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WHATS INSIDE

NEWS 1-3

SPORTS 5-6

OPINION 4

CULTURE 8-10 I SSU E

24

The Independent Student Voice of Boise State Since 1933

Volume 22

First Issue

F R E E NOVEMBER 12, 2009

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Horizon paints Q400 BSU theme

2

‘As You Like It’ begins Thursday

9

Football preview in this issue

JOSH RASMU

SSEN/THE

ARBITE

R

President Bob Kustra echoes philosophy of Robin Hood

GLENN LANDBERG/THE ARBITER

Tony Fernandez, LCSC Provo, looks over notes with Tracie Bent before the State Board of Education Meeting Monday in the Stueckle Sky Center. KIM KING Journalist

The Idaho State Board of Education met Monday at the Stueckle Sky Center to propose a new vision statement with updated goals and objectives. The current vision statement is summarized in four words - A well-educated Idaho. Interim Executive Officer Mike Rush also presented statistics comparing college graduation rates, both locally and nationally. He said only 66 percent of

first year students attending four year colleges returned for their sophomore year in 2008, ranking Idaho as the lowest performing state. President Bob Kustra said statistics work well for general purposes but can not be assumed to be accurate on all levels. “Numbers are deceiving,” Kustra said. “This data is totally unrealistic when it leaves many students unaccounted for.” He cited the example of a student moving from a com-

munity college after the first or second year to complete their degree at a university. A comparison of the U. S. with other countries shows a national need of four million graduating students with associate or bachelors degrees by the year 2020 to become the most educated in the world. Kustra said we would probably never be able to compete with China and other countries because of budget and other constraints. Idaho also ranked low in state need-based grant dollars

per undergraduate student. Idaho is listed at $17 compared to Washington’s $756 for the year 2007-2008. “What do we do?” Kustra said. “We take from those who can afford it and redistribute to those who need it. We do it quietly as public institutions and without fanfare.” Young people from the lowest income nationally account for seven percent of college graduates compared to 60 percent from high income families. Kustra remains focused on attracting new students while acknowledging the shortage of available scholarships and the need to create more funding. “If we increase tuition by double digits, it must be returned to need-based students,” he said. The suggestion of a double digit increase is new and would impact every student at Boise State. ASBSU President Trevor Grigg is researching and planning ways to avoid any increase in student tuition and fees. He is meeting with other student presidents from around the state this week to brainstorm new ideas. “Student activities will be my focus,” Grigg said. “There should be less staff members in areas that do not benefit the majority of students. Raising tuition is not the answer.”

NIK BJURSTROM/THE ARBITER

Jacob Gilbert, a member of the Army’s 25th Army Band in the Idaho Honor Guard plays the Bugle Wednesday afternoon in the SUB during a speech to honor Veterans. Darrel Manning, a retired Air Force major thanked the university for putting on the event for the United States military. “(It’s a) great honor to serve with great airmen and soldiers in the United States,” Manning said.

BRONCO ATHLETICS

Gene Bleymaier, Boise State athletic director

Boise State Broncos Inc. launches KIRK BELL Editor

Boise State athletic director Gene Bleymaier announced the formation of Boise State Broncos, Inc. Wednesday at the Allen Noble Hall of Fame at Bronco Stadium. The newly formed corporate entity is an opportunity for fans and athletic supporters to participate in the purchasing of shares in the Boise State Broncos. Each share costs $100 per unit with 200,000 available shares and carries no monetary value and produces no dividends. It will, however, allow those who become shareholders in BSB, Inc. to attend an annual shareholder’s meeting where they can vote on the distribution of athletic funds to support athletic programs. BSB, Inc. was inspired by a similar route taken by the Green Bay Packers. The Packers moved forward with the sale of 4,750,937 shares sold to 112,120 investors. Boise State hopes to raise $20 million to put toward improvements on athletic facilities and to help retain coaches and staff. “We can’t do it without the community,” Bleymaier said. “We need their help in every way, shape and form. This program has worked tremendously for the Green Bay Packers, and we think it can work for us.” BSU wants to move forward with the planned men’s and women’s basketball locker room complex, Dona Larsen Park (track and field) and a south end zone expansion of Bronco Stadium. “We need to appeal to the passion of Broncos Nation to help us keep our coaching staffs add the scholarships

that we need to add and build the facilities that we need to have so that we can keep this program, not just football but the rest of our sports at the level we’re enjoying now,” Bleymaier said. The stocks are transferable to heirs. Stocks do not receive any privileges for tickets, game entry or preferential treatment for athletic events. The purchase of the Bronco Stock is tax deductible. Bleymaier referenced the South Eastern Conference and the athletic support it’s member schools receive. The goal of this corporate endeavor is similar - to garner assistance from fans and supporters, helping the athletic entity progress to the level that other top universities boast. “What we’re appealing to, much like the Packers, is the passion of our supporters,” Bleymaier said. “We’re nothing without the support of our donors, our boosters and our supporters. For us to compete at the level that we are now and to stay at this level it’s going to take passion on the part of this community and of Bronco Nation.” Members will have the option to elect the board of directors at the annual shareholders meeting. The stocks are available immediately. The initial board members include Jerry Caven, Jerry Dancer, Allen Dykman, Richard Fedrizzi, Jon Miller, Allen Noble, Duane Stueckle, Milford Terrell, David Turnbull, George Wade, Larry Williams and Charles Wilson. Bronco Stock is available at the Bronco Athletic Association office located at the Allen Noble Hall of Fame Gallery at the southwest corner of Bronco Stadium.

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2

NEWS

NOVEMBER 09, 2009

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Boise State flying higher than ever JOSH RASMUSSEN Media Manager

Boise State University earned its wings, Monday, when a newly-painted Horizon Air Bombardier Q400, boasting BSU colors and logos, taxied to the gate at the Boise Air Terminal. The blue and orange aircraft is the latest in a series of university-themed paint schemes unveiled by Horizon. “We had an opportunity to paint a plane with the Boise

State University colors and marks,” said Dan Russo, vice president of marketing and communication for Horizon Air, “and we’re happy to do it and be an ambassador for the city of Boise.” He called the plane a “tribute to Boise State University and to the city of Boise.” “This aircraft is going to fly throughout our system,” he said, “from the northern regions of Western Canada down to Palm Springs and throughout Montana.” It arrived from Sacramento, Calif., around 1:30 p.m. and presented itself before a mass of select Boise State representatives including University President Bob Kustra, the Boise State cheer-

The Boise State-themed Horizon Q400 taxis to the gate after landing for the first time at the Boise Air Terminal.

leaders and mascot Buster Bronco. Russo presented Kustra with a model of the aircraft and thanked the University for it’s help. “Boise State University was wonderful to work with,” he said, “and certainly recognized the benefit of the exposure as the plane flies throughout our system.” Kustra said, “It’s not often I get an opportunity to thank the people in this airport for what they do for us, but I want to start with the Horizon Air employees. Every time we come through this airport we know we’re home.” With this symbol of who we are and where we’re going,” Kustra said, “and

with the daily successes we’re having at Boise State, whether it’s rising enrollment, whether it’s rising research, whether it’s rising reputation, this is just a great day for Boise State University.” Arriving passengers were handed a city of Boise gift bag by Boise State cheerleaders after they stepped off the plane. Jenna Harvy, a passenger on the flight visiting from California said she was told in flight, “There might be a camera when you land. If you see a film crew, don’t mind them.” Just before the plane landed, she said, “They announced the cheerleaders would be there.” “I did not

expect this big of a production. I said, ‘only in Idaho’. This would never happen in California,” Harvy said, “It’s really neat though, it’s so nice to see so much pride.” Kathy Terry, who was in town on a business trip and waiting to depart said, “I thought maybe the President was coming in. I think it’s great. It shows the spirit around the football.” “You don’t have this kind of stuff in a big city,” she said, “They don’t pay attention.” The aircraft sat on the ramp for a couple hours and provided a perfect background for the ceremonies in the terminal before it prepared for its first flight to Idaho Falls. “We think it’s great that it’s flying in the state of Idaho for its first flight.” Russo said. The University of Oregon, Oregon State, Washington State and the University of Wash-

JOSH RASMUSSEN/THE ARBITER

“This would never happen in California. It’s really neat though, it’s so nice to see so much pride.” - Jenna Harvy

ington were the other four schools Horizon featured with this program. Russo mentioned the appropriateness of the TSA’s threat level being “orange,” then referenced the football team. “It is not about the win-loss record,” he said, “otherwise we’d have a couple of planes in Washington that we would have to be repainting pretty soon.” Russo said the paint job totaled about the average cost -- $40,000, and should last about 5 to 7 years. Models of the aircraft will be available to purchase in the bookstore shortly according to Russo.

JOSH RASMUSSEN/THE ARBITER

The Boise State-themed Horizon Q400 waits at the gate to unload passengers from Sacramento, Calif., after making its first stop in Boise.

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NEWS

3

NOVEMBER 12, 2009

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BSU Concurrent Enrollment Program gains national accreditation MIKE JOHNSON Journalist

Boise State University’s concurrent enrollment program has received accreditation from the National Alliance for Concurrent Enrollment Partnership (NACEP). BSU is Idaho’s only public institution to gain recognition from NACEP, which bases its accreditation on 15 established standards evaluating faculty, curriculum and various other areas. “Boise State met or exceeded every NACEP standard,” Dean of extended studies Mark Wheeler said. “This speaks volumes for the quality of Boise State’s concurrent programming at high schools throughout

southwestern Idaho.” Concurrent enrollment is a partnership between high schools and the University to allow high school students the opportunity to take college-level courses for both high school and college credit. Part of the State of Idaho’s Dual Credit Program, 31 high schools in the state participate, offering over 100 classes in a variety of subjects. According to the Department of Extended Studies website, “The State Board of Education established the Idaho Dual Credit Program to provide an economical way for promising students to get a head start on their college career.” There are 1,367 students currently enrolled in Boise

Concurrent enrollment allows high school students the opportunity to take college-level courses for both high school and college credit.

State’s concurrent program, earning 6,044 college credits, which will ultimately save these students over $1 million in student fees and tuition, according to the director of concurrent enrollment Fabiola Juarez-Coca. “We have a decent high school graduation rate in Idaho, and with concurrent enrollment high school students can get a taste of college life and see that they are capable of doing the work, which will encourage them to go on to college,” Juarez-Coca said. High school students enrolled in the program receive an ID card, access to the Albertsons Library and the Writing Center, as well as the ability to attend campus workshops and lectures. “It’s an incredibly good feeling to receive this recognition,” Juarez-Coca said. “It’s validation that we are running a strong and rigorous academic program.”

NIK BJURSTROM/THE ARBITER

An overview of the campus from the top of the Stueckle Sky Center.

American Sign Language Emotional Beauty in the Silence of Sound TONY ROGERS Journalist

its inception. Prior to 2003, the ASL department was located in the communications building. Upon the request of students, the program was moved to the Modern Language department, and an area one core credit was given to classes ASL 101 and 102. In 2004, two more classes were added to the schedule, 201 and 202. Finally in 2008, a third level of language classes were added, bringing the total of classes the department offers to six. “With four credits per class,

teaching methods. For example Lavona Andrew uses Youtube videos to help enable learning. “The videos that she uses are prime examples of how the ASL program relies on new technologies to teach a completely visual topic,” Boucher said. Melanie Palmer, a junior majoring in sociology, is proficient in sign language. “I had a friend who was deaf, and I learned ASL so that I would be able to communicate with them,” Palmer

It’s hard to imagine. Complete and utter silence. The thought of losing the ability to communicate can send chills down anyone’s spine. Sometimes it’s lost at birth, while other times it can be lost doing everyday things. For many, losing the ability to hear is a regression into the past. Adapting into a new environment can be extremely scary at first, but it can also inspire people to take acTONY ROGERS/THE ARBITER tions they never thought they would have to do. Interpreter Hollie Hurt signs to deaf student Kevin Though some people may Majors in Political Science 101. be under the impression that being deaf has severe limita- it gives us a total of 24 cred- said. “There were many deaf tions, this “disability” can ac- its,” Teresa Boucher, chair for people at our school, and tually open doors to a whole the Modern language depart- knowing sign language really new world of culture and ment said. “This means that helped us to communicate, enlightenment. The Modern we now have the number of and it helped open my eyes Language Department has a credits needed to create our to a new culture.” program that can give those own minor!” As mentioned before, deafof hearing a glimpse into The minor, which will be ness can come from birth, the world of the deaf, with available to students start- and a startling statistic acclasses in the language of the ing with the 2010 graduating companies that fact. “95 perAmerican deaf community: class, will apply to eligible cent of people who are born sign language. students who have taken all deaf are born to parents who American Sign Language six language classes. have the ability to hear,” Ma(ASL) is derived from Old “We are proud to be able ria Shawver, ASL instructor French Sign Language, origi- to offer this minor, especially said. This creates an obvious nally developed by Charles since it can apply to so many problem that the ASL DeMicheal de l’Epee in the majors and be so beneficial,” partment tries to alleviate. 18th century. From there the Boucher said. “Most of our classes have language ballooned into a Another opportunity is for more people in them than system that is taught to the students applying themselves is allowed, just because we hearing impaired worldwide. in the field of social work. can’t say no,” Boucher said. Like spoken languages, there “If a deaf person has a “If hearing parents give birth are many forms of sign lan- mental illness or condition, to a child who is deaf, how guage, such as the French as well as being deaf, the so- can you say no to someone Sign Language and Dutch cial worker can be the one who needs to learn this in orSign Language. Each form who can help enable con- der to communicate?” of sign language is unique. tact,” Boucher said. Another concern is the For example, a speaker of The ASL section consists of limited number of staff. American Sign Language Boucher as the head of the “All of our instructors are wont be able to distinguish department, and six instruc- adjunct faculty. All have jobs what a speaker of British Sign tors. The instructors, who outside of teaching here, Language is saying, because come from varying back- and all aren’t paid very well,” both dialects come from dif- grounds, are comprised of Boucher Said. “I don’t know ferent roots. This makes the two hearing, one hearing im- where the section would be language one of the most paired, and three deaf teach- without their dedication.” unique on the planet. ers. In the classroom, ASL is The ASL program at Boise primarily taught by visual See the expanded State has been evolving dra- instruction, which opens up version of this article matically since the date of the door to new and unique on arbiteronline.com

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4

OPINION

NOVEMBER 12, 2009

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Healthcare

Social Networking: The Borg had it right

compromise won’t perform All over campus - and likely everywhere else - people are talking about healthcare. STEVEN HEKLER Journalist

All over campus - and likely everywhere else - people are talking about healthcare. That is, they are still talking about healthcare. I like to imagine that some duty-bound messenger marched from building to building and classroom to classroom after the vote was made public, sticking her head in saying, “The healthcare bill passed the House.” And then, “You can get back to fighting now.” You see, nothing has been resolved. The divisive HR 3962 has yet to go before Senate, and even if it passes - it probably won’t - no one will come away happy. Or at least they shouldn’t. After much revision and compromise the bill doesn’t represent a healthcare plan that anyone really believes in. Now the politicians are just playing to win. A single-payer system is off the table, even though it is the real prize for the Democrats. Such an extreme step would violate the notion of grinding compromise that controls American politics. The Dems shouldn’t kid themselves, the Republicans won’t like this new program any more than a single-payer system. After all, we are creating a government option and then pitting it against the private insurance companies of

the market. No one should want this option, because, prima facie, there are only two possible outcomes: the businesses fail or the government option fails. If the private sector fails, then the federal government has successfully sacked a profitable industry in the midst of an economic downturn. Imagine that the U.S. Postal Service did not exist, and that a successful, if pricey, shipping and postage industry filled its place in society. Introducing a government-run system, even one with all the benefits that U.S.P.S. offers today, would be highly problematic. The Democrats have not, to date, come up with any suitable plans for phasing out private healthcare providers. Instead, this system walks the fine line between supplementing the private industry and defeating it. Either way, government run healthcare is likely to wind up with dirt on its face. If the government option fails, then the Democrats will have to face the conclusion that government run healthcare is not a plausible option in America—the mantra of the Republican Party. This crippled universal healthcare proposal therefore presents a significant problem, especially for Americans in favor of authentic single-payer healthcare. If a government option is implemented but unsuccessful, then the Democrats, communists, and moderates can forget about a single-payer system. Maybe it’s time to give up the idea that compromise leads to the best solution. The beneficial nature of compromise is one of the strangest assumptions that we hold in our political system. We have this myth that every negotiation is like

JENNY KNISS Online Editor

MCT

Thousands rally in front of the U.S. Capitol to protest health care reform in Washington on Nov. 5, 2009. a pumpkin pie, or a cake, or whatever. Both sides want the whole pie, but the best solution is to cut it into an appropriate amount of pieces, probably two, and hand them out. Let’s all just focus on what we have in common. That isn’t how things work. At least they usually don’t work that way. Politicians - most people, actually - form complete world-views for a reason. I have a certain set of beliefs about the roles of the government, the individual, and the private sector. If I wanted to create or modify a system, I should do my best to come up with a consistent set of regulations, institutions, etc. Ideologies, and the policies resulting from them, are therefore more like organisms than baked goods. We are talking about dogs and cats, but feel at liberty to cut them up like pies. Some mixing and matching is possible across ideologies, but in general these systems are designed to be homogeneous and

consistent. This is obvious in other ideology-driven fields. No Freudian psychologist would adopt a method that contradicted theories of the subconscious. Politics is analogous, although American politicians benefit tremendously from pretending to think that the center holds all the answers. Healthcare is an incredibly important topic; otherwise it would not receive as much focus as it has. Pressure from the American people causes both parties to feel driven to produce something, and in their haste they are increasingly willing to toss aside some of their important beliefs in order to pass legislation. I fear that the resulting healthcare bill will perform like a dead dog, having its vital organs treated as though they are interchangeable with those of a cat. There is no neutral ground here. If we remain afraid to step away from the center, we are not going to solve this problem.

The Weekly Buzz Kill: America runs on pop-politics

JOSH GAMBLE

Community Manager Everyone has something to say about politics, unless, you know, you don’t (it’s cool; I respect your lifestyle choice). But here’s the great thing about writing a column: I get to do it in public. So here’s what I’m whining about today: Pop-politics. Pop-politics is defined (by me) as the propensity America has for turning politicians into celebrities and simplifying complex issues. It often also involves turning non-issues into political debates, usually via the extreme Christian right, and the phenomenon of “infotainment.” Don’t believe me? Well too bad, I’m going to keep writing anyway. If politicians are celebrities, then Barack Obama is like Robert Pattinson if he showered more. Incidentally, Dick Cheney is Jason Voorhees and Mark Sanford equates to Jon Gosselin. It doesn’t help that celebrities have been getting in-

volved in politics for decades, from Bono to Reagan. Even with the line already blurred, the Obama family collectively takes the concept of political celebrity to a whole new level. I’m all for personal transparency of the president, but do we really need to know when the dog’s birthday is? (The answer is no, by the way.) Not only to politicians get uninformative media attention, but so do “hot button issues.” Anyone armed with Glenn Beck quotes and a chain letter with a strange vendetta against Acorn can pass as an expert on health care. Look at the debacles that were the Tea Party Protests and town hall meetings. It

Lawmakers don’t belong in an “evolution debate.” Leave that to scientists and evangelicals. There shouldn’t even be a debate over gay rights. used to be that being a sensationalist earned nothing but exasperation, but now it gets you a TV show or the endorsement of the Republican Party. Looking to other direction, you’ll see “issues” that really shouldn’t be issues. Lawmakers don’t belong in an “evolution debate.” Leave that to

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scientists and evangelicals. There shouldn’t even be a debate over “gay rights.” Why are those different from everyone else’s rights? I could rant on the hypocrisy of the whole thing, but I’m on deadline. Religious issues don’t belong in congress. They have more important things to worry about than non-issues like these that come with pop-politics. The fourth tier of pop-politics is infotainment or pseudo-news. This has become so prevalent that spellchecker actually acknowledges infotainment as a word. It comes in two forms: parody news and sensationalism. The two aren’t mutually exclusive, although sometimes

Journalists:

Chris Bodovinitz Mitch Esplin Josh Gamble Bryce Getusky Nikki Houston Andrew Johnson Mike Johnson Ryan Johnson Kim King Ben Mack Margaret Reimer Tony Rogers Jennifer Spencer

what I’d love to believe is parody isn’t. The airwaves are full of poppolitics shows, often sporting loud and opinionated talking heads like Bill Maher, Glenn Beck, Keith Olberman, Nancy Grace, and Bill O’Reily. These people are then lampooned by people like Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert and the cast of Sat-

urday Night Live. This wouldn’t be a terribly big problem if people didn’t insist on taking everything they say at face value. They aren’t out to inform the righteous conservatives of a huge liberal conspiracy, they’re out to get ratings. Except Glenn Beck, I think he might be truly crazy. Regardless, all of these commentators are taken far too seriously. It crosses the line from annoying to dangerous when citizens, thinking they are doing what’s best for America, take matters into their own hands. Then we get Tea Party Protesters. Pop-politics has been with America since the hay day of yellow journalism during the industrial revolution, possibly prior. As corporations grow powerful, so do their mouthpieces. If you like to listen to commentators and satirists, that’s fine. However, everything they say should be taken with a grain of salt; they are owned by the same people that own our congressmen, after all. If you must know what’s going on in D.C., watch C-Span or read the bills yourself. Sure, it’s not the fast and sexy politics we all know and love, but if you speak lawyer and have a huge amount of time to kill, it’s a considerably more accurate source of information.

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According to The Washington Post, 300 million users and counting are now on Facebook. To put that in perspective, the U.S. Census Bureau count put the United States’ population at just over 304 million in 2008. And let me pause here to say I can hear the dissension among you Social Networking haters now. I think you feign the hate mostly, especially since in, my experience, many of you are actually using social networking in some form or another – or even better - haven’t even used the social networking you claim is so heinous and socially depleting. The biggest complaint I hear these days is about the menial topics of conversation crammed into Twitter’s 140-character limit. Let’s be honest here, it wasn’t Twitter that made people suddenly start saying menial things - like how great the hamburger was they just ate. Take an inventory of your conversations over the next few days and you’ll probably find that very few of them are deep, intense or meaningful. Who wants to say incredibly worthy and meaningful things all the time anyway? Sometimes the beauty of social networks is whispering little nothings on your page mixed with the links to video, research, ‘WTF?’ images and breaking news. I certainly don’t see gatherings of people inperson swapping information at that rate. Saying Twitter and Facebook are useless, drivel, that you just “don’t get it”, is similarly futile to saying those same things about e-mail. If your “friends list” only talk about food or where they are stopping on their way to work with nothing of significance to offer you, you’re doing it wrong. There is an idea this spike in the world’s online activity is going to turn us into bumbling, inarticulate, socially-isolated and awkward Homo erectus. While it may be making us put on the pounds as suggested by the documentary “Killer at Large,” we are not socially isolated by any means. According to a study published this month by the Pew Research Center, “people’s use of the mobile phone and the internet is associated with larger and more diverse discussion networks. And, when we examine people’s full personal network - their strong and weak ties -- internet use in general, and use of social networking services such as Facebook in particular, are associated with more diverse social networks. Social Networking is an online expression of what Ethan Watters defined in his book Urban Tribes. Watters describes urban tribes as “...an intricate community of young people who live and work together in various combinations, form regular rituals, and provide the support of an extended family.” Like it or not social networking isn’t going anywhere so you might as well know how to use it.

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SPORTS

NOVEMBER 12, 2009

5

ARBITERONLINE.COM

Rivalry week

Students exhibit excitment of gridiron in-state rivalry

KIRK BELL/THE ARBITER

Students wait in line during the Broncos home opener against the Ducks. The Vandals created a strong buzz this season due to recent success in gridiron contest. The Broncos face off against UI Saturday at Bronco Stadium BRENDAN SHERRY Journalist

Rivalry week means a lot of things to a lot of different people. It has a different

meaning to the players, the coaches, and especially the fans. Although players and coaches play the biggest role in the outcome, the poor results of rivalry game can dev-

astate a loyal fan for an entire year. It is almost impossible for a fan to forget about a loss to a bitter rival. Since rivalries are often times formed because of the

two schools proximity to each other, the fans of the schools are forced to interact with one another throughout the year. This can cause a great deal of heart break for the

fan whose team losses. For a whole year they are forced to listen to endless verbal attacks from their friends, family, or co-workers. The game between Boise State and the University of Idaho is no different. Idaho’s instate rivalry forces interactions between Broncos and Vandals year round. However both sets of fans start to get a little more on edge each day leading up to the big game. And no one knows this better than the students from the two schools. The game between Boise State and Idaho, which oddly lacks a catchy title, can split apart lifelong friends in the days leading up to the game. A Boise State student might start referring to their friend as a “VanDoll who attends the school up north.” Or an Idaho student might call his friend a “Bozo State Donkey.” In recent years the rivalry hasn’t received much attention. The lopsided victories have made those who aren’t close to the rivalry doubters. Some believe that rivalry games are supposed to be close, and both teams should have a shot at winning. But for others a big victory just

ads to the fire. “I think the margin of victory ads to their motivation, because it’s their biggest game of the year every year and if they beat us it makes their season.” Senior kinesiology major Matt Bunch said. “For us it is just another game on the way to a BCS bowl.” This year’s matchup seems to have a little more intensity than years past when the Vandals were unable to compete. However, this year Idaho has put together their best season in recent memory and come into Boise bowl eligible. But for senior marketing major Amber Uriate their record doesn’t matter. “They are better than they have been recently but it doesn’t really matter what their record is,” Uriarte said. “I just don’t think they have the same quality of team as we do. If we can go in there and play our game and not worry about their record, then I think we’ll be just fine.” As the clock ticks down towards kickoff it is a sure bet that student’s comments about their despised rival will become less subtle, while the name calling and verbal attacks will quickly intensify.

Harris, Van Hoogen, Broncos back to business KIRK BELL Editor

During their 2008-09 campaign the Broncos had to do without their two senior leaders; guard Tasha Harris and forward Jessica (Thompson) Van Hoogen. Van Hoogen fell to injury before the season opener and Harris ended hers season early just four games into the season. But there appeared a sense of relief with the two as the final buzzer sounded. They seemed glad to be back to work for BSU and head coach Gordy Presnell. They are back and able to produce. But old ties are out the door. There are 11 players on this season’s roster besides Harris and Van Hoogen. Seven have yet to play a full season with the senior standouts. Both are feeling healthy again and back to full form. By watching them both on Sunday, it was difficult to see a step lost. Each was able to create plays for the Broncos and get up and physical with their opponents. They still carry themselves with the same finesse and flare fans would expect from the dy-

namic duo. “It was fun. I just had a lot of fun,” Van Hoogen said. “I’m just blessed to be able to play on the court again. I’m excited.” Each joked about pushing themselves and feeling it later, forced to sooth it with a frigid ice bath. Neither Harris nor Van Hoogen are strangers to physical pain caused by old injuries. “I don’t think during the game we changed our style. I think afterwards we think about it and we regret it,” Harris laughed. “I don’t think it affected us during the game. I think that we’re just focused on what we have to do out there.” Candid as the two are, they continue to progress and learn from their new teammates. Coming back after difficult recoveries is never an easy endeavor for an athlete. “I’ve done it before. It’s always hard coming back,” Harris said about returning to competition. “It’s so much easier when you have teammates who can take the pressure off of you and you can kind of work your way back in. It feels pretty good.” That should not be a problem for the Broncos this sea-

son. While Harris and Van Hoogen sat observing last year, their fellow Broncos were busy getting time on the court and much need experience. Learning their roles Five players – Heather Pilcher, Melissa Rima, Janie Bos, Rebecca Kepilino and Stacie Gross – averaged 15.4 minutes per game combined for a much-needed boost in experience prior to this season. The development should help those who contributed to last season’s shared fifth place finish in the Western Athletic Conference. “I definitely feel that this is a team and a program for roles,” Harris said “…We really haven’t gotten our roles from our coach yet but I think as we get those and put those together, we just have to know that each person is important no matter what their role is. As long as we stay in it together I think we should be pretty good and keep improving.” The Broncos look to Friday as their season opener against Western Oregon. The coaches and media each picked the Broncos to finish third this season behind favorites Louisiana Tech and Fresno State.

Pressing for improvement is a major focus for the Broncos early on in the season next to getting a feel for the team. “We have a lot of big, hard competition that we’re going

to face,” Van Hoogen said. “We’re all going to have to get better. We need to get better as a team. We need to get better individually. So I’m looking forward to seeing how we

do with that kind of competition.” BSU tips of against Western Oregon at Taco Bell Arena Friday, Nov. 13, at 7:00 p.m.

NIK BJURSTROM/THE ARBITER

Broncos’ senior Tasha Harris battles for the ball on the floor during their exhibition game against LCSC Sunday afternoon. Harris recorded three assists, three steals and 7-points for the Broncos

to you: Time to get creative Bronco Nation BRITTNEY JOHNSON EDITOR

Bronco faithful it’s a new year, a new team, a new undefeated season but it’s also a new beginning for the University of Idaho rivalry game. Things have changed this year up north while the Broncos stay consistent. For starters the Vandals have seven wins and only three losses making them bowl eligible for the first time in a very, very long time. Bronco fans, sadly the same old taunting chants won’t work this year. So here’s a look back on the best of the best. The decades old reliable taunt: “VanDULLS”. A perfect description of the style of play the Vandals have shown over the past decade. A Bronco fan’s favorite joke: “How does a Vandal count to 10? Answer; 0-1, 0-2, 0-3, 0-4, 0-5, 0-6, 0-7, 0-8, 0-9, 0-10.” This joke holds true with the countless losing season up in the Palouse.

The chant heard around the Stadium: “And that’s another Vandal…. 4th DOWN!” This chant dates back to the 2004 shellacking at Bronco Stadium where the Broncos put up 65-points to the Vandals seven. Winner of best sign at a game: “Need wins? Call 1-800-BIGSKY.” The sign dropped from the over hang of the upper deck of Bronco Stadium in the 2007 game was an additional low blow for Vandals. Post Fiesta Bowl era taunt: “Buck up Vandals! You’re ruining our strength of schedule!” After strength of schedule was on the minds of Bronco Nation the Vandals defiantly took blows by Boise State fans to toughen up. Best BCS related taunt: “Top 10, bottom 10! Top 10, bottom 10!” (completed with pointing up and down to signify top and bottom) These are a few of the greats that have been echoed throughout Bronco Stadium on many

occasions. This year is different. This year it’s time for Bronco Nation to put on their creative caps and get to work on new taunting cheers to compete with the overused, “Donkey State,” and, “Boise Junior College.” Bronco Nation, you have been creative before it’s time to be creative again. This year the Rivalry is definitely different. There are so many Vandal fans coming out of the wood works ready to cheer a Idaho team with an actual winning record. The Vandals are on quick sprint to the Humanitarian Bowl in December so Saturday isn’t the only day this year Idaho fans will flock to Boise. So it’s time to come up with new material to complete the grudge week known as Rivalry week. North against South. Houses and families divided. A state split. On a final note Bronco Nation, the taunting, “Toe Tappers.” line is always, and will always be fair game. JOSH RASMUSSEN/THE ARBITER

The Arbiter ! arbiteronline.com


6

SPORTS CULTURE

NOVEMBER 12, 2009

Athletics Calendar 11/5 - 11/8 *game to be played at home

Thursday, Nov. 12 Volleyball – