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February 2012

Volume 24

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Boise, Idaho

Love-love

PostSecret creator to speak at Morrison Center

Men’s and women’s tennis show Bronco pride in their wins.

Lindsey Hileman Lifestyles Editor

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iPads now on campus

The Library, The Zone offers students iPads to rent for free.

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Moving in together

One-man band

Benefits and drawbacks of living together before marriage.

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Weather

A Bogus winter hurts Stephen Percy Journalist

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At 10 a.m. on Tuesday, the Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area sat under clear blue skies. The temperature hovered around 31 degrees Fahrenheit and 53 inches of snow lay on the summit. To the casual observer, the scene appeared idyllic, but the ski season has been anything but. Bogus Basin shattered its record for late-start dates when it opened on Jan. 19. Since then, the resort’s operators have been struggling to deal with an estimated $2 million in lost revenue. According to Alan Moore, vice president of finance, Bogus Basin has already lost over 50 percent of its skier visits for the

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year. The busiest times for the resort are the weeks before and during Christmas. This year, both weeks saw bare slopes and empty chairlifts. The resort has cut pay for full-time employees by 10 percent. The chief executive officer and chief financial officer are not being paid at all. Rachel Parsons, a junior geosciences major, teaches ski lessons at Bogus Basin. “Usually I do most of my work during Christmas break so that’s a whole month of work I didn’t get,” Parsons said. Parsons had planned some ski trips with friends, but was forced to scrap her plans and pay bills instead. Despite the disappointment, Parsons is upbeat. “Everyone on the mountain went without pay but every-

one made that sacrifice and now we’re working really hard to make it up,” Parsons said. “I can always go up there and find work which has been really nice. We’re all pretty stoked that we’re working now and hoping for a longer season.” Part of the reason Bogus Basin has had to be hard-nosed in dealing with losses is because it is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit corporation. Being a nonprofit, the resort does not have money stored for a rainy day. “We are owned by the community and any money we make is plowed back into the mountain to provide better services and a better ski area for the public,” Moore said.

See BOGUS I page 03

This Thursday, Frank Warren, the creator of PostSecret, will spill the beans about his project at the Morrison Center. PostSecret is a community project that invites people to anonymously send in their deepest and darkest on a handmade postcard. The secrets are PostSecret: then published in books, Thursday Feb. 16 as well as online each Sun7 p.m. day. The postcards range from silly confessions to Morrison Center disclosures of abuse to shocking desires. $5 for BSU stuThe mutimedia event, PostSecret Live, sells out dents $10 for the quickly on many campuses public and is itself shrouded in secrecy. Warren asks everyone to turn off their cameras before he unveils secrets so juicy they were banned from the books, reveals his own secret and allows others to step up to the microphone and do the same. This public lecture is being presented by Student Programs Board. “We wanted to get an engaging speaker on campus that students can relate to and we came up with Frank Warren,” Student Programs Board Special Events Coordinator Julian Rodriguez said. The event took months to plan, but Rodriguez said it was worth all the effort because, for young people, getting things off their chests is a great way to express themselves. “Everyone has secrets that they’re aren’t proud of and PostSecret is a healthy way to get them out,” Rodriguez said. PostSecret.com has had over 500 million visitors, making it the largest ad-free blog in the world.

crets Boise State Se

rets! Share your sec

Send a handmade postcard (4’ x 6’) with your secret to The Arbiter and we will publish the best ones in the issue following the event. Submissions will be accepted through Friday until 5 p.m.

Arbiter address: 1910 University Drive Boise ID 83725 mail stop 1335 Or drop it off in the box at the Student Media office Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Illustration Bree Jones/THE ARBITER

BoVi showcases student creativity in film Mallory Barker

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CODY FINNEY/THE ARBITER

Boise musician James Orr performed Saturday night at the Stueckle Sky Center Double R Ranch Room to promote his sophomore ablum, Tiny Love. Another local act, Uintahs, also played for the sharply dressed crowd.

Record-late open means bad financial news for resort

Today

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Frank Warren shares secrets

Top Stories

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In spring of 2011, Boise State welcomed the new club, Boise International Student Video (BoVi) Festival. Ryan Morgan, a 22-year-old mass communication major and the president of BoVi, said the festival was created “to showcase the works of student filmmakers.”

The film festival is open to all students from grade school through college. Morgan explained that since this is the first time the festival is being offered, the date the film was created does not matter. The last day to submit films is March 15, but there is a $10 entrance fee for all films submitted after Wednesday. However, Morgan said it may be possible for exceptions to be

How to submit your film:

• Download the entry form (found on the communication department page on Broncoweb or on BoVi’s Facebook page). • Submit your video via DVD or URL.

• Send entry to: Professor Daehwan Cho Department of Communication 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1920

made for Boise State students. The festival itself takes place April 28 and 29 in the Student Union Building. Alex Weiss, a 24-year-old senior majoring in media production said BoVi is exciting because it’s a way to feature talent on campus. “Putting our classmates’ work out there for other people to see could really help grow the film program here at BSU,” Weiss said. BoVi’s Facebook page enCODY FINNEY/THE ARBITER courages students to join the Ryan Morgan, president of BoVi, encourages meetings every Monday at students to submit films for the festival in April. 9 p.m. The page describes the meetings as a great en- broadcasters or mass commu- production, because it can vironment of learning and nication majors, but is open to be a great experience for fucreativity, essential in good everyone. Weiss encourages ture careers such as business, all students, including those accounting and numerous filmmaking. BoVi is not exclusive to not already involved in media other fields. arbiteronline.com


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February 13, 2012

World

National

Brazilian police Romney narrowly wins Maine caucus after losses go on strike RIO DE JANEIRO —- Rio state officers, prison guards and firefighters are on strike, demanding increased pay and medical benefits due to their hazardous work conditions. Brazil’s Carnival celebration—the world’s largest—starts Friday. Concerns are being raised that the more than 800,000 tourists and the inhabitants of Rio de Janeiro will be at risk without police officers on patrol. According to NPR, the celebration boosts the state’s economy by $500 million annually. Sergio Simoes, head of Rio’s civil defense department, said the army was prepared to supply 14,000 soldiers to help keep order in Rio during the celebration. State Governor Sergio Cabral hopes the police do not let it go that far. “You cannot have a strike in essential services like public safety. Rio de Janeiro doesn’t deserve this,” Cabral said in a public statement. Retired police officer Joao Morais de Silva, who was shot in the eye and sustained damage to his shoulder while on the job, doesn’t think Cabral’s appeal will work because the strike is too empowering. “I feel like a citizen, I feel like we’re standing here asking for... our right(s),” de Silva said to the Associated Press.

Syrian general shot to death Saturday DAMASCUS — A Syrian general was gunned down in the middle of the capital city on Saturday according to the state news service. Brig. Gen. Issa al-Kholi was assassinated in front of his home. Al-Kholi was a military physician and the director of Hamish Hospital but is not considered a key figure of the regime by political analysts, according to CNN. Analyst Jeffrey White acknowledged this was probably the first assassination of a high ranking figure within the regime, though with news from Damascus hard to verify, it is unknown if other deaths have simply gone unreported. It is also unclear if rebels targeted al-Kholi or the regime ordered his assassination. Representatives of the Free Syrian Army attest that the Assad regime was likely to have ordered the attack themselves if al-Kholi was suspected of fraternizing with the rebels.

E ditor - in -C hief

P O RT L A N D, MAINE — Republican front-runner Mitt Romney secured a narrow lead in the Maine caucus after three consecutive losses in other states. Ron Paul was in second place for the state. Santorum and Gingrich didn’t campaign in Maine. The margin between Romney and Paul

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was narrow, within 10 percent. According to Reuters, Paul said afterward “it’s almost like we could call it a tie.” This win for Romney comes after unexpectedly losing in Missouri, Colorado and Minnesota to candidate Rick Santorum. The three losses raised concerns Romney would

be unable to gain support from party conservatives. Romney flew out to Maine to promote his campaign, fearing what the loss of a fourth consecutive state would do. He spoke in two town hall meetings and a few more frequented caucuses to garner additional support.

WTF

Hepatitis risk from server in Boise

Sewage plant opens its doors to couples for a ‘unique date’ on Valentine’s Day

BOISE, IDAHO — An employee at the Cheesecake Factory on Milwaukee Avenue may have exposed diners to hepatitis A, according to the Central District Health Department. The exposure would have occurred sometime between Dec. 13, 2011 and Jan. 22, 2012. Hepatitis A is a liver disease virus. It is spread by contaminated food. Symptoms include jaundice and dark urine. Health officials suggest anyone who ate there around the given time frame and have the symptoms see their physician.

NEW YORK CITY — Newton Creek Wastewater plant is opening its doors on the day of hearts and chocolates, letting couples come in and get a good look at their sewage treatment facilities. The highlight of the tour is the giant egg-shaped digestors that break down the noxious waste into harmless sludge and gas. The plant sits along the severely contaminated Newton Creek. This creek is so badly polluted the government declared

an emergency cleanup operation. The new water treatment plant is a state-of-theart facility designed to help lessen the severe pollution in the waterway, one of the most toxic in the Northeast. And now, a date destination. “It’s a unique date, and one they’ll never forget,” plant superintendent Jim Pynn said to the Huffington Post. Every couple coming in will receive a Hershey’s kiss at the end of the tour and an interesting conversation starter.

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Open to all skill levels for competitive and non-competitive play

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Hitchhikes 7 Hiker’s snack mix 11 “Cocoon” director Howard 14 “Très sexy!” 15 Chevy hatchback 16 Tavern order 17 Baker’s sweetener 20 Columnist Landers 21 Swiss calculus pioneer 22 Odds and ends 23 “__ silly question, get . . .” 24 “Twittering Machine” artist Paul 26 Cinnamon blend for a Thanksgiving recipe 33 “The Sheik of __”: 1920s song 34 “Poor me!” 35 Carpenter’s cutter 36 Places for compost 37 Little ones who, they say, are made up of the ends of this puzzle’s four longest entries 39 Israel’s Netanyahu, familiarly 40 Took a load off 41 Writing implements 42 Elegant dress material 43 “All finished!” 47 Make less difficult 48 Ages upon ages 49 Heart or liver 52 The devil 54 Tavern spigot 57 1966 Beach Boys hit 60 Sick 61 __ pro quo: substitute 62 Laundry employee 63 Santa’s little helper 64 Trig function 65 Equivalent of A-flat DOWN 1 Old Roman garment 2 Sound of traffic frustration

By Anna Gundlach

3 __ Bator, Mongolia 4 Fellow 5 Feature of a clear day 6 Dog also called a Persian Greyhound 7 Garden entrance 8 Too much of a good thing 9 Little wagon’s color 10 Have in one’s hands 11 Classico competitor 12 Norwegian royal name 13 Indoor ball brand 18 Shepard who hit golf balls on the moon 19 Lone Star State sch. 23 LAPD alerts 25 Grazing lands 26 Blue Ribbon beer 27 Dickens villain Heep 28 Underwater ray 29 Examine grammatically 30 Last Supper query 31 Mountain quarters 32 “Dallas” surname

BY LINDA C. BLACK Tribune Media Services

Today’s Birthday (02/13/12). Rely on your team to go all the way; aren’t networks amazing? Grow yours this year. Your friends are your most valuable wealth, gifting you with laughter and love, fabulous ideas and surprises. Plant seeds of kindness. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Today is an 8 - Take time for mind, body and spirit. You may find yourself tempted to a more “laissez-faire” point of view. Let it be.

Hands On Joomla Classes learn how to make a professional website with out knowing code. JoomlaTeacher.info (dot info, NOT dot com)

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 - Utilize your best administrative and management skills to handle the workload today. Find support from an expert.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Health and Human Performance Club

Today is an 8 - Invent a fun, new game at work, a new vision for the future. Imagine the world you’d like to see for your children and contribute to that.

Join us in the Human Performance Lab of the Kinesiology Department On October 5th at 4pm

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 - Spend time with friends, and figure out how you can work together. Networking benefits your career for the next few weeks.

“Kinesthetically Driven” For more info contact Gloria Garber at gloriagarber@u.boisestate.edu

The Funnies

Adventures of a crazy sports fan/Alyssa Cumpton

O nline T eam

Jessica Swider Troy Hatfield onlineeditor@ arbiteronline.com

2/13/12 Thursday’s Saturday’sPuzzle PuzzleSolved Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 Thousands, in a heist 38 Buy for the future, as gold 39 German road 41 Manners to be minded 42 Rock-throwing protesters 44 Marsh duck 45 Heavy metal band named for a rodent 46 “’Bout this large”

2/13/12

49 Boo-boo, to tots 50 Turn at the casino 51 __ of Mexico 53 Senate page, for one 54 Rocking Turner 55 Expert server, in tennis 56 Whodunit quarry 58 Rapa __: Easter Island 59 Japanese dramatic form

The Future

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Contact Sean at seancampbell@u.boisestate.edu for more information.

L ifestyles E ditor Lindsey Hileman culture@ arbiteronline.com

FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 13, 2012

Today is an 8 - Mercury is in Pisces from today until March 2nd, shifting to a flowing, livein-the-moment perspective on communications.

M anaging E ditor

managingeditor@ arbiteronline.com

Crossword

Aries (March 21-April 19)

editor@ arbiteronline.com

Haley Robinson

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Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 - Your partner seems more perceptive, and you have an easier time expressing yourself through the end of the month.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 - Organization increases income. Explore the great human mysteries of life, death and love.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 - You’re in charge, and you know it. How do you define “success”? It’s more powerful if it includes laughing at yourself.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7 - Indulge your social yearnings. It’s in your interest to talk to a person of higher position. What could you create together?

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 - Get in touch with special friends you haven’t seen in a long time. Make a phone call, write an email or letter.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 - Today you’re especially attuned to creating new business. Launch a marketing campaign, and contact clients you appreciate.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 - There’s so much to do today, and you have the power to make it happen. Do the research, but don’t let it slow you down. ___ (c) 2012, Tribune Media Services Inc.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S PUZZLE

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February 13, 2012

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Boise State rocks the latest technology: iPads Ellie Parton Journalist

Boise State is keeping up with the current technological swing by making the Apple iPad available to rent at no cost. Students are now able to check out the trendy iPad for educational and personal use. One of the locations provding the tablets is the Office of Information Technology help desk located in The Zone in the Interactive Learning Center. According to The Zone website, the iPads are available to current students, faculty and staff at Boise State. The iPads may be rented out for up to 72 hours and can be taken off campus. Brighton McCabe, junior mechanical engineering major and computer sup-

port analyst at the Office of Information Technology help desk, said she believes this rental service should be a part of every student’s education. “Students really need to start taking advantage of the services that they pay for,” McCabe said. She said the iPad rental service is relatively new at The Zone and more students should look into seeing how this technology can be beneficial to their education. “We offer a variety of equipment ranging from these iPads for recreation or demonstration to audio and video recorders for school projects,” McCabe said. All a student needs to take advantage of this cutting-edge technology is a student identification card. McCabe said iPads are frequently rented

out, however, students may call ahead of time to reserve an iPad for a specific date. “Come over and see us and take a look at what we can offer,” McCabe said. The Albertsons Library also has iPads available for students to check out. The rental process at the library differs from the rental process at The Zone. The library’s website states the iPads may be rented with a current student identification card— the same process a student would use to rent a book. However, students may not leave the building with the iPads. The iPads in the library may be checked out for up to three hours. They come with research, social media and entertainment apps including Blackboard, Drop-

box, Evernote, GraphCalc HD, QuickOffice, and Science 360. Every iPad is re-imaged after each use to protect the privacy of the user. For more information on checking out iPads from The Zone, visit Room 128 in the ILC or call 4264357 to reserve one ahead of time. The Zone is open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday. Students interested in checking out the iPads the library has to offer can visit the circulation desk at the Albertsons Library or call 426-1204. The library is open from 7 a.m. to midnight Monday through Thursday, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to midnight Sunday.

Jake Essman/THE ARBITER

Jessica Brookhouse, a junior chemistry major, takes notes on her iPad as she sits in class on Wednesday.

A Bogus Winter

[News page 1]

Ryan morgan/THE ARBITER

Ski school finishes the evening on the bunny hill at Bogus Basin Friday night, three weeks after its opening.

Online dating’s promises, pitfalls MCT Campus

Online dating has come a long way from its less-thanpositive association with the personal ad. But is it actually a better way to meet that special someone? In some ways yes—and in

others, maybe not, according to a study on online dating released by the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest. “Romantic relationships can begin anywhere. When Cupid’s arrow strikes, you might be at church or at

mct campus

Dating sites offer a large pool of matches to browse.

school, playing chess or softball, searching for a partner at a party, or minding your own business on the train,” the authors write. “But sometimes Cupid goes on vacation, or takes a long nap, or kicks back for a marathon of Lifetime original movies. As a result, people go through stretches of time when desirable potential partners seem out of reach.” Many dating sites, such as Match.com or eHarmony, purport to have an advantage over random real-life encounters in that they employ special algorithms that can help people find their match— weeding through all the people who wouldn’t be compatible in the first place. But this practice might be grossly misleading and even counterproductive—especially since none of these formulas has undergone rigorous

scientific review—according to the study. The authors write in the study led by Eli Finkel of Northwestern University said, “It can also cause people to make lazy, ill-advised decisions when selecting among the large array of potential partners.” It’s reminiscent of other work by Finkel, which found, among other things, such ap-

jOin us fOR lunch…

Bogus Basin is sticking to its no-refund policy for season passes. Refunds are only given to season pass holders if they are unable to ski due to injury, become pregnant, or move out of town. But before you break your leg or get pregnant, it might help to know that a deal is being offered. “We will give existing pass holders the best deal they have ever gotten on a Bogus Basin season pass,” Moore said. If current season pass holders purchase new passes between Feb. 20 and 26, they could save $20 to $250 depending on when they buy their passes (the price of a season pass increases throughout the year). Other businesses have felt the impact of a late snowfall. According to Nicole Gallaher,

coordinator for the Outdoor Program, winter sports equipment rentals have been down significantly from their usual levels. But lately students have been hitting the slopes with a vengeance and winter trips through the Outdoor Program have filled to capacity. As if to say “better late than never,” winter sports enthusiasts all over the Treasure Valley are turning out for what is left of the season. Despite setbacks, Bogus Basin is back in business and running better than ever thanks to a new high-speed chairlift. “The snow conditions from the time we opened up through this weekend were really pretty good and we had some beautiful bluebird bluesky days and, of course, that always helps,” Moore said.

parently trivial distinctions made a difference. For example, women go for men who gaze away from the camera—the broody, mysterious look—while men respond to women who smile at the camera, because it triggers what Finkel called “men’s ‘sexual over-perception bias.’” But the fact that these sites provide singles with unprecedented access to others

who also want to date means that singles have far more opportunities to meet and form a lasting bond than they would otherwise, the authors point out. If there’s interest, the trick might be to take things offline as quickly as possible— because a face-to-face interaction is a better way to “get a clearer sense of their romantic potential.”

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February 13, 2012

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Boise State Vocal Jazz Ensemble performs the four opening numbers at the annual Vocal Jazz Festival in the Jordan Ballroom on Thursday.

Let loose, enjoy vocal jazz Amy Howarth Journalist

Some choirs wear robes, others don formal dresses and suits. The Boise State Vocal Jazz Ensemble mem-

bers can be spotted by their black vests and red neckties. Some choirs are comprised only of singers. But in addition to 10 singers, the ensemble has a rhyth-

mic section—piano, bass and drums. Like the unexpected attire and meshing of performers, the choir’s music fits into a genre of its very own.

COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY COMEDY

COMEDY NIGHT

ASBSU and Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship presents

Night of comedy with

Dennis Gaxiola Feb 13th @ 7 pm in the BSU Special Events Center

FREE for students

www.bsuxa.com

At a concert held last Thursday in the Jordan Ballroom of the Student Union Building, the ensemble sang bebop, blues and samba music. In two songs there were no words at all—just syllables, scat, scoops and rhythm. Ensemble Director Jim Jirak, Ph.D. explained jazz music doesn’t always focus on words because “the story is the rhythm and the harmony.” “Listen to solo moments,” Jirak said. “I like to give everybody a chance to solo.” Throughout the concert the audience heard brief solos—little windows in each piece—from the pianist, bassist, drummer and singers. Each solo infused a distinct character and dynamic into the songs. Jazz singers improvise during solo sections, making up new rhythms and melodies so each performance is a little bit different from the rest. “(Improvisation) is a great collaborative exchange,” Jirak said. April Farlow, a soprano singer, said improvisation is about listening to chords

Vocal jazz singers share the rhythm of their love for jazz and get the audience moving to their music

(In jazz music) the story is the rhythm and the harmony. —Ensemble Director Jim Jirak

and other musicians. “You just go with it,” she said. This “just go with it” mood was evident in the concert—the choir was relaxed and so was the director and audience. After a song with a long solo, Jirak said to the performer, “Thanks, Sarah.” The response: “No problem.” The singers bounced and swayed and smiled at the audience and at each other. During a blues solo, the lyrics were changed to reference Boise State and the Blue Turf. Audience members cheered and applauded— not raucously, but rather with open delight. Jazz creates an environment that encourages performers and audience members to have fun. “The music itself is full of life,” Farlow said. It’s no surprise people have so much fun listening to and performing jazz. It began as an avenue for

relief and entertainment during World War II. “People were displaced during World War II— they went to factories; they went overseas, to urban areas,” Jirak said. “There was a large war effort to relieve or entertain themselves. During the war, the armed forces provided this sort of music for the soldiers.” When the war ended, soldiers came home, and they went to school. Many of them became music teachers, passing down jazz techniques from student to student, all the way through the current jazz program. “We’re part of that vocal jazz ‘happening,’ if you will,” Jirak said. That rich history of jazz, passed from generation to generation, lives on at Boise State. The Vocal Jazz Ensemble will host the Gene Harris Jazz Festival on campus March 20 and 21. They will also perform on April 25 with the jazz band.

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February 13, 2012

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Take a crash course in healthy relationships Natalie Craig Journalist

A student’s life is based on relationships, whether with classmates, friends, professors, family or a significant other. Starting a new semester and the added stress of Valentine’s Day plans can affect any relationship. This Valentine’s Day week stay cool, calm and collected with your loved one by following five tips from StayTeen.org and advice from conflict coaches on campus. “My personal keys to maintaining a healthy relationship are good communication, trust, honesty and, in general, remembering that conflict doesn’t have to be a negative thing if you have the skills to manage it in a positive, constructive way,” Jenafer Crofts, senior sociology major and conflict coach, said. Communicating through conflicts is one of the most proactive things you can do for your relationship. If there is a disagreement, ask your partner to explain their point of view and work together to compromise to find a solution that works best for both of you. If you are ever hurt by your partner’s actions or words, speak up so your partner knows they have crossed the line. “Communication is key to understanding and interpreting any relationship. Although, the people reading that statement take it as a ticket to speak freely and bluntly without regard to the other person,” said Lacey Vander Boegh, a conflict coach with a communication degree. “I believe it is important to speak openly. However, it is also important to speak respectfully. In doing so,

the relationship will keep a healthy communication line open where each person does feel safe to speak to one another.” Respect one another. Get to know your partner on all levels so he or she is able to see the real you and can respect your diversity and needs. If you feel as though you can’t be yourself because your partner will not respect or like you, this may not be the right person for you. Allow yourself time and space away from each other. Although you may want to be with your significant other at all times, don’t ditch your friends or stop participating in activities you love. Just because you become seriously involved with someone doesn’t mean you have to lose yourself. Always make time to indulge your individual needs. Trust isn’t something that always comes easy, but it’s one of the biggest pieces of the relationship puzzle. You need to be able to trust your partner with your mind, your body and your heart. It may be frustrating at times to try to give away your trust as well as earn someone else’s. Don’t give up. This will show your partner you are in this relationship together and an obstacle won’t get in the way of your love. Always be honest and truthful. Sometimes the truth does hurt, however, it will increase the trust between you and your significant other. Always communicate your feelings in a caring and compassionate way. Lying and cheating will only hurt a relationship more if it is hidden. When you are honest, trust will follow and cre-

ate the foundation of a healthy relationship. If the problems occurring in a relationship lead to sexual assault or domestic violence, help is available and it is easily accessible. Many organizations on campus offer resources to help maintain your individuality while assisting in identifying problems, figuring out solutions and achieving your relationship goals. The Women’s Center hosts three Healthy Relationship workshops on the topics of healthy communication, successfully navigating conflict in relationships and talking with a partner about consent and boundaries. In addition to those workshops, a bystander intervention will also be offered this semester. “If anyone is interested in learning more about how to promote or recognize healthy relationships we are happy to be a resource,” Adriane Bang, Violence Prevention and Support Coordinator at the Women’s Center, said. Conflict coaching is another source for communicating and solving issues a student may have in their personal relationships. Conflict coaches are trained to help students find a solution and understand their feelings in troubling situations. “In conflict coaching we, as students, don’t actually give advice but what we do do is focus on getting the real issue out and helping them work through a way to approach the situation,” Crofts said. “If a student is having a personal relationship problem, the first thing I would do is validate how they are feeling. As I do that, I am able to find the real issue. This helps not only in recognizing the real problem but it

also lets the student recognize the part they might be playing in this tense conflict.” Most coaches agree the five steps to a healthy relationship are also key ingredients to happiness with your partner. However, they also say conflict management is equally important. “Conflict exists, a healthy approach to everyday conflicts allows people to minimize stress,” Monica Gillies, senior general studies major and conflict coach, said. “Helping people discover solutions helps free up time and energy spent on worrying about conflicts in relationships.” Love can be blind and it may be hard to know if your relationship is healthy or at risk of becoming a threat to you and your partner. Take the free

quiz on the Women’s Center website to make sure you are not in an abusive relationship and visit the conflict coaching page for more information on how you can speak with a coach. “The best I can tell you to keep a relationship healthy is to be that person’s best friend,” Daniel Morgan, junior elementary education major, said. “Listen, give your opinion, respect and accept them no matter what. Give them space when they need it, and hold them when they need it. Talk everything out, no matter how small and insignificant it seems. And be yourself, don’t let someone fall in love with your fake persona that you make the rest of the world see. Let them fall in love with you, because there’s a 99.9 percent chance that you’re awesome.”

top 5 one

Communication is key

two

Respect one another

three

Give each other space

four

Trust your partner and be trustworthy

five

Be honest

CHAN GE

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Opinion

February 13, 2012

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Students debate when to move in Con

Pro

Don’t skip steps on road to marriage

Couples should tie the knot first

Tony Madonna

ships,” Rhoades said in an article from LiveScience. com. “Perhaps if a person is feeling a need to test the relationship, he or she already knows some important information about how a relationship may go over time.” Sophomore business major Kayla Pryor agrees that couples should be able to work out a marriage regardless of the complications of moving in together. “I feel if you love someone enough to get married to them and commit your entire life to them, then you can definitely make it through the differences of things you find out about them once you live together,” she said. People may think that despite the odds they can make it work. However, on top of divorce rates and unhappy marriages for those who live together before their wedding day, there is also the dissatisfaction when coming home from the honeymoon. “I lived with my husband for a year before we got married. It was so much fun when we first moved in together. But after the wedding and our trip to the Bahamas, coming home was like going back to our normal life. Nothing was exciting we already had a dish set together; we already knew what it was like waking up next to one another every morning and our lives were completely the same. It wasn’t as exciting as my friends who hadn’t lived with their husbands before marriage had told me about. I was disappointed and wished that I saved that excitement for after our wedding,” said a source who wishes to remain anonymous. Those who have gone through setting up their room together don’t get to feel the new excitement when they return from their honeymoon. Starting their life together is what makes getting married such a thrill. It’s a change in the couple’s everyday routine. They get to share something new as a married couple. It isn’t the same when they’ve already had that with other people in relationships or even with each other. There are many reasons why moving in with your significant other can be dangerous for the relationship. Don’t risk losing the one you love. Wait until you’re married to live together. Cut the odds of splitting up and get to feel the thrill of starting a new life with the one you love after your honeymoon.

Opinion Editor

Marriage lives at the high-stakes table of the casino. Some people build up their capital and their game before taking a seat, while others throw down their life’s savings in one hand of Texas Hold’em and hope for the best. It can work out in both instances, but playing at the low-stakes tables first teaches people how to win, how to lose and how to play the game with no considerable risk. Of course, losing a couple hundred dollars on a hand or two will hurt, but it’s better than losing 50K all at once. People in a relationship should learn how to play the game with their partner before heading into the high-stakes realm of marriage. They need to know their tendencies, their flaws, when to raise, when to fold and when they are bluffing. Without knowing these aspects, they only have a few hands, rather than a few hundred hands, to gather that information. Moving in together before marriage is similar to those low-stakes tables, giving insight into who a person really is. Compatibility lives in the heart of every relationship and two people must be compatible in many different ways in order for the relationship to work. Living habits is one of those ways. Dealing with a mess, loud music or late nights for a day or two is completely different than dealing with them for a lifetime. Couples can learn each other’s habits through spending the night or weekends together but, in such short amounts of time, they won’t learn everything. Everyone bluffs once in a while, but at some point the opposition is holding all the cards. Living together will give those in a relationship a chance to either catch those bluffs or lay ‘em down and walk away. “Living with someone can bring out whole (different) sides to a person that you like or dislike. Best friends move in together all the time and after a short period of time, they‘re no longer speaking,” Katie Chamo Wolter, a fourth year music major said. It’s like a couple getting a pet before they have kids. Sure, not everyone does this, but it’s a great way for a couple to see if they are ready to take on that job as caretakers as opposed to popping out a kid and being thrown into a 24/7 job. Simulating the real thing can reveal to people if they

Jake Essman/THE ARBITER

A Boise State student and his girlfriend move into their an apartment together before taking the next step. are ready or if they it will work out. “I’ve had a relationship where we were together for two years and moved in together for the whole third year and ended up not working out, “ Amy Hummel, a sophomore sports medicine major, said. “I’m glad I figured out how it would have been if we lived together for the rest of our lives.” Even if you bring your A-game, losing still occurs. Heartbreak happens regardless of whether or not a couple moves in together before marriage. Waiting until marriage could only prolong the inevitable. It’s better to lay ‘em down and say, “I don’t think this is working out” rather than risking it all and say, “I want a divorce.” Couples should give themselves the opportunity to fold and play another hand instead of folding after they push all-in. People risk big chunks of change in one hand because it’s exciting to antici-

pate winning the big bucks, but they risk everything. Not living together before marriage takes this risk. Once a couple comes back from their honeymoon, to their home, it could end up being great, or they could be filing for divorce in six months. “I’m just as excited as any other girl for her wedding day,” Jessie Johnson, a sophomore sociology major said. “We are completely in love, and living together doesn’t change that. I’m no less excited than any other girl to get married just because we live together.” Couples should progress from dating, to spending the weekend together, to moving in together and finding out who the person they care for most really is, then on to marriage. Hold on to that opportunity to fold if need be. Don’t go from risking $5 and winning a lucky bet to risking that $50,000 in the bank in one hand and losing it all.

Eva Hart

Opinion Editor

Over 70 percent of U.S. couples are cohabiting before marrying, studies by University of Denver (DU) estimate. The study points out that such move-ins are not wise and may be detrimental to the relationship. Those who cohabit have been known to have higher divorce rates. On top of this, living together before marriage also takes away from the excitement of post-honeymoon experiences. The study done by DU shows those who moved in with their significant other before marriage reported significantly lower quality marriages and have a greater chance of splitting than other couples. For instance, about 19 percent of those who cohabited before marriage suggested divorce compared with just 10 percent of participants who did not cohabit prior to the wedding bells.

“Living together is a great trial run at marriage,” said junior pre-med student Antonin Filicetti. “I wouldn’t marry someone without living together first,” junior communications major Amanda Berardinelli said. These are common responses among students. Testing the relationship before marriage may seem like a good idea to some, but it isn’t. If people trusted their hearts, they wouldn’t feel the need for a trial-run marriage. They would trust that it would work out after the wedding either way. Lead researcher at DU Galena Rhoades studied why people move in together and those who listed “testing” as the primary move-in reason were more likely than others to score high on measures of negative communication. “Cohabiting to test a relationship turns out to be associated with the most problems in relation-

l e tt e r t o t h e e d i t o r

I am severely disappointed with the article the Arbiter published whose title claims that three women’s presence at an “orange sportsball” game signifies a “leap for womankind.” I implore the student-run newspaper not to suggest

that women are generally dismissive and uninterested in athletics—this exposure was a leap for Haley Robinson and her cohorts, not for “womankind.” I question the purpose of this piece—its writers and supporters claim it was intended to humorously persuade BSU students to show support for their [men’s] basketball

team. However, that message was undermined by the underlying premise that women don’t understand sports, and if they are in attendance at a sporting event, it is to “scope out men,” or to appease “their boyfriends.” Is this article suggesting that all women are even interested in men? Of the three supposed

“types” of women who watch sports, why did the ones so ignorant as to clump all forms of athletics into the name “sportsball” write the article about filling seats? Such a “point-of-view” should not be published as if it is insightful perspective into athletics. Why didn’t the “real sports fans” publish an article about THEIR

perspective? Furthermore, the article is labeled “satirical,” displaying a misunderstanding on the writers’ part: satirical journalism aims to condemn normalized idiocies—this article, instead of questioning unchallenged behaviors, perpetuates and glorifies the stupidity of women. Why did the piece describe the

Guest opinions and Letters to the Editor (300 to 500 word limit each) can be emailed to letters@ arbiteronline.com

The Arbiter cannot verify the accuracy of statements made in guest submissions. Opinions expressed by guest and staff colum-

nists reflect the diversity of opinion in the academic community and often will be controversial, but they do not represent the institution-

al opinion of The Arbiter or any organization the author may be affiliated with unless it is labeled as such. The Arbiter cannot guarantee

submissions will make it to print due to time and space constraints. The content of the opinion does not affect its eligibility to be printed.

The Arbiter

managing editor of the Arbiter as having to “grapple [ . . . ] with the concept of the scoring system” (a scoring system in which points are clearly determined by how far away from the basket one is shooting)? I’d much rather read an article that respects the game, regardless of the gender of the writer.

Online

Briana Cornwall is a junior majoring in English and social science.

Read unprinted opinions online.

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Men’s tennis sweeps the weekend John Engel

Sports Journalist

With temperatures nearing the mid-forties in the Treasure Valley—Boise detests predictable weather—the Boise State men’s tennis team has their eyes on the 2012 spring season. Before the outdoor events could take place, however, the No. 45 nationally ranked Broncos had to face Montana State, Idaho State and University of Idaho at Boas Indoor Tennis Center last weekend. Boise State earned two wins against the Bobcats (6-1) and Bengals (7-1) Friday, followed by yet another win against the Vandals (7-1). The Broncos improved to 8-1 on the season, and left Santa Clara as their only blemish on their record. On Friday, Head Coach Greg Patton made an interesting lineup change, moving redshirt junior Scott Sears into the number one slot. In his first career game as the Broncos’ ace, the London native fell to Niklas Brandes of Montana State, but rebounded against Idaho State’s Charles Norman 6-2, 6-2. Sears played entirely in the No. 3 position last spring. “We moved everybody up and the whole idea was to challenge them. Our depth is real important and we’re trying to stay fine-tuned,” Patton said. Redshirt freshman Aidan Reid won two matches in three sets and is now a combined 5-0 in singles and doubles since last spring. Freshman Garrett Patton, sophomore Nathan Sereke and junior Filipp Pogostin all won in straight sets Friday. Being the coach’s son, as well

as a true freshman, Garrett Patton knows he still has a lot to prove to his teammates. Despite the added pressure of playing in the No. 2 spot in the lineup, the Boise High School product has shown he can compete in a strong program. “It’s a great opportunity and it’s a lot of fun,” Garrett said. “I’ve been working on my confidence. Playing number two and winning has definitely boosted that.” For Coach Patton, the first day of matches—against ISU and MSU—was more of an “experiment.” Idaho, however, was an opponent the Broncos still had a vendetta against from the previous season. Despite the Broncos’ fear of a possible slip-up against the 66th ranked Vandals, Coach Patton was able to lead his team to a 7-0 victory, improving Boise State to 7-1 on the season. Though Friday and Saturday’s games were positive for the Broncos, the team is not satisfied with their No. 45 national ranking. Coach Patton still believes a top-30 ranking is obtainable, once the team is at full strength. Damian Hume, who finished with an individual No. 25 national ranking, has been sidelined due to NCAA violations and technicalities. Hume has missed the entire season so far and is expected to return in the next couple of weeks. “We’ve just got to wait until the NCAA gives us the OK, but they’re just brutal,” Coach Patton said. “Sometimes they just don’t have any common sense. Is this what sports are about?”

Sports

February 13, 2012

7

David Wuerth/THE ARBITER

Freshman Garrett Patton concentrates on his return shot to his Montana State doubles opponent Friday.

Boise State serves loss to U of I Women’s tennis team defeats in-state rival Vandals, 5-2 John Garretson

Online Sports Editor

David Wuerth/THE ARBITER

Sophomore Manuela Pietzuch reaches for the return.

The in-state rivalry was in high gear Saturday morning as the women’s tennis team defeated the University of Idaho Vandals 5-2 at the Boas Tennis Center. Coming off a fresh sweep of the Eastern Washington University Eagles, the Broncos kept the blinders on. They outlasted the Vandals in what was the women’s tennis equivalent of the Governor’s Cup match-up. “All of us really wanted to beat the Vandals. It’s really tough competition and they always fight. But we came out on top of the doubles competition, had a great start and finished it off with singles,” sophomore Sandy Vo said.

A great start is an understatement for the women’s team, as they dominated in the doubles matches with the Pietzuch sisters, juniors Manuela and Marlena, earning a win as the No. 1 seed against Beatriz Flores and Victoria Lozano 8-4 while Vo and sophomore Morgan Basil captured a No. 2 seeded victory against Alejandra Lozano and Molly Knox, 8-2. Even with freshman Kaitlyn Brown and senior Sonia Klamcyznska coming up short to Almudena Sanz and Sophie Vickers 8-2 for the No. 3 seed match, the Broncos prevailed with the double’s point. The Broncos kept it in high gear for the single’s matches, highlighted by Basil’s swift 6-2, 6-1 vic-

tory over Lozano for the No. 5 seed match. “With the Vandals we really wanted to come out and make a statement because we always have something to prove with being a small team,” Basil said. “We definitely felt (the rivalry) a lot this year. It was one of our goals to beat the Vandals.” Carrying the momentum for the rest of the Broncos were Vo topping Knox 6-4, 6-0 in the fourth seed, Marlena Pietzuch’s 7-5, 6-2 victory against Lozano in the first seed and Klamcznska’s 6-1, 6-4 win against Sanz for the second seed. In only her second NCAA appearance, newly added Fiona Mok fell 6-1, 6-2 to Florez in the sixth seed and Manuela Pietzuch took

it to third set to fall short to Vickers 6-0, 4-6, 10-4 in the third seed, but the Broncos had the single’s wins to take the points and victory. “It went about as well as it could go. I was really proud on how the girls prepared themselves all week. We had a couple injuries in the matches last week but the girls did a great job getting ready to go physically and mentally and we executed on all cylinders,” Head Coach Beck Roghaar said on his team’s performance. With the back-to-back victories over the Eagles and Vandals, the women’s team is off next weekend before they head to Malibu, Calif. to face Pepperdine University and Arizona State University.

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Sports

February 13, 2012

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Bronco women led with balanced scoring Ty Hawkins

Senior Journalist

Although the team’s two leading scorers, Lauren Lenhardt and Katy Isham, weren’t much of a factor offensively Saturday afternoon at Taco Bell Arena, the women’s basketball team (13-11, 4-5) was able to have four players score in double-digits helping them pick up the victory over the Air Force Academy Falcons (5-19, 0-9) 83-59. “Those teams are the teams you have to watch out for the most,” junior forward Kinzi Poteet said of AFA and their win-less conference record. “They’re not going to stop fighting the whole game— they’re super hungry for a win.” Poteet finished with 10 points, two rebounds and two assists.

The keys to the game were the Broncos’ ability to shoot the three-point shot consistently—they were 7 of 12 in the second half from deep— and, of course, their balanced scoring attack. Along with Poteet, guards Keiahnna Engel and Cinnamon Lister also added 10 points each, respectively. “I was pleased with how we shot the ball and performed,” Head Coach Gordy Presnell said. “I was really pleased with our bench scoring. If you can get scoring out of that six, seven and eight spot, you’re going to do well and we did tonight.” Senior forward Nicole Brady picked up two quick fouls in the first half, but still finished the game 5 of 10 from the field, while going 3 of 4 from behind the arc for a team high 16 points. She was able to get back on

track and hit the big shots the Broncos desperately needed. After watching the Falcons fight back from a 20-point deficit early in the second half cutting the BSU lead to five, Brady and company make it rain from downtown. “She’s a good shooter, a rhythm shooter,” Presnell said. “If we can get her rolling a little bit we have a chance to finish this thing pretty strongly.” “I had a lot of good screens set so I was wide open and had plenty of time to shoot,” Brady added. The Broncos will be on the road Tuesday as they travel to Fort Collins to face the Colorado State Rams at 7:30 p.m., with the game airing on The Mtn. television network for your viewing pleasure. They return to Boise Wednesday Feb. 22 to play UNLV.

ROBBY MILO/THE ARBITER

Junior Kinzi Poteet sends two for a lay-in against Air Force Saturday night.

Men secure first MW win against Air Force, 72-61

Wyatt Martin Sports Editor

Saturday night, the Boise State men’s basketball team logged their first victory in the Mountain West, defeating the Air Force Academy Falcons, 72-61. The Broncos were led by freshman Joe Hanstad, who finished the game with a career-high 19 points. Hanstad shot 6-11 from the floor and hit four three-point field goals. Hanstad was not the only Bronco freshman to have a career night. Anthony Drimic added 12 points and 10 rebounds—coming away with his first double-double in Bronco blue. The scoring was wellbalanced for Boise State, as five Broncos finished with double-digit scoring. Drew Wiley and Derrick Marks each had 11 points, while Kenny Buckner had 10 in 17 minutes of action. The win takes Boise to 11-12 on the season and 1-7 in the MW conference. Though Air Force may not be the strongest of opponents (11-12, 1-7), the win could give this young team the confidence it needs to move forward.

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Freshman Joe Hanstad takes it strong to the basket. The Broncos have six games remaining in their regular season. They will return home this week to face Colorado State

Wednesday at 8 p.m. and will square-off against Texas Christian Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Taco Bell Arena.

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Sports

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February 13, 2012

9

To be the best, you have to play the best Cody Finney Photo Editor

The Boise State Lacrosse Club was fired up to take on the reining MCLA D-I champions, the Brigham Young Cougars, Friday evening at Bronco Stadium. Though it would be an understatement to say the Broncos were the underdogs, this young team came out to make an impression on the turf they haven’t played on in eight years. “I feel like if we come out here, play to the best of our abilities and we all go 110 percent, we have a chance of staying in this game,” enthusiastic sophomore Jarron Woodson said before the game. The Broncos came out playing with intensity, but it wasn’t enough to stop the defending champs who scored within the first 10 minutes of the game. Following the first score, another score and a cavalcade of points, BYU’s attack made it rain,

jumping to a quick 6-0 lead. The Cougars’ monstrous players not only out-scored the Broncos but also towered over them. However, size did not hinder freshman Trae Field from laying a devastating blow to a BYU opponent, which gave possession back to the Broncos. Sophomore Dolin Culver chalked the first goal up for the Broncos during the second quarter, giving Boise State some momentum going into the half. But as halftime approached, sophomore Michael Ericson had an illegal stick violation that halted their momentum. Following the penalty, BYU replied with an illegal stick call that caused a one minute non-releasable penalty. Penalties were minimal, but ground balls and communication problems were abundant. Mistakes chipped away at the potential of the very capable Boise State offense. Many teams strive to make a statement during the forth quarter of games and

never deliver, but the Broncos cranked up their determination and proved they could hang with the reigning champs. Out-scoring the Cougars in the forth quarter is not a common occurrence. Boise tagged on three points over BYU’s two points in the fourth quarter. As the final seconds of the game rolled to 00:00, the final score was recorded as 15-4, Brigham Young. There is no scapegoat for the Boise State Lacrosse Club. Win as a team, lose as a team. The Broncos lost against the reigning champs in their division, but walked away as a team with heads held high. According to Head Coach Paul Rocchio, “We are trying to get to a point to where we can compete on a national basis.” The Lacrosse Club has a goal of playing nationally ranked teams and they showed Friday, lacrosse is yet another sport at Boise State that will be one to watch for in the future.

photos by CODY FINNEY/THE ARBITER

Junior Gunnar Guth loses possession as three BYU Cougars check him. The last time the Boise State Lacrosse Club played on the Blue turf was eight years ago.

Online Check out The Arbiter’s photo album for the intense Lacrosse game at arbiteronline.com/sports. Do it. Do it now.

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Sports

February 13, 2012

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T&F breaks records nounced over the P.A. Their fellow teammates surround them and cheer them on. Coaches give their final points—it’s now or never. As they get set they hold still like a lineman waiting for the snap count and then with a giant “BANG” they are off. Justin Malnes and Rolando Trammel posted second and third place times in their men 60 meter hurdles preliminary heats. The Boise State Track and Field team held its final regular season meet this Friday and Saturday, at the Jacksons Indoor Track at the Idaho Center in Nampa. The Boise State Team Challenge is the sixth consecutive meet the Broncos have had in Nampa. The Jackson Indoor Track will also host the NCAA Division-I Indoor Track and Field Championships in March. The Boise State Team Challenge will fea-

Lucio Prado Journalist

As the crowd reacts to the terrible reverb from the loud speakers the static finally fades and a familiar voice tells us we are ready to begin the next event. “And the gun is up and ready for the men’s 60-meter hurdles,” the public service announcer said. A faint cheer can be heard from the crowd watching the men’s high jump event going on in the background. The hurdlers take their time, reaching down touching their toes, stretching, then with a quick burst they are off their mark. They test their abilities to clear the hurdles. They clear the first and second and then they make their way back to their mark where they await the gun. “ROLO,” is heard as the Bronco fan favorite is an-

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ture some elite competition as No.5 Arizona men and No. 10 Arizona women bring their teams up to Idaho. Trevor Kraychir, Boise State’s men’s weight throw athlete came in ranked No. 18 in the nation, riding a five-event win streak. Tucking his chin, he combined great balance and strength to throw for a record sixth straight win—with his final toss going 20.28 meters. Kraychir along with teammates Racquel Jones, Kurt Felix and Mele Vaisima are hopeful to earn a spot at this year’s indoor nationals. Jones and Felix have competed in national events. Jones participated in the NCAA outdoor first round and Felix made the indoor nationals last year. They both know these last few meets are important for success in Conference and National championships.

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Sophomore heptathlete Kimberly Miller hucks the shotput at Jacksons Track.

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BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF STUDENT TUITION/FEE HEARING A HEARING OF THE PROPOSED INCREASES WILL BE HELD WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 BEGINNING AT 1:00 P.M. IN THE JORDAN ROOM OF THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. PROPOSALS WILL BE PRESENTED IN THE ORDER LISTED BELOW. Detailed information about the proposed tuition and fee increases is available for inspection during regular business hours from the Budget Office, Room 305 of the Administration Building. All interested Boise State University students, faculty and staff may submit oral testimony at the hearing or written testimony before February 22nd. BSU students, faculty and staff wishing to testify in person may sign up at the hearing or in advance at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and are asked to provide a written copy of their testimony to the hearing officer. Persons not currently affiliated with Boise State University are allowed to testify at the Student Fee Hearing under the following conditions: 1 2 3 4

They must sign up to testify and in doing so, indicate they are not a student, faculty or staff. They must submit a written copy of their testimony prior to testifying. They will be allowed to testify only at the discretion of the hearing officer. If allowed to testify, they must identify themselves as a non student at the onset of their verbal testimony.

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97.25

10.00

10.25

105.50

9.95

0.00

5.00

0.60

0.00

110.50

10.55

0.00

THEATER ARTS

1.50

0.00

0.00

0.50

0.00

0.00

2.00

0.00

0.00

MUSIC (NEW)

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.50

0.50

0.50

1.50

0.50

0.50

UNIVERSITY FELLOWS (NEW)

0.00

0.00

0.00

11.00

1.10

1.10

11.00

1.10

1.10

CAREER CENTER (NEW)

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.50

0.25

0.25

2.50

0.25

0.25

FACILITIES FEE TECHNOLOGY FEES INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

SUMMARY INFORMATION GENERAL EDUCATION TUITION FACILITY FEES TECHNOLOGY FEES ACTIVITY FEES TOTAL TUITION and FEES

Current Fee/Semester Full Time

Part Time

Proposed Increase

Summer

Full Time

Part Time

Proposed Fee/Semester

Summer

Full Time

Part Time

Summer

1,862.05

151.22

160.07

137.95

5.00

1.70

2,000.00

156.22

505.00

48.40

50.40

20.00

2.00

2.00

525.00

50.40

161.77 52.40

67.25

6.65

6.90

30.00

3.35

3.35

97.25

10.00

10.25

348.70

32.73

21.63

20.50

2.45

1.85

369.20

35.18

23.48

2,783.00

239.00

239.00

208.45

12.80

8.90

2,991.45

251.80

247.90

Dr. Lisa Harris Vice President for Student Affairs Boise State University 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725

The Arbiter

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Arbiter 2-13-12