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February 2012

Volume 24

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Boise, Idaho

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r a e Y n o i t c Ele for s e i m m u D

acob LaurelinstJ Journa

Vampire energy can be sucking the life out of your wallet.

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Want kids?

Here is a brief list of the republican candidates in random order

Are social norms pressuring you to have children?

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Softball hits the diamond

The Bronco-bombers return to take on the spring season.

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Do your research Presidential election years always involve political scandal and mudslinging. Since the republican candidates announced their candidacy, we haven’t been short on either of those. With the constant humiliation following each of the candidates, it’s easy to turn your back on politics and look the other way. When it comes time to vote, many people know little more than which candidate had an affair or which candidate was accused of sexual harassment 30 years ago. “Voting is vital to the democratic process, but I can see where people get frustrated by the system,” said Jerod Shelton, a senior political science major. Amidst the scandals that seem to overtake news outlets, it’s important to do some research and see where each candidate stands on the important issues. “Too many people are un-informed and vote without doing research,” Shelton said. “Blind voting is dangerous.” There are many ways to stay informed about the candidates. The most accessible way to accumulate information is from specific campaign websites. Candidates list their stances on the issues and give background on who they are. There are also multiple websites that compare each candidate on specific issues. Be careful, though—try to look for trustworthy websites. Watching debates is where most people get the best feel for who they can vote for. It allows voters to judge what kind of person each candidate is, if he or she stays consistent under pressure. Fact-checking after debates is

a good way to keep up with the candidate’s consistency. The Idaho Statesman and other news outlets run these fact checks after debates and inform the public about how accurate each of them is. Another helpful resource is thegreenpapers.com. It has a running tally of delegates the candidates have earned and compares it to what they need. And there is, of course, the honorable Arbiter to deliver you your political fodder. “I try to keep track of the delegates,” said Richard Kinney, Ph.D., professor in the political science department. “(Keeping track) is what it comes down to in the end.” Recently, Idaho has switched from hosting a Republican Primary to doing a Republican Caucus. The difference is that in the caucus, one must be a registered Republican to vote and the process of naming a candidate takes more time—the caucus runs multiple rounds of voting. The winner will be chosen by a simple majority (more than 50 percent of voters) or the top two will face off. “If you do go to the caucus, you want to know about the candidates,” Kinney said. “People will try to persuade you if you don’t.” Even though the general election is far off, these early elections are just as important. “It’s about having a voice in your party to pick the nominee who will run later in the year against the other party,” Kinney said. Having the knowledge of how and where to vote and researching each candidate is something that can be time-consuming, but necessary. Look beyond the scandals to find out the important issues.

Mitt Romney * Former governor of Massachusetts * Wants to cut taxes and reduce gas prices * Wants to invest in alternative energy resources * Against gay marriage * Against abortion * Supports capital punishment

Ron Paul * Congressman from Texas, former medical doctor * Wants to reduce the nation’s deficit by lowering expenses * Wants to shut down the departments of education, energy, housing, commerce and interior * Advocate for a Second Amendment protection act, prohibiting the limiting of the right to bear arms * Advocate of giving the states more deciding power * Strongly against abortion, believing that it should be treated as violence * Opposes capital punishment

Rick Santorum * Former U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania. * Believes America’s involvement in foreign conflict should only be necessary in times of direct impact to our country * Believes in focusing on succeeding in Afghanistan rather than troop withdrawals that seem to be politically motivated * In favor of teaching intelligent design in schools alongside evolution * Strongly against abortion * Despite historical voting patterns on gun control issues, he is now a supporter of the Second Amendment

Newt Gingrich * Former Speaker of the House of Representatives * Wants to downsize the Federal government * Wants to re-introduce school prayer and instigate rewards for girls who graduate high school as virgins * In favor of giving no-interest loans to students in math and science only * Supports the right to bear arms * Against capital punishment * Believes health care should be privatized * Against gay marriage and domestic partnership benefits for same-sex couples design by Bryan Talbot/THE ARBITER

Look for a job by looking to the Career Center

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The Arbiter

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Amy Merrill

Assistant News Editor

Jobs. Students either have one (or two), need one, or will need one in the near future. With the current statistics on unemployment painting a bleak picture, students should be doing everything possible to make themselves appear to be the most attractive candidate for employers. In the job market, appearing to be an attractive candidate (hopefully) has little to do with physical appearance and more to do with what’s in a student’s personal arsenal as far as qualifications, skills and networking are concerned. For arsenals lacking an aweinspiring stockpile of goods, there is still time to create more inventory. The one-stop shopping center, otherwise known as the Career Center has their own cache of tools to help students succeed.

Students may think the Career Center is geared toward graduating seniors or students seeking work on campus, however, the Career Center has something to offer to all students, regardless of class standing. It’s a resource available to all students, and it’s especially beneficial for individuals with no clue what they want to major in, or what kind of work they would like associated with a specific major. This is a part of career planning the Career Center specializes in. Debbie Kaylor, director of the Career Center, said students come in and say, “I don’t have a clue what I want to do.” “If students would spend more time on the front end, then you wouldn’t need us as much on the back end with the job search,” she said. Eric Lindsay, a second-year business major, used the Career Center to obtain a second

opinion on his resumé and prepare for an interview. “It was a good experience,” Lindsay said. “I found it helpful.” Kaylor stressed the importance of taking advantage of internships which can help build a network and skills needed on the job. “If you know the direction you want to go and can start targeting those opportunities and experiences you will be that much more marketable,” Kaylor said. This is precisely how careerplanning can help students get on track to be job-ready after graduation. For students who are venturing out into the job market, there are a variety of programs that can help, from a 15-minute resumé test to practice interviews and the Bronco Jobs website to browse job listings. During the 15-minute resumé test, students can expect to be provided with information

and tips on what employers are looking for. For the first time ever, students are allowed to walk in without an appointment for a 15-minute resumé test only. If students are looking for more than just a quick look over their resumé and are more interested in honing their interview skills, mock interviews are available by appointment, which tend to run about an hour and a half. The option to be videotaped is available for a comprehensive critique. Students can come in with a particular job in mind or a particular job field or major. The goal is to target specific questions while arming students with knowledge of how to handle illegal questions posed by interviewers. When seeking a job, students can take advantage of Bronco Jobs for work on and off campus, full-time or parttime positions and internships.

