels, met me while I was managing Leo’s, and said, “I have a friend you have to meet; you’re so much alike it’s scary.” Two weeks later, as I was bartending during the day shift at Leo’s, a stout and sturdy young gent whom I’d never seen before strode through the front door, walked up to the bar, and without a blink said, “Hi Chip. Barbara around?” I replied, “Sure, Rudy. She’s upstairs. Take the elevator next door.” Thus began “a beautiful friendship.” Phillipe and Jorge manifested itself out of that instant camaraderie. I was a fan of the British satire magazine, Private Eye, founded by Peter Cook; and we both loved Alexander Cockburn’s “Press Clips” column in the Village Voice. Modeling P&J on those pieces, with a healthy mutual appreciation of Providence-raised humor-writing genius S.J. Perelman, “Phillipe and Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” was born a couple years later. The painter, Dan Gosch, came up with the title. We had a great devotion to absurdity, and tried to make each other laugh out loud — no easy feat for a couple of totally jaded stand-up comedy fans. And that’s about the best background I can give for a couple of professional wiseasses and reprobates who you’ve had to endure for 36 years. But as my dearly beloved and sainted mother would say, “Fuck ’em if they can’t take a joke.”

thank You, thank You, thank You . . . .

There are a lot of people we'd like to thank and we’ll probably miss some but we’ll make an attempt to remember most everyone. Thank you to NewPaper founder Ty Davis, and to NewPaper/Phoenix news editors Peter Donahue, Clea Simon, Lisa Prevost, Jody Ericson, Ian Donnis, David Scharfenberg, and Phil Eil. And thank you to the uber-editor of them all, a total professional and steady hand since the beginning, Lou Papineau. And to the heart and soul of the Providence Phoenix, longtime associate publisher, Steve Brown. Then there were the many sales associates who got the money to keep us going, the senior-most being Bruce Allen. And of course, Stephen Mindich, the founder of all the Phoenix publications and ventures, a man who risked — and often lost — millions of his own money to keep this thing going. These were wonderful people and years that we will cherish. Perhaps “Phillipe and Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” will find another home. We’re working on that. But this has been home for a long, long time and we are grateful. ^


8 OCTOBER 17, 2014 | ThE pROvidEnCE phOEnix | pROvidEnCE.ThEphOEnix.COm | @pROvphOEnix | faCEBOOk.COm/pROvidEnCEphOEnix

“It's not about playing perfect guitar solos, it's about expressing yourself through music. The outcome we're looking for is empowerment.”

This Just In

_hilary jones

Amplifiers, Etc.

The Festival Circuit

tractors, cow poop, nunchucks, Singing good covers of and cider donuts in richmond bad songs for a great cause In 2000, a rap-rock band from Los

Angeles named Crazy Town briefly f dominated the American pop charts with the song “Butterfly.” The song reached number one in 15 countries. It features a sampled Red Hot Chili Peppers guitar hook and lyrics such as, “Such a sexy, sexy, pretty little thing/ Fierce nipple pierce you got me sprung with your tongue ring.” To hear it is to hate it. In the music video, shirtless band members dance in a Lisa Frankinspired forest, sneering arrogantly at the camera while animated butterflies float in the air around them.

“Butterfly” should have never been allowed to happen, but the silver lining is that the song will be transformed into something hilarious and awesome on Saturday, October 18 at Aurora, when Girls Rock! Rhode Island celebrates its five-year anniversary with “Take Back the Mic: Good Covers of Bad Songs.” The all-ages show features local bands and performers including Mother Tongue, Virusse, Roz and the Rice Cakes, and Gertrude Atherton, all performing rewritten and/or re-appropriated versions of otherwise unsavory songs. Girls Rock! has come a long way since its inception in 2009, when executive director Hilary Jones and a few other founding members decided they wanted to establish a local rock camp for girls modeled after similar programs around the country. Today, the organization is one of more than 50 camps worldwide that operate independently but share the same mission: to empower girls via music creation, performance, collaboration, workshops, and being introduced to positive role models. “I think one of the major takeaways from camp is that campers are doing this thing that’s kind of impossible in some ways,” says Jones. “Learning an instrument and writing a song with a band that didn’t exist five days ago and then playing it in front of 500 people —

the hope is that it makes them think, ‘If I did this, what else can I do in my life?’ ” Over the last five years, Girls Rock! RI has expanded its programming to include year-round lessons, a Ladies Rock Camp for adults, and most recently, an after-school chorus program at the all-girl Sophia Academy, a Providence middle school focused on economically disadvantaged students. “It’s not about playing perfect guitar solos, it’s about expressing yourself through music,” says Jones. “The outcome we’re looking for is empowerment, and not necessarily the ability to be a crazy shredder.” During a recent afterschool workshop, guitar instructor Ana Mallozzi sat with four students on the floor of the Girls Rock! West End headquarters and began class by asking if anyone in the group had ever tuned a guitar before. “I have, several times!” shouted a girl named Cecily, who looked about 12 and sat holding a black electric guitar that looked disproportionately large against her small frame. The group learned about tuners, amplifiers, distortion, and feedback, and not one of them seemed even slightly self-conscious or frustrated at their ability level, despite this being only the second day of class. This, says Jones, is exactly the type of atmosphere that Girls Rock! strives to create. “It’s a little bit like a utopia, in some ways. You really do feel like you’re in a bubble. And when you leave the bubble and go back to your job or whatever you do afterwards, it feels weird. It’s pretty nice, we have a very supportive community.” The general public will be able to experience a bit of that community at Saturday’s show, when bands and former campers will cover songs by George Michael, Dolly Parton, the Carpenters and, yes, Crazy Town. “The rules for interpretation are pretty open,” says Jones. “Either it’s a song that’s lyrically bad or offensive in some way and the performer has to change the words, or it’s a song that’s just really bad and they have to find a creative way to make it better. There will definitely be some great performances.” “Take Back the Mic: Good Covers of Bad Songs” will take place Saturday, October 18 at 7 pm at Aurora, 276 Westminster St, Providence. The cover is $5. To find out more about Girls Rock!, visit girlsrockri.org.

_Liz Lee

f

The cow poop has everyone excited. People know when it will happen — shortly after 2 pm on a sunny Sunday, October 12, at the Washington County Fairgrounds in Richmond — but they don’t know where. Everyone hopes that the cow will do her business on their miniature plot of land, temporarily deeded for $5 by the Chariho Rotary Club. A field is marked off with plot numbers, and spectators will sit in bleachers, waiting and watching the cow until nature calls. If she plops on their plot, they win $500. “The cows keep us going,” says Rotarian Sherilyn Reed of Richmond. It’s her job this year to sell deeds, but last year she was right up close for the action. “Last year they let two young bulls out on the field together, and they were both so excited that it was over as soon as it started. And then we went out with measuring tapes to determine the winner.” There are also smaller prizes for the second and third droppings. Regulars agree that it’s a slow year for Swamp Yankee Days, a festival now in its third decade. Some blame Saturday’s rainy weather; others think there are just too many competing events on Columbus Day weekend. The Rotary Club used to host Swamp Yankee Days in September, but it moved to October when the Carolina Volunteer Fire Department took over the festival a couple of years ago. This year, Saturday was a washout — too swampy, not enough Yankees — and Sunday was a little slow, too, despite the sunny, early fall weather. The diehard Swamp Yankees — “swampahs,” they call themselves — are out in full force, though. About 60 spectators, men and women of all ages, watch a tractor pull, where one young woman waited her turn alongside a group of men mostly old enough to be her grandfather. Two of the tractors were painted pink and covered with slogans about breast cancer.

FarM-reaDy Vintage John Deeres.

There are classic cars and a large display of tractors on the field, too — the latter group put together by the Rhode Island Antique Tractor Club. The club boasts about 140 members, and despite the name, members come from Massachusetts and Connecticut as well, including club president John Anderson, a serious tractor enthusiast sporting denim overalls and a gray handlebar moustache. “He’s a wooden nutmegger,” says Glenn Gough, one of the group’s founding members, about Anderson’s Connecticut roots. Gough, who lives in Charlestown, founded the club in 1990 with two friends. (Gough’s wife Janice was the club’s first secretary, and she still attends every event. She’s wearing a baseball hat with a brim autographed by South County cartoonist Don Bousquet.) There are dozens of farm tractors and garden tractors, most of which are over a half-century old. “Some of the newer garden tractors are from the ’60s, but most of them are older than that,” Anderson says. “The oldest is Sherman’s 1934 John Deere Unstyled A, one of three Unstyled As in a row, all painted the trademark John Deere green. But tractors and cow poop aren’t the festival’s only draw. There are jonnycakes and clam chowder, as well as massive warm cider doughnuts, pumpkin pie, fried zucchini, and bratwurst. There is small stage where bluegrass and country singers run through renditions of “King of the Road” and “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry.” Late Sunday morning, a pair of teenaged karate students performed a choreographed nunchucks demonstration to the tune of “Dueling Banjos,” the song made famous by the 1972 film, Deliverance. Which gets to the heart of what a swamp yankee is, really. A swamp yankee is not quite a redneck, not quite a hillbilly, but definitely features elements of both. Coincidentally, a brand-new roadhouse called Billy Hill’s — a joking reference to its owner’s hillbilly qualities — was celebrating its grand opening just down the street from the festival. Saturday’s event featured a performance by RI’s former country-singing wunderkind, Billy Gilman (who is now 26). While the origins of the name swamp yankee are unclear, it’s generally agreed that the term refers to colonial descendants living in the rural parts of western Rhode Island and eastern Connecticut. The term can be an insult or a badge of honor, although it’s so regionally specific that linguist Ruth Schell probably wasn’t far off when she predicted in a 1963 article that the expression might die off altogether in a generation or two. When asked whether they consider themselves swamp yankees, Reed and the other Chariho Rotarians nod in agreement. “I guess you could say that,” Reed says.

_Matthew Lawrence


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10 OCTOBER 17, 2014 | ThE pROvidEnCE phOEnix | pROvidEnCE.ThEphOEnix.COm

farewell, phoenix the ocean state loses its voice _By Ph il iP e il I am the last person to interview for a job at the Boston Phoenix’s office. That’s what outgoing Phoenix editor Peter Kadzis told me on the morning of March 25, 2013 as he walked me past enormous trash bins, empty desks, and stacks of old issues on our way out of the now-abandoned office space at 126 Brookline Ave, down the street from Fenway Park. The announcement of the Boston Phoenix’s closing had come a week and a half earlier, triggering a flood of elegies and love letters from across the country. “We never got paid much, but we did get paid, and we were able to write about what we wanted to write the way we wanted to write it,” Charles Pierce wrote for Grantland.com. “I was thrilled every minute of my time there. No hyperbole: every minute,” added New York magazine film critic David Edelstein, in a blog post of his own. In “Memories of the Phoenix” on newyorker.com, longtime New Yorker staffer Susan Orlean wrote, “I attended the University of Michigan, but I got my real education at alternative newsweeklies. That’s where I learned to write, to report, and to think of myself as a journalist; that’s where I grew up.” I read these testimonials to prep for my Phoenix interview and, apparently, said a few of the right things during my conversation with Kadzis. A few days later, I got a call offering me the news editor job in Providence. I accepted immediately, and with a somewhat muddled mood — spooked by the funereal vibe of my interview, yet ecstatic to have my first full-time writing/editing job, and bolstered by the Phoenixinspired words of some of my writing heroes — I went to work. The job lasted 18 months. Now, before we go any further, I want to state my limitations. Eighteen months is just a tiny fraction — literally, about 1/24th — of the total lifespan of the Providence Phoenix. And, since I was born in 1985, this paper is seven years older than I am. So I’m not the guy who was there when this all began. (For that, I suggest heading to our collection of testimonials on page 14.) That said, for the next 24 hours or so, I’m still the guy getting paid for this giddy and gritty, heart swelling and heartbreaking, sublime and stressful job of news editor at the Providence Phoenix. So it falls on me to say something. It’s an honor to have the opportunity.

many people realize,” read an introductory note. “This modest preview issue represents the first step towards establishing a new, major weekly offering both the most comprehensive entertainment information possible, and a fresh perspective on what’s going on in the state. Unlike Boston, which has two fat weeklies and two large dailies, Rhode Island has never had a major statewide weekly. One daily newspaper company more-or-less determines most of

richard mccaffrey

f

I recently visited a journalism class at RISD and,

before we began, I asked, “Does everyone know what f the Providence Phoenix is?” Only about three of 15 students raised their hand. This was better than the zero hands raised when I asked a similar question about Gawker. com, but it was still striking. So, perhaps it’s wise to offer some history. The NewPaper (predecessor to the Phoenix) was a free, biweekly newspaper born on March 8, 1978. That first 12-page “preview” issue featured a cover story on the Beatles parody band, the Rutles, plus articles on Warren Zevon, the reggae-soundtracked film The Harder They Come, and notable upcoming events like “the J. Geils Band, still celebrating their first decade together, perform[ing] with Roomful of Blues at 8 in Walsh Gym on the Rhode Island College campus” on March 17. The issue also included a brief manifesto. “We believe that, whether you’re discussing music or arguing politics, there’s a lot more going on in Rhode Island than

the information Rhode Islanders receive from local news sources. We don’t believe this is a healthy situation.” And so it began. Within a few months, the NewPaper shifted to weekly distribution, and Providence — following New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Philadelphia, Portland [OR], and various other cities — became an altweekly town. Now, in addition (or in opposition) to the Providence Journal, readers could pick up a free paper featuring first-person accounts of abortions and nuclear power plant protests, and interviews with Talking Heads front man David Byrne about his time working at the New York System on Smith Street. “One of the guys who worked there insulted one of the customers one night so the customer picked up a big pot of mustard and poured it on his head,” Byrne told writer Rudy Cheeks in a November 1978 interview. Cheeks would soon embark with fellow NewPaper writer Chip Young on a gonzo, riotous, decadeslong political/cultural conversation about “Vo Dilun” called “Phillipe & Jorge’s Cool, Cool World.” Over time, that column — and the paper, in general — worked its way into the fabric of the Ocean State. In 1979, Jean Rawson told of the difficulties the 8000 domestic violence victims in Rhode Island faced when seeking help. A woman named Ann told her, “At one point I went to Welfare to ask for help when I was 17, and they said, ‘You’re either the property of your parents or the property of your husband until you’re 18 years old, and we’re not going to do anything.’ ” In 1987 Bill Flanagan bade farewell to the Schemers, which had been dubbed by many “the best rock ’n’ roll

band Rhode Island ever produced.” He didn’t disagree. “They articulated exactly what it felt like to be living hungry in New England in the 1980s. And it was not affected, it was real,” he wrote. “The Schemers reached more people, moved and inspired and made sense for more people, than a lot of big stars ever will.” In 1994 — six years after the 1988 purchase of the NewPaper by the Boston Phoenix — the now-Providence Phoenix (after a few awkward years as the Phoenix’s NewPaper) endorsed Myrth York as the Democratic nominee for governor with a list of 94 reasons why incumbent Bruce Sundlun was the wrong choice: “14. He used the analogy of a housewife spending twice as much as her husband gives her to explain the state budget deficit ‘for the ladies in the audience.’ 15. He said of Elizabeth Leonard, his Republican opponent in 1992: ‘I’ve been chasing blondes all my life but it’s going to get turned around. There’s going to be a blonde chasing me.” The article ran with an illustration of Sundlun sporting a pig’s snout for a nose. In 1999 the paper collected testimonials from Rick Moody, Jeffrey Eugenides, John Barth, former New York State poet laureate Robert Creeley, and others, for a tribute to John Hawkes, the iconoclastic novelist/poet/playwright and Brown University creative writing guru. In 2002, on the eve of Mayor Buddy Cianci’s “Plunder Dome” trial, news editor Ian Donnis wrote profiles of the lead lawyers on both sides of the case: Assistant US Attorney and the second black federal prosecutor in Rhode Island history, Richard W. Rose; and the $525-an-hour, Boston-based defense wizard, Richard Egbert. These are just a few stories from the nearly 1900 issues that, at times, averaged 72 pages. The 1993 Providence Phoenix Summer Guide had six sections, 216 pages, and weighed over a pound. In contrast, the Phoenix I inherited in the spring of 2013 was slightly enfeebled. The paper sometimes flopped over in your hands at a mere 20 pages. The equipment around the office had a tendency to — how do I say this? — not work. Our web site was . . . quaint. But the attitude was still there. And I freely admit to stealing and paraphrasing Charlie Pierce’s line about being paid to “write about what I want in the way I want to write it” when describing how much I loved this job. In my time at the Phoenix, we called the Westboro Baptist Church — which sent a contingent to RI to decry the legalization of same sex marriage on August 1, 2013 — “a flaring rash on the ass of humanity that itches too much to be completely ignored.” We called the Providence Journal’s climate change-denying op-eds and political cartoons “horseshit.” We reminded readers that, in 2010, former Governor Donald Carcieri told a reporter in regards to taxpayer-backed loans to Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios that “there is only a risk if everything goes wrong.” We trumpeted the legalization of gay marriage, lambasted Brown University’s refusal to divest from fossil fuels, and ran a story officially retiring the media practice of publishing sensational law enforcement photos from marijuana busts. Referring to a recent Patch.com photo from a seizure of 13.5 pounds of weed in central Rhode Island, we asked, “Will the guys busted for possessing banned plants in Coventry and Scituate do more time in prison than Charles Continued on p 12


dale stePhanos

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Continued from p 10

Moreau, the corrupt former mayor of Central Falls recently released from prison after 13 months?” All the while, our coverage of music, theater, dance, food, and visual art hummed along. You could spend hours digging through the riches of our final “Fall Arts Preview” issue from September 12. In other words, we were still fulfilling that inaugural 1978 promise to provide “both the most comprehensive entertainment information possible, and a fresh perspective on what’s going on in the state” on Wednesday, October 8, when the staff received an email about a meeting in the conference room at 4:30 pm. “What will Rhode Island be missing without the Providence Phoenix?” That’s a question I’ve been asked over and over by reporters in the last week. So let’s answer it. First, Rhode Island is losing an employer for two writer/editors, four salespeople, two designers, a finance manager, an HR manager, a circulation director, a chief operating officer, and other office staffers. The Phoenix had 14 full-time employees, plus more than a dozen freelance writers and delivery drivers. Rhode Island is losing what has been its most thorough and thoughtful chronicler, critic, and champion of local arts and culture for the last three decades. Period. (Yes, we’re still boasting from our deathbed.) Rhode Island is losing a vigorous advocate for free speech and transparency. Even after the March 2013 closing of the Boston Phoenix, we continued to give our annual Muzzle Awards on July 4, calling out various power players who, in ways large and small, infringed the First Amendment rights of others. Lincoln Chafee received a 2014 Muzzle, for example, for signing a bill into law that diminished citizens’ ability to access and assess the safety plans of Rhode Island public schools. On the transparency and accountability side, the final months of the Providence Phoenix brought cover stories informing readers of the latest developments in the ongoing 38 Studios meltdown (including the schedule of multimillion dollar bond payments notched into state budgets through 2021); calling out the uberdominant Rhode Island Democratic Party for being the only state Democratic party in New England not to post a party platform online, then chiding them when the platform they eventually posted referred to “the Clinton Administration” in the present tense; and delivering a “Public Information 101” tutorial from journalists and good-government advocates in our third-to-last issue. Rhode Island is losing a dedicated voice for the voiceless. In 1988 and ’89 (to pick just two years), the paper delivered pieces on AIDS activists, teen moms, the exploding Southeast Asian refugee population in South Providence, the under-reported homelessness and poverty in Newport, the underpayment and generally shitty treatment of Providence Journal delivery workers, and sexual assault on RI’s college campuses. Rhode Island’s underprivileged and victimized got one hell of a better shake in these pages than they did in the ProJo’s opinion pages. Speaking of the Journal, Rhode Island is losing the unofficial ombudsman for its most important news organization — and the other players in our crowded media market. After hearing news of the Phoenix’s closing, Woonsocket Call/Pawtucket Times managing editor David Pepin wrote on Facebook that this paper’s media criticism and coverage is “perhaps its greatest legacy.” “For a long

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time, the Phoenix had the only media coverage in this town,” he wrote. “God forbid the ProJo or any of the TV or radio stations cover each other (or themselves) as power institutions in Providence. The Phoenix created the media beat here, and may it live on.” Rhode Island is losing two iconic political commentators, in Phillipe and Jorge (Chip Young and Rudy Cheeks) who, in decades’ worth of weekly columns, straddled the line between righteous indignation and juvenile banter. A state where judges are photographed zipping their flies while walking out of motels and governors dive into dumpsters for bags of cash deserves more than a simple AP Stylebook-abiding play-by-play. P&J brought the color commentary, right up through their August 2014 description of “manchild David [Caprio] embroiled in the Beach Blanket Bozo affair that involves state Rep. Peter Palumbo (D-Cranston) and their alleged collusion on food concession contracts for the Misquamicut, ‘Scah-Bro,’ and Roger Wheeler state beaches.” Rhode Island is losing a teacher who broke down complicated, yet important, subjects without being boring or didactic. Former news editor David Scharfenberg’s pieces on pensions (March 2011’s “Rhode Island’s Ticking Time Bomb”) and the unexpected passage of a voter ID law in deep-blue Rhode Island (May 2012’s “Who Passed Voter ID?”) are classic examples of this. More recently, we offered a similarly down-to-earth guide to what makes the Rhode Island House Speaker the “most powerful politician in the state,” following the hectic Smith Hill power-grab after Speaker Gordon Fox’s resignation in March of 2014. Rhode Island is losing a vital training ground for journalists and writers. What the PawSox are to the Red Sox, the NewPaper/Phoenix was to local and national journalism. You’ll find this little ol’ paper on the resumes of contributors to GQ, the Boston Globe, New York Times, Rolling Stone, Rhode Island Public Radio, Providence Journal, Esquire, CBS Sunday Morning, PBS, MTV Networks,Village Voice, Vanity Fair, and elsewhere. Rhode Island is losing a highly functional object that was replenished in stacks weekly in the corners of wiener joints, coffee shops, liquor stores, supermarkets, libraries, and college hallways. The Phoenix didn’t require a wifi signal or a charged battery. It didn’t cost anything. It didn’t judge you if you just wanted to do the crossword, or look up a movie listing, or use the paper to light your grill in the summertime. Though, if you wanted to, it could have a serious discussion about, say, the dearth of women in the latest RISD Museum exhibition. There were 68,000 copies of the paper distributed each week. According to recently published circulation stats, the Journal sells an average of 72,023 copies on weekdays. Translation: even in its final hours, the Phoenix was on its way toward becoming the largest paper in the state on the Thursdays it was distributed. And, finally, Rhode Island is losing a preeminent giver of farewells. From Rocky Point Park to former Secretary of State Susan Farmer, people and institutions received gilded send-offs in these pulpy pages. One of my proudest moments as an editor was seeing the response to Phoenix freelancer (and former Acme Video clerk) Zach Green’s obituary for the Providence video store, “Adieu,

Acme Video,” in our January 22, 2014 issue. That week’s newsletter from Acme’s Brook Street neighbor, Campus Fine Wines, linked to the story and wrote, “then someone comes along and writes the best ever homage to our neighbor, Acme Video, and this person positively nails what it is to simply be in and of a place, and the entire reason for us being in this business, but more importantly: in this store, in this city . . . It’s an ode to brick and mortar, an ode to the humble and illustrious masses, and seriously, an ode to humanity (Oh, the humanity!) that flourishes in the little places like Acme, the places that make a city a home. Bruce Allen is 60 years old. He was 24 in 1978 when,

after studying creative writing at Roger Williams f College, then cleaning cages at a pet store in Seekonk, he

took a job selling subscriptions at the Providence Journal. He lasted three hours. When he walked out of the building, he found two things on the windshield of his Volkswagen Beetle: a parking ticket and that first “Rutlemania!!” issue of the NewPaper. Grabbing the paper, he walked over to the NewPaper’s office on Washington Street, took the rickety elevator up to the second floor, and inquired about a job. Bruce is the longest-tenured employee at the NewPaper/ Phoenix, having started at the paper just a few weeks later. (His friend from Roger Williams, Lou Papineau, joined the paper shortly after and has also been here ever since.) He’s seen the paper transition from its origins as “a funky rock and roll paper managed and run by a bunch of ne’er-do-wells” to the late-’80s, wear-a-tie-to-work “culture shock” of the NewPaper/Phoenix transition, to the recent months after the Boston Phoenix closed down, when the office in Providence reminded him of the scrappy, small-town paper where he was first hired. Bruce won’t underplay the loss of the Phoenix. “I don’t know anything else,” he says. The paper “formed me. It’s part of my personality. It’s part of my being.” But he isn’t totally despondent over its closing. Bruce handles the Phoenix’s longestrunning advertising accounts — the Ocean Mist, the RISD Museum, Trinity Rep, AS220, Olneyville New York System, Cellar Stories Used Books, Nick-a-Nee’s, the Avon, and the Cable Car — and in his final email pitch to advertisers for this “one last kickass issue,” he included a Dr. Suess quote: “Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” “I’ve never worked here for the money,” he told me in a recent conversation in the paper’s conference room. “I’m not a business guy; I just fell into this. And when I’m selling ads, I was never thinking about my wallet. I was thinking about my friend Lou getting paid. I was thinking about the culture. I was thinking about getting excited [by] being associated with AS220 and ...with the bands and the colorful people I would encounter every day.” He calls the experience a “Jackson Pollock-y kind of tapestry of life here in Rhode Island from 1978 to 2014. “We had a ball,” he says. “And I all can say is that I was lucky enough to catch the wave.” ^

‘What will Rhode Island be missing without the Providence Phoenix?’ Let us count the ways.

Philip Eil can be reached at philip.edward.eil@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @phileil.


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14 october 17, 2014 | the providence phoenix | providence.thephoenix.com | @provphoenix | facebook.com/providencephoenix

dear phoenix ...

an avalanche of remembrances, tributes, tall tales, and trivia

_compil e d b y p hil ip ei l It was only a matter of seconds after we sent out a press release on Thursday, October 9 — “MEDIA ADVISORY: PROVIDENCE PHOENIX TO CEASE PUBLICATION; FAREWELL ISSUE WILL BE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16” — before the emails, tweets, Facebook comments, calls, texts, and articles started pouring in. And they haven’t stopped. Some are short (“Sad!!!” “WHY?” “NOOOOO FUCK NO”) and some are long. Some come from near (the Providence Journal, Rhode Island Public Radio, AS220); others came from Rhody emigres in Manhattan, Florida, Tennessee, and Utah. Some made us chuckle, others made us choke up. We’ve done our best to reproduce as many messages here as space will allow. Some of them may overlap or repeat slightly, and we’re OK with that. A friendly reminder before we begin: newsprint conveniently doubles as a handkerchief, in emergencies.

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TY DAVIS

NEWPAPER FOUNDER When I founded the NewPaper during the Great Blizzard of 1978, it was for two main reasons: to disseminate the news that was being ignored by the mainstream media of those days and to give Rhode Island’s vibrant music and cultural arts scene the coverage it deserved. In those days, the “Internet” only existed in college and military computer labs, the World Wide Web — that “www” thing — wouldn’t happen until 1993 (and kudos to you youngsters who know the difference) and there was no “Lifebeat” in the Providence Journal (which started that section to compete with us and to follow a national trend by other dailies). The Boston Phoenix had been blazing a lot of trails up north and I figured RI needed a good alternative paper of its own. Several had been tried but none lasted more than a few months. The NewPaper was the first statewide alternative weekly to succeed. And succeed it did for 10 years until it eventually became the Providence Phoenix. In short, the NewPaper filled a need and its staff had a great time making it happen. A few of us even got full-time jobs out of it! We were fearless in trying different ideas. For instance, we ran original fiction before Rolling Stone did. We also tried a TV section with full listings (neither idea survived). In addition, we ran comics — both original works such as Steven and the various creations of John “The Mad” Peck (he of “The Providence Poster” fame), as well as little known syndicated daily strips, six at a time, such as Conan the Barbarian and Bloom County. We were always in tune with Rhode

Jimmy ilarraza at the safari lounge

Island. The vast majority of political candidates we supported won — well over 90 percent, I believe. Similarly, when a competing paper gave away free classifieds to music-related groups, most musicians preferred to pay for NewPaper classified ads — a fact we always appreciated. We delivered our papers on Wednesday and they were gone by Friday. Everybody, it seemed, read us. When a freelancer publicized an RI ecological disaster in an early issue, we were gratified to hear that then-Senator Claiborne Pell publicly read excepts from our story to help create the EPA “Superfund” laws. And when we ran a cover featuring New Times’ revelation of a Buddy Cianci scandal from his college days, suddenly many of those papers disappeared — at least within the then-Mayor’s capitol city. I also loved “the critics’ bands” — under-rehearsed groups of the local music critics who would open NewPaper birthday party club nights and let the musicians and others turn the tables on the critics. Names included A Flock of Egos, Tony Goes to Cranston, Deranged Deranged, and We Be 40. One of those nights actually set the house record for attendance at the late, lamented Living Room! The NewPaper also introduced “The Personals” (personal classified ads) to RI. It was a shame when the personals got decimated by the Internet dating sites — more than a few weddings resulted from our Personals. Despite the fun, I eventually sold the NewPaper to the Phoenix — not because I was worried about competition from them, but because I wanted Rhode Island to have the strongest alternative paper it could

have. (Also, I had a very young son who had no idea who I was, due to hours the paper required.) Stephen Mindich and the Phoenix did a great job carrying on and improving things. Just about all the staff that wanted to stay did so, especially editor Lou Papineau, who has helmed the paper for the vast majority of its 36 years. However, just like composite tennis rackets replaced wooden ones, better ways of accomplishing the NewPaper’s original goals appeared — mostly via the many avenues of the Internet. In fact, one could argue that the Providence Phoenix should have died around 2001 or so. That it soldiered on for another 13 years is a tribute to the editorial department, the advertisers, the publisher, and especially the readers. When the news came out last week, I told an acquaintance about my connection with the Phoenix. He didn’t know I had founded its predecessor. “Wow,” he said, “the NewPaper, that was a great paper!” Yes, yes it was! The NewPaper and the Providence Phoenix were great newspapers that changed their communities for the better. A newspaper of any type cannot have a better epitaph than that. R.I.P. to both of them.

BILL FLANAGAN

NEWPAPER/PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 1978; AUTHOR; FORmER EDITOR-INCHIEF OF MusIcIAN mAGAzINE; mTV NETwORkS EXECUTIVE; FIRST NON-mUSICIAN INDUCTED INTO RI mUSIC HALL OF FAmE [NEw YORk, NY] The end of the Providence Phoenix — or as some of us knew it, the NewPaper — comes as a shock. It’s like hearing that your old high school has been torn down. An awful lot of talented people (and perhaps one or

two freeloaders) have passed through this periodical since 1978. Why, back when the NewPaper started, Buddy Cianci was mayor! It’s hard to exaggerate how important the NewPaper was to the rebirth of Providence in the 1980s. It was not only that local musicians, theater folks, writers, and artists could get reviewed, interviewed, and promoted in its pages. It was not only that local politics got covered from a different angle than what the Journal offered — the NewPaper provided a voice for what started out being called the underground and eventually became the New Providence. The NewPaper was a weathervane pointing toward a different kind of city. It was the community bulletin board for Rhode Island’s post-war generation. Now that generation is approaching retirement age; it is sad but not entirely surprising that the bulletin board is coming down. A lot of people contributed to the NewPaper/Phoenix over the last 36 years, but two names must be shouted from the top of the nation’s second largest unsupported dome: Ty Davis, that crafty, smiling, endlessly patient entrepreneur who kept his eye on the prize while everyone was freaking out around him. Ty built the local paper no one else was ever able to build. And Lou Papineau, the tireless Mister Roberts who put his blood into every issue, who made order out of the chaos, and who remains the single most selfless editor I have ever had the luck to work for. Lou made everybody else look good, and he did it for decades. There must be something in the air. I left Rhode Island 30 years ago but in the past couple of weeks I have attended a reunion of Brown-based rock groups from the ’70s, led by graduates of Johnny and the Luncheonettes and the Mundanes; gotten a new song in the email from Anthony Franco and Richard Ribb of the late great band the Shake; and received photos from Spain of a tour by a group featuring Klem Klimeck, front man of the legendary Rizzz. There was something so vibrant in the creative scene in Providence 30 years ago that it’s still giving off sparks.

SEAN DALY

wPRI-TV/FOX PROVIDENCE REPORTER The loss of the Providence Phoenix as an institution is trumped only by the loss of an arguably bigger institution that lurked within for 36 years: “Philippe & Jorge’s Cool, Cool World.” Right away and all along, Chip Young and Rudy Cheeks totally “got” Rhode Island’s charmingly homespun, if also clubby and corrupt, DNA. First appearing in the Providence Eagle and later moving to the NewPaper which was renamed the Providence Phoenix, P&J’s irreverent column always


facebook.com/providencephoenix | @provphoenix | providence.thephoenix.com | the providence phoenix | october 17, 2014 15

PHOTOS BY RICHARD mcCAFFREY randy hien

two weeklies, as do Chicago, Portland, Seattle, Philadelphia, and Kansas City. Providence won’t support even one, but Harper, Kansas does. What does that say about you? The Phoenix wasn’t great every week. It was often insular and juvenile. (It was also too white and too male.) It was also brazen, outlandish, and provocative, like you. The Phoenix was the Rhode Island sensibility rendered into cheap print. And you let it die. There’s hardly anything Providence about the Providence Journal. Do you know who owns daily papers? Wealthy people who care more about safeguarding and increasing their wealth than they do about the city they cover. Weekly papers? They’re run by your neighbors. I feel bad for the people who work at the Phoenix. I feel worse for you.

IAN DONNIS was the draw for me and countless others who salivated for Thursdays to see who or what they might skewer or celebrate next, and what hilarious new nicknames might emerge in the process. Ed “Gerber Baby” DiPrete, Susan “Muffy” Farmer, and Bruce “Captain Blowhard” Sundlun remain favorites. Covering the whole range of topics, Chip and Rudy were plugged in way before our world was wired, and they kept their devoted readers plugged in. In the parlance of today’s Twitter-verse, we readers were their “followers.” And there were a lot of us. Their “Cool, Cool World” was sort of an early version of social media with a journalistic backbone where writing with attitude that would never fly in the prime time world of the Providence Journal found expression. What a great name for a column, too. I mean, who doesn’t want entrée into coolness? As a Facebook commenter wrote recently on news of the death of the Phoenix, when you made it into “Philippe and Jorge,” good or bad, you knew you had made it in Rhode Island. That’s influence. So thanks, boys. I am forever grateful for your kindnesses, and I will miss your weekly musings terribly. You both leave an indelible mark on Little Rhody. It’s easy to make a buck. It’s much harder to make a difference.

JOHNETTE RODRIGUEz

NEWPAPER/PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 1985 Writing about the arts, food, travel, even local politics — over a span of almost 30 years — for the NewPaper/Providence Phoenix has been stimulating and sustaining, fun and fulfilling, with its typical share of ups and downs. The following are people whom I’ve appreciated and who have often told me how much they appreciated me and my writing: arts organizations and artists, including poets, authors, playwrights; filmmakers, screenwriters, producers; directors, designers, actors, storytellers; dancers, choreographers, musicians; visual artists and curators; food-related folk, including restaurant owners, chefs, farmers, small-business food producers; anyone trying to promote and protect Rhode Island’s natural and traditional resources, including environmentalists, naturalists, historians, state legislators. And, of course, the staff at this unusual publication, which has been valued for its ability to tell the truth to power and to maintain an alternative and supportive voice for the arts. A large encompassing thank-you goes out to all of them and to you, our longtime readers. We were a good team!

ROB TANNENBAUm

NEWPAPER/PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 1984; CONTRIBUTOR TO GQ, BLENDER, ROLLING sTONE, THE NEW YORK TIMEs; CO-AUTHOR, I WANT MY MTV: THE uNcENsORED sTORY OF THE MusIc VIDEO REVOLuTION [NEw YORk, NY] This final edition of the Phoenix will likely be full of fond remembrances from those of us who wrote for the paper, and reminders of its accomplishments. I’m here on a different mission. I’m here to talk about you. And to let you know: you are fucked. The Phoenix was a lively one-source guide to arts and news. “But,” you’ll say, “we have blogs now.” Yes. You’ll need to bookmark many of them to get the same amount of information, and they’ll be curated by people who have far less expertise and insight. Instead of reading a newspaper, you’ll spend even more time staring at your stupid smartphone while the world walks past. Also, the Phoenix was a bulwark against the Providence Journal, a once-respected newspaper that has become a quilt of generic wire stories (“Is Your Lawn Fertilizer Making Your Cat Sterile?”), run by people who think the interests of corporations should prevail over the welfare of the poor and middle class. The Phoenix fact-checked the Journal, revealed and argued against its biases, and as you’ll see from the tweet by Weekly Standard literary editor Philip Terzian (a smug idiot who formerly edited the ProJo’s editorial pages) calling the Phoenix’s closing “amusing” and “deeply satisfying,” the paper’s diaspora of lackeys has been celebrating the removal of the biggest thorn in their side. The Journal doesn’t want free and open debate — it wants to reign, unquestioned. The Phoenix was your mom. Mom’s dead, so have fun with your haughty, selfish dad. Alternative weeklies have been struggling for years, and it’s an accomplishment that the Providence Phoenix lasted longer than its Boston namesake. The strength of a city’s alternative press reflects the intelligence and vigor of the local citizenry. San Diego supports

FORmER PHOENIX NEwS EDITOR (19992009), RHODE ISLAND PUBLIC RADIO POLITICAL REPORTER Buddy Cianci was still riding high when word of dissatisfaction with the Providence Police Department’s approach to community policing continued to simmer. It was the summer of 1999, a time when national hype about the Providence Renaissance remained in full effect, and Buddy’s approval rating was north of 60 percent. But poor and working-class residents across Rhode Island’s capital city wanted a police department more responsive to its citizens — a sentiment that inspired the cover headline “Whose Force Is It, Anyway?” (one of many thanks to Lou Papineau, the Phoenix’s stalwart managing editor, for that), and the accompanying story I wrote, outlining a marginalized approach to community policing within the PPD. Flash forward 15 years: Cianci has been indicted, prosecuted, convicted, imprisoned, freed, hired (again) as a radio host, and by 2014, he’s once again pursuing the mayor’s office—- his “rightful place,” according to more than one supporter. So a tiny light bulb flares when Buddy, during a recent televised debate at RIC, is talking up public safety and his

commitment to community policing; I tweeted out a link to the 1999 Phoenix story indicating otherwise. This was the mission of the Phoenix, to do something a bit different that informed and contributed to the communal record. The Journal itself offered a fruitful vein for reporting, both because of its traditional importance as Rhode Island’s dominant media institution and the question of how citizens get informed in a time marked by disappearing reporting jobs. Under Belo’s former ownership, the ProJo’s management team almost always declined to talk, a curiously aloof position for people in the business of communicating, particularly compared with the more voluble stance of editors and executives at larger papers. But that didn’t stop the Phoenix from offering a singular kind of local media criticism and reporting stories that would go otherwise unreported, like how a Providence Newspaper Guild protest once reached into the Journal newsroom. So many stories, so many years: politics, arts, and the gaps in between. So many talented interns who went on to greater things (Jessica Grose, David Hirschman, and Alex Provan, to name a few) and stellar contributors like Steven Stycos and Brian C. Jones. The challenge and opportunity of being part of a little alt-empire that prized insight and deft writing. And things I’m just realizing, like how I’d never have met my wife if not for the Phoenix, since I met her after coming to Rhode Island to work at the paper.

mAX wINTER

PROVIDENCE-BASED wRITER Thursday used to mean something other than one more day of work, or two or maybe three more if you work in a restaurant or bar. For me, growing up, Thursday also used to mean an empty fridge, so I likely first read the Phoenix — then called the NewPaper — hot off the presses, while waiting for chili or pudding at Leo’s, where some of the paper’s staff worked and/or drank. More and more, Buddy was there, too, flanked by goons, face down on the bar. When he’d come to, he’d adjust his rug and hit on the hottest woman within earshot, no matter what side of the bar she was on. But I was eight or nine, then, and wouldn’t drink there for another eight years. Sometimes the kitchen was backed up, but that was part of it, and on Thursday there was a fresh stack of NewPapers by the cigarette machine. I liked the movie reviews because they didn’t say things like, “if you liked ________, then you’ll love ________!”, or “Nothing Less Than _________!”, but instead noted the increasing likelihood of today’s — meaning the 1980s — young female Continued on p 16

What cheer? brigade


16 october 17, 2014 | the providence phoenix | providence.thephoenix.com | @provphoenix | facebook.com/providencephoenix

Continued from p 15

characters having boys’ names, like Sam and Syd or Billie. This still seems like a better way to talk about movies. Unlike Buddy, but very much like his rug, Leo’s is no longer there, and became two or maybe three other things before settling into nothing. And now the Phoenix is gone, too. Like Acme Video and Fort Thunder and the train tunnel before it. A couple years ago, I walked by a strip club that’s now a hotel and thought, “Hey, I remember when that used to be a strip club.”

the station fire memorial site

BILL RODRIGUEz

JOSHUA COURNOYER

NEWPAPER/PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 1989 So long, Phoenix, you window onto the arts and music scene. Print media have been rustling in the winds of digital change for a long while, so it’s good you lasted as long as you did. So long, theatergoers, actors, and directors, at least until I write about and for you again elsewhere. And so long, dear readers, the reason for my privilege of being able to get up in the morning and get paid for tapping the keyboard and thinking about what I enjoyed the night before.

LISA PREVOST

FORmER PHOENIX NEwS EDITOR (1989-’97); FREELANCE wRITER; AUTHOR OF sNOB ZONEs: FEAR, PREJuDIcE, AND REAL EsTATE [FAIRFIELD, CT] As I sit here flipping through my yellowed copies of the Phoenix, I am surprised to find that what I feel is grateful. These issues are fat, relics from the golden ’90s. We had space, glorious space. And we had the freedom to go after whatever needed attention. The combination inspired some terrific journalism. I’m not blinded by nostalgia. The hours as news editor were ridiculously long, and the paychecks to freelancers were shamefully small. Many were the Rhode Islanders who refused to take the paper seriously because of the “adult entertainment” section. And you try editing Phillipe and Jorge. But how lucky we were to be able to unfurl the long, detailed stories of our choosing. Here are a few pulled from the stack in my attic: The intrepid Steve Stycos took on the Providence Police Department over brutality claims. He also combed state inspection records to expose neglect in numerous nursing homes. Former staffer Jody Ericson relayed fascinating conversations with doctors about how they, the saviors, dealt with the reality of death. Equally mesmerizing was her tale of a Jamestown woman who lived life on her own bold terms and, after a diagnosis of progressive dementia, ended it the same way. For my part, I’m proudest of the months I spent unraveling the heart-wrenching story of a battered mother whose ex-husband used the Family Court system to continue torturing her, at the expense of their young daughter. The questionable power-building tactics of a political bully, Representative Vincent Mesolella, were fodder for another lengthy piece that ultimately won a

issue with his insight, clarity, and stamina (in some quarters it’s known as The LouPaper). Applause goes his way from me in particular — Lou gave my byline a major boost early on. Nope, given the state of global print media, it’s not shocking that the end has arrived. But it is infuriating. Culturewise, there are plenty of vital new characters in action these days and the Phoenix won’t be around to shine a light on their work. Here’s to all those they celebrated, and here’s to the power of teamwork that made doing so such a blast.

mUSICIAN, FORmER PHOENIX DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS [NASHVILLE, TN]

national award from the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. Throughout, the guy who managed to get the whole thing out the door every week was the legendary Lou Papineau. Lou, thanks for making all those thousands of hours so worthwhile.

next year. What better time and place to pop the question to an “outdoorsy” girl? More than 18 years after those few lines of ink in the Phoenix, we have two spectacular sons. Two boys who owe their life to a newspaper that, sadly, is at the end of its own life.

BERT CRENCA

JIm mACNIE

AS220 ARTISTIC DIRECTOR The Phoenix’s historic relationship with AS220 is well documented in the innumerable articles written in support of our work. I can say, without reservation, that AS220’s growth and evolution was aided and abetted by the Phoenix and its awesome staff. Their commitment to alternative culture has been critical to making visible what has become the soul of Providence. Thanks tons from AS220 and the city for helping realize Providence as one of the favored cultural destinations in the country.

PAUL PARkER

PROVIDENcE JOuRNAL REPORTER One week in 1996, the Phoenix personals carried an ad for a 23-year-old “outdoorsy” redhead. I was just coming off a disappointing relationship with someone “my age,” so I figured, “What the heck. It could be fun hanging around with someone almost 10 years younger than me.” We agreed to meet at Cafe Paragon on Thayer Street. The night before our date, she frantically tried to dye her chocolate-brown hair red. I walked into the restaurant and saw her at the bar. Model gorgeous. Way out of my league. We had dinner. Most excruciating date in history. We barely said three words to each other. After dinner, we went to Trinity Brewhouse for drinks. More silent torture. Turns out that by “outdoorsy” she meant that she went outdoors almost every day. Like from the house to the car to the mall. For reasons that defy explanation, we made a second date, which didn’t go a whole lot better than the first. That led to a third date, which led to a Florida beach at dawn on the first day of spring the

NEWPAPER/ PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 1983 A thriving arts culture not only deserves but demands the kind of press coverage that the NewPaper/Providence Phoenix provided during its 36-year run. From the Chorus of Westerly (yay, George Kent!) to the blues and jazz in Woonsocket (take a bow, Chan’s), I kept my eye on the state’s musical events for the most part. But music is politics and politics is theater and theater is storytelling and storytelling is at the heart of visual art — and yep, they’re all connected if viewed correctly. Rhode Island, a compact and confounding place, has always provided audiences with plenty of the above, and our little weekly was heroic when it came to expanding the coverage of plays, exhibits, films, concerts, and festivals and legislation that La Prov’s statewide daily shrugged off as being too insignificant. I’d sometimes look at an issue and be amazed that all the key events of a very packed week were represented, from a Wisconsin skronk outfit’s Club Babyhead blast to an avant-garde film fest at the Cable Car. That’s important stuff, and it made me feel proud to be part of a squad that had their eye on the ball. Whether questioning the nogoodniks in office (y’all ain’t really thinking of putting Buddy back in power now are ya? C’mon, guys . . .) or beating the drums for an adventurous show at Perishable Theater, the editors and their writers made sure Rhode Island felt a bit more alive. Enthusiastic previews, post-gig critiques — all that coverage helped animate the action across the state. Lou Papineau is an under-heralded linchpin in this impressive achievement — he had his hand on the wheel since 1980, and refined each

The loss of the Phoenix has been weighing heavily the past few days. It’s easy to move away from home with the naive expectation that nothing will change while you’re gone. You secretly hope that your friends will still be at the same bars, keeping a seat warm and a beer cold in case you might stop in. Coming to the realization that there won’t be another Phoenix waiting in my mailbox or another chance to hound Lou and Chris about a covering a show is going to take a while to sink in. I left my desk eight months ago, and while my career at the Phoenix was rather short, it made a lasting impact on my life. It was my first job with health insurance and a steady paycheck. It helped me find stability while chasing freedom, I was never told no to an idea, never asked to not go on a tour, even when it meant someone would have to pick up the slack while I was gone, and when I decided to leave the state, my fellow staffers at the Phoenix helped me with that final push of courage to take a risk. For me the Phoenix will always represent freedom. The articles and writers never held back for the sake of keeping everyone happy; the Phoenix either was your paper or it wasn’t. It was the voice of the counter culture, the forward thinkers, the artists, musicians, writers, hippies, and rebels who make our state so great. Times change, economies change, and next trip home there will be one less thing to look forward to. But the ideas the paper represented, our little corner of the world that the paper tried its best to capture each week — that will live on forever. Thank you for being our voice for so many years.

mICHAEL ATCHISON

PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 2008 [kANSAS CITY, mO] “You have to ask David Byrne if that arm chopping motion he did was an homage to his days slinging wieners in Providence.” “I’m from Kansas City, Lou. I don’t even know what that means.” “Ask it!” So I asked it. I learned, quite forcefully, that it was not such an homage. But contributing occasionally to the Providence Phoenix gave me the pleasure of talking to David Byrne about slinging wieners in Providence, talking to Beck about Continued on p 18


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18 october 17, 2014 | the providence phoenix | providence.thephoenix.com | @provphoenix | facebook.com/providencephoenix

our evolving moment in time and space that it provided week after week. I miss it already.

Continued from p 15

the primordial ooze of Newport folk, and talking to Bill Flanagan about the thrill of working for this rag back in the days when black ink actually produced black ink. It gave me the chance to get a glimpse into the life of a city that values it wieners, its music, its books and, above all, its distinct and true Providence-ness. My first assignment here, from Lou Papineau, the paper’s managing editor, was to deliver 1400 words on the Hold Steady’s then-new album, Stay Positive, because he thought it was a great and important record, and he thought you should know about it. For those who know little about publishing, know this: that’s insane. Nobody does that. And now nobody will. Which is a shame because real illumination often requires more than 140 characters and clickbait headlines. Stay positive, Providence. The pleasure has been mine.

DAVID ANDREw STOLER

FORmER PHOENIX wRITER AND EDITOR (1997-’00); wRITER AND FILmmAkER It was the NewPaper that got me into this mess in the first place — for the simple reason that I had never seen anyone write like that: serious, seriously irreverent, smart, right-on and very much right now. A stack of them had been thrown at me when I was new to the city and was tasked with finding content for a radio show: “This is how you find out what’s going on around here.” Johnny Lydon once said one of the best things about being in the Sex Pistols was going into a new town and getting to meet regular people and just asking them, “What’s life like for you?” The NewPaper is the best embodiment of that idea I have ever come across — not of the New Journalism or the Free Press or the Alternative What Have You, but of the idea of the “paper” being the last best hope normal people have for expression and empowerment in a world of media Babel. That is what I learned from Jody Ericson, my first editor there, and Lou Papineau, my mentor and the paper’s guiding light — to ask the basic question, to listen, and record — and it has informed everything I have written or tried to do since. To give the powerless a voice is one of the most generous acts I can think of, and the NewPaper has been doing it since 1978. It showed me and many others that there is a different way of writing — a more important way — and we are out there, in the world, carrying its mission forward, and will be, whether a new issue comes out next Thursday or not.

ABEL COLLINS

PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR; RHODE ISLAND SIERRA CLUB PROGRAm mANAGER, 2012 INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE FOR CONGRESS (RI 2ND DISTRICT) It was thrilling the first time that I saw my name on the byline in the Providence Phoenix, and I’m humbled that I was asked to write again for the most honest paper in town several more times. However, my fondest memories of the Phoenix are of Phillipe and Jorge coming to my defense during my campaign for Congress, humiliating Channel 12 for refusing to allow me to debate. Who now will come to the defense of us commoners?

DAVID SCHARFENBERG

FORmER PHOENIX NEwS EDITOR (2009’13); BOsTON GLOBE POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY REPORTER

occupy providence

Thank you to all of the folks who have made the Phoenix. Our democracy is less without you.

CHRISTINA BEVILACQUA

PHOENIX CONTRIBUTOR SINCE 2001; DIRECTOR OF PROGRAmS AND PUBLIC ENGAGEmENT AT THE PROVIDENCE ATHENAEUm I don’t remember when I started reading the Phoenix, except that it was still the NewPaper, and it was in an earlier century, when we walked around unconnected; one still had to go out in active search of printed information to know what was going on. Once one had gleaned the information, one then had to wait for things like bands and movies to actually come to town in order to experience them. The Phoenix was where we learned what things would be worth waiting for that week. It was also a place that cultivated new voices with sardonic but significant things to say about our crackpot little city and state and beyond. “Phillipe & Jorge’s Cool, Cool World” was required reading, as was “E.L.” (later Ted) Widmer’s “Rhode Island Almanack,”

which managed to simultaneously skewer and shower with love present-day RI by means of forgotten tales from its history, always ending with a slyly relevant excerpt from Roger Williams’s 1643 lexicon of the Narragansett’s language. I left for several decades and then returned, and sometime around 1999 or so I ran into Ian Donnis at a standing-roomonly talk at the RI Historical Society on “The History of the Colonial Postal Service.” Our shared experience at this bizarre and quintessentially Providence event somehow led to my writing occasionally for the Phoenix for the next dozen or so years. Ian was a dream editor; one turned in copy and had it published seemingly unchanged but so much better. David Scharfenberg, Lou Papineau, and Phil Eil have also been wonderful to write for. Kudos, too, to Johnette and Bill Rodriguez for their intelligent, engaging cultural criticism over the years. The Phoenix wore its erudition lightly, but it’s hard to see where we’ll find the kind of thoughtful, original analysis of

kATH CONNOLLY

SELF-DESCRIBED “CRANkY LADY” Someday we are going to have to explain that there was news created by a team of professionals who talked to people face-to-face, checked multiple sources, and argued about editorial clarity. And that there was an Other Paper. I get sick to my stomach thinking about the implications. The Phoenix has been my trusted guide for doing Providence since I first starting sorting through this town in 1985. I’d look at “8 Days a Week” to see what fun I might miss otherwise, check “Cool, Cool World” for some gossip and outrage from Casa Diablo, and read many, many column inches of insight about RI politics. In the pre-“40 under 40” days you knew you had made it when you were mentioned by P&J, hopefully under a nifty pseudonym for something witty you said at Leo’s.

deer tick

This is a city of artists and intellects, crooks and cranks. It’s got a river running through the middle. In the summer, they set it on fire. There’s a guy who works amid the industrial debris of Allens Avenue, shaping high-end surfboards that are shipped around the world. Oil Can Boyd plays in an amateur baseball league on the outskirts of the city. Lightning Bolt came out of here. So did Deer Tick. A two-time felon may soon win election as mayor. Again. This is a city of stories. And many of them the Phoenix told better than anyone else. Every city needs an alternative weekly. But this one, perhaps, more than most. We’ll miss it.

CHRIS SUCHmANN

PHOENIX DRIVER SINCE 1988 I think I speak for all of the Phoenix drivers when I say that we are stunned following the announcement that this week’s issue is our last. I remember feeling like this when Johnny Carson announced that he was retiring as the host of The Tonight Show. I had taken for granted that he would always be there. His departure left a hole, a vacuum, and a feeling that something important to the common good was gone. The end of the Phoenix leaves a similar hole, but this time it is much more personal. More like a kick to the solar plexis. Week after week, year after year, this paper has chronicled our culture and “stuck it to the man” in an irreverent and entertaining style that everyone could appreciate. Our writers have shaped the political landscape and helped to build and maintain a thriving community for our artists, inventors, and musicians. For more than a quarter of a century, it has been an honor to deliver the “best” weekly paper in the State of Rhode Island. I have enjoyed your ridiculous questions (“Is that this week’s Phoenix?”) and your astute observations (“Hey the Phoenix guy, it must be Thursday!”) and I will miss them sorely. But fear not. Although Carson and Leno are gone with Letterman close behind, we now have Fallon, Ferguson, Meyers and, excuse the pun, a host of others who have filled their shoes. It is just a matter of time until another group of miscreants and dreamers “rise from the ashes” to publish a “new paper” — a paper that will take on arguably the most important question of our time: Why do drunken people insist on karate kicking newspaper distribution boxes? ^


20 OCTOBER 17, 2014 | ThE pROvidEnCE phOEnix | pROvidEnCE.ThEphOEnix.COm | @pROvphOEnix | faCEBOOk.COm/pROvidEnCEphOEnix

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_By p hilip eil There is no backseat in Chris Suchmann’s silver

minivan. Instead, there are stacks of the Providence f Phoenix. The stacks, which vary in height from about one

to three feet, are made up of plastic-belted bundles of 50 papers. There are probably 3000 copies in the car right now, Suchmann says. Back in the day, he would carry 8500 papers on his downtown Providence route, and drop 400 copies at each end of the Providence Arcade. Suchmann has been a Phoenix driver for 26 years. His uniform today —Thursday, October 9, 2014; the day Phoenix owner, Stephen Mindich, announces that the paper will close after 36 years — is hiking boots, dark jeans, and a blue T-shirt from the developmental disabilities service center where he works full-time. On his right index finger, he wears a thick metal ring with a short curved knife that extends like an eagle’s talon. “It’s to cut open the bundles,” he explains. “Alas, I will not need it much longer.” After I hop in the van outside Phoenix HQ on Chestnut Street in the Jewelry District, we lurch around the corner 100 yards to the first stop: Alibi Café, on Bassett Street. Suchmann hustles out, drops 15 copies in the deli and 10 more at the adjoining bar, then jumps back in the car to drive another 100 yards to Jerry’s Art Shop, which used to be Art Supply Warehouse, he tells me before walking in. Suchmann overflows with such facts. Feeling the “pulse” of the city is one of the byproducts — and joys — of the delivery gig. “I see who’s open and who’s closing,” he says. “I talk to a lot of restaurateurs, bar owners, store owners.” These people used to greet him as “the NewPaper Delivery Dude.” Now, he’s “the Phoenix Guy.” Suchmann has earned the title. Before the paper switched printers a few months ago, he would drive 40 miles up to Auburn, Massachusetts, to pick up his haul around 1:30 am, complete as much of his route as possible before 7, then head to his full-time job. He knows his route so well, and cares about it so much, that it’s tough to find a substitute. Not that Suchmann would accept one. On his wedding day in 1996, Suchmann delivered papers with his soon-to-be wife before the ceremony. Over time, he has also developed a thorough taxonomy of Phoenix readers: the irreverent 94-’HJY listener who has been reading for decades, the Philippe and Jorge fans who want to laugh at the latest Vo Dilun political corruption, the musicians who want to see which bands are being covered, the political wonks who want to learn about the art scene, the crossword people, the “smut people,” and their counterparts, “the person who consciously makes sure that I see that they’re taking the adult services [section] out.”

He tells me all of this as we drive and drop papers at Rick’s Roadhouse, Olga’s Cup + Saucer, and Rue Bis, the café on South Street where a meter-checker nearby shouts, “You guys can’t park here!” Then she spots Suchmann, softens her stance, and says, “Hurry up!” His van has a laminated sign on the dashboard reading, “PROVIDENCE PHOENIX DELIVERY. PLEASE DO NOT TICKET! THANK YOU.” A few minutes later, we pull into Davol Square and Suchmann rolls down his window to hand a paper to the guy in the glass booth. The wooden arm rises to let us into the parking lot. Inside one of the buildings, he leaves a stack in a nondescript spot near a row of mailboxes. People know to look for it there, he assures me. “It’s sort of like a bird feeder — once you put the paper out, they come by.” From there, it’s on to the Spot on Richmond Street; the Marquee Café, at the Providence Performing Arts Center on Weybosset; a red Phoenix box near the Johnson & Wales quad; the 7-Eleven down the street; another box outside the Arcade Garage; and the Corporate Café in the first floor of Textron headquarters. As we drive and stop, drive and stop, he tells stories of cops yelling in his face like drill sergeants when he parked in the wrong place; frigid winters days when he’d invite homeless guys to ride the route with him for a few hours to warm up and make some money dropping papers. He tells me about shop owners who hassle him when the paper isn’t there early enough and customers are clamoring for it. “It’s a free paper, dude,” he says. “Chill.” After Textron, we make a sharp left and head up Westminster, where Suchmann parks and leaves the back gate of the van open while he scurries to Symposium Books, Small Point Café, Craftland, Eno Fine Wine, Queen of Hearts, and URI’s Providence campus. Then he hops back in the car and swings back to Chestnut Street to drop me off. As I get out, he calls through the window to say that if anyone — Lou Papineau, the longtime managing editor; Bruce Allen, the veteran sales rep — wants to keep the paper going “just sort of as a labor of love . . . without the pressure of having to make money,” he’s in. “I’m down,” he repeats. “I don’t care. It’s not the money ...It’s just keeping something out there that’s a voice,” he says. He mentions the “vacuum” that will be left in the paper’s absence. “It’s scary,” he says, before rolling away to finish his route. ^

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RISD MuSeuM What Nerve!

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Installation view of Forcefield’s Third Annual Roggabogga, Whitney Museum of American Art, 2002. Copyright Hisham Bharoocha. Photo by Hisham Bharoocha.


22 OCTOBER 17, 2014 | ThE pROvidEnCE phOEnix | pROvidEnCE.ThEphOEnix.COm | @pROvphOEnix | faCEBOOk.COm/pROvidEnCEphOEnix

Lifetime piLing up my back pages: notes on 1809 weeks of newspaper-making _by lou pa pin e a u Two years ago, in a dour mood and feeling less than optimistic about the future of the paper, I blew off steam by whipping up a cover for the inevitable any-daynow last go-’round:

f

See the hype in the lower left corner? I assumed that we wouldn’t get to say goodbye. But we do! Last week, after being informed that we had just shipped our penultimate issue, we found out we could do one more. Then the panic set in: what do we do?!? On the previous pages, you’ve seen what we did (with pretty short notice): An incisive overview from news editor Phil Eil (who energized these pages in the past 18 months; mega-thanks to him and his illustrious predecessors: David Scharfenberg, Ian Donnis, Jody Ericson, and Lisa Prevost); a ton of moving and immeasurably bittersweet words from current and former staffers and longtime readers; and a shotgun view of Chris Suchmann’s experience as our stalwart delivery guy for 27 years. That’s a swell compendium of where we are at the end of our road. We’d already chronicled our storied history (with much more time to prepare) in the hefty anniversary issues marking our 20th, 25th, and 30th years. The 25th was our best “special issue” ever. Period. It’s a rich trove of recollections and anecdotes and insight. (We’re not sure how long the web will be there, but go to providencephoenix. com/whats_new/archive/2003whatsnew1024.asp now.) In 1998, in the first of our deep dives (providence phoenix.com/archive/features/98/10/22), I wrote: “It has been a daunting task. How do you cram 20 years of journalism — 20 years of life — into 12 pages? Luckily, there’s a lot to draw on. The boxes and file cabinets and towering piles of pulp that we’ve been digging through for the past few months provide ample evidence of who we are, and what we’ve done. “ ‘I can feel my lifetime piling up,’ Talking Head David Byrne sang about 10 years ago. That’s certainly how we feel after turning every page of the approximately 1040 issues of the NewPaper and the Providence Phoenix . . . But as the memories surged and the musty old papers yielded their treasures (and embarrassments), we were struck by the vitality and spirit of the work. The great thing about this job is the end result — it’s a new paper every week.” After the Boston Phoenix gave up the ghost on March 15, 2013, we knew that any given edition could be the last. You all know the story: the diminished advertising market and radically altered media world have taken their toll. (An ironic note about the free content movement putting us out of business — we’ve been free all along. Damnit!) Some perspective: this year’s Best issue was 48 pages;

the 1999 edition was 116. The 2014 Summer Guide was 60 pages; in 1993: 216 (and the canvas was bigger: 10”x16” vs. our current 10”x12.75”). Corporate-structurally, it’s been a wild ride: from the freewheeling NewPaper days (though, 10 years in, we were definitely ready for prime time) to the expansion/corporate/banner days after the Boston Phoenix bought the NewP in 1988, to the hey-we’re-calling-our-own-shots-again final stretch when we lost the support system/overview/contentsharing that our colleagues at the mothership provided. It was a fun, challenging, rewarding (and sometimes exhausting) job. I salute my editorial gurus, Peter Kadzis and Clif Garboden; the men who kept the presses running: Stephen Mindich, Barry Morris, Steve Brown, Everett Finkelstein, and Ty Davis; and the hundreds of writers, photographers, and illustrators who have graced these pages. A few personal highlights: In the early days, I talked with hundreds of musicians: Paul Westerberg, Laurie Anderson, Warren Zevon, Michael Stipe and Peter Buck of R.E.M., Richard Thompson, the Edge, Grace Slick, the guy with the hair from A Flock of Seagulls, and Billy Zoom of X, who gave me one quotable line — “We make stuff up and play it.” And we got to champion a few of them: we put Marshall Crenshaw on the cover — twice; I gave the Hold Steady 4.5 pages (and it’s not musical, but I wish we had done an Orphan Black cover). We assembled poignant tributes to Randy Hien and David Lamb, pillars of the local music scene who passed too soon. In 2010, I got the staff at AS220 (whose empire now includes the Washington Street building where the NewPaper was launched) to go up on their roof :

Major Medical Procedure; I have years of unused vacation time). That’s a whole lotta editing, image-gathering, headline-writing, and cover-making. Yay, journalism! The inbox is stuffed with condolences and thanks from colleagues and reps from dance companies, arts organizations, bands, etc., all saying boo-hoo and wishing well. And the social media reaction to the demise of the Providence Phoenix has also been touching and heartfelt and greatly appreciated. What we did mattered to people — getting their band in the listings, getting in 8 Days a Week (thank you, Jim Macnie, for thousands of stellar entries and spirited music writing), winning a Best Music Poll award (I’m gonna miss spray painting the gold records), and getting cited as The Best. At the back end of the hundreds of hours that went into those issues — when “Best” was a four-letter epithet — all of the work was worth it to see how happy the winners were at our Best events (and to subsequently see the Best stickers and Best awards proudly displayed all over the state). We also honored Local Heroes in the Best issues, welcomed inductees into the Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame, and covered our lively and quirky and vital little corner of the world week in and week out. We done good. (And here’s the parenthetical note re: how the paper has shaped my life beyond the 1809 issues. It has been the throughline for everything, and I have the family, friends, and memories to prove it and cherish forever.) Music is my other throughline — it brought me to the NewP, it brings the noise all day, every day (I forced Casey Kasem’s American Top 40 on the production crew when we worked on weekends; we also spent thousands of hours with WBRU), and it has connected me with new friends (and writers) through the miracle of streaming radio. So let’s leave with a couple of lyrics for the ages. From the Schemers’ “Remember” (thanks for music and friendship, Mark): Please don’t forget [our] name You never really die if your memory’s alive And, from the Hold Steady: ’Cause it’s one thing to start it with a positive jam And it’s another thing to see it on through And we couldn’t have even done this, if it wasn’t for you We gotta stay positive Amen. ^

And for the last three years, I got to write about beer; thanks to all the folks who answered my constant queries and shared their brew-related opinions in the survey pieces. (And one last Bottles & Cans & Clap Your Hands note: Grey Sail’s new double IPA, Captain’s Daughter, is damn good.) Cheers! An old and dear friend got right to the point: “Heard

the news this morning about the Phoenix. What are f you going to do?” After I clean out the desk and dump

piles of pulp into the recycling bins, I’m going to try to do nothing for two or three days. Since 1980, every week has been defined by a deadline. I just did the math: this is my 1809th issue as managing editor (the NewP debuted on 3.8.78; my first piece, an interview with Rachel Sweet, ran in July ’79; I did some typesetting and had the East Bay route before getting the editing gig). And I never missed an issue (even after a


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Oct 17th - 19th Rhode Island Convention Center 1 Sabin St. Providence, RI 02903

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$20 Day / $40 Weekend Show Info 215-423-4780 Friday 2 PM - 12 AM Saturday 11 AM - 12 AM Sunday 11 AM - 8 PM Over 400 Tattoo Artists LA Ink • Best Ink I n k M a s te r Including Season 5 Cast The Enigma Marlo Marquise Human Suspension Show by Ascension & Misguided Youth The Inkllusionist Sideshow • Burlesque Tattoo Contests MC Dr. Blasphemy Hotrod Cars & More


24 october 17, 2014 | the providence phoenix | providence.thephoenix.com | @provphoenix | facebook.com/providencephoenix

ll

enCe Fa

the

Id al PRov 6th annu

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Rhode Island ConventIon CenteR, hall C&d 1 Sabin Street, Providence, Rhode Island

SATURDAY 10AM-6PM • SUNDAY 10AM-5PM

oveR 150 exhIbItoRs FoR youR home ImPRovement and lIFestyle needs paul split: Horticultural Specialist giving lectures all weekend on organic gardening, cooking, container growing and handing out organic seed packets.

Home Depot Kids Workshops Saturday and Sunday 12pm-2pm! PaRtICIPatIng sPonsoRs:

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fond flashbacks from the club crawl _by chr is conti I am writing

this prior to f meeting up with

Midday Records prez Davey Moore at Dusk on a Sunday night for his new podcast series, which we actually scheduled over a month ago. And when he inevitably asks, “So, what’s next for you?,” my honest reply will go something like, “Guy, I have no fucking idea.” Not to say the heartbreaking news comes as a shock; with the ad count dwindling and the seemingly abrupt shuttering of the Boston Phoenix offices last year, we all knew the clock was ticking for the PVD PHX. Managing editor (and longtime pickup hoops partner) Lou Papineau offered me the music column gig in 2008 and I gladly accepted; I started with the Providence Phoenix back in 1997 (shoutout to Jody Ericson!) and paid my dues via years of spot appearances in our Best issues and seasonal preview guides. Our goal was simple: to get our readers “off the couch” and out to a show and take in some of the top-shelf “homegrown product” around Lil Rhody. From there I routinely tortured him with my procrastinating while banging out features on an outdated, pieceof-shit ThinkPad from my corner office (bedroom). Lou Pap also afforded me the chance to interview some of my all-time favorite national acts; I recall pacing my apartment for six hours prior to a phoner with Dinosaur Jr’s Lou Barlow, and an hourlong chat with a surprisingly down-toearth MF Doom (I printed and framed an email response from Prince Paul). I also interviewed my three favorite comedians: Louie CK (disastrous), Bill Burr (twice, and a total blast), and Norm MacDonald. I thank Lou for all these opportunities, as well as Mr. Steve Brown for keeping me around and always offering kind and encouraging words whenever I saw him at our Best Music Poll parties. I regret not pounding the desk for one final Best Music Poll last year. And while the complaints always rolled in regarding the categories, nominees, winners, etc. (this is RI — we reserve the right to piss and moan about anything), our objective remained intact — to provide well-deserved exposure to some of the state’s best

musicmakers. Flashbacks abound while skimming through the 21 pages of my features on the PVD PHX site, dating back to my first foray as a Rock Hunt judge (what up, Wendell!) at the Living Room. I covered more than 300 locally sourced artists during this time and, sadly, I have a list of artists I planned on covering by year’s end. I am proud that some of the state’s best received full-cover love, like the Low Anthem, Brown Bird (chatting with David Lamb about our mutual infatuation with Mastodon and QOTSA was special for me), Joe Fletcher, Sage Francis (many thanks to Stormy Davis), and THR33 Piece Suit. I felt a great sense of pride when I pushed for that THR33 Piece cover — no one deserves it more than Chachi Carvalho and the GOAT Swann Notty. I discovered so much great music and developed plenty of friendships through the Homegrown column, and perhaps the most meaningful is winning the trust of rock legend Bob Otis. My love of Lolita Black is well-documented, but getting to know Bob Otis ranks at the top of the list. Dude is a fucking sweetheart and the most sincere and impassioned artist I have encountered. I had some good times with the 75orLess Records crew (those summertime shows at the Common Pub in Bristol — yikes), and was privileged to work alongside Davey Moore, Tracy Garrity, and Dusk owner Rick Sunderland for the Music For Paws benefit show, which raised more than $2000 for the Bristol Animal Shelter. Shoutout to my fellow paisans Sean Sbardella aka Meta P. (backyard bocce rap league, son!), and Mike Lamantia and Zan Laorenza. Thank you Mikey Lams for raising my tennis game over the past three years. I’ll see you at Centre Court this Friday. Local music fans are in good hands with Tony Pacitti, Rob Duguay (also booking some great shows every week), and Marc Clarkin, the best in the biz around these parts. So now what? I have no fucking idea. Thanks for reading. And thanks for supporting the Rhody music community. See you out at the show(s). ^


Join Us

View a complete list of events and buy tickets at www.ric.edu/pfa or call (401) 456-8144

11th ANNIVERSARY SALE! OCTOBER 18 - 24 65% OFF ALL BACK ISSUES in BOXES! 35% off Trade Paperbacks & Wall Books! 50% off ALL RECORDS, CD’s , VIDEO GAMES, TOYS !

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Help make your campus tobacco free

Monday, October 27 7:30 p.m.

More than 1,100 colleges and universities are 100% smoke free. More than 800 are completely tobacco free. Currently, none of these campuses are in RI. You can help change this.

Award-winning cabaret artist Lauren Fox and company bring to life the folk music of Joni Mitchell, The Mamas & the Papas, Neil Young, Jackson Browne, The Byrds, the Eagles and Crosby, Stills & Nash.

Helping to pass a policy on your campus is a great learning experience. It will reduce exposure to harmful secondhand smoke, maintain a cleaner environment, create a marketing and recruiting advantage and much more.

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in the Nazarian Center Rhode Island College 600 Mt. Pleasant Ave. Providence, R.I. 02908

PerformingArtsSeries.RIC Join us for a discussion and learn more about tobacco free campuses – Friday, November 7th from 9am to 3pm @ Schneider Auditorium of Johnson & Wales University. To Register, contact Benvinda.Santos@health.ri.gov

Accommodations for persons with disabilities available upon request. Call (401) 456-8144 for assistance. TTY/TDD: 711. Phoenix-Laurel-Canyon-ad-Fall2014.indd 1

10/8/14 1:25 PM


26 october 17, 2014 | the providence phoenix | providence.thephoenix.com | @provphoenix | facebook.com/providencephoenix

art October 2 – November 2

making life more magical on ideas and community _By gr eg cook In 2004, the

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greg cook

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amazing alternative art empire, published a paper titled “Compost and the Arts.” It argued that though this art-making thing can seem mysterious, there are practical ways of incubating exciting creative communities. Key among them is offering shared workspaces, bulletin boards, galleries, and hangouts like cafes and bars. Because places where people meet and ideas get shared are ELEMENTAL the 2010 iron Pour at the steel yard. vital to creativity. Theaters, music halls, galleries, and newspapers like our I feel tolerated, rather than embraced or dear departing Providence Phoenix — the encouraged. The Phoenix has been one of spark for these thoughts today — are the rare places in my life where I’ve felt at machines for seeding ideas into our home — a big, public institution for the communities. freaks and activists, the radicals and the And I think these mechanics were rascals. Losing it, for me, is like the death on the mind of John Adams, the second of a close friend. The loss is physical, in American president, when he became the my belly. principal author of the constitution for Last Monday saw the infectious that state to the north of here, MassachuPRONK! street band festival here in Provisetts — the joint that the great founders dence. I’ve been studying how these of Providence were smart enough to get spectacular events work for years now, thrown out of. things like the Urban Pond Procession, But Massachusetts got this thing right. WaterFire and the astonishing annual In the fine art world, there’s lots of dreary Halloween Iron Pour at Providence’s Steel talk about how the creative economy will Yard (on October 25 this year). Community give people jobs or bring moolah to restauspectacles assert that life is more magical rants and souvenir shops, or something. than our usual daily grind — by actually Instead I’m inspired that Adams and going out into the streets and making life friends made it the legal “duty of legislamore magical. tures and magistrates, in all future periIn her 2006 book Dancing In the Streets: A ods of this Commonwealth” to promote History of Collective Joy, social critic Barbara the arts. Ehrenreich notes that around the 17th Why is this the duty of the Massachucentury, carnival, communal rituals and setts government? Because the arts help festivities were extensively drummed spread “wisdom, and knowledge, as well out of Europe for fears that they were imas virtue.” And that fostering these qualimoral, raucous, sexy fun — and that they ties is “necessary for the preservation of might inspire folks to overthrow kings their rights and liberties.” and bishops. This coincided in the West In other words, Adams and friends are with “an epidemic of melancholy.” telling us that we need the arts because Ehrenreich writes that there are reathey help us think better. And we need to sons to think “that festivities and danced think better to be successful in our roles in rituals actually cured the disease we maintaining a healthy democracy. know as depression . . . First, because such For me, writing about art is about rituals serve to break down the sufferer’s community-building in another way — to sense of isolation and reconnect him or encourage more art-making here and to her with the human community. Second, create a more wondrous and meaningful because they encourage the experience of community for all of us who live around self-loss, that is, a release, however tempothese parts. Which is part of why I prefer rary, from the prison of the self, or at least to do it at a free newspaper like the Phoefrom the anxious business of evaluating nix, to make the art we feature accessible how one stands in the group or in the eyes to more folks. of an ever-critical God.” The arts aren’t just nutritional suppleIn Providence, the magic anti-depresments, of course. As an art person, I often sant formula seems to be loud music, unfeel like I don’t fit right in the normal derground/alternative worlds, and setting world. Much as I try, it’s like I’m coming things on fire. So besides, say, mourning at it sideways or upside down. Like I’m dothe Phoenix with drink, I’m going to keep ing it wrong. Perhaps you come to the arts close to that stuff. Let’s stay in touch. because you feel this way too. Let’s hang out. You can find me on TwitWhatever the reason, it feels like I end ter @AestheticResear and at the Facebook. up doing projects in many places where And I’ll be around. ^

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Listings CLUBS THURSDAY 16

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. BOONDOCKS BAR & GRILL | Fall River, MA | Mixtape CITY SIDE | Woonsocket | Crunchy Monkey CLUB EGO | Providence | Star Search Thursday [talent contest/drag show/dance party] THE CONTINENTAL | Smithfield | 8:30 pm | Mitchell Kaltsunas THE 88 LOUNGE | Providence | 7:30 pm | Speakeasy Burlesque Show | 9:30 pm | Brooks Milgate 1150 OAK BAR & GRILL | Cranston | Dizzy Reed + Johnny Kelly THE FATT SQUIRREL | Providence | One Drop Thursday with DJ Paul Michael GILLIGAN’S ISLAND | Westerly | Open mic hosted by Bob Lavalley IRON WORKS TAVERN | Warwick | Betsy Listenfelt KNICKERBOCKER CAFE | Westerly | 8 pm | Open Mike with host band the Double D’s Band LOCAL 121 | Providence | DJ Nook MARINER GRILLE | Narragansett | 7 pm | Alger Mitchell MEDIATOR STAGE | Providence | 7 pm | Open mic hosted by Don Tassone THE MET | Pawtucket | Puss N Boots, featuring Norah Jones, Sasha Dobson & Catherine Popper + Van Hayride 95 EMPIRE BLACK BOX | Providence | Zomes + Corso + Matt Underwood + Locators 133 CLUB | East Providence | Mac Odom Band PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | Whitesmoke

PERRY MILL TAVERN & MUSIC HALL | Newport | Throwback Thursday with DJ Double G

PICASSO’S PIZZA & PUB | Warwick

| 9:30 pm | Karaoke with DJ Bobby Devine POWERS PUB | Cranston | Mike & Mark THE SALON | Providence | DJ Handsome J SIMON’S 677 | Providence | 6 pm | Sparks the Rescue + We Built the Moon + Halfway Home + the Parkwoods + more THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | Providence | Jimkata + Chicken Ghost House Tribe THE WHISKEY REPUBLIC | Providence | Vinny Vibe

FRIDAY 17

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. AURORA | Providence | DJ Mute City featuring Jerome BOONDOCKS BAR & GRILL | Fall River, MA | Felix Brown BOVI’S | East Providence | Neal Vitullo & the Vipers CADY’S TAVERN | Chepachet | White Shadows CHAN’S | Woonsocket | 8 pm | Barrence Whitfield & the Grits & Grocery Orchestra CITY SIDE | Woonsocket | Them Apples CLUB EGO | Providence | Twerk Friday with DK Rukiz CLUB ROXX | North Kingstown | Blurred Vision THE CONTINENTAL | Smithfield | 7 pm | Fabulous Calamari Brothers CUSTOM HOUSE COFFEE | Middletown | 5 pm | Open mic with John Hillmann & Graham Gibbs THE 88 LOUNGE | Providence | 6 pm | Viana Newton | 9 pm | Tom Chace FINN’S HARBORSIDE | East Greenwich | 5:30 pm | Alger Mitchell FIREHOUSE 13 | Providence | Eternal Khan + Sorrowseed + Leukorrhea + more

GREENWICH HOTEL | East Greenwich | Mark Cutler & the Tiny String Band HANK’S DOWN SOUTH | Narragansett | 8 pm | The Automatics INDIGO PIZZA | Coventry | 8 pm | Kala Farnham IRON WORKS TAVERN | Warwick | Brian Joseph KNICKERBOCKER CAFE | Westerly | 8 pm | Shiny Lapel Trio THE LAST RESORT | Smithfield | World Premiere LIGHTHOUSE BAR AT TWIN RIVER

| Lincoln | The B-Street Band LOCAL 121 | Providence | Music Please MACHINES WITH MAGNETS | Pawtucket | 5 pm | Brighter Death Now + Deutsch Nepal + Raison D’Etre + the Vomit Arsonist + Bocksholm + Post Scriptvm + Nurture Abuse + Sewer Goddess MANCHESTER 65 | West Warwick | Catie Curtis + Marc Douglas Berardo + Mary Day MARINER GRILLE | Narragansett | 7:30 pm | Jason Colonies THE MET | Pawtucket | 8:30 pm | Chelsy Lau Band + Bochek + Vanilla Function MURPHY’S LAW | Pawtucket | 8:30 pm | Night Life NARRAGANSETT CAFE | Jamestown | Lazy Dog NEWPORT BLUES CAFE | Run For Covers NEWPORT GRAND | Java Jive NEWS CAFE | Pawtucket | Indian Twin NICK-A-NEE’S | Providence | Biscuit City OAK HILL TAVERN | North Kingstown | 2nd Avenue OCEAN MIST | Matunuck | Deadbeat + the Al Keith Collective ONE PELHAM EAST | Newport | Green Line Inbound 133 CLUB | East Providence | Stone Leaf PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | The Shuffle Kings POWERS PUB | Cranston | Electric Flood RALPH’S DINER | Worcester, MA | Tollbooth Willie + Radon

RHODE ISLAND BILLIARD BAR & BISTRO | North Providence | RembrantZ

THE SALON | Providence | Upstairs

| DJ Knowlton Walsh | Downstairs | Parallel with DJs Damian Daviid & 11:11 SIMON’S 677 | Providence | 7 pm | King Los + MTE + Young Legend + Gavi THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | Providence | 6 pm | Alexz Johnson + Jared & the Mill + Patrick Droney | 10 pm | Daddie Long Legs + Groove Shoes + Otter 39 WEST | Cranston | E Water Band UNCLE RONNIE’S RED TAVERN | Burrillville | Angry Farmers VANILLA BEAN CAFE | Pomfret, CT | 7 pm | Hooetenanny Session hosted by Lisa Martin THE WHARF PUB | Newport | 8:30 pm | The Unknown Artist THE WHISKEY REPUBLIC | Providence | 5 pm | Brian Twohey | 9 pm | DJ Dirty DEK

SATURDAY 18

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. AS220 | Providence | 4 pm | Traditional Irish Music Session hosted by Jimmy and Hannah Devine with Mark Roberts, Andrea Cooper, Teddi Scobi & friends | 7:30 pm | LGB presents A Taste of Hip-Hop AURORA | Providence | 7 pm | Girls Rock! RI 5th Anniversary Extravaganza with Roz and the Rice Cakes + Shellshag + the Sugar Honey Iced Tea + Virusse + Mother Tongue + Secret Lover + Gertrude Atherton + the Mary Day Band + House Red + Girls Rock Camp and Ladies Rock Camp alums + DJ Merry Def

ue, but there this is our last iss of listings @ ds re are still hund phoenix.com! he providence.t

BOONDOCKS BAR & GRILL | Fall River, MA | Dirty Deeds BOVI’S | East Providence | Bent CADY’S TAVERN | Chepachet | Keep

It Rolling Band CAFE ZOG | Providence | 8 pm | The Baskethouse with G.W. Mercure CHAN’S | Woonsocket | 8 pm | Mississippi Heat CITY SIDE | Woonsocket | Smear Campaign CLUB EGO | Providence | Super Ego Saturday with DJ Rich Ladue CLUB ROXX | North Kingstown | Damaged Goods THE 88 LOUNGE | Providence | 7 pm | Danny Arico | 10 pm | Guest acts FÊTE LOUNGE | Providence | 8 pm | Motopony + the Family Crest FIREHOUSE 13 | Providence | 7 pm | The Paraplegics + DooshBucket + Defectives + VapoRubs + Chanticleer + the Pity Whores + Whisky Fyre | 7 pm | The Paraplegics+ DooshBucket + Defectives + VapoRubs + Chanticleer + the Pity Whores + Whisky Fyre GREENWICH HOTEL | East Greenwich | 8:30 pm | Open mic HANK’S DOWN SOUTH | Narragansett | 8 pm | Greg Roch IRON WORKS TAVERN | Warwick | Travis Colby Band JAVA MADNESS | Wakefield | 11 am | Marie Claude | 2 pm | Open mic JIMMY’S SALOON | Newport | 10 pm | Extinction Machine + the Loud Ones + Fucking Invincible KNICKERBOCKER CAFE | Westerly | 8 pm | Christine Ohlman THE LAST RESORT | Smithfield | False Positive

LIGHTHOUSE BAR AT TWIN RIVER

| Lincoln | M80 LOCAL 121 | Providence | Dox Ellis LUPO’S HEARTBREAK HOTEL | Providence | 7 pm | Jimmy Eat World + Minibosses

LUXURY BOX SPORTS BAR & GRILL | Seekonk, MA | Sasquatch MACHINES WITH MAGNETS |

Pawtucket | 8 pm | Jamathon Rhode

Island with Skinny Millionaires + Straw Man Standing + Chronovore + Cluster Flux MANCHESTER 65 | West Warwick | 8 pm | Fennario MARINER GRILLE | Narragansett | 7:30 pm | Greg & Mark THE MET | Pawtucket | 8 pm | Transit + Such Gold + Driver Friendly MURPHY’S LAW | Pawtucket | DJ Franco NARRAGANSETT CAFE | Jamestown | Steve Smith & the Nakeds NEWPORT BLUES CAFE | Sugar NEWPORT GRAND | Mondo Soul

NEWPORT GRAND EVENT CENTER

| Kashmir [Led Zeppelin tribute] NEWS CAFE | Pawtucket | Get Naked! NICK-A-NEE’S | Providence | Tim Taylor Blues Band OAK HILL TAVERN | North Kingstown | Steadfast OLIVES | Providence | What Matters? ONE PELHAM EAST | Newport | Bearfight 133 CLUB | East Providence | Mark Cutler Band O’ROURKE’S BAR & GRILL | Warwick | Bill Gannon PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | 8 pm | Marc Douglas Berardo POWERS PUB | Cranston | Chicago Robbery RALPH’S DINER | Worcester, MA | Clamfight + Wizard Eye + Faces of Bayon + Conclave + Bedroom Rehab Corporation THE SALON | Providence | Upstairs | All Out with DJ Nick Bishop | Downstairs | Soul Teknology with the AfroSonic DJs THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | Providence | Indobox + Mojo + Lespecial + Wyllys 39 WEST | Cranston | XS Band UNCLE RONNIE’S RED TAVERN | Burrillville | TBA

VANILLA BEAN CAFE | Pomfret, CT | 8 pm | Gail Wade Trio

THE WHARF PUB | Newport | 8:30 pm | Dave Flamand

THE WHISKEY REPUBLIC | Provi-

dence | The Network + DJ Jessica Who

SUNDAY 19

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. BOUNDARY BREWHOUSE | Pawtucket | 7 pm | Open blues jam with Wolfie & the Jam Daddies CADY’S TAVERN | Chepachet | 3 pm | Open mic blues jam with the Rick Harrington Band CLUB EGO | Providence | X Room Sunday [all-male revue with guest gay porn stars] THE 88 LOUNGE | Providence | 5:30 pm | Danny Arico | 8:30 pm | Sunday Sing-Along/Karaoke FIREHOUSE 13 | Providence | 6 pm | Strength Approach + Nebraska Bricks + Dealbreaker + Monsignor Meth + more GEORGE’S OF GALILEE | Narragansett | 2 pm | Second Avenue GILLIGAN’S ISLAND | Westerly | Steve Chrisitan HANK’S DOWN SOUTH | Narragansett | 4 pm | Bill Gannon JAVA MADNESS | Wakefield | 11 am | Moe & Tom

LIGHTHOUSE BAR AT TWIN RIVER | Lincoln | 2 pm | The Reminisants MANCHESTER 65 | West Warwick | 4:20 pm | Phamily & Friends MURPHY’S LAW | Pawtucket | 9 pm | Sunday Night Blues Jam NARRAGANSETT CAFE | Jamestown | 4 pm | Mike Crandall Band ONE PELHAM EAST | Newport | 5 pm | The Booze Bros. Reunion 133 CLUB | East Providence | 7:30 pm | Vintage Soul O’ROURKE’S BAR & GRILL | Warwick | 4:30 pm | Brian Twohey PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | 8 pm | Sandy Allen PICASSO’S PIZZA & PUB | Warwick | Karaoke with DJ Bobby Devine UNCLE RONNIE’S RED TAVERN | Burrillville | Karaoke with Stu from WRIK THE WHARF PUB | Newport | 2 pm | Brian Scott

MONDAY 20

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. BOVI’S | East Providence | John Allmark’s Jazz Orchestra THE 88 LOUNGE | Providence | 8 pm | Piano jam open mic with host Travis Colby GREENWICH HOTEL | East Greenwich | 7 pm | Hotel Jam Night THE MET | Pawtucket | 9 pm | Shwayze + Cam Meekins + Carlton + Nikko Gray + DJ Set by BVillain NICK-A-NEE’S | Providence | The House Combo THE PARLOUR | Providence | Reggae Night with Upsetta International + the Natural Element Band PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | Songwriters’ open mic THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | Providence | 7 pm | Madcap Open Mic Monday hosted by Nate Cozzolino

TUESDAY 21

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. AS220 | Providence | Filmstrip + Jake Wasson + more AURORA | Providence | 7 pm | Piano Lounge with JPA Falzone GREENWICH HOTEL | East Greenwich | 8:30 pm | Open mic THE MET | Pawtucket | 9 pm | Drive By Truckers + the Silks MURPHY’S LAW | Pawtucket | 7 pm | Groove E Tuesday with Joe Potenza, Ben Ricci, and Gene Rosati ONE PELHAM EAST | Newport | Stu Sinclair from Never In Vegas

Continued on p 30

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30 october 17, 2014 | the Providence Phoenix | Providence.thePhoenix.com | @ProvPhoenix | facebook.com/ProvidencePhoenix

On Behalf of Your Friends at

POWERS PUB | Cranston | Jay

Listings Continued from p 29 THE PARLOUR | Providence | 7:30 pm | Open mic night

RALPH’S DINER | Worcester, MA |

Dead Congregation + Mausoleum + Pissgrave + Desolate THE SALON | Providence | 8:30 pm | Kimi’s Movie Night THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | Providence | 7 pm | Re-Creation Tuesday: Rhythm Rebels Edition [open mic + jam] THE WHARF PUB | Newport | 8 pm | Open Mic Night

WEDNESDAY 22

Thanks for 36 Years of News and Views!

BENNYS PHOENIX AD 2014.indd 1

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. AS220 | Providence | Days of Judgement + Justin Chase + Starship Shape CLUB EGO | Providence | Alter Ego [fetish/fantasy night] DUSK | Providence | Dead Congregation + Mausoleum + Pissgrave + Churchburn GILLIGAN’S ISLAND | Westerly | Karaoke with DJ Deelish INDIGO PIZZA | Coventry | 6 pm | Joanne Lurgio KNICKERBOCKER CAFE | Westerly | 7:30 pm | The Zingerz THE MET | Pawtucket | 9 pm | Aer + Dizzy Wright MURPHY’S LAW | Pawtucket | 7 pm | Jim Tootell NICK-A-NEE’S | Providence | The Bluegrass Throedown with the Pegheads NOREY’S | Newport | David Olney + Sergio Webb 133 CLUB | East Providence | Karaoke with Big Bill O’ROURKE’S BAR & GRILL | Warwick | 8:30 pm | Gary Gramolilni THE PARLOUR | Providence | The Funky Autocrats PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | 8 pm | Brian Dolzani

10/15/14 2:45 PM

Ferguson from Chicago Robbery THE SALON | Providence | 10 pm | Free Up Wednesday with DJ Moy

THURSDAY 23

See Club Directory for phone numbers and addresses. BOONDOCKS BAR & GRILL | Fall River, MA | Mixtape CITY SIDE | Woonsocket | eNVy CLUB EGO | Providence | Star Search Thursday [talent contest/drag show/dance party] 1150 OAK BAR & GRILL | Cranston | Super Troup with Chas West, Scott LaFlamme, and Kelly Garni THE FATT SQUIRREL | Providence | One Drop Thursday with DJ Paul Michael GILLIGAN’S ISLAND | Westerly | Open mic hosted by Bob Lavalley IRON WORKS TAVERN | Warwick | Betsy Listenfelt KNICKERBOCKER CAFE | Westerly | 8 pm | Open Mike with host band the Low Budget Blues Band LOCAL 121 | Providence | DJ Nook MARINER GRILLE | Narragansett | 7 pm | Lori Silvia MEDIATOR STAGE | Providence | 7 pm | Open mic hosted by Don Tassone NICK-A-NEE’S | Providence | Friends of Dennis ONE PELHAM EAST | Newport | The Little Compton Band 133 CLUB | East Providence | Mac Odom Band PERKS & CORKS | Westerly | The Choos

PERRY MILL TAVERN & MUSIC HALL | Newport | Throwback

Thursday with DJ Double G PICASSO’S PIZZA & PUB | Warwick | 9:30 pm | Karaoke with DJ Bobby Devine POWERS PUB | Cranston | Mike & Mark RALPH’S DINER | Worcester, MA | Analog Heart + Bulletproof Candy + Rite of Red THE SALON | Providence | DJ Handsome J THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | Providence | Elephant + Northeast Traffic THE WHISKEY REPUBLIC | Providence | Red Bull DJ Battle

COMEDY THURSDAY 16

THE JOKES ON YOU COMEDY TOUR with Bob Nelson + Artie Fletcher + Rain Pryor | 8 pm | Comedy Connection, 39 Warren Ave, East Providence | $25 | 401.438.8383 | ricomedy connection.com THE COMEDY FACTORY with Dick Doherty, Ralphie Joyal, John Perrotta, Eddie Galvin, and more | Lemongrass, 1138 Post Rd, Warwick | $35 [buffet @ 6 pm, show @ 7:15] | 401.461.7896 | comedyfactoryri.com

PROVIDENCE IMPROV GUILD

presents “Redrum: Oath,” an improvised, interactive Halloween series | Thurs-Fri Thurs-Fri 8 pm | Providence Improv Guild, 393 Broad St | $15 | improvpig.com

PRE-GAME COMIX AND FOOTBALL with Geri Wulle, Pat Oates, and Ryan Brauth | 7:30 pm | Comix at Foxwoods, 350 Trolley Line Blvd, Mashantucket, CT | $10-$20 advance | 860.312.6649 | foxwoods.com

FRIDAY 17

PETE CORREALE | Fri 8 pm; Sat 8 + 10:15 pm | Comedy Connection, East Providence | $15 HARDCORE COMEDY SHOW hosted by Brian Beaudoin | 10:30 pm | Comedy Connection, East Providence | $15 PIPES MUSICAL IMPROV with Andrew Frazier | 7:30 pm | 95 Empire Black Box, 95 Empire St, Providence | $5 | 401.831.9327 | as220.org THE COMEDY FACTORY with John Perrotta, Rockin’ Joe Hebert, Eddie Galvin, Brian Vincent, Steve DeNuccio, Dan O’Brien, Nathan Loura, Marie Foester, and more | Legion Pub, 661 Park Ave, Cranston | $30 [buffet 7:30 pm, show 8:45, includes dinner + show + tax + tip] | 401.781.8888 | comedyfactoryri.com THE BIT PLAYERS | Fri 8 pm; Sat 8 + 10 pm | Firehouse Theater, 4 Equality Park Pl, Newport | $15, $10 Sat @ 10 pm [BYOB] | 401.849.3473 | bitplayers.net

BRING YOUR OWN IMPROV | 7 [family-friendly show] + 9 pm | Warwick Museum of Art, 3259 Post Rd | $5 | 401.737.0010 | bringyourown improv.com FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE with improvised song, dance, and skits | Everett, 9 Duncan Ave, Providence | $5 | 401.831.9479 | everettri.org MICETO IMPROV | 9:30 pm | Contemporary Theater, 327 Main St, Wakefield | $7 | 401.218.0282 | contemporarytheatercompany.com SEMI-FAMOUS COMEDY TOUR | with Mike Gaffney, Nick Guerra, and Erin Jackson | 8 pm | Comix at Foxwoods, Mashantucket, CT | $15$25 advance PROVIDENCE IMPROV GUILD | See listing for Thurs

SATURDAY 18

COMEDIC LEANINGS with Chris Reyes, Marie Forster, Ben Keefe, Adam Perry, and Kelly Morse | 7:30 pm | Jimmy’s Saloon, 37 Memorial Blvd, Newport | $5 | 401.846.5121 | facebook. com/JimmysSaloonNewport DAVID ALAN GRIER | 8 + 10:30 pm | Comix at Foxwoods, 350 Trolley Line Blvd, Mashantucket, CT | $30-$55 advance | 860.312.6649 | foxwoods.com PETE CORREALE | See listing for Fri THE BIT PLAYERS | See listing for Fri

SUNDAY 19

COMEDY SHOWCASE | 8 pm | Comedy Connection, East Providence | $10 SPINNATO’S HYPNOTIC HYSTERIA | 8 pm | Comix at Foxwoods,

Mashantucket, CT | $15-$25 advance

WEDNESDAY 22

BEST OF LAST COMIX STANDING with Angela Johnson, Brian Beaudoin, Kenny Garcia, Matt Barry, Mike Gillerman, a NYC-based comedian and writer, and Ryan Brauth | 8 pm | Comix at Foxwoods, Mashantucket, CT | $10-$20 advance

THURSDAY 23

MARLON WAYANS | 8 pm | Comedy Connection, East Providence | $35 Continued on p 32

CLUB DIRECTORY THE ARENA BAR & GRILL | 401.369.7100 | 641 Atwood ve, Cranston | thearenari.com AS220 | 401.831.9327 | 115 Empire St, Providence AURORA | 401.272.5722 | 276 Westminster St, Providence | aurora providence.com BLU ON THE WATER | 401.885.3700 | 20 Water St, East Greenwich | blueonthewater.com BOONDOCKS BAR & GRILL | 508.673.2200 | 46 Water St, Fall River, MA | myboondocks.com BOUNDARY BREWHOUSE | 401.725.4260 | 67 Garrity St, Pawtucket | facebook. com/Boundarybrewhouse BOVI’S | 401.434.9670 | 278 Taunton Ave, East Providence CADY’S TAVERN | 401.568.4102 | 2168 Putnam Pike, Chepachet | cadystavern.com CAFE ZOG | 401.421.2213 | 239 Wickenden St, Providence | cafezog.com CHAN’S | 401.765.1900 | 267 Main St, Woonsocket | chanseggrollsand jazz.com CHIEFTAIN PUB | 508.643.9031 | 23 Washington St, Plainville, MA | chieftainpub.com CITY SIDE | 401.235.9026 | 74 South Main St, Woonsocket | citysideri.com CLUB EGO | 73 Richmond St, Providence | EGOPVD.com CLUB ROXX | 401.8884.4450 | 6125 Post Rd, North Kingstown | kbowl. com THE CONTINENTAL | 401.233.1800 | 332 Farnum Pike, Smithfield | smithfieldcontinental.com DAN’S PLACE | 401.392.3092 | 880 Victory Hwy, West Greenwich | danspizzaplace.com DIVE BAR | 401.272.2000 | 201 Westminster St, Providence DUSK | 401.714.0444 | 301 Harris Ave, Providence | duskprovidence.com 88 LOUNGE | 401.437.8830 | 55 Union St, Providence | 88pianolounge.com

THE FATT SQUIRREL | 150 Chestnut St, Providence | 401.808.6898 FÊTE | 401.383.1112 | 103 Dike St, Providence | fetemusic.com FINN’S HARBORSIDE | 401.884.6363 | 38 Water St, East Greenwich | finnsharborside.com GAME 7 SPORTS BAR & GRILL | 508.643.2700 | 60 Man Mar Dr, Plainville, MA | game7sportsbar andgrill.com GILLIGAN’S ISLAND | 401.315.5556 | 105 White Rock Rd, Westerly GREENWICH HOTEL | 401.884.4200 | 162 Main St, East Greenwich | facebook.com/greenwichhotel HANK’S DOWN SOUTH | 401.792.9200 | 33 State St, Narragansett | facebook.com/HanksDownSouthRI INDIGO PIZZA | 401.615.9600 | 599 Tiogue Ave, Coventry | indigopizza.com IRON WORKS TAVERN | 401.739.5111 | 697 Jefferson Blvd, Warwick | theironworkstavern.com JAVA MADNESS | 401.788.0088 | 134 Salt Pond Rd, Wakefield | javamadness.com THE KNICKERBOCKER | 401.315.5070 | 35 Railroad Ave, Westerly | theknickerbockercafe.com THE LAST RESORT | 401.349.3500 | 325 Farnum Pike, Smithfield | thelastresortri.com L’ATTITUDE | 401.780.8700 | 2190 Broad St, Cranston | lattituderi. com LIGHTHOUSE BAR AT TWIN RIVER | 877.82.RIVER | 100 Twin River Rd, Lincoln | twinriver.com LOCAL 121 | 401.274.2121 | 121 Washington St, Providence | local121.com LUPO’S HEARTBREAK HOTEL | 401.331.5876 | 79 Washington St, Providence | lupos.com MACHINES WITH MAGNETS | 401.261.4938 | 400 Main St, Pawtucket | machineswithmagnets.com

MANCHESTER 65 | 65 Manchester St, West Warwick | manchester 65.com MARINER GRILL | 401.284.3282 | 142 Point Judith Rd, Narragansett | marinergrille.com THE MEDIATOR | 401.461.3683 | 50 Rounds Ave, Providence THE MET | 401.729.1005 | 1005 Main St, Pawtucket | themetri.com MURPHY’S LAW | 401.724.5522 | 2 George St, Pawtucket | murphys lawri.com NARRAGANSETT CAFE | 401.423.2150 | 25 Narragansett Ave, Jamestown | narragansettcafe.com/ NEWPORT BLUES CAFE | 401.841.5510 | 286 Thames St | newportblues.com NEWPORT GRAND | 401.849.5000 | 150 Admiral Kalbfus Rd, Newport | newportgrand.com NEWS CAFE | 401.728.6475 | 43 Broad St, Pawtucket NICK-A-NEE’S | 401.861.7290 | 75 South St, Providence NOREY’S | 401.847.4971 | 156 Broadway, Newport | noreys.com OAK HILL TAVERN | 401.294.3282 | 565 Tower Hill Rd, North Kingstown | oakhilltavern.com OCEAN MIST | 401.782.3740 | 895 Matunuck Beach Rd, Matunuck | oceanmist.net OLIVES | 401.751.1200 | 108 North Main St, Providence | olivesrocks.com 133 CLUB | 401.438.1330 | 29 Warren Ave, East Providence ONE PELHAM EAST | 401.847.9460 | 270 Thames St, Newport | thepelham.com O’ROURKE’S BAR & GRILL | 401.228.7444 | 23 Peck Ln, Warwick | orourkesbarandgrill.com THE PARLOUR | 401.383.5858 | 1119 North Main St, Providence | facebook.com/ParlourRI PERKS & CORKS | 401.596.1260 | 48 High St, Westerly | perksand corks.com

PERRY MILL TAVERN & MUSIC HALL | 401.846.0907 | 337 Thames St, Newport | perrymilltavern. com PICASSO’S PIZZA AND PUB | 401.739.5030 | 2323 Warwick Ave, Warwick | picassosrocks.com POWERS PUB | 401.714.0655 | 27 Aborn St, Cranston | powerspub. com RALPH’S DINER | 508.753.9543 | 148 Grove St, Worcester, MA | myspace.com/ralphsdiner RHODE ISLAND BILLIARD BAR & BISTRO | 401.232.1331 | 2026 Smith St, North Providence | RIBBB.com RI RA | They closed their doors on October 12. Bad week in Prov .... THE SALON | 401.865.6330 | 57 Eddy St, Providence | thesalonpvd.com SIMON’S 677 | 401.270.6144 | 677 Valley St, Providence | facebook. com/simons677 THE SPOT UNDERGROUND | 401.383.7133 | 101 Richmond St, Providence | thespotprovidence. com STEVIE D’S BAR & GRILL | 401.658.2591 | 80 Manville Hill Rd, Cumberland | stevie-ds.com TAVERN ON BROADWAY | 401.619.5675 | 16 Broadway, Newport | tavern onbroadway.com 39 WEST | 401.944.7770 | 39 Phenix Ave, Cranston | 39westri.com UNCLE RONNIE’S RED TAVERN | 401.568.6243 | 2692 Victory Hwy, Burrillville | uncleronniesred tavern.com VANILLA BEAN CAFE | 860.928.1562 | Rts 44, 169 and 97, Pomfret, CT | thevanillabeancafe.com THE WHARF PUB | 401.619.5672 | 37 Bowen’s Wharf, Newport | thewharfpubnewport.com WHISKEY REPUBLIC | 401.588.5158 | 515 South Water St, Providence | TheWhiskeyRepublic.com


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32 october 17, 2014 | the Providence Phoenix | Providence.thePhoenix.com | @ProvPhoenix | facebook.com/ProvidencePhoenix

Farewell

Ann Rossoni] + more | 11 am-5 pm [rain date: Oct 19] | Fort Adams State Park, Newport | $12 advance, $15 day of event | 401.952.0963 | fortadamsdogandponyshow.com

Providence Phoenix !

Listings

STEAMPUNK MANSION MASHUP,

For the pleasing aroma oF pulp. now exclusively at Cellar stories! Cellar stories used Book Browsatorium sinCe ‘81

www.cellarstories.com 111 mathewson st. Providence ri 521-2665

Continued from p 30 COMEDY NIGHT | 7 pm | The 88

Lounge, 55 Union St, Providence | $5 | 401.437.8830 | 88pianolounge.com STEVE BYRNE | 8 pm | Comix at Foxwoods, Mashantucket, CT | $20$50 advance PROVIDENCE IMPROV GUILD | See listing for Thurs

CONCERTS POPULAR THURSDAY 16

TOWN HALL LANES Cosmic Bowl and Birthday Parties $5 Off Open Bowling

ACOUSTICANA + Chasing Blue + Jesse Burdick & the New Republic | 8 pm | Narrows Center For the Arts, 16 Anawan St, Fall River, MA | $18 advance, $20 day of show | 508.324.1926 | narrowscenter.org JAKE SHIMABUKURO | 8 pm | Zeiterion Performing Arts Center, 684 Purchase St, New Bedford, MA | $29$45 | 508.994.2900 | zeiterion.org

FRIDAY 17

APRIL VERCH BAND + Rosie Newton & Richie Stearns | 7:30 pm | Lily Pads, 27 North Rd, Peace Dale | $20 | musicatlilypads.org BONEY JAMES AND STANLEY JORDAN | 8 pm | Park Theatre, 848 Park Ave, Cranston | $35 + $45 | 401.467.7275 | parktheatreri.com

1463 Atwood Ave Johnston, RI 401-831-6940 www.townhalllanes.com

CLASSICAL GUITARIST HIROYA TSUKAMOTO | 8 pm | The Meeting

House, 3852 Main Rd, Tiverton | $15 advance, $20 door | 401.624.2600 | fourcornersarts.org CLAUDE BOURBON | Sandywoods Center For the Arts, 43 Muse Way, Tiverton | $TBA | 401.241.7349 | sandywoodsmusic.com

SMITH & WEEDEN + THE HORSEEYED MEN + THE SUN PARADE | 9

Southern New England’s premier roots music venue for concerts, dining, and dancing! Tickets Available On Line!

Thanks to the Phoenix for helping to keep music & the arts alive! There’s nothing like music to relieve the soul and uplift it. ~ Mickey Hart ........................................................................................................................

Fri. Oct. 17 • 8p • $10 Shiny Lapel Trio

Swing/Blues

..............................................................................................................................................................................................

Sat. Oct. 18 • 8p $10

Christine Ohlman Longtime vocalist of SNL Band

..............................................................................................................................................................................................

Fri. Oct. 24 • 8p $10 - Delta Generators

Roots/Rock/Blues

..............................................................................................................................................................................................

Sat. Oct. 25 • 9p $5 - Atlas Gray

w/Crows Toes Opening. Soul/Rock ..............................................................................................................................................................................................

LET’S DANCE WEDNESDAYS! $10

Doors open 6:30 pm, Music 7:30-10 pm FREE DANCE LESSONS 7pm! Weds. 10/22 • The Zingerz

Weds. 10/29 • Dan Lord & The Big Shots ................................................................................................................................................................................................

OPEN MIKE NIGHT THURS. Doors, 7p • 8p • NC 35 Railroad Ave I Westerly, RI 401.315.5070 theknickerbockercafe.com

dAvId KATzENSTEIN

SCRATCH ‘n Sniff

FIRSTWORKS PRESENTS Regina Carter on Saturday. We did a Q&A with her, but ran out of space in this special Final Issue. Read the piece @ providence.thephoenix.com. ROY BOOK BINDER | Sandywoods Center For the Arts, 43 Muse Way, Tiverton | $TBA | 401.241.7349 | sandywoodsmusic.com XYLOURIS WHITE | 9 pm | Columbus Theatre, 270 Broadway, Providence | $10 advance, $12 day of show | columbustheatre.com

SUNDAY 19

CHANCE THE RAPPER + SWEATER BEATS + YOUNG & SICK | 8 pm | Ryan Center, 1 Lincoln Almond Plaza, Kingston | $30 | 401.788.3200 | theryancenter.com THE EMPTY HEARTS | 7:30 pm | Park Theatre, 848 Park Ave, Cranston | $27 + $37 | 401.467.7275 | parktheatreri.com

THE JOBE/REDFEARN ENSEMBLE

| 2 pm | Roger Williams University Performing Arts Center, 1 Old Ferry Rd, Bristol | Free | 401.254.3626 | rwu.edu/academics/schoolscolleges/fcas/music-program

NARROWS BLUES BRUNCH WITH JOHNNY HOY & THE BLUEFISH | Narrows Center For the Arts, Fall River, MA | $40

TUESDAY 21

THE TUBES | 8 pm | Narrows Center

For the Arts, Fall River, MA | $35 advance, $40 day of show

pm | Columbus Theatre, 270 Broadway, Providence | $10 advance, $12 day of show | columbustheatre.com SONNY LANDRETH | 8 pm | Narrows Center For the Arts, Fall River, MA | $27 advance, $30 day of show

ALBERT CUMMINGS BAND | 8 pm | Narrows Center For the Arts, Fall River, MA | $22 advance, $25 day of show

SATURDAY 18

CLASSICAL

ATHENE WILSON & FRIENDS with the Mixed Magic Exult Choir | 6:30 pm | Central Congregational Church, 296 Angell St, Providence | $20, $15 students | 401.831.1800 | historichamilton.com BLUEGRASS GOSPEL PROJECT | 7 pm | Stone Soup Coffeehouse @ Slater Mill, 67 Roosevelt Ave, Pawtucket | $20 | 401.248.4692 | stonesoupcoffeehouse.com BLUZ U CAN USE | 7 pm | Jamestown Arts Center, 18 Valley St | $10 | 401.560.0979 | jamestownartcenter.org

FIRSTWORKS PRESENTS THE REGINA CARTER QUINTET | 8

pm | RISD Auditorium, 17 Canal Walkway, Providence | $20-$44 | 401.421.4278 | first-works.org GARNET ROGERS | 8 pm | Rose Garden Coffeehouse at the Congregational Church, 17 West St, Mansfield, MA | $20 | 508.699.8122 | rosegardenfolk.com GIPSY KINGS | 8 pm | Zeiterion Performing Arts Center, 684 Purchase St, New Bedford, MA | $49-$79 | 508.994.2900 | zeiterion.org ROCKAPELLA | 7:30 pm | George Kent Performance Hall, 119 High St, Westerly | $24-$60 | 401.596.8663 | chorusofwesterly.org

THURSDAY 23

FRIDAY 17

THE BROWN UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY performing works by

Steven Bryant and Gustav Holst | 8 pm | Brown University’s Salomon DeCiccio Family Auditorium, Waterman and George sts, Providence | Free | 401.863.3234 | brown.edu/ music/events

SATURDAY 18

THE RHODE ISLAND PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA with pianist

Jon Nakamatsu performing works by Shostakovich, Beethoven, and Rimsky-Korsakov | 8 pm | The Vets, 1 Avenue of the Arts, Providence | $35$150 | 401.248.7000 | riphil.org

SUNDAY 19

THE NARRAGANSETT BAY SYMPHONY COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA will perform works

by Bernstein, Dvorak, and Mozart | 3 pm | Jewish Community Center of Rhode Island, 401 Elmgrove Ave, Providence | $15, $5 students + seniors | 401.274.4578 | jewishallianceri.org

DANCE PARTICIPATORY SUNDAY 19

COMMUNITY DANCE with music by the Sunday Night Jammers | 7 pm | Goff Memorial Hall, 124 Bay State Rd, Rehoboth, MA | Free | 774.644.1369 | contradancelinks. com/jammers.html

EVENTS THROUGH NOV 2

JACK-O-LANTERN SPECTACULAR | The theme is “Jack-O-Lanterns A to Z,” with more than 5000 illuminated pumpkins arrayed in alphabetical order, with highlights from history and popular culture | Nightly 6-11 pm [till midnight on Sat] through Nov 2 | Roger Williams Park Zoo, 1000 Elmwood Ave, Providence | Mon-Thurs, $12, $10 seniors, $9 ages 3-12, free under 3; FriSun, $16, $14 seniors, $13 ages 3-12, free under | 401.785.3510 | rwpzoo.org

FRIDAY 17

BEERVANA FEST ’14 with samplings of 180 beers from 60 breweries, plus educational seminars by Dave Engbers of Founders Brewing Co. and Ron Lindenbusch of Lagunitas Brewing Company| 6:30-10 pm | Rhodes-On-the-Pawtuxet, 60 Rhodes Pl, Cranston | $50 advance, $60 door | 401.785.4333 | beervanafest.com FEAR AT FORT ADAMS | The event features the Tunnels of Terror, Haunted Officers Quarters, Apocalypse Airsoft, and a carnival midway | 6-10 pm | Fort Adams State Park, Harrison Avenue, Newport | $15 | 401.841.0707 | fear.fortadams.org THE HAUNTED TUNNEL | 6:30-9 pm | Slater Memorial Park, Newport Ave & Armistice Blvd, Pawtucket | $8 | 401.728.0500 x 251 | facebook.com/ hauntedtunnelri PROVIDENCE TATTOO ARTS CONVENTION with more than 400 tattoo

artists (including many from Ink Master) + a human suspension show + burlesque performances + tattoo contests + hot rod cars + more | Oct 17 2 pm-midnight + Oct 18 11 am-midnight + Oct 19 11 am-8 pm | Rhode Island Convention Center, 1 Sabin St, Providence | $20 [$40 three-day pass], free under 12 | villainarts.com

SATURDAY 18

9TH ANNUAL HOPARTS STUDIO TRAIL | Take a self-guided tour of

more than 30 artists’ studios in a seven-mile radius within Hopkinton and Richmond | 10 am-5 pm [rain or shine] | HopArts Studio Trail, Main St, Hope Valley | Free | hoparts.org

BOWEN’S WHARF SEAFOOD FESTIVAL with local specialties + baked goods + music + kids’ activities + more | 11 am-5 pm | Bowen’s Wharf, America’s Cup Ave, Newport | Free | 401.849.2120 | bowenswharf.com

FIRSTWORKS’ 10TH ANNIVERSARY GALA with gourmet fare, cock-

tails, music + more | 6 pm | Biltmore Hotel, 11 Dorrance St, Providence | $110 | 401.421.4278 | first-works.org ILLUSIONIST MATT THE KNIFE | 7:30 pm | 95 Empire Black Box, Providence | $19 | 401.831.9327 | as220.org MASTERS OF ILLUSION | 8 pm | Garde Arts Center, 325 State St, New London, CT | $50 + 56 | 860.444.7373 | gardearts.org NEWPORT DOG & PONY SHOW with pet exhibits + vendors + a petting zoo + pony rides + kids’ activities + music by the James Montgomery Blues Band & Friends + Triple Threat + Big Cat Blues + Smith & Weeden + Roz & the Rice Cakes + the Second Baptist Choir Group + the Mintones + Cory & Yasmine + the Songwriters [Amy Herrera + Eva + J0anne Lurgio + Mary

with “Steampunk musicians, performers, and artists providing entertainment and general wonderment in a free-flowing format,” featuring Baron Von Lahey, Edward Von Arkham the Mad Hatter, Miss Kitty the Imperial Tea Hostess, Pirate Crew of the Dead Rabbit, Professor Death & the Mostly Ghostly and Painless Parker the Wandering Cellist | 8 pm | Lippitt House Museum, 199 Hope St, Providence | $15 advance, $18 day of event | 401.453.0688 | lippitthouse.org FEAR AT FORT ADAMS | See listing for Fri THE HAUNTED TUNNEL | See listing for Fri

PROVIDENCE TATTOO ARTS CONVENTION | See listing for Fri

SUNDAY 19

CHEFS COLLABORATIVE’S 5TH ANNUAL HARVEST BBQ, a gather-

ing of Rhode Island’s best “farmto-fork” chefs presenting a locallysourced, barbecue-themed menu, featuring Matthew Gennuso of Chez Pascal, James Mark of north, David Reynoso of Al Forno, Matthew Varga of Gracie’s, Beau Vestal of New Rivers, Chad Hart of One Bellevue at the Hotel Viking, Chad Hoffer and Tyler Burnley of Thames Street Kitchen, Matthew Petersen of 22 Bowen’s, James Day of the Beehive, Champe Speidel of Persimmon, and Eli Dunn of Eli’s Kitchen 4-7 pm | Schartner Farms, 1 Arnold Pl, Exeter | $68, $25 ages 11-17, free under 11 | chefscollaborative.org/connect/ locals/rhode-island-local MASTERS OF ILLUSION | 7 pm | The Vets, 1 Avenue of the Arts, Providence | $38 + $48 | 401.421.ARTS | ppacri.org

RHODE ISLAND MODEL TRAIN SHOW | 10 am-3 pm | Pawtucket Ar-

mory, 172 Exchange Street, Pawtucket | $5, free under 13, family max $15 | 401.246.0381 | arts-exchange.org

PROVIDENCE TATTOO ARTS CONVENTION | See listing for Fri 9TH ANNUAL HOPARTS STUDIO TRAIL | See listing for Sat BOWEN’S WHARF SEAFOOD FESTIVAL | See listing for Sat

FILM THURSDAY 16 + FRIDAY 17

CINEBRASIL 2014: A BRAZILIAN FILM FESTIVAL | Screenings at

Brown University’s Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium, 167 Thayer St, Providence [Oct 16 + 17]; see website for details | Free, but tickets are required; reserve @ watson.brown.edu/brazil/ events/2014/cinebrasil-2014

THURSDAY 16 + 23

“FROM FANGS TO BANGS AND BEYOND: THE EVOLUTION OF THE VAMPIRE IN FILM” | Oct 16: House of

Dark Shadows [1970] + Oct 23: Interview with the Vampire [1994] | 6 pm | Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St | Free | 401.455.8000 | provlib.org

MONDAY 20-SUNDAY 26

15TH ANNUAL RHODE ISLAND INTERNATIONAL HORROR FILM FESTIVAL | See website for complete details | 401.861.4445 | film-festival. org/Horror_ri.php

MONDAY 20

“GIRLS WITH GUNS: A CRITICAL FILM SERIES” | This week: Hanna

| 6 pm | Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St | Free | 401.455.8000 | provlib.org

LIT EVENTS THURSDAY 16

BELINDA RATHBONE will discuss and sign her new book, The Boston RaContinued on p 34


Open Every Day for Lunch, Pintxos & Dinner 60 Valley Street • ProVidence, ri • (401) 270-6080 • bocadotaPaSbar.com

Bocado-Prov_Phoenix_HalfPage_Prepare-Share.indd 1

10/15/14 12:31 PM


34 october 17, 2014 | the Providence Phoenix | Providence.thePhoenix.com | @ProvPhoenix | facebook.com/ProvidencePhoenix

CAD GET A

Listings

CERTIFICATE

Continued from p 32

OR UPDATE YOUR SKILLS

phael: A Mysterious Painting, an Embattled Museum In an Era of Change, and a Daughter’s Search for the Truth | 7 pm | Books On the Square, 471 Angell St, Providence | 401.331.9097 | booksq.com

You can enroll now in our Computer-Aided Drafting Certificate program.

• Auto CAD 2015 • Inventor 2015 • Solid Works 2014

FRANK GRZYB AND RUSSELL DESIMONE will discuss and sign

their book, Remarkable Women of Rhode Island | 6:30 pm | Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St | Free | 401.455.8000 | provlib.org LUCY CORIN will read from her fiction | 2:30 pm | Brown University McCormack Family Theater, 70 Brown St, Providence | Free | 401.863.3260 | brown.edu/cw PROVIDENCE POETRY SLAM featuring Hanif Abdurraqib | 8 pm | AS220, 115 Empire St, Providence | $4 [$2 under 20] | 401.831.9327 | as220.org

Classes Start December 2 Call 401-598-2342 • 401-598-2339 explore.jwu.edu/ceinfo3

MMJ Patient Care Connection If you have a MMJ prescription and would like to connect with a Care Giver, contact us at once for quality and service. We service the entire state of RI and are ready to help you with the medicine that you need. We are licensed and approved to provide quality medicine to qualified patients. If you do not have a Doctors prescription or a MMJ card, we can guide you thru the process, step by step. Contact us today for quality, service and most of all… care.

Canna Care Connect Where MMJ Patients and Care Givers connect

www.CannaCareConnect.com Call: 1 (401) 583-4580

SATURDAY 18

DAMASE OLSSON, the brewmaster from Foolproof Brewing Company, will discuss beer and beer-related topics | Free admission; RSVP @ 877.694.2662 or beer@hannainst. com | 1 pm | Hanna Instruments, 584 Park East Dr, Woonsocket | 877.694.2662 | hannainst.com

“WHERE CINEMA MEETS HISTORY,” a talk by Oliver Stone and

American University professor Peter Kuznick, will follow a screening of an episode titled “The ‘50s: Eisenhower, The Bomb and The Third World,” from their new Showtime series, Oliver Stone’s Untold History of the United States | 5 pm | Brown University’s Watson Institute, 111 Thayer St, Providence | Free | 401.863.2809 | watson.brown. edu/events/2014/oliver-stone-wherecinema-meets-history

TUESDAY 21

PEYTON MARSHALL will read from, discuss and sign her new novel, Good House | 7 pm | Books On the Square, 471 Angell St, Providence | 401.331.9097 | booksq.com

A PANEL ON CYBERCRIME will be moderated by Congressman James Langevin, founder and co-chair of the Congressional Cybersecurity Caucus | Part of URI’s Fall 2014 Honors Colloquium, “Cybersecurity & Privacy” | 7:30 pm | Edwards Auditorium, University of Rhode Island, Upper College Road, Kingston | Free | 401.874.2381 | uri.edu/hc

SATURDAY 18

THURSDAY 23

FRIDAY 17

Johnson & Wales University admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin, among other categories.

den Place, 500 Hope St, Bristol | $5 | 401.253.0390 | lindenplace.org

ELLEN STIMSON will read from,

discuss and sign her new novel, Good Grief! | 7 pm | Books On the Square, 471 Angell St, Providence | 401.331.9097 | booksq.com

SUNDAY 19

“AN HOUR IN PROVIDENCE WITH EDGAR ALLAN POE,” a presenta-

tion by Carl L. Johnson | 2 pm | Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St | Free | 401.455.8000 | provlib.org

PARANORMAL EXPERT TOM D’AGOSTINO AND PHOTOGRAPHER ARLENE NICHOLSON will

discuss and sign their new book, Rhode Island’s Haunted Ramtail Factory | 3 pm | Books On the Square, 471 Angell St, Providence | 401.331.9097 | booksq.com

“THE ART OF COLUMN WRITING,” a talk by Suzette Standring, based on her book The Art of Column Writing: Inside Secrets From Art Buchwald, Dave Barry, Arianna Huffington, Pete Hamill, and Other Great Columnists | 2 pm | Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St | Free | 401.455.8000 | provlib.org

MONDAY 20

OKEY NDIBE will discuss and sign

his new novel, Foreign Gods, Inc.. The event also includes a panel discussion with Patricia Agupusi, Keith Brown, Anani Dzidzienyo, Lina Fruzzetti, Glenn Loury, Okey, Ndibe, and Daniel Smith | 4 pm | Brown Bookstore, 244 Thayer St, Providence | 401.863.3168 | brown.edu/campuslife/support/bookstore/events

WEDNESDAY 22

AINISSA RAMIREZ will read from,

discuss and sign her new book, Newton’s Football: The Science Behind America’s Game | 4:30 pm | Brown Bookstore, 244 Thayer St, Providence | 401.863.3168 | brown.edu/campuslife/support/bookstore/events

THURSDAY 23

FANNY HOWE + BRADFORD MORROW will read from their fiction |

7:30 pm | Brown University McCormack Family Theater, 70 Brown St, Providence | Free | brown.edu/cw MARTA V. MARTINEZ will discuss and sign her book, Latino History in Rhode Island | 6:30 pm | Providence Public Library, 150 Empire St | Free | 401.455.8000 | provlib.org RAP IS POETRY SLAM | 8 pm | AS220, 115 Empire St, Providence | $4 | 401.831.9327 | as220.org

TALKS THURSDAY 16

“SAMUEL POMEROY COLT: SHADOWED BY THE GUN,” a talk by

historian Claire Benson | 7 pm | Lin-

“STRATEGIES OF NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION: HOW STATES LEARNED TO LOVE GETTING THE BOMB,” a talk by Vipin Narang,

an associate professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology | 4 pm | Brown University’s Watson Institute, 111 Thayer St, Providence | 401.863.2809 | watson.brown.edu/events/2014/ vipin-narang-strategies-nuclearproliferation-how-states-learnedlove-getting-bomb

“TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AFTER THE FALL OF THE WALL,” a panel

discussion with William Crossgrove, emeritus professor of German studies; Christian Reisinger, professor and head of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Rostock; ??Wolfgang Schareck, president of the University of Rostock; Duncan Smith, emeritus professor of German studies; and Marilyn Rueschemeyer, adjunct professor of international studies | Noon | Brown University’s Watson Institute, 111 Thayer St, Providence | 401.863.2809 | watson.brown.edu/events/2014/ twenty-five-years-after-fall-wall

ART GALLERIES ARTISTS’ COOPERATIVE GALLERY OF WESTERLY | 401.596.2221 | 7

Canal St | westerlyarts.com | Tues-Sat 10 am-5 pm | Through Nov 2: “All Members’ Show,” work by artist members and associate members ARTPROV GALLERY | 401.641.5182 | 150 Chestnut St, Providence | art providence.com | Through Oct 10: “Earthen Elements,” abstract paintings by Vibha Nanda | Through Nov 14: “Crew Scapes,” oil paintings of rowers on the Charles River in Boston by Nick Paciorek AS220 | 401.831.9327 | 115 Empire St, Providence | as220.org | Wed-Fri 1-6 pm; Sat 12-5 pm + by appointment | Through Oct 25: “I, Barfly,” by new paintings by Nate Shaw | “Urban Voyeur,” new photographs by Vivian Madrid | New work by Margaret Worthen AS220 PROJECT SPACE | 401.831.9327 | 93 Mathewson St, Providence | as220. org | Wed-Fri 1-6 pm; Sat 12-5 pm + by appointment | Through Oct 25: “truth of the matter,” new work by Lisa perez | “Please Simplify,” new work by Margie Butler BANKRI GALLERY | 401.456.5015 x 1330 | 137 Pitman St, Providence | bankri.com | Mon-Fri 9 am-7 pm; Sat 9 am-3 pm; Sun 12-4 pm | Through Nov 5: paintings on copper by Cath-

Continued on p 36


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36 october 17, 2014 | the Providence Phoenix | Providence.thePhoenix.com | @ProvPhoenix | facebook.com/ProvidencePhoenix

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QUIT FOR HEALTH Women: Want to Quit Smoking in 2014? The Quit for Health research study is a 12 –week program with strategies to help you quit smoking , such as exercise and the nicotine patch. • Must be 18-65 and not a regular exerciser • Must be female and generally healthy • Must be able to attend 3 times a week

• We provide 10 weeks of the nicotine patch and compensation up to $593.

CALL (877) 688-4247 to see if you qualify! You can also find us online at www.quitwithbrown.org/ourprojects and scroll down to the Quit for Health study for more information and link to answer our screening questions online.

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Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies

Listings Continued from p 34 erine Curtis — 1140 Ten Rod Rd, North Kingstown | Mon-Fri 9 am-7 pm; Sat 9 am-3 pm; Sun 12-4 pm | Through Jan 7: “Ice Abstractions,” photographs by Aaron Usher

BANNISTER GALLERY AT RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE | 401.456.9765 |

600 Mount Pleasant Ave, Providence | ric.edu/bannister | Tues-Fri 12-8 pm

| Through Oct 24: “Embodied: The Figure In Paint,” works by Susanna Coffey, Bob Collins, Ann Gale, Catherine Kehoe, Francoise McAree, and Patrice Sullivan

BROWN UNIVERSITY’S WATSON INSTITUTE | 111 Thayer St, Providence

| Through Oct 31: photographs of Rio de Janeiro by Cesar Barreto

CHAZAN GALLERY AT WHEELER

| 401.421.9230 | 228 Angell St, Providence | chazangallery.org | Tues-Sat 11 am-4 pm; Sun 2-4 pm | Through Nov 5: works by Michelle Benoit, Susan Doyle, and Joan Wyand COASTAL LIVING GALLERY | 83 Brown St, Wickford | coastalliving gallery.com | Through Oct 31: “Pour & Scratch,” paitnings by Elizabeth Kirby Sullivan and Carolina Arensten DEBLOIS GALLERY | 401.847.9977 | 134 Aquidneck Ave, Middletown | debloisgallery.com | Tues-Sun 12-5 pm | Through Oct 26: “Coordinates,” oil on linen landscapes by Peter Dickison | “Fantasy Figures,” ceramic sculptures by Nina Hope Pfanstiehl | “The Personality of Cuba,” photography by Pao DEDEE SHATTUCK GALLERY | 508.636.4177 | 1 Partners Ln, Westport, MA | dedeeshattuckgallery. com | Tues-Sat 10 am-5 pm; Sun 12-5 pm | Through Nov 9: digital art and furniture design by Jean-Pierre Hébert and Gail Fredell GALLERY 4 | 401.816.0999 | 3848 Main Rd, Tiverton | gallery4tiverton. com | Mon-Sat 10 am-5 pm; Sun 11 am-5 pm | Through Nov 9: “Bella Terra: Beautiful Earth: Italy,” photographs by Serena Parente Charlebois GRIN | 60 valley St #3, Providence | grinprovidence.com | Sat 12-5 pm | Through Nov 15: “Great Acceptations,” works by Pat Falco HERA GALLERY | 401.789.1488 | 10 High St, Wakefield | heragallery. org | Wed-Fri 1-5 pm; Sat 10 am-4 pm | Oct 18-Nov 15: “Forty Years Interpreting Tradition,” the Saunderstown Weaving School 40th anniversary exhibition

IMAGO FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS | 401.245.0173 | 36 Market St, Warren | imagofoundation4art.org |

Thurs 4-8 pm, Fri + Sat 12-8 pm | Oct 17-Nov 8: “Multiplicities: New Directions in Fiber” JAMESTOWN ARTS CENTER | 401.560.0979 | 18 valley St | jamestown artcenter.org | Wed-Sat 10 am-2 pm | Through Oct 17: “Second Home,” works by Alice O’Neill, Colgate Searle, and Dan O’Neill

NARROWS CENTER FOR THE ARTS GALLERY | 508.324.1926 | 16

Anawan St, Fall River, MA | narrows center.org | Wed-Sat 12-5 pm | Through

Oct 25: “Third Annual Poster Exhibition,” with works by Ghost-Town, Doe Eyed, Land Land, LeDouxville, and Little Friends of Printmaking PROVIDENCE ART CLUB | 401.331.1114 | 11 Thomas St | providence artclub.org | Mon-Fri 12-4 pm; SatSun 2-4 pm | Through Oct 17: works by William Heydt, Timothy Philbrick, and Johanna McKenzie | “Calendar Days,” works by Nancy Hart PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY | 401.455.8000 | 150 Empire St | provlib. org | Mon + Thurs 12-8 pm; Tues + Wed 10 am-6 pm; Fri + Sat 9 am5:30 pm | Through Oct 30: “Protecting Providence: Three Centuries of Policing In Rhode Island’s Capital”

RHODE ISLAND WATERCOLOR SOCIETY GALLERY | 401.726.1876 | Slater Memorial Park, Armistice Blvd, Pawtucket | rhodeisland watercolorsociety.wildapricot.org |

Tues-Sat 10 am-4 pm; Sun 1-5 pm | Through Oct 23: “RIWS Member Group Show,” works by Jerry Aissis, Denise Cornwall, Allen Halle, Donna Kenny-Kirwan, and Ben Macomber

SOL KOFFLER GRADUATE STUDENT GALLERY | 169 Weybosset St, Providence | risd.edu/About/ Galleries_Exhibitions/Sol_Koffler |

Sun-Fri 12-5 pm | Through Oct 19: “Painting Graduate Student Exhibition”

SOUTH COUNTY ART ASSOCIATION | 401.783.2195 | 2587 Kingstown Rd, Kingston | southcountyart.org | WedSun 10 am-6 pm; Fri 10 am-8 pm | Through Nov 15: “Members and Staff Invitational,” with ceramics by Elizabeth Alvarez, sculpture by Patricia Anderson, mixed media works by Anthony DeAngelis, photography by Josh Edenbaum and Karin Forde Whittemore, watercolors by Edmund Ferszt, drawings by William Gilroy, woodwork by Richard Heinz Jr., and paintings by M.A. Podolak

URI PROVIDENCE CAMPUS GALLERY | 401.277.5206 | 80 Washington

St | uri.edu/prov | Mon-Thurs 9 am-9 pm; Fri + Sat 9 am-4 pm | Through Oct 31: “Solamente Tamara: Colorful Soul,” a mixed media exhibit by Tamara Diaz

WICKFORD ART ASSOCIATION GALLERY | 401.294.6840 | 36 Beach

St, North Kingstown | wickfordart.org | Tues-Sat 11 am-3 pm; Sun 12-3 pm | Through Oct 26: “Abstract/Avant Garde” WOODS-GERRY HOUSE | 401.454.6141 | 62 Prospect St, Providence | risd.edu/About/Galleries_ Exhibitions/Woods_Gerry | Mon-Sat 10 am-5 pm; Sun 2-5 pm | Through Oct 26: “RISD Photography Departmental Exhibition” YELLOW PERIL GALLERY | 401.861.1535 | 60 valley St #5, Providence | yellowperilmedia.com/gallery | Wed-Fri 3-8 pm; other days by appointment | Through Nov 16: “Mile High, Red Hot,” a mixed media dual exhibition by Garcia Sinclair and Nafis White

MUSEUMS BRISTOL ART MUSEUM |

401.253.4400 | 10 Wardwell St | bristol artmuseum.org | Wed-Sun 1-4 pm |

Through Oct 19: “Objects For Work, Objects For Play, and Objects To Cherish,” with fine art jewelry by Kelly Jean Conroy, interdisciplinary works by Candis Dixon, pencils by Dalton Ghetti, paintings by Dan Golden, miniature sugar carvings by Judith G. Klausner, photography by Dan McManus, and drawings by David Shapleigh NEWPORT ART MUSEUM | 401.848.8200 | 76 Bellevue Ave | newportartmuseum.org | Tues-Sat 11 am-4 pm; Sun 12-4 pm | Admission $10 adults; $8 seniors; $6 students and military personnel with ID; free for children 5 and under | Through Jan 4: “Palate to Plate: Prints & Recipes From Members of the Boston Printmakers” | Through Jan 11: “Solemnities,” works by Claudia Flynn RISD MUSEUM | 401.454.6500 | 224 Benefit St, Providence | risdmuseum. org | Tues-Sun 10 am-5 pm [Thurs until 9 pm] | Admission $12; $10 seniors; $5 college students, $3 ages 5-18; free every Sun 10 am-1 pm | Through Nov 16: “UuDam Tran Nguyen: Waltz of the Machine Equestrians,” a video installation | Through Jan 4: “What Nerve! Alternative Figures in American Art, 1960 to the Present,” which “proposes an alternate history of figurative painting, sculpture, and vernacular image-making from 1960 to the present that has been largely overlooked and undervalued. At the heart of ‘What Nerve!’ are four miniexhibitions based on crucial shows, spaces, and groups in Chicago (the Hairy Who), San Francisco (Funk), Ann Arbor (Destroy All Monsters), and Providence (Forcefield) — places outside the artistic focal point of New York” | Through Feb 22: “Circus,” with 40 circus-themed paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and posters from 1850-1960 WARWICK MUSEUM OF ART | 401.737.0010 | 3259 Post Rd | warwick museum.org | Tues + Wed + Fri 12-4

pm, Thurs 4-8 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm | Through Oct 25: “28th Annual RI Open,” a juried exhibit

THEATER BROWN/TRINITY REP MFA PROGRAMS | 401.351.4242 |

trinityrep.com/about_us/venues/ pell_chafee_center.php | At the Pell Chafee Performance Center, 87 Empire St, Providence | Through Oct 19:

Cymbeline, by William Shakespeare | Thurs-Sat 7:30 pm + Sun 2 pm | $10, $5 students + seniors CONTEMPORARY THEATER | 401.218.0282 | thecontemporary theater.com | 327 Main St, Wakefield | Oct 17-Nov 15: The Visit, by Friedrich Durrenmatt, adapted by Kevin Broccoli | This week: Oct 17 18 8 pm | $15 Thurs + Sun, $20 Fri + Sat THE COMMUNITY PLAYERS | At

Shea High School, 485 East Ave, Pawtucket | Oct 17-Nov 2: The 25th Annual

Putnam County Spelling Bee | Fri-Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm | $20, $15 students

ENCORE REPERTORY COMPANY

| 401.762.4545 | stadiumtheatre.com | At the Stadium Theatre, 28 Monument Sq, Woonsocket | Oct 17-19: Monty Python’s Spamalot | Fri-Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $21 EPIC THEATRE COMPANY | At Theatre 82, 82 Rolfe St, Cranston | Through Oct 25: Stop Kiss, by Diana Son | Fri-Sat 8 pm | $15, $12 students + seniors GAMM THEATRE | 401.723.4266 | gammtheatre.org | 172 Exchange St, Pawtucket | Oct 23-Nov 30: Hedda Gabler, by Henrik Ibsen, adapted and directed by Tony Estrella | This week: Oct 23 7 pm | $41 + $49 [previews Oct 23-26 $30] GRANITE THEATRE | 401.596.2341 | granitetheatre.com | 1 Granite St, Westerly | Through Nov 16: South Pacific | Thurs-Sat 8 pm + Sun 2 pm | $25, $22 seniors, $15 under 13

LITTLE THEATRE OF FALL RIVER

| 508.678.2811 x 2631 | bristol.mass. edu/gallery | At Bristol Community

College’s Jackson Arts Center, 777 Elsbree St, Fall River, MA | Through

Oct 19: Les Misérables | Oct 16 + 17 7:30 pm + Oct 18 1 + 7:30 pm + Oct 19 2 pm | $25, $20 students + seniors, $10 under 13

OCEAN STATE THEATRE COMPANY

| 401.921.6800 | oceanstatetheatre.org | 1245 Jefferson Blvd, Warwick | Through Oct 19: My Fair Lady by Lerner & Loewe, adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion | This week: Oct 17 7:30 pm + Oct 18 2 + 7:30 pm + Oct 19 2 pm | $39-$54

PAFF AUDITORIUM AT URI PROVIDENCE | 80 Washington St | Oct 23

7:30 pm: Behind Closed, Doors, a play created from real stories of domestic violence, hope, and survival | Free THE PLAYERS | 401.273.0590 |

playersri.org | At the Barker Playhouse, 400 Benefit St, Providence |

Through Oct 19: Guys and Dolls, with book by Abe Burrows and Jo Swerling and music and lyrics by Frank Loesser | Fri + Sat 8 pm + Sun 2 pm

PROVIDENCE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER | 401.421.ARTS | ppacri.org |

220 Weybosset St | Through Oct 18: Cinderella | Oct 16 + 17 7:30 pm + Oct 18 2 pm | $53-$80

THE RHODE ISLAND SHAKESPEARE THEATRE | 401.782.1018

| courthousecenterstage.org | At

the Couthouse Center For the Arts, 3481 Kingstown Rd, West Kingston |

Through Oct 19: The Impaler’s Progress, by Mark Carter | Thurs-Sun 8 pm | $18

ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY THEATRE | 401.254.3666 | depart-

ments. rwu.edu/theatre | Performing Arts Center, 1 Old Ferry Rd, Bristol |

Through Oct 18: She Stoops To Conquer, by Oliver Goldsmith | Fri + Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $10, $5 students + seniors 2ND STORY THEATRE | 401.247.4200 | 2ndstorytheatre.com | 28 Market St, Warren | Through Nov 2: Enron, by Lucy Prebble | Thurs-Sat 7:30 pm + Sun 2:30 pm | $30, $21 under 21

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND THEATRE | At J Studio, 105 Upper

College Rd, Kingston | Through Oct 19: Seminar, by Theresa Rebeck | Thurs-Sat 7:30 pm + Sun 3 pm | $20,$15 seniors, $12 students


full liquor, full nudity Free Admission noon - 6pm unforgettable bachelor, birthday & office parties Secure parking & ATM on premises Free admission w/ military ID for our veterans

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thursday october 23rd

cash prizes for best costume 1st and 2nd place

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38 OctOber 17, 2014 | the prOvidence phOenix | prOvidence.thephOenix.cOm | @prOvphOenix | facebOOk.cOm/prOvidencephOenix

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5

6

7

8

9

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

32

Monday october 20 15

tuesday october 21

32

32

Moon KeyS this horoscope traces the passage of the moon, not the sun. Simply read from day to day to watch the moon’s influence as it moves through the signs of the zodiac. | When the moon is in your sun sign, you are beginning a new 28-day emotional cycle, and you can expect increased insight and emotionality. When the moon moves into the sun sign opposite yours (see below), expect to have difficulties dealing with the opposite sex, family, or authority figures; social or romantic activities will not be at their best. | When the moon is in aries, it opposes Libra, and vice versa. Other oppositions are taurus/Scorpio, Gemini/Sagittarius, cancer/capricorn, Leo/aquarius, and virgo/pisces. the moon stays in each sign approximately two and a half days. | as the moon moves between signs, it will sometimes become “void of course,” making no major angles to planets. consider this a null time and try to avoid making or implementing decisions if you can. but it’s great for brainstorming. | for Symboline dai’s sun-sign horoscopes and advice column, visit our Web site at thephoenix.com. Symboline Dai can be reached at sally@moonsigns.net.

Jonesin’ _by matt Jones F “the big picture”— you, your time, and your place.

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Across 1 tree with needles 5 bangladesh’s capital 10 Slanted type of type: abbr. 14 The Dukes of Hazzard deputy 15 ___ alphabet 16 Got in the pool, maybe 17 prefix with “mom” 18 foot holder 19 andrews of sportscasting 20 You’re part of it, along with being in the class mammalia 23 Spike who directed Crooklyn 24 Stadium cheer 25 cream of the crop 27 abbr. on a cornerstone 29 part of a crab 32 part of a race 33 Jolly ___ 36 additionally 37 You’re living in it, geologically 39 Some resorts 41 armed agent 42 place for cremains 43 Used to be 44 classifies 48 Game with cards and callers 50 the shortest month? 52 Symbol of strength 53 You live in it, physically 58 ___ San Lucas 59 kind of duck

60 take ___ (go swimming) 61 egyptian, probably 62 Love so much 63 not yours 64 Lovett who loved Julia roberts 65 Steppenwolf author 66 Gets on one’s knees Down 1 magazine with a famous crossword 2 4th and ___ 3 probably soon 4 class for intl. students 5 Unnecessary hassle 6 Suspicion 7 cairo cross 8 about 2.2 pounds, for short 9 computer brand 10 perfect 11 burrito outside 12 takes to the skies 13 Spy novelist deighton 21 citified 22 “do the ___” 26 driving force 28 War god 29 doing the dishes, say 30 niihau necklaces 31 missouri structure 34 One end of the iditarod race 35 nicholas ii, e.g.

© 2 0 1 4 J o n e s i n ’ C r o s s w o r d s | e d i to r @ Jo n e s i n Cr o s s w o r d s . C o m

36 Woody Guthrie’s kid 37 he’d love to have you over for dinner 38 class that’s simple to pass 39 teacher for the day 40 ___ colors 43 taipei pan 45 tour worker 46 difficult 47 talks to online 49 boston paper

50 51 54 55

fort ___, florida See it the same way “Uh-huh” too far to the left or right, as a field goal attempt 56 fusses 57 baby bleater 58 first name in Orioles history Solution iS on page 38


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