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thebattalion ! tuesday,

april 10, 2012

! serving

texas a&m since 1893

!"first paper free – additional copies $1 !"© 2012 student media

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Citizens to pick up tab for emergency services College Station proposal requires responsible party in auto accidents to pay city expenses Chase Carter The Battalion

The College Station City Council approved a proposal for a new revenue program that will bill responsible parties of automobile accidents and other incidents to cover the cost of emergency services.

At a council meeting on March 8, Revenue Rescue was chosen from a list of vendors to provide a medium between College Station Fire Department and the numerous insurance companies who receive claims. After a brief discussion, the council agreed to pass the proposal into the bidding phase by a six-to-one vote. The proposal is not yet in effect, as the city’s legal department has yet to approve the bid from Revenue Rescue, but the fire department is hopeful all will be in place by Oct. 1, for the start of the next fiscal year. City officials said Revenue Rescue was

chosen based on its history with the city of Bryan and other county volunteer precincts. The company operates in cities throughout the state of Texas and the U.S. The details of the plan involve billing “responsible parties” of automobile accidents and emergency service calls if special services are required. “The use of hydraulic rescue tools, like the Jaws of Life, and the cleanup of vehicle fluid leaks or other hazardous materials are all situations where Revenue Rescue would send the responsible party a bill,” said Bart Humphreys, public information officer for

the City of College Station. “Any extenuating circumstances will be handled on a caseby-case basis.” The responsible party for each case would be determined by the College Station Police Department, either through a ticketed offense or official accident reports. These include motor accidents and storage and transportation of hazardous materials. The bill is then handled between an individual’s insurance company and Revenue Rescue, except in the case that a willfully See Accident on page 2

Campaign stop: College Station

The Ron Paul campaign has used young voters’ enthusiasm to fuel a national push.

GOP hopeful brings liberty message to Rudder Barrett House

press interest in joining the campaign effort and began working almost immediately. She came to campus the first week of classes to settle affairs with her class schedule and to let her friends know about her plans, then rejoined her grandfather. Moira Skea, junior finance major and Linda’s roommate, said she was initially “shocked” by Linda’s decision. “I guess it is something I would expect from her. She’s smart and usually so successful at anything she attempts. It’s the opportunity of a lifetime,” Skea said. “Not everybody’s family member has a legitimate run for president.”

The Battalion Down-but-not-out GOP candidate Rep. Ron Paul will make a campaign stop at Texas A&M on Tuesday, looking to generate support with students as Mitt Romney threatens to put the Republican primary out of reach. Paul, who will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Rudder Theatre, was invited to A&M after Youth for Ron Paul at Texas A&M began a petition to have the seasoned representative from Texas’ 14th district speak to Aggies. Derek Seidel, graduate genetics student and member of Youth for Ron Paul, said he is excited for Paul to come to A&M and what the occasion means for the student body. “It provides an opportunity for those concerned about the future of our country to gain a perspective that isn’t conveyed by our nation’s mainstream media and the other presidential candidates, including Obama,” Seidel said. “The ideas that Ron Paul has for fixing our country are unmatched by the other candidates who mostly rely on unsubstantiated promises with no real answers to the problems we face.” Seidel said he isn’t discouraged that Paul hasn’t kept pace with GOP contenders Romney and Rick Santorum in recent months, saying students need to pay attention to the policies and ideas Paul brings “now more than ever.” “It makes no sense for the youth to be apathetic about our politics only to inherit the consequences later in life,” Seidel said. Tuesday’s event adds to Paul’s list of university visits, where he has drawn large crowds of college students. The “Ron Paul Revolution” has relied on

See Linda Paul on page 7

See Rally on page 7

COURTESY PHOTO

Linda Paul smiles with her grandparents, Rep. Ron Paul and Carol Paul, on the campaign trail.

Linda Paul spends semester on grandfather’s presidential campaign Rachel Bishop The Battalion

W

orking closely on the campaign trail with a presidential candidate is an opportunity many would relish but few ever get to experience. Still fewer can call a presidential hopeful “grandpa.” The exception would be Linda Paul, junior biomedical sciences major and granddaughter of Congressman Ron Paul. This semester, Linda has crisscrossed the country with her grandfather contributing to the campaign effort. She is still considered to be a student — enrolled in three hours of online courses to retain her student status — but for all practical purposes, she has taken the semester off. Linda said she didn’t even consider an academic hiatus until a family member made the suggestion during winter break. “I was scheduled to graduate a semester early and am still unsure what I want to do after college,” Linda said. “So when the idea was brought up … I thought, why rush to graduate? Instead, I can take this chance of a lifetime and spend time with my grandparents.” Linda spoke with the Ron Paul campaign chair to ex-

coming wednesday

Sexual assault Learn about the impacts of sexual assault on men and children in the fourth and final story in the series.

thebatt.com

Sushi: The truth Sushi takes more forms than the casual consumer recognizes. There may be a whole world of sushi left unexplored by many.

Pg. 1-04.10.12.indd 1

campus

Rudder Fountain springs to life as Plaza, Breezeway open Barrett House

The Battalion To the sounds of whoops and wildcats, the new Rudder Fountain sprayers launched water into the Monday evening air with maroon lights coloring the water’s surface. With the re-opening of the Memorial Student Center less than two weeks away, the relighting of the Rudder Fountain Plaza gave students a taste of what is to come. The relighting also signaled the opening of Rudder Plaza and the MSC breezeway, clearing a route through construction that divided the University for the past three years. “I’ve seen a lot of you guys throughout the day looking around thinking ‘Can we actually walk through here now? Is the construction stopping?’

and I’m happy to say, ‘Yes, we’re open, we’re ready to go’,” said Elizabeth Andrasi, MSC President, before giving the signal to bring the fountain back to life. Andrasi, nonprofit management certificate student and Class of 2011, reminisced about the Plaza in years past. Andrasi said the area in front of Koldus and Academic Plaza pale in comparison to Rudder Plaza, which saw the highest traffic on campus. Tyler Stewart, junior biomedical sciences major and 2012-2013 MSC President, only saw the original MSC and Rudder Fountain Plaza as a senior in high school, but said he was excited to participate in the Plaza’s unveiling, and that class year doesn’t matter. “I’m excited because I’ve seen a lot of underclassmen here, a lot of freshmen here who came out, and that ex-

Roger Zhang — THE BATTALION

Students gather outside the MSC for the Rudder Fountain reopening Monday. cites me because they don’t know what While the area itself has undergone the MSC is,” Stewart said. “I think it’s tremendous change, Stewart said it still integral that they are here, but no mat- holds the memorial atmosphere and is ter how old you are, if you’re an Aggie, representative of Aggie traditions. the MSC and the Rudder Fountain are See Rudder on page 2 for you.”

4/10/12 12:48 AM


thebattalion Robert Carpenter, Editor in Chief THE BATTALION (ISSN #1055-4726) is published daily, Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Monday through Thursday during the summer session (except University holidays and exam periods) at Texas A&M University. Periodicals Postage Paid at College Station, TX 77840. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Battalion, Texas A&M University, 1111 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-1111. News: The Battalion news department is managed by students at Texas A&M University in Student Media, a unit of the Division of Student Affairs. News offices are in The Grove, Bldg. 8901. Newsroom phone: 979-845-3313; Fax: 979-845-2647; E-mail: metro@thebatt.com; website: http://www. thebatt.com. Advertising: Publication of advertising does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by The Battalion. For campus, local, and national display advertising, call 979-845-2696. For classified advertising, call 979-845-0569. Advertising offices are in The Grove, Bldg. 8901, and office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Fax: 979-845-2678. Subscriptions: A part of the Student Services Fee entitles each Texas A&M student to pick up a single copy of The Battalion. First copy free, additional copies $1. Mail subscriptions are $125 per school year.

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corrections The Battalion welcomes readers’ comments about published information that may require correction. Please contact us at editor@thebatt.com.

howtoapply If you are interested in writing or contributing content in The Battalion, apply at thebatt.com, or call 845-3313. The Battalion welcomes any Texas A&M student interested in writing for the arts, campus, metro or sports staffs to try out. We particularly encourage freshmen and sophomores to apply, but students may try out regardless of semester standing or major. No previous journalism experience is necessary.

texas Federal judge sentences Houston residents HOUSTON — A federal judge has given prison sentences to a man and woman who prosecutors say smuggled Mexican women into the country to prostitute themselves at Houston-area bars and restaurants. A statement from the U.S. attorney’s office Monday says Jose Luis and Maria Rojas received 16-year prison sentences for their November guilty pleas to conspiracy to harbor illegal immigrants and conspiracy to commit sex trafficking. Associated Press

Matthew Wong — THE BATTALION

A&M students donate blood at the Student Recreation Center Monday afternoon. Alpha Phi Omega will host blood donations this week at the REC, G. Rollie White Coliseum and Zachry Engineering Center.

Rudder Continued from page 1

“It’s the first step to the unveiling of this beautiful building that personifies what A&M is and what the Aggie spirit is. It retains that memorial aspect but it’s still something you’re excited to see,” Stewart said. “I think the fact that this maroon water is spraying means more than just the reopening of the fountain; it means the reopening of the heart of campus.” Following the relighting, students could enjoy a performance by The Rocketboys, a band from Austin. The Rocketboys played from a permanent raised platform in the Northeast

corner of the plaza, a new feature. Andrasi told those in attendance that this is the first of many performances in the coming years. “This is where you’ll be recruited in the fall, this is where you’ll hand out flyers and we’re going to have tons more bands over the next few years to break in this stage,” Andrasi said. The fountain now features sprayers — sending water as high as 12 feet — and lights that can turn any color. The area has been deemed a “dismount zone,” requiring campus cyclists to walk their bikes through the Plaza. Andrasi also took the opportunity to remind students to avoid walking on the grass and to remove their hats when entering the building

Accident Continued from page 1

illegal activity, such as arson or meth lab explosions, caused damage to people or property. By implementing the plan, the city hopes to alleviate budget constraints caused by the cost of liquid absorbencies and maintenance on rescue equipment. Ticket costs will range from $550 to $800. “Our whole principle behind this decision is to raise funds so we don’t have to raise taxes,” said R.B. Alley, fire chief of the College Station Fire Department. “We boast one of the lowest tax rates in the state, and we want to preserve that as much as possible.”