The extended search feature is also helpful for finding jobs in a variety of locations, fields and disciplines. Additionally, there is a feature available to search for federal or state government jobs. But Kaylor cautions there are two markets for jobs. The job market and the hidden job market. “The far majority of jobs are not even posted anymore. Employers don’t want to have to sift through 500 resumés. The job search now is all about your ability to network,” she said. Kaylor said students can come in for help developing a LinkedIn profile or learning how to use Twitter to build a personal brand. For more information on the numerous services the Career Center offers, career.boisestate.edu or call 426-1747 to schedule an appointment. There will be a career fair in the SUB next Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. arbiteronline.com


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February 13, 2012

World

Pakistan allows NATO to ship food I S L A M A B A D, PA K I STA N — Pakistani officials allowed NATO to ship perishable food items to troops in Afghanistan across international borders, a thawing in the state of affairs since the accidental killing of 24 Pakistani soldiers by drone strikes last year. The closing of the borders to alliance shipments was the cause of many headaches as more money was spent sending the food through alternate routes. Pakistani Defense Minister Ahmed Mukhtar said the government would only allow NATO to ship perishable items

for a limited time and has asked the coalition to not order any more. He did not indicate when the approval was given in his statement made to the Associated Press. Officials have been going back and forth between the two governments as to who exactly was responsible for the deaths in the drone attacks, but relations have been gradually improving. The parliament is expected to put new measures to vote in an effort to reconstruct U.S.-Pakistan relations. This is possibly a precursor to a renegotiation of trade privileges.

Second-in-command from China visits D.C. WA SHING TON, D.C. — Vice president of China, Xi Jingping, visited Washington earlier this week in a “getto-know-you” move since he is the presumed heir to power in China. Vice President Joe Biden bluntly said cooperative relations between the U.S. and China would occur “only if the game is fair,” according to the Washington Post. This statement

E ditor - in -C hief

was delivered in the Valentine’s Day decorated reception room. The decorations consisted of red and pink flowers and red table cloths with fuchsia flower patterns. Xi also met with Defense Secretary Leon Panetta to discuss security concerns. There were no specifics mentioned, as Xi stated that he was in town to continue moving U.S.China relations in the right direction.

National

Suspects in kidnap of high school math teacher returned to Montana SIDNEY, MONT. — Sherry Arnold, high school math teacher, went missing on Jan. 7 during her morning run. Two men charged with her disappearance were extradited to Montana and are scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 28. Lester Van Waters, 47, and Michael Spell, 22, were warned they could

face the death penalty if convicted with aggravated kidnapping. Arnold’s body has not been found, but with more than six weeks having passed since her disappearance, her family does not hold out much hope she’s alive. “We’ve just come to the conclusion she’s probably not (alive). Yesterday

Local

was Sherry’s birthday. That was a rough day. She would have been 44,” Sharon Whited, Arnold’s mother, said to the Associated Press. Waters and Spell were arrested last month and held in North Dakota. They contested their extradition but were ordered to return to Montana on Tuesday morning.

WTF

Republican Barman who mooned candidates Queen is fined $750 campaign SYDNEY, AUSThe move was TRALIA — Barman a political protest in Idaho BOISE, IDAHO — Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum check in to Boise to campaign for Idaho’s 32 caucus delegates. Tuesday evening, Santorum spoke at Capital High. Romney’s campaign announced he will host a fundraising luncheon tomorrow at the Boise Grove Hotel. Romney’s fundraising includes a VIP photo opportunity at $2,500 each and a luncheon at $1,000 a plate, according to the Idaho Statesman. He is also speaking at Guerdon Enterprises that afternoon.

Liam Warriner made his impression on Queen Elizabeth II last October. While her motorcade was passing through Brisbane during her visit to Queensland, Warriner came out of his workplace and dropped his pants, baring himself to the world. He then ran down the street for 50 yards with the Australian flag clamped between his butt cheeks. He was subsequently arrested and charged with being a public nuisance and indecent exposure. The latter charge was dropped.

against the monarchy system. He was not convicted of anything after his appearance in court earlier this week, but was fined the equivalent of $750. After his appearance in court, Warriner maintains that he did nothing wrong, parroting his lawyer when he said that no one would have raised an eyebrow if he had done it at a different event. He called himself a “proud anti-monarchist” and stated “we come into the world naked” according to the Herald Sun. Let’s hope the flag was disposed of with dignity at least.

Information MCT Campus/The Arbiter

Clubs & Orgs

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Haley Robinson managingeditor@ arbiteronline.com

Wyatt Martin sports@ arbiteronline.com

O nline S ports E ditor

Health and Human Performance Club

Baptist Campus

Ministries

Join us in the Human Performance Lab of the Kinesiology Department On October 5th at 4pm

Free Lunch every Wednesday At University Baptist

(Corner of Beacon and Euclid)

Thursdays

“Kinesthetically Driven” For more info contact Gloria Garber at gloriagarber@u.boisestate.edu

BIBLE STUDY

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At 7pm in the SUB by the Chik-Fil-A and Coffee Bar

For more information contact Phillip at phillip.grant89@gmail.com

“LIKE” US Boise State College Republicans Page

Contact Nick Rolison (President) nickrolison@u.boisestate.edu Davy Karkason (Instructor) davykarkason@u.boisestate.edu

John Garretson sports@ arbiteronline.com

All dedicated persons welcome!

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CHAIRMAN

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L ifestyles E ditor Lindsey Hileman culture@ arbiteronline.com

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 USAF NCO 5 Crème de la crème 10 Jazz devotees 14 “Tulip chair” designer Saarinen 15 Plant need 16 Crowning 17 Some HDTVs 18 Hopelessly lost 19 Pasta/rice brand word 20 Basic computer command 21 “Check, mate” 22 Common Cape Cod feature 24 Restaurant kitchen workload 26 Get one’s teeth into 28 Bush spokesman Fleischer 29 Invoice word 30 Encourages 31 “__ a problem” 32 Palm tree starch 33 Organize, in a way 34 Incidentally, in IMs 35 Massachusetts school ... and a description of the two-word meeting that occurs at each circled letter 38 Summer setting in Chi-town 40 Off-the-wall response? 41 61-Across curl 44 Rival 45 Catchall checkbox 46 One point from a service break 48 Football’s Parseghian 49 Thing to cook up 50 “Just like that!” 51 To a greater extent 53 Expert in pop psychology? 54 Vinaigrette ingredient 55 __ ideal world 56 First name in bologna 59 One-named illustrator 60 Touch down 61 Fire sign

The Funnies

Adventures of a crazy sports fan/Alyssa Cumpton

O nline T eam

Jessica Swider Troy Hatfield onlineeditor@ arbiteronline.com

2/16/12 Thursday’s Puzzle Solved Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

By Barbara and Don Gagliardo

62 Stepped heavily 63 What some losers have to resist 64 Cary of “The Princess Bride” 65 “__-mite!”: “Good Times” catchword DOWN 1 Severe fear 2 Bolts down 3 Fictional wolf’s disguise 4 Talking-__: tongue lashings 5 Somewhat far 6 Past curfew 7 Part of TGIF 8 “Catch my drift?” 9 Acquired by, in the big leagues 10 “The Alienist” writer 11 Cartoon hero with antennae 12 Twelve-note scale, e.g. 13 Séance contact 21 Lovable droid 23 Clumsy hammerers’ cries 25 Square dance complement

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

26 Hobby with hooks 27 30-Down genre 30 Classic film involving a split personality 34 A sleeper hit may be on it 36 Went wild 37 Bee complex 38 Circles around the sun 39 Landers lead-in

2/16/12

42 “My sympathies” 43 Exhortation from a gift giver 44 Clan 45 Chances for photos 47 Lake Erie city 50 Small openings 52 Fades to black 53 Create 57 Tee size letters 58 Bully 59 Flight board abbr.

The Future BY LINDA C. BLACK Tribune Media Services

Today’s Birthday (02/16/12). Frugality is practical; Whether it’s energy, money or resources that you’re saving, it’s always a good idea to stash some for later. Explore and boldly discover this year. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Today is an 8 - A slow morning leads to big picture conversations with a broad outlook. Take notes. New doors are opening.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 - Continue developing partnerships in impossible places. In case of doubt, review the instructions. Put yourself in another person’s shoes.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 9 - As if you’re not busy enough, there’s more work coming. Someone shows you how to use technology to increase productivity.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

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Suzanne Craig news@ arbiteronline.com

FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

Today is an 8 - You’ve got tons of energy for making big strides toward final outcomes. Don’t worry about details right now. Your easy humor lets you coast to victory.

editor@ arbiteronline.com

D eveloping N ews E ditor

Crossword

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Rebecca De León

Tasha Adams news@ arbiteronline.com

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Today is a 9 - Don’t wait until the last minute to finish projects. It’s about to get intense, make it to the finish line. Relax with friends after a job well done.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is a 7 - You keep your family together with your capacity to see both sides of the story. Create better communication channels. Don’t get too serious.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 7 - You get a morale booster. Now see if you can pass it on. There are many opportunities for growth, especially in your relationships.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 - There may be morning grumpiness or frustration. Get into projects with diligence and passion, and afternoon energy relaxes.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 - Put the pieces together. There’s nothing that can stop you now. You can always get help for the puzzles you don’t understand.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 5 - Enjoy the sunshine, if you can. A partner’s encouragement empowers you. Face-to-face interactions produce great ideas.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7 - You can really make it happen. Surround yourself with those who truly support your creative vision.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 - Enjoy peaceful moments. See yourself in a new light. Your enthusiasm and creativity are quite attractive. ___ (c) 2012, Tribune Media Services Inc.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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February 16, 2012

3

Vampires among us

Illustration by alyssa cumpton/THE ARBITER

Electronics that are turned off but not unplugged can still drain energy. This wasted energy, also known as vampire energy, can add up and waste money.

Christina Marfice Journalist

These days, vampires are everywhere: books, TV shows, movies … microwaves? Almost all home electronics that plug into an outlet are “energy vampires,” meaning even when they are not turned on, they constantly drain small amounts of electricity. When considering how many of these energy vampires exist in the average household, it is easy to see that small amounts of electricity add up. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that as much as 10 percent of a household’s total energy use is wasted vampire energy. Boise State’s energy vampires: The Interactive Learning Center (ILC) is a building where technology is king and every room

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is outfitted with gadgets any tech geek dreams of. Each classroom includes a computer, DVD player, VCR, projector and several other electronics, all of which are constantly plugged in and draining energy. Most of them are even left on overnight. The ILC’s 27 computers, 13 projectors, three big screen TVs and many other vampire electronics certainly add up. According to measures provided in the DOE’s Standby Power Data Center, all of the electronics in the building that are never turned off waste an estimated 985 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity in any given week. Electricity is relatively cheap in Idaho; the statewide average is about six cents per kWh. At this rate, the ILC alone could be wasting enough energy to unnecessarily cost the university nearly $3,000 per year.

Kaleb Saldana, a freshman computer science major, lives in Morrison Hall. His room is outfitted with a refrigerator, microwave, TV, XBOX and alarm clock, all of which remain plugged in at all times. “I turn things off out of habit,” Saldana said. “They always stay plugged in though.” Saldana also said his orientation at Morrison included no information about ways to conserve electricity. In fact, the lights in Morrison’s bathrooms, hallways, and other common areas are left on at all hours, even in the middle of the night. How to slay energy vampires: No wooden stake needed. To the right, The Arbiter has provided a few simple ways you can reduce your energy waste, saving money and helping preserve natural resources that produce electricity:

* Unplug devices not in use. TVs are one of the biggest culprits, wasting nearly 1500 kWh of electricity in a year. Simply unplugging your TV when you aren’t using it saves all that power. The same goes for phone and computer chargers, microwaves, gaming consoles and radios. * Use a power strip or surge protector. It can be a pain in the butt to unplug every electronic device you use every time you stop using it, so simply plug all of them into a power strip, and each time you leave the house, flip the switch off. * Do a little research. The Standby Power Data Center is full of studies conducted by the DOE showing how much electricity certain electronics are capable of wasting. Find out what types are more energy efficient and opt for those instead.

Online Share your tips on saving energy at arbiteronline.com.

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Followers

based on true stories

The Party Trevor Villagrana

Assistant Lifestyles Editor

Halloween was in the air and Cameron, having fallen victim to freshman naïvety, was on his way to a costume party. Dressed to the nines in a $50 Elvis costume, he hopped in Collin’s car and sped off toward the worst night of his life. Part 1: The Drive “Do you think Sally will be there?” Collin stomped on the brakes, veering hard into the other lane and eventually to the side of the road. “Get out, now.” Even in a Cupid costume, Collin had a level of severity about him. Without blinking he slowly reached for his bow and arrow and pointed the heart-shaped tip to Cameron’s head, informing him that if her name were to be spoken again there would be dire consequences. “Consider that a warning,” Collin said as he lowered the weapon, breaking the intense silence with his stupid grin. “Here we are, chump. Get to drinking.” Cameron had never seen so much cleavage in his entire life. He stood there motionless and took it all in two at a time. “The force is strong with that one,” remarked Collin about the Princess Leia he

had already begun mentally undressing from across the room. “She looks … talented.” Before he even had the time to catch her name, the two had put down six shots between them; five for Collin and one for what’s-her-name. The Return of the Jedi bit seemed to be working on this broad but Cameron had no time to be playing third wheel. Cameron pushed his way through the skantily clad cheerleaders and pirates and poured himself a whiskey and Coke, contemplating his next move. Direction came in the form of a tap on the shoulder and a tongue in his ear as tiny bolts of lightning struck every inch of his slender frame. “I don’t think your ego is big enough for that silly wig, Mr. Presley.” The words left his earlobe damp and swollen. “Jesus, Sally, you scared the hell out of me.” Her eyes were like sapphire; a swirling dilated pool of messy waves. She was drunk and motioning for the shot glasses. Cameron didn’t have a chance in hell. “Down the hatch King, a lady never drinks by herself.” One shot quickly became eight shots as their desire turned from fantasy to fruition. Clutching for any sense of stability, Cameron’s hands found her waist. She looked down at them and then back up at him, stumbling over her attempts at killing the mood. He wanted to tell her that she was his stars in the sky, his sun and his moon. He leaned hard into her, dragging his fingertips across the dimples in her back and wet his lips. “Sally, I think that—” ‘Followers’ is a quasi auto-biographical miniseries about a college senior looking back on his freshman year at Boise State University.

February 16, 2012

4

Bronco Couture

Bundle your way to trendy Natalie Craig Journalist

Winter is the most exhilarating time to accessorize. Layering is key to keeping warm during chilly times. Bring on the pea coats, scarves, mittens, umbrellas, and maybe a cute cuddle buddy. This year, fashion lovers will see many old trends come back into style and reinvented for an edgier, more futuristic look. Celebrate the cold this season with over-thetop layers and trends. Layering is the trend theme this winter season. Keeping layers modest is a thing of the

‘The Artist’

past. Indulge in layering many different elements, fabrics, pieces and textures to create the ultimate winter look. Scarves have evolved tremendously from the average wrap-around style. In 2011 scarves were the up-and-coming trend and this year they are the trend above all trends. Infinity scarves give every look a high-fashion touch. “Scarves are so plentiful and versatile you can wear them in the warmer months,” Rifeta Kajdic, alumnus with a bachelor’s in sociology, said. “Scarves are, in every respect, a no-brainer. They are effortless, yet add so much to your look.” The bulkiness of this style is a unique way to layer up outfits. Infinity scarves aren’t just for women—men can sport this trend, as well. This particular style of scarf can look more masculine than the average long fringe scarf and adds edge to a man’s look. When you think about mittens and gloves, the average style comes to mind. Some can be cute, but their primary funtion is to keep your fingers warm. Don’t freak out when the fingers of the gloves go missing—this is the year of reinvention. These fingerless gloves and mittens are a huge hit, instantly adding that bad girl or bad boy look to any outfit. “I will be wearing scarves and mittens with finger holes,” Sarina Sinner, freshman general and business manage-

ment major, said. “That way I can still use my phone and iPod without having to pull on and off my gloves all the time.” They may not be great for keeping you warm, so layer them on top of thin patterned gloves—reinvention and layering at their finest. Leg warmers were huge in the ‘80s, but in recent years their refined style makes them a classy chic staple to any outfit. This trend can be worn in many ways: under or over boots, over a pair of leggings and flats or over your favorite pair of skinny jeans. Rain or snow this winter, it might be smart to carry an umbrella around. With a vast selection of different styles, umbrellas are a trend, as well. “I love a lot of winter accessories but my favorite and most unique are my umbrellas,” Kelsea Moore, senior sociology major, said. “I have three different umbrellas because I don’t like getting wet when it’s raining. My favorite is my Victoria’s Secret umbrella which is striped bright pink and pale pink. It is not compactable so I walk with it and I get complimented everywhere I go. I love that it can brighten up those rainy dreary days.” Personalize your umbrella style and you’ll be singing in the rain in style this season. When the temperatures drop to winter norms, top off your layered winter ensemble with a pea coat. These coats look fabulous on men and

women and add the missing piece to the puzzle by tying in every element of the layered look. During the warmer times of this winter, ditch the coat and instead layer scarves cardigans and mittens. “I feel like the oversize sweaters and leggings is a trend from the ‘80s,” Sinner said. “So I think I would bring that back to a main fashion trend.” Here is how to achieve the perfect winter look: Ladies, start off with a pair of leggings, add a bright blouse with a chunky infinity scarf and top it off with a fitted blazer or pea coat. Add ankle socks or leg warmers with ankle or mid leg boots. Accessorize with fingerless gloves that match the texture of your outerwear. “This winter I am getting more into thick tights or leggings, whether it is under a dress or just a long T-shirt,” Moore said. “I love this look which is coming back from when my mom was in high school.” Gentlemen, pair your favorite pair of fitted jeans with a Vneck and a dark gray or black infinity scarf. Biker boots are very trendy in men’s fashion this season, however, your go-to sneakers will work well with your casual layered winter look. Complete the look with a pea coat. Kick those baggy sweatshirts to the curb and look fierce and trendy with these layering tricks and trends.

Film review

Amy Howarth Journalist

There’s no color, no special effects and (almost) no speech. But what it lacks leaves bare a simple and moving story—one that sheds all the fluff and frills of contemporary film. George Valentin, played by French actor Jean Dujardin, is at the peak of his silent film career as the story begins. French actress Bérénice Bejo is Peppy Miller, an aspiring star who through the kindness of Valentin—plus her charm and looks—lands a role as an extra in one of his films. She rises with the ad-

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vent of sound films while Valentin falls, and eventually, the dynamic between the two actors is reversed. Valentin’s fall happens swiftly—one moment he’s living the luxurious life of a celebrity and the next he’s in a studio apartment with nothing left but his dog, unrecognized by those who once flocked to his films. The pride he once knew is gone, replaced by humiliation. Move ahead from the 1930s to 2012: The recession has stripped many people of livelihood and lifestyle. Valentin’s character is relatable, making us question the certainty of life, pride and

The silent film speaks to audiences with emotional story

the unpredicatbility of one’s existence. But always, there’s a glimmer of color behind every pallid situation. The story is told in typical silent film fashion—black and white, orchestral music to set the emotional tone, body language and facial expressions to fuel the acting and printed dialogue to move the plot. While “The Artist” is a silent film, there are a few ironic moments of sound— something we take for granted in modern film. It’s almost unnerving to hear the clink of glass or the bark of the dog when everything else exists in silence. And in moments

of total silence, where the background music is absent, it’s hard to breathe through all the tension. That this film lacks spoken words is perhaps what makes it so moving. Rather than relying on dialogue, the audience must focus on the characters’ expressions, gestures and everything else happening on the screen. Emotional bonds are formed between the audience and the characters, making each scene more and more moving. It’s an uncanny way of getting into the characters’ minds. Dujardin is the star of this film, and he builds Valen-

tin’s character masterfully. His body language and facial expressions aren’t too exaggerated but evident enough to convey everything he can’t say. With just a slight shift of his eyebrows or lips, Dujardin can convey pride or pain or vulnerability, and the audience relies on this ability to gain understanding of his character and the depth of the situation. The chemistry between Dujardin and Bejo makes this a love story, but the love is silently carried by both characters. Both watch the other from afar, but each glimpse adds a flicker of adoration

that the audience can catch only because they’ve grown so connected with the characters. The violin music and singing in the background also helps. Dujardin leads with an uncanny supporting actor—a dog who stands as a pivotal character in key scenes and provides charm and friendship in the darkest moments. But don’t let the inclusion of the dog lessen the impact of the story: this isn’t a children’s movie and it isn’t by any means “cute.” “The Artist” is a film like no other, and what it lacks in words it makes up for in honesty and charm.

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Opinion

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February 16, 2012

5

Put it in Print

Firefox

Bryce Dunham-Zemberi Columnist

The Arbiter

Green problems

Electric cars are OK for now but are not the economic or environmental answer Will Sondermann Journalist

Electric cars have been hailed as the alternative to gasoline vehicles. Proponents of these vehicles claim they will reduce air pollution, remove dependency from foreign oil and reduce society’s carbon footprint. Though technological questions remain, all automobile options should be explored. Electric cars obviously produce lower emissions than gasoline automobiles, but they still require energy to move down the road. Where does that energy come from? According to Mapawatt. com, more than 45 percent of all power in the United States is produced by coal-burning power plants. Critics of electric cars point to the fact that while emissions at the auto-

mobile level may decrease, there will be a dramatic increase in pollution created by the multiplied demand of electricity. Also, some claim the national power grid would need substantial upgrades to keep up with the increase and would require more power plants to be constructed. Proponents, on the other hand, point out that most people would plug their cars in at night when the power grid could handle such an increase. They also believe over time the coal-burning power plants will be replaced by cleaner forms of power production. However, this is the kind of pie-in-the-sky thinking that does little for the cause of cleaner air and energy independence. It should not be assumed everyone would plug in on the

same schedule, or that coal plants will disappear and be replaced by cleaner alternatives. After all, what would alternatives be? Solar power, hydropower and wind power are not efficient options, and it is hard to believe the public would clamor for more nuclear or even natural gas power plants. What is the answer? Does society keep its dependence on foreign oil regardless of what it does to the environment or economy? Certainly not. However, with the electric car issue it might actually be more of the same–no matter which power production method is used. A key hidden factor when it comes to electric automobiles is the battery system in the vehicle. The vast majority of these batteries are made using a substance called lith-

ium. With current demand at fairly low levels it isn’t a problem to produce these batteries. However, as the demand increases, so will the mining and processing of this element. William Tahil, research director for Meridian International Research, published a report entitled “The Trouble with Lithium.” In it, he indicates the world is poised to replace the oil war with the lithium war. Right now, 80 percent of the world’s accessible lithium supply is located in South America. The shift of power as the need for oil decreases and lithium increases would be monumental. The energy power center of the Middle East would simply be transported to South America, according to Tahil. Ultimately, issues sur-

rounding the production and purchase of lithium would be eerily similar to what is seen today in the oil market. Obviously there are a lot of unanswered questions when it comes to electric cars. The U.S. should not just blindly trust that these vehicles are the best replacement to modern gasoline automobiles. The answer could be diversification. Hydrogen powered cars are an interesting option, as are multi-powered vehicles using solar, electric, hydrogen and gasoline in various combination. If society truly wants to be responsible, it should look at every option and not just blindly accept electric automobiles as the only answer. They are a great first step, but this shouldn’t be where the quest for viable alternatives ends.

You don’t have to have kids right now Kelsey Crow Journalist

First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes a baby in the baby carriage. While known and loved by many—and accurately reflecting social expectations—this classic ditty has a fatal flaw. It assumes the “baby carriage” is a necessary result of love and marriage, with any deviance being unnatural. “The message is that this is what everyone does–fall in love, get married and start a family,” said Ellen Walker, Ph.D., from psychologytoday.com. This widespread assumption, overall pressure, and the ignorance this idea encourages about the repercussions of having children puts a lot of pressure on adults to procreate. It constitutes a deeply ingrained social expectation. Don’t believe it? Just ask a few adults if they view remaining child-less as totally natural or sort of strange. Jared Ostyn, a sophomore computer science major, said he doesn’t know when he first started wanting children. “I guess it’s just one of those things that I thought people just did,” he said. While Ostyn portrays

The Arbiter cannot verify the accuracy of statements made in guest submissions. Opinions expressed by guest and staff colum-

the forceful influence of this social expectation, he identifies it as something more young people should definitely be doing. This expectation might have lulled many adults into mindlessly wanting children without critical evaluation of or valid preparation for parenthood, particularly relating to the experience of raising children. Children, especially infants, aren’t flawless little cherubs. They scream, defecate, cry, vomit, are overwhelmingly needy and will keep many parents in a constant state of near-exhaustion. If someone hasn’t decided if he or she has the time and energy required to raise a child, he or she will be in one hot mess. Some argue one can’t have as fulfilling a marriage or life without children. However, a respectful agreement to honor each spouse’s priorities, allowing them to focus on each other sounds nothing less than a fulfilling marriage. Furthermore, each spouse can still have romance, close friends, an enjoyable career, financial success, time to pursue hobbies and intimate spirituality—all of which make for a full life. Another incredibly im-

nists reflect the diversity of opinion in the academic community and often will be controversial, but they do not represent the institution-

portant factor to consider is the amount of money raising a child costs. According to CNN Money, raising a child to age 18 costs $226,920. Needless to say, that’s a lot of money, especially for young adults still paying off student loans and a mortgage. Having children drastically affects one’s personal goals and career, particularly for women. “When you have children, your entire life is devoted to them, so you can’t pursue your own goals until they are out (of the house) and by then, you’re too old,” said Kalikai Declements, a freshman Spanish major. On the other hand, some people are more than happy to put their career on hold in order to have children. “My kids come first,” said Emily Austin, a freshman pre-nursing major, of her decision to prioritize children over a career in the future. It would be ridiculous and biologically unsound to say baby carriages should absolutely never follow love and marriage, but it’s valid to say critical evaluation and adequate preparations for children are positively imperative—for oneself and any hypothetical offspring.

al opinion of The Arbiter or any organization the author may be affiliated with unless it is labeled as such. The Arbiter cannot guarantee

CODY FINNEY/THE ARBITER

Children are not required to live a happy life.

Visit arbiteronline.com to respond to our poll about children.

submissions will make it to print due to time and space constraints. The content of the opinion does not affect its eligibility to be printed.

Online

Guest opinions and Letters to the Editor (300 to 500 word limit each) can be emailed to letters@ arbiteronline.com

JAKE ESSMAN/THE ARBITER

Although cars that run on alternate fuels such as electricity look like an easy fix, they may cause more problems in the future.

ONLINE

The Mozilla Firefox (Fx) internet browser will never die. The browser’s open-source spirit, innovative technologies and unique appeal will forever influence the web surfing experience. According to statcounter.com February is the first month Google Chrome (Chrome) gained substantial ground over Fx in the global market share of browsers. In November 2011, Chrome had 25.69 percent and Fx clung to its 25.23 percent; leaving Internet Explorer (IE) in the lead at 40.63 percent. Four months later, February 2012, Chrome obtained 29.55 percent and Fx dropped to 24.8 percent; while IE deteriorated to 36.28 percent of market share. There’s no shame in Fx’s loss in market share. The browser always will be an open source, supporting the free exchange of software code for the betterment of people rather than greed. Fx came from the Mozilla Foundation (MF), a nonprofit subsidiary of AOL. “It has been a long-standing objective of the Mozilla team to create an independent organization so we can continue to lead and innovate,” said Mitchell Baker, Chief Lizard Wrangler (Chairperson) at Mozilla Foundation. AOL would donate more than $2 million to the foundations. Baker’s title (Chief Lizard Wrangler), insinuates what Fx is all about. Titles like this demonstrate commitment to changing all aspects of the web browser industry. And so Fx did. The desktop shortcut is just too cute. A fox hugging the web? It’s as if Fx wants users to enjoy the internet experience. In 2006, Fx 2.0 was launched, forever changing what it means to browse the Web. Unlike IE 7, it introduced something many of us have taken for granted—Multiple tabs. This feature allowed users to contain all internet browsing activities in a single pane instead of having a stack of windows in the task bar. Furthermore, Fx introduced browser-embedded search engines that enabled users to search Google without having to go to the website entirely. The 3.0 of Fx release in 2006 truly embraced the open-source spirit. A realistic customizable browser and the first “App Store,” was started with Fx’s adaptation of Application Programming Interface (API). All Fx’s code is open source, meaning users and software developers alike can upload the add-on database without having to call a lawyer. The number of extensions is endless; the first included MySpace and Flickr—extensions which enabled users to upload photos and get updates without having to go their appropriate websites. Other add-ons improve security functions, speed and enhanced pop up-blockers. Beyond the add-ons, user and staff created customized themes. Fx eventually had later updates which improved speed, efficiency and functionality. Chrome has adopted many, if not all, of Fx’s innovations. Future browsers will be ultimately better—pushing Fx and Chrome into submission. But it all wouldn’t have happened if it wasn’t for Fx and its desire to change what we knew about browsing the internet.

Read unprinted opinions online.

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Sports

February 16, 2012

arbiteronline.com

The past, present, and future Softball brings powerhouse team to 2012 Nikki Hanson

Assistant Sports Editor

The Boise State women’s softball team is back in action, picking up right where they left off from its previous season. The ladies returned from a weekend in sunny California boasting success with three wins and one loss to begin the new year. Highlights from the fall season: The ladies also had a promising beginning to its fall season, as well. Boise State won a doubleheader sweep against College of Southern Idaho at Mountain Cove Softball Field. The Broncos return three members of the 2011 AllWAC First Team, and each played a big role in game one. In addition, the National Fastpitch Coaches Association named five Boise State softball student-athletes as 2011 All-American Scholar Athletes. Junior Holly Bourke, Junior Megan Harvey, Sophomore Jessica Kraft, Sophomore Mackenzie Whyte and Senior Aubray Zell represented Boise State. The team will participate in four different tournaments before it return shome to Mountain Cove Softball Field March 15 for the SpringHill Suites Invitational. In total, the Broncos will play four home series this season, including the two SpringHill Invitationals, accounting for their 17 home games.

The Arbiter

CODY FINNEY/THE ARBITER

The softball team rallies together during a fall season home game at Mountain Cove Softball Field.

Sophomore Devon for the second-place Bron- the Aggie Stampede in DaBridges was named on cos, starting eight games in vis, Calif.

Players to watch:

Senior Aubray Zell

earned two of her three WAC Pitcher of the Week awards during conference play as she went on to a 9-2 mark and a 2.80 ERA facing off against WAC opponents. She posted

a 51:6 strikeout-to-walk ratio over her 65 innings in 13 conference games, winning at least one game in each of the Broncos’ first six series, including two each in back-to-back sweeps of Hawai’i and Fresno State.

the USA Softball Collegiate Player of the Year Watch List. She’s the first player in school history to earn this honorable distinction, and was one of only eight sophomores to make the cut. She set school records in batting average (.393), RBI (53), walks (37), onbase percentage (.531) and slugging percentage (.785). She also led the team with 16 home runs and tied for the national lead with three grand slams on her way to being named All-WAC First Team and second-team AllPacific Region.

Senior Allie Crump

became the first player in Boise State history to earn multiple all-conference selections. She batted .311 with three home runs and 12 RBI, starting all 21 WAC games in the cleanup spot

the circle and compiled a 4-2 record with a 4.71 ERA in conference play. The start of the 2012 season: The Broncos were picked to finish third in a poll of the conference coaches in their first season in the Mountain West. However, the Mountain West does not sponsor a conference tournament in softball. The champion and recipient of the automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament will be determined by the regular-season standings. The award is given to student-athletes achieving at least a 3.5 grade-point average for the 2010-11 academic year. Boise State began its fourth season of softball Feb. 10, against Loyola Marymount and Nevada at

The pitchers played the dominant roles during the ladies first two games on Friday. Zell and Crump, each delivered a three-hit shutout, on the opening day of the 2012 season. The Broncos beat Loyola Marymount 3-0 and Nevada 4-0 at the Aggie Stampede. Saturday would prove to be more of a challenge. Boise State split a pair of games on the Saturday, defeating Nevada 7-3 and falling to Loyola Marymount 10-9 in 10 innings. Boise State will resume play at the Campbell Cartier Classic in San Diego Friday through Sunday. The Broncos will face No. 19 UCLA, No. 12 Washington and Notre Dame. The ladies’ weekend will begin at 10 a.m. (PT) against UC Santa Barbara.

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Sports

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Hawk’s Nest

Jeremy Lin Experience Ty Hawkins

Senior Journalist

Where to begin? Everything from whose couch he slept on to where his high school coach watched him battle the Lakers at a local pub is being covered. He’s Jeremy Lin. Here’s my take on the one-time nobody turned NBA heartthrob. The Journey. Really? He got cut by the Houston Rockets and the Golden State Warriors? Guess what? No one cares. Players get cut all the time, become journeymen and sometimes have careers as trade bait. The fact that Lin made the Warriors summer league team in 2010 was a dream come true for the Harvard grad. Obviously he can play; he just needed the right opportunity. The System. It wasn’t until Steve Nash hooked up with Knicks Head Coach Mike D’Antoni in Phoenix that his career took off. Sure he was good, but those back-to-back MVP awards didn’t come with Michael Finley and Dirk. I believe Lin is a product that is benefiting from D’Antoni’s system, much like Nash did. Will he ever win an MVP? Doubtful, but he’s making plays and winning.

Nash wasn’t a defensive stopper and Lin doesn’t appear to be either, and that’s fine by D’Antoni. He’s scoring big, getting players to play and leading the team. Enough said. The name that is Lin. The ability to tie in a threeletter last name into sports headlines has made the sports media’s lives a lot easier. Check ESPN.com and they will have a new nickname every four hours. Personally, I found the “Yellow Mamba” (a nickname given by one of Lin’s fans in New York) to be the most amusing. International Player. NBA dictator-er-commissioner David Stern is sitting back like a fat rat. After a stressful summer with the lockout, he has found a way to re-open the Asian market he has been trying to tap into since Yao rolled into Houston. It’s no secret Stern would like to expand the game globally. With more and more media outlets taking interest worldwide, this equates to more money for the League. The icing on the cake for Stern is the fact this is all unfolding in New York, one of the biggest sports markets. A scholar and a gentleman. Let’s not kid ourselves, he played Ivy League basketball collegiately so he has to be somewhat smart. In a game that saw Larry Bird become one of the all-time greats because of his ability to think steps ahead, Lin is in the same category as far as mind set. I wouldn’t go as far to compare him to Tim Tebow, two similar yet different stories, but like Timmy he gets guys to want to play for him. It’s a great story and it’s nice to see a guy get credit for working hard instead of making headlines for beating his wife, drugs or some sort of legal troubles. Lin is showing young fans there’s a chance for anyone if you stay ready and want it.

February 16, 2012

7

mct campus

Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz (80) hoists the Lombardi trophy at this year’s Super Bowl.

Super Bowl Monday

How to watch the big game with frog-eating French fútbol fanatics

Justin Dalme Senior Journalist

LYON, FRANCE — It was just another Sunday for the French. But, being American, it was a Sunday like no other, for it was Super Sunday. Actually make that Monday. As the clock neared 12:30 in France, the Super Bowl was just starting back in the States. I sat in an Irish pub waiting for kick off. Around me were some fellow Americans, Mexicans, Canadians, and Irish, all breaking international barriers to watch one of the world’s greatest sporting events. About 25 people were in the pub, a small number indeed, but probably a good turnout for France. I’m pretty sure all of us spoke English. There was only one small group of French people. The first thing I noticed missing was the party food.

There were no wings, no chips and dip, no pizza, no nachos. But, there was beer. My palette was deprived from this delicious food, but nothing would deter me from enjoying my American Football (there is a big difference here between football and American football, you must specify). As the Patriots kicked off to the Giants to start Super Bowl XVLI, I knew that all was right in the world. Even a continent and an ocean away, I was able to find comfort in the sport I loved. After the first commercial break I noticed that we did not get to see any of the famous Super Bowl commercials. The European channel we were watching it on did not broadcast any of American the commercials during the game. Another setback, but I trudged on. This evening, I happened to

be rooting for the Giants. The quick 9-0 lead pleased me, but the Patriots fought back to take the half time lead. At half, our group tried to find some sort of food place that was open at 2:00 in the morning. That mission failed. I had to settle for a bag of peanuts at the bar. At half, the whole group departed and made their way home. I found no problem with the Mexicans, Irish, or even Canadians peacin’-out at half, but I took great offense that my fellow Americans left before the game was over. Indeed the stars on their spangled banner did not shine so bright. Class in the morning is no excuse to skip on the greatest American sporting event. With the weak weeded out, there were only two of us left. My Mexican friend and I joined the small amount of bar patrons still left to watch the rest of the game.

I would have to say the bar was somewhat split 50-50 team-wise. But, as Eli Manning connected to Mario Manningham along the sideline, those of us who chose wisely rejoiced. Once again, Eli and the GMen bested Tom Brady and the Patriots. I may have had to stay up until four in the morning to watch the game, but it was time well spent. There wasn’t the usual party atmosphere, but being able to watch a great game was all that mattered this year. Plus, I was able to go back to my residence and watch all of the commercials online. The other type of football may be more popular here in France, but hard-nosed American football will always take precedent in my life, and there is nothing like the Super Bowl to give you a little feeling of home while in a foreign country.

CHANGE

Need an opportunity for change?

Boise State Student Media

is seeking applications for the following:

Radio General Manager Business Manager Editor in Chief Deadline is Feb 16, 2012 Email barendt@boisestate.edu for more information or an application

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8

Sports

February 16, 2012

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Aces bested by the Steelies Idaho gives Alaskans hockey lessons Mazzolini struck again with a second power play goal late in the game, but it was not enough to push the Aces to a win, resulting in a 3-2 victory for Idaho. Friday’s game drew a large crowd with 4,853 fans packed into CenturyLink Arena. The first goal of the night, scored by Idaho’s Stephen Schultz (newly acquired Forward), made the night look promising for the Steelheads only until Ace’s player Chad Anderson scored on a power play in the second. Idaho defenseman Adam Maccarone shot one passed Alaskan goalie Adam Courchaine, bringing the Steelheads lead to 2-1. But only held this lead for less than a minute when Dan Kissel scored against Idaho’s Jerry Kuhn. Overtime play looked promising while the teams remained tied late into the third period, until Brian Swanson scored with only 1:34 remaining on the clock, to give Alaska the 3-2 victory. The Steelheads began Saturday’s game fired up after Friday’s loss, starting off strong by scoring three goals in the first period in front of an impressive crowd of 4,653 fans. One

Jordan Warwick

Courtesy to The Arbiter

The Idaho Steelheads (23-21-2-3) faced their toughest opponent as the Alaska Aces (33-13-6), the reigning 2011-2012 Kelly Cup champions. The two rivals took the ice on Wednesday, Feb. 8, Friday the 10 and Saturday the 11. Seven of Alaska’s nineteen losses have come from the Steelheads with two of them occurring in the last series, resulting in the Steelheads beating the Aces 7-6 in their matchups this season. Wednesday started the series between the two and began with a great defensive effort for both teams, leaving the first period scoreless. Less than five minutes into the second period, Patrick Kennedy (Forward) scored on a power play giving the Steelheads a 1-0 lead on the Aces. The Aces answered when Nick Mazzolini scored on a power play, and shortly after, Idaho maintained their lead with Derek Leblanc’s 11 goal of the season. The Steelheads expanded the gap when newcomer Aaron Lewicki scored his first goal with the Steelheads in the third.

ROBBY MILO/THE ARBITER

A Boise State player attempts to get a shot past the Western Washington goalie.

Hockey Club closes out home schedule Scott Thorton Arbiter Staff

Boise State hosted the Vikings of Western Washington University last Saturday and Sunday to close out their home schedule for the 2011-12 season. The teams started out a little slow as they felt each other out to start. However, Western Washington got on the board early and often, jumping out to 3-0 lead only eight minutes and thirty seconds into the first period. The Broncos thought they got on the board to make it 3-1 with 7:43 left in the first period, but the goal was waived off by a goal tender interference penalty. Less than a minute later Western Washington added a power play goal to make it 4-0. Boise was finally able to get on the board with their own power play goal with 6:27 left in the first period. The goal was scored by freshman Morgan Cunningham from Kenai, Alaska, making it 4-1. Devon Harris, a freshman from Boise, and Matt Nukaya-Heady, a junior from Idaho Falls, assisted Cunningham on the play. Another goal was scored in the

first period, but by the opposing team with 3:31 left in the period. The second period came and went without much excitement, as both teams were unable to score. Western Washington added two goals in the third period to make the final score 7-1. The Broncos junior goalie and Boise native Dan Beaudreau made great saves but the attack of the Vikings was just too much. Devon Harris and Matt Nukaya-Heady were the Bronco’s highlight players. It seemed as if Nukaya-Heady won every faceoff on the night. Harris looked to be the enforcer for the team, laying some heavy hits throughout the game. Claude Cardinal is a sophomore in his first year as the club president. He is pleased with the progress of the team but said there is still a lot of work to do. “It takes about $60,000 to operate a season,” Cardinal said. “To find a balance with the players, booster club and the great help we have with donors and sponsors would be a step in the right direction.” According to university re-

cords, there was a hockey team at Boise State in the 70’s but under its current format it has been in existence for 5 years. They reached a milestone on Dec. 10, when they had 2,000 people in attendance for the game against the University of Idaho and were able to raise $16,000 plus for meals on wheels. Claude hopes through the team website and through other advertising, the hockey team’s awareness will continue to grow. The team is having a fundraiser to help raise money. There are only 5,000 tickets available and they are $5 each. “The grand prize is $6000 in tuition to Boise State and the second prize is a year’s books up to $1000,” Cardinal said. For information and to purchase tickets you can visit www.boisestatehockeyclub. com. The team would also like to thank President Bob Kustra and his wife for attending the team’s games in McCall against the Idaho Vandals. They are working hard on putting a competitive team together and would love the support of everyone to help make that happen.

of which was scored on an Alaskan power play, when Jacob Cepis caught a loose puck and passed it off to Derek LeBlanc, making it his twelfth goal of the season. Bryan Hince, Idaho’s newest goalie, showcased his skills by coming up with 34 saves and only let one puck get passed him. The Steelheads did not give in after the 3-0 advantage going into the second, when David Fredriksson scored just 22 seconds into the period. This 4-0 lead by the Steelheads sent Alaskan goalie Adam Courchaine to the bench for the remainder of the game. In the second period, Jacob Cepis also scored on a shorthanded play bringing it to 5-0. The Steelhead’s hopes of having a shutout was expunged in the third with an Alaskan goal, but fans still cheered as the buzzer sounded and a 5-1 victory ended the series. The Steelheads face the Utah Grizzlies at home on Wednesday, Feb. 22, Friday, Feb. 24 and Saturday, Feb. 25. The puck drops at 7:10 p.m. for all games. This article was written by Jordan Warwick, a marketing student participating in the Idaho Steelheads Internship Program presented by The Arbiter.

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BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF STUDENT TUITION/FEE HEARING (UPDATED 2/16/12) A HEARING OF THE PROPOSED INCREASES WILL BE HELD WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 BEGINNING AT 1:00 P.M. IN THE JORDAN ROOM OF THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. PROPOSALS WILL BE PRESENTED IN THE ORDER LISTED BELOW. Detailed information about the proposed tuition and fee increases is available for inspection during regular business hours from the Budget Office, Room 305 of the Administration Building. All interested Boise State University students, faculty and staff may submit oral testimony at the hearing or written testimony before February 22nd. BSU students, faculty and staff wishing to testify in person may sign up at the hearing or in advance at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and are asked to provide a written copy of their testimony to the hearing officer. Persons not currently affiliated with Boise State University are allowed to testify at the Student Fee Hearing under the following conditions: 1 2 3 4

They must sign up to testify and in doing so, indicate they are not a student, faculty or staff. They must submit a written copy of their testimony prior to testifying. They will be allowed to testify only at the discretion of the hearing officer. If allowed to testify, they must identify themselves as a non student at the onset of their verbal testimony.

Requesting Unit GENERAL EDUCATION - TUITION

Current Fee/Semester Full Time

Part Time

Proposed Increase

Summer

Full Time

Part Time

Proposed Fee/Semester

Summer

Full Time

Part Time

Summer

1,862.05

151.22

160.07

137.95

5.00

1.70

2,000.00

156.22

161.77

232.00

22.50

22.50

20.00

2.00

2.00

252.00

24.50

24.50

67.25

6.65

6.90

30.00

3.35

3.35

97.25

10.00

10.25

105.50

9.95

0.00

5.00

0.60

0.00

110.50

10.55

0.00

THEATER ARTS

1.50

0.00

0.00

0.50

0.00

0.00

2.00

0.00

0.00

FACILITIES FEE TECHNOLOGY FEES INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

MARCHING BAND

8.75

0.70

0.00

1.45

0.15

0.00

10.20

0.85

0.00

MUSIC (NEW)

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.50

0.50

0.50

1.50

0.50

0.50

UNIVERSITY FELLOWS (NEW)

0.00

0.00

0.00

11.00

1.10

1.10

11.00

1.10

1.10

CAREER CENTER (NEW)

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.50

0.25

0.25

2.50

0.25

0.25

SUMMARY INFORMATION GENERAL EDUCATION TUITION FACILITY FEES TECHNOLOGY FEES ACTIVITY FEES TOTAL TUITION and FEES

Current Fee/Semester Full Time

Part Time

Proposed Increase

Summer

Full Time

Part Time

Proposed Fee/Semester

Summer

Full Time

Part Time

Summer

1,862.05

151.22

160.07

137.95

5.00

1.70

2,000.00

156.22

505.00

48.40

50.40

20.00

2.00

2.00

525.00

50.40

161.77 52.40

67.25

6.65

6.90

30.00

3.35

3.35

97.25

10.00

10.25

348.70

32.73

21.63

21.95

2.60

1.85

370.65

35.33

23.48

2,783.00

239.00

239.00

209.90

12.95

8.90

2,992.90

251.95

247.90

Dr. Lisa Harris Vice President for Student Affairs Boise State University 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725

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