QEP = Aggies Commit to Learning for a Lifetime! Your Future is Calling... Answer confidently by knowing the value of your Texas A&M degree. Instead of an app... we’ve got a QEP* for that! * Quality Enhancement Plan

Vision 2020 Aggies Commit Action 2015

Our QEP is a 10-year commitment to enhancing student learning at Texas A&M. Intentional Learning Students commit to intentional learning Rich Learning Environment Academic Affairs & Student Affairs foster a rich learning environment High-impact Learning Experiences Faculty provide high-impact learning experiences

The number of annual traffic accidents is not expected to be affected by this decision. City officials also said it would not affect standard emergency services provided by either the fire or police department during which the special circumstances outlined by the proposal were not implemented. “Out of an estimated total of 7,000 EMS calls last year, 400 of those would have fallen under billable service,” Humphreys said. “By those numbers, an approximate $120,000 was used to answer those calls.” Senior English major T.D. Durham said it sounded like an OK plan as long as the right party foots the bill and reasonable regulations would limit the amount charged. Bruce McLemore, senior psychology major, said it offers an incentive to drive safely. “We are in an economic crisis and every-

To learn more about Aggies Commit to Learning for a Lifetime... visit the website @ http://provost.tamu.edu/initiatives/ quality-enhancement-plan

Integrative, Lifelong Learning Students develop habits and skills for integrative, lifelong learning Assessment of Learning Faculty and staff assess student learning Aggies Commit to Learning for a Lifetime demonstrates our shared commitment to continuous improvement documented by TAMU’s accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges & Schools Commission on Colleges.

Pg. 2-04.10.12.indd 1

later this month, traditions only experienced by those who attended or visited the University before August 2009. Although seniors won’t experience Rudder Plaza or the MSC for long as undergraduates, senior Ren Tsuruta said it’s good for A&M to make these kinds of improvements. “It’s an extreme difference, a great improvement, something that we need for Texas A&M. It’s great to see that [the University] is improving in all aspects,” Tsuruta said. “It kind of sucks I didn’t get to experience it here as a student, but I know its for the betterment of the University.”

Funding and support for Aggies Commit to Learning for a Lifetime is provided by each college, the university administration and The Association of Former Students.

4/10/12 12:32 AM


news

page p g 3 tuesday 4.10.2012

thebattalion

Crochet king Student finds unconventional way to pay for school

Joanna Raines and Kalee Bumguardner

The Battalion This is not your grandma’s crochet collection. It’s not a hobby or pastime, and it’s certainly not a way to relax. For curriculum and instruction graduate student Jose Luis Zelaya, crocheting is a means of making financial ends meet. After overcoming a violent and abusive childhood in Honduras, Zelaya and his family came to America. Once here, crocheting became Zelaya’s way to provide for his mother and sister. Zelaya said he had to take control because his father was not in the picture. “I had to find a way to help out my family,” Zelaya said. “I was the

man of the house.” Zelaya has crocheted for 12 years. He became interested in the craft while walking though the streets of Honduras as a child. “I saw a lady who was crocheting and it really caught my attention,” Zelaya said. “I saw her making a sweater, and I asked her to teach me. … She told me no because I was not a woman. So I just watched her until I learned.” Zelaya wanted to make the sweater, but instead elected to craft beanies, which he could make quickly. “The crazy thing is, I didn’t make a sweater until 11 years later,” Jose said. “I actually just finished it the other day.”

Christina Fuentes — THE BATTALION

He began selling his beanies in flea markets in downtown Houston while attending community college. Today, he sells various crocheted goods online through his Facebook page and website, dreambeanies.net. “Whenever I first came to the United States, it was December and it was really cold,” Jose said. “I’ve always been the kind of guy that wants to help out my family, and I knew that I could crochet. People started buying the beanies, so I started to make more and more and more. And that’s how I paid for college.” His mission is to raise enough money to finish the English as a second language graduate program

Jose Zelaya, curriculum and instruction graduate student, learned to crochet as a child in Honduras, and uses his talent to raise money to support his family and put himself and his younger sister through college.

Jay Kapadia — THE BATTALION

Pg. 3-04.10.12.indd 1

kind of guy that wants to help out my family, and I knew that I could crochet. People started buying the beanies, so I started to make more and more and more. And that’s how I paid for college.” I’ve always been the

— Jose Luis Zelaya, curriculum and instruction graduate student

at Texas A&M and one day earn a doctoral degree. Zelaya ran for student body president earlier this semester, but didn’t tap into crochet profits to fund the effort. He did not spend a single dollar while on the campaign trail. Zelaya’s younger sister is also a student at A&M, a junior community health major, and his mother is unemployed. He shoulders the responsibility of providing for his family while finishing his education at the same time. “He is the one helping me through college,” said Gaby Zelaya, Jose’s sister. “In a way, he is kind of like the dad.” Gaby said she didn’t expect the crocheting business to alleviate much financial burden, but they depend on it for rent and tuition. Gaby is not the only one impacted by Jose’s “Dream Beanies.” He has spoken at two high schools in Bryan and hopes to continue inspiring youth after graduating. Jose specializes in beanies but said he has also made blankets, scarves, a puppy sweater — even a prom dress. “One of the biggest things that I’ve done is made a lot of beanies and donated about 50 of them to a homeless shelter,” Jose said. “I was just trying to help out my community.”

Jose is faster at crocheting than the current Guinness World Record holder. “The fastest crocheter in the world right now is Lisa Gentry, and she can do between 24 and 27 double crochet stitches per minute, and I can do between 37 and 44 stitches per minute,” Jose said. Sophomore electrical engineering major Leticia Ibarra said she was inspired by Jose’s Dream Beanies. “How many people do you see going to that extent to afford school?” Ibarra said. Ibarra has placed six orders for family and friends from Dream Beanies, and said the quality is good and the price is reasonable. Jose makes custom designs, and has hundreds of images online for customers to choose from. Jose wants to use his graduate degree to impact the English as a second language program. As a former ESL student, he hopes to inspire others to find the means to go on to higher education. His tenacity to achieve his dreams is not weighed down by financial burden. Although he says he is going through a difficult time financially right now, he knows he will earn his degree. “Even if it means I have to crochet … I’m going to make it,” Jose said.

4/9/12 11:31 PM


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brought. Even though I was not attending classes or living in the dorms, the comfort level I felt with the students was exceedingly high. In return, the U.S. students showed respect for the cultural and religious differences of the Qatar students, as well. Sadly, we are limited to this group of 27 people. The vast majority of A&M students do not readily accept differences and diversities among their peers in day-to-day life. Statistics do not lie: our campus community is among the worst al to show care, acceptance at supporting diversity, as and compassion with this suggested by the Princeton common experience. Review. The spring program I never had to speak challenged the 27 of us to English before coming to the change that. U.S., a personal experience Can we create a welcomshared by many international ing environment for the students. Now, imagine entire A&M community? I you are going to study at think we can create such a Nepalese university. an environment of You have to speak care and comin Nepali and stay â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can create passion at our away from your a humane campus. family on the model of Those other side of the acceptance of us in the world. in this era of global leaderNow, suppose globalization.â&#x20AC;? ship conferyou are a Cathoence spent lic and you are days with the gay. Suppose that you same people and grew are an Arabic Muslim who familiar with each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goes to a majority-Christian global differences. We came school in the U.S. You come to appreciate and respect one to this other world and are another for those differences. pressured to live a foreign We spent days together lifestyle â&#x20AC;&#x201D; regardless of â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A&M students spend four how unhappy it might make years together, being part you. How inhumane does it of the same traditions and seem if you cannot express history, living in the same yourself? dorms. It shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be unusu-

Jorge Montalvo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; THE BATTALION

Put yourself in those situations. We should not judge people for experiences, backgrounds and lifestyles not under their control, but rather accept them. History has shown that people can solve these issues, and it will only be a matter of time before our community follows suit if we dedicate ourselves to action. We are not limited to the university we attend, and should embrace the idea of spreading the feeling of â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;? rather than â&#x20AC;&#x153;me.â&#x20AC;? We can create a humane model of acceptance in this era of globalization. Texas A&M is where we can start. Sarin Regmi is a senior computer engineering major

From William Guzman, freshman chemistry major The opinion column â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outsourcing: a dirty wordâ&#x20AC;? (page 5, March 9) provides a good example of the inability to check oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facts. In the column, the columnist throws out that Dining Services has run a â&#x20AC;&#x153;$1 million deficit the past six years,â&#x20AC;? a figure floated by Chancellor John Sharp despite the fact that he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t directly involved with the audits. The columnist also doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t acknowledge that an outside company has been hired to audit Dining Services and that this audit is not even complete â&#x20AC;&#x201D; though it appears Sharp didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel the need to wait for the results before initiating the outsourcing process. The columnist also failed to find the facts about

the deficit amount. According to audits by the Division of Administration, the actual deficit is about one-fourth that which was included in the column. Furthermore, it is difficult to swallow the naĂŻve notion that workers will simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;switch payrolls.â&#x20AC;? The workers will not only most likely lose the state retirement that they have been working toward for years, but also the state benefits that A&M has provided for so long. The real problem here is not the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;outsourcing,â&#x20AC;? but the ignorance that many students have about the matter. Instead of spreading lies, it would be better to ask the people who are actually behind the scenes working on fixing the problem.

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;SNOTE The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the various authors and forum participants in this paper do not necessarily reflect those of Texas A&M University, The Battalion or its staff.

MAILCALL GUESTCOLUMNS Make your opinion known by submitting Mail Call or guest columns to The Battalion. Mail

call must be fewer than 200 words and include the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, classification, major and phone number. Staff and faculty must include title. Guest columns must be fewer than 700 words. All submissions should focus on issues not personalities, become property of The Battalion and are subject to editing for style, clarity and space concerns. Anonymous letters will be read,

but not printed. The Battalion will print only one letter per author per month. No mail call will appear in The Battalionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s print or online editions before it is verified. Direct all correspondence to: Editor in chief of The Battalion (979) 845-3315 | mailcall@ thebatt.com

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4/9/12 11:13 PM


softball | The Aggies travel to Waco 6:30 p.m. Tuesday to face the Baylor Bears.

Middleton declares for draft Texas A&M junior Khris Middleton has declared for the NBA draft. Middleton missed 12 games last season with a knee injury. He averaged 13.2 points and five rebounds in a disappointing 14-18 season for the Aggies which broke a streak of six straight NCAA tournament appearances.

NCAA investigates Baylor calls WACO, Texas — Less than a week after its women’s basketball team won the national championship, Baylor said Monday it has been involved in a three-year investigation with the NCAA into what are believed to be hundreds of impermissible phone calls and text messages sent by coaches to prospects. ESPN.com reported that coaches for both the men’s and women’s basketball programs had made more than 1,200 calls and text messages to prospects over a 29-month span dating to 2008. ESPN. com cited an NCAA report it had obtained.

Trent Johnson joins TCU FORT WORTH, Texas — Trent Johnson relishes the opportunity and challenge of taking over a program that hasn’t been to the NCAA tournament since 1998 and is moving to the Big 12 Conference next season. TCU introduced Johnson as its basketball coach Monday, a day after he resigned from LSU. “I can’t express how excited I am about the challenge ahead of us,” Johnson said. Associated Press

Pg. 5-04.10.12.indd 1

tennis | After a loss to Notre Dame Monday, the women will face Texas Tech Friday at 6 p.m.

sports

golf | The Aggie men’s golf team, now in third place, completes the Woodlands Intercollegiate Tuesday. thebattalion 04.10.2012 page5

No. 2 A&M readies for UT-Arlington James Solano

The Battalion After a 3-0 series sweep against Oklahoma this weekend at Olsen Field at Blue Bell Park, the No. 2 Texas A&M baseball team improved to 26-6 on the season, holding the second-best conference record in the Big 12, 7-2, as they prepare for a non-conference matchup against UT-Arlington Tuesday to close out a ninegame homestand. Sunday afternoon, dressed in camouflage jerseys to symbolize the search for a series sweep over the Sooners, the Top-5 Aggie baseball team won with a 5–3 victory. At Olsen Field, a crowd of 4,549 fans watched the televised victory “I always tell our guys it’s not how you start, it’s how you finish,” said Texas A&M head coach Rob Childress. “Obviously, in today’s game that was definitely the case. We were able to get it back together. Pineda was able to get us into the sixth and those guys that came in from the bullpen did a phenomenal job.” Sophomore Rafael Pineda picked up his fifth win of the season, as the 6-foot-6 righty gave up two earned runs on five hits in 5.1 innings of work en-route to victory. Senior first baseman Jacob House and junior All-American Tyler Naquin both had two hits

Game time First pitch is at 6:35 p.m. Tuesday at Olsen Field at Blue Bell Park. apiece Saturday afternoon to lead the Aggies. “It’s always fun to come out wearing the camo and trying to get the sweep,” House said. “The big thing with baseball is momentum. We were able to keep them from getting too much momentum by answering every time they scored.” The Aggies welcome the UT-Arlington Mavericks, 20-12, Tuesday as they try to extend their winning streak to six before resuming conference play this weekend at Kansas. The Mavericks snapped a seven-game winning streak—that started March 27 against TCU, 4–3, in 10 innings—Saturday with an 8–4 loss to Nicholls State. The Mavericks also beat Texas earlier this season in a 7–5 contest. Last season when the Aggies and Mavericks met on the diamond, it took 10 innings for the maroon and white to put the Mavericks away, 7–4. The season before last in College Station, the Aggies won 11–7. Freshman right-hander Gandy Stubblefield is projected to get the start against the MavFile photo THE BATTALION ericks. This will be Stubblefield’s third start of Senior first baseman Jacob House’s two hits Saturday the season. helped propel the Aggies to a series sweep of OU.

Aggies adjust to new coach’s expectations Chandler Smith

The Battalion A&M head coach Kevin Sumlin wasn’t afraid to dish out tough love to the Aggie football team before they took off for the three-day weekend. As of last week, players talking a big game hadn’t walked the walk. “We’ve got some guys that, just like any other time, are coming to the forefront, physical guys that like to play. And we’ve had some guys that are pretenders. Not very tough,” Sumlin said following Thursday’s practice. “We’ve got to figure out a way over the next couple weeks to develop some mental and physical toughness.” Following Monday’s practice, however, the desire was starting to show in Sumlin’s players. The first-year coach said he saw more positive signs and, most importantly, a better sense of drive. “We had a meeting today, just talking about where we’re going,” Sumlin said. “By no means are we ready to play a game but our attitude was better, our tempo was better and I think our want-to was better.” Of greater focus since Sumlin took over in Aggieland has been special teams. No longer seen as a tool to not lose games, Sumlin — and his new special teams coordinator

Brian Polian — are looking to win in this oft-overlooked component of football. Sumlin heaped praise on Polian, who he snagged from a Stanford program coming off two consecutive Bowl Championship Series appearances. “[Polian] is one of the best special teams coaches in college football. He’s had opportunities to go to the NFL. He’s been at Notre Dame. He’s been at Stanford. He understands, as I say, what it looks like,” Sumlin said. “Being in BCS games, being the Rivals Recruiter of the Year and being a really strong coach, he brings real value to our coaching staff.” Junior defensive back Steven Terrell said he enjoys the enthusiasm that Polian brings to practice. “Coach Polian’s a cool guy, I really like him. He has a lot of energy and he’s bringing a different side to special teams that we haven’t seen,” Terrell said. “I feel like he’s a great special teams coach.” A unit that stood out to coaches in Monday’s practice was one that struggled with consistency through much of the 2011 season: the defensive backs. Sumlin said he was pleased with what he saw from the youthful group. “Our young corners have a ways to go but I’ve been really pleased with their ath-

Photos by Chandler Smith — THE BATTALION

Aggies work on offense versus defense drills in spring practice Monday at the Coolidge Practice Fields. letic ability. Deshazor Everett and Floyd Raven continue to come on,” Sumlin said. “Those guys have to get a hold of the scheme, but what I am pleased with is our secondary’s aggressiveness.” In 2011, the Aggies ranked 113th in pass defense gave up 280.5 yards per game through the air. Secondary coach and codefensive coordinator Marcell Yates, former defensive backs coach for Boise State, said A&M’s secondary provides an athletic upgrade from Boise, but needs to improve the little things. “We’re a lot more athletic as a whole than what I’ve ever had. They don’t understand the game yet as well as I would like them to understand it,” Yates said. “We’re getting there. … We have to make sure those guys are disciplined and they’re doing they’re job.” With A&M’s upgrade in

Wide receiver coach David Beaty looks on as his wide receiver unit begins drills. offensive pace, Terrell said the challenge of practicing so rapidly would only increase the secondary’s performance.

“[The offense is] fast, that’s the biggest thing. They have a great tempo, but that’ll only make us better.”

4/10/12 12:40 AM


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thebattalion

Linda Paul Continued from page 1

On the campaign trail, Linda acts as an extra pair of hands, the liaison for any other family members who tour with the candidate, and completes any other tasks to keep things running smoothly. Working the campaign is something Linda said she not only enjoys, but believes in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To me, he is simply my grandfather. But after traveling with him, seeing him speak in front of crowds that number in the thousands, as well as the enthusiasm and dedication of people everywhere we go, well, to others he is this man who stands for things they believe in so fervently,â&#x20AC;? Linda said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has been an incredible experience.â&#x20AC;? Linda has stayed connected with the A&M campus by making monthly return visits. Alayne Andrie, junior finance major and one of Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best friends, has enjoyed hearing Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the tales from the trail. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just amazing what insights this experience has brought her. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re both so interested in politics

and thrive off these things,â&#x20AC;? Andrie said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to hear from her exactly what a presidential campaign is like and see how the media portrays things. In that way, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strengthened our friendship, and because she comes into town whenever sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Texas, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still here.â&#x20AC;? Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest in politics began early in life, fostered by her grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speeches and events. She connects with his platforms as well as with the message delivered by his stances and political record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been saying the same thing, not only for my life, but for the past 30 years. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not common for politicians,â&#x20AC;? Linda said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He educated himself and formed this philosophy, and I am proud for his commitment to the message and for never compromising on his position for political gain.â&#x20AC;? Linda wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rule out a future in politics, but has no definite plans to pursue a career in policy anytime soon. While she has enjoyed her time with the Paul campaign, she leans on the advice her grandfather gives to anyone interested in politics as a career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He advises against [getting into

Linda Paul is spending the spring semester on the campaign trail with her grandfather, Ron Paul. politics] straightaway, and to instead first get an education, then a job, and then, if you feel the need to change something in government, get involved,â&#x20AC;? Linda said. Linda returns to College Station once more this week, as the Ron Paul Presidential Campaign Committee introduces the politician to campus Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Rudder Auditorium. The candidate will speak at the event.

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Rep. Ron Paul will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Rudder Auditorium.

energy and enthusiasm from the college demographic to spread its message, something Seidel attributes to the generationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; political awareness and use of the Internet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are the future of America, including those who will run for public office one day,â&#x20AC;? Seidel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking why the youth is so involved, it has to be that we use the Internet more than older generations. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get Dr. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message through mainstream TV news networks. The Internet has given us a chance to inform ourselves.â&#x20AC;? Some students said they are attending the event to hear Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message. Senior chemical engineering major Samuel Congiundi said the event is a chance for those who are undecided to hear Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to show my support for Ron Paul. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to bring friends who are undecided or who do not know much about him, as well,â&#x20AC;? Congiundi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be prepared for a huge turn out. Freedom

Linda plans to continue to work for the campaign during the summer and return as a full-time student in the fall. When her time with the campaign ends, she does not see her interest in the process wavering. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With my family, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll always be involved in politics,â&#x20AC;? Linda said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;in one way or another.â&#x20AC;?

is a universal message that appeals to everyone.â&#x20AC;? Seidel said he believes Paul can still win the GOP nomination, but added that even if he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, the campaign will still have impacted U.S. politics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His ideas are spreading and people are waking up to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really going on in this country. Regardless of the outcome in November, the ideas that he has shared cannot be stopped,â&#x20AC;? Seidel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His message resonates with people of all ethnic, social, economic backgrounds. He is a man who can truly bring people together regardless of their differences.â&#x20AC;? Billy Yoder, sophomore political science major and member of Youth for Ron Paul, was active in the push to bring Ron Paul to A&M. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The officers and members of Youth for Ron Paul at Texas A&M University worked very hard through their schedules to gather the petition signatures needed to host Congressman Paul,â&#x20AC;? Yoder said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We gained 1,200 signatures in just four short days. That really solidified the support that Ron Paul has on this

campus.â&#x20AC;? And while not every person attending is a Ron Paul supporter, they are still taking advantage of having a presidential hopeful visit the University. Ryan Davenport, senior interdisciplinary studies major, said A&M has played a large role in the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political history and continues the tradition today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that a presidential candidate is making a stop for a rally at Texas A&M demonstrates just how relevant our community and our students are,â&#x20AC;? Davenport said. Before he became a politician, Paul was a medical physician, an OBGYN. Davenport has an uncommon connection to the presidential hopeful â&#x20AC;&#x201D; having been delivered by Paul. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have one of the most conservative student bodies in the nation,â&#x20AC;? Davenport said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That, coupled with our mission to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;developing leaders of character dedicated to serving the greater goodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; makes Texas A&M a prime stop for Ron Paul to excite his base, recruit volunteers and spread his message.â&#x20AC;?

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4/10/12 12:17 AM


Writer to share her work Helena Maria Viramontes, professor of English with the creative writing program at Cornell University and award-winning writer, will read at the Brazos Valley Reads program at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Bryan Civic Auditorium.

nation Facebook buying Instagram NEW YORK — Facebook is spending $1 billion to buy the photo-sharing company Instagram in the social network’s largest acquisition ever. Instagram lets people share photos they snap with their mobile devices. The app has filters that can make photos look as if they’ve been taken in the 1970s or on Polaroid cameras.

b!

page8

scene

thebattalion 04.10.2012

Fight back

Associated Press

Autumn Rizzo — THE BATTALION

Be a Hometown Hero. Donate Blood. You can do something to make a difference in someone’s life. You can donate blood at the Scott & White bloodmobile at the Zachry Engineering Building. Blood donation usually takes about 30 minutes and can save up to three lives. Donors will receive: t A free “DONORS ROCK” T-shirt in your size

t 12 free wings from Buffalo Wild Wings in College Station

t A free cow squeezie

t A chance to win a $100 Walmart gift card

t Free snacks when you donate

Zachry Engineering Building 204 Zachry Engineering Center Texas A&M University, College Station blood donation schedule:

Monday–Tuesday April 9–10 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Thursday April 12 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Friday April 13 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

All blood donated will remain in Central Texas so it will be available when you, your family or your friends need it most. Support your local community. Be a Hometown Hero.

Texas A&M’s Self Defense Club teaches practical skills Elise Brunsvold

The Battalion While some students arm themselves with knives or pepper spray, other students arm themselves with their bodies thanks to Texas A&M University’s Self Defense Club. The club, officially established in 2011, teaches students in Krav Maga and the Keysi Fighting Method. Both styles of defense are meant to focus on real-life situations. The Keysi Fighting Method originated from the streets of Spain and Krav Maga is the preferred style of the Israeli military. These methods promote self-protection and physical fitness by offering students a way to acquire more confidence and fighting skills for safety. “We basically want A&M students and faculty to never be able to not defend themselves,” said John Tee, junior anthropology major, president of the self defense club and Battalion staff member. “That’s the mission of our club.” Every Monday and Wednesday night, the club meets at the University of Sidekicks where they’re trained and taught new skills. The club is currently focusing on Krav Maga. “At each meeting, we learn different techniques, like different strikes and takedowns,” Tee said. “It’s a lot of fun.” Although it sounds somewhat dangerous, senior psychology major Ken Richardson said the club makes sure no harm comes to participants. The University of Sidekicks offers them a non-hazardous environment and plenty of equipment for training. “We practice in as safe of an environment as we can,” Richardson said. “We’re using pads and there’s still physical contact but we never go full speed on each other. We try to do as much as we can in as safe of a way as we can, while still getting the

We try to do as much as we can in as safe of a way as we can, while still getting the practice we need to use in the real world. — Ken Richardson, senior psychology major

practice we need to use in the real world.” The club’s coach, Master Renee Nolte, is a certified instructor and expert in both styles — brown belt in the Keysi Fighting Method and expert level in Krav Maga. Nolte has also been teaching self-defense for 16 years. “She’s by far the most qualified person in the Brazos Valley to train us,” Tee said. Tee said that Nolte’s training sessions, in addition to teaching students self defense, promote health through exercise and highintensity training. Students are guaranteed a tough workout and intense training at each meeting. “It’s definitely intense and a great mental release,” Tee said. And, although the participants may be fighting one another in meetings, Ethan Cartwright, senior environmental studies major, said friends and bonds are made in the training process. “The camaraderie is my favorite part,” Cartwright said. “We come in here and we’re fighting each other, acting like it’s the hostile environment, but at the end you’re training with your friends.”

To learn more Prices and more information about the club can be found at selfdefense.tamu.edu.

bloodcenter.sw.org

877-724-HERO (4376)

Pg. 8-04.10.12.indd 1

4/9/12 11:51 PM


Writer to share her work Helena Maria Viramontes, professor of English with the creative writing program at Cornell University and award-winning writer, will read at the Brazos Valley Reads program at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Bryan Civic Auditorium.

nation Facebook buying Instagram NEW YORK — Facebook is spending $1 billion to buy the photo-sharing company Instagram in the social network’s largest acquisition ever. Instagram lets people share photos they snap with their mobile devices. The app has filters that can make photos look as if they’ve been taken in the 1970s or on Polaroid cameras.

b!

page8

scene

thebattalion 04.10.2012

Fight back

Associated Press

Autumn Rizzo — THE BATTALION

Be a Hometown Hero. Donate Blood. You can do something to make a difference in someone’s life. You can donate blood at the Scott & White bloodmobile at the Zachry Engineering Building. Blood donation usually takes about 30 minutes and can save up to three lives. Donors will receive: t A free “DONORS ROCK” T-shirt in your size

t 12 free wings from Buffalo Wild Wings in College Station

t A free cow squeezie

t A chance to win a $100 Walmart gift card

t Free snacks when you donate

Zachry Engineering Building 204 Zachry Engineering Center Texas A&M University, College Station blood donation schedule:

Monday–Tuesday April 9–10 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Thursday April 12 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Friday April 13 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

All blood donated will remain in Central Texas so it will be available when you, your family or your friends need it most. Support your local community. Be a Hometown Hero.

Texas A&M’s Self Defense Club teaches practical skills Elise Brunsvold

The Battalion While some students arm themselves with knives or pepper spray, other students arm themselves with their bodies thanks to Texas A&M University’s Self Defense Club. The club, officially established in 2011, teaches students in Krav Maga and the Keysi Fighting Method. Both styles of defense are meant to focus on real-life situations. The Keysi Fighting Method originated from the streets of Spain and Krav Maga is the preferred style of the Israeli military. These methods promote self-protection and physical fitness by offering students a way to acquire more confidence and fighting skills for safety. “We basically want A&M students and faculty to never be able to not defend themselves,” said John Tee, junior anthropology major, president of the self defense club and Battalion staff member. “That’s the mission of our club.” Every Monday and Wednesday night, the club meets at the University of Sidekicks where they’re trained and taught new skills. The club is currently focusing on Krav Maga. “At each meeting, we learn different techniques, like different strikes and takedowns,” Tee said. “It’s a lot of fun.” Although it sounds somewhat dangerous, senior psychology major Ken Richardson said the club makes sure no harm comes to participants. The University of Sidekicks offers them a non-hazardous environment and plenty of equipment for training. “We practice in as safe of an environment as we can,” Richardson said. “We’re using pads and there’s still physical contact but we never go full speed on each other. We try to do as much as we can in as safe of a way as we can, while still getting the

We try to do as much as we can in as safe of a way as we can, while still getting the practice we need to use in the real world. — Ken Richardson, senior psychology major

practice we need to use in the real world.” The club’s coach, Master Renee Nolte, is a certified instructor and expert in both styles — brown belt in the Keysi Fighting Method and expert level in Krav Maga. Nolte has also been teaching self-defense for 16 years. “She’s by far the most qualified person in the Brazos Valley to train us,” Tee said. Tee said that Nolte’s training sessions, in addition to teaching students self defense, promote health through exercise and highintensity training. Students are guaranteed a tough workout and intense training at each meeting. “It’s definitely intense and a great mental release,” Tee said. And, although the participants may be fighting one another in meetings, Ethan Cartwright, senior environmental studies major, said friends and bonds are made in the training process. “The camaraderie is my favorite part,” Cartwright said. “We come in here and we’re fighting each other, acting like it’s the hostile environment, but at the end you’re training with your friends.”

To learn more Prices and more information about the club can be found at selfdefense.tamu.edu.

bloodcenter.sw.org

877-724-HERO (4376)

Pg. 8-04.10.12.indd 1

4/9/12 11:51 PM


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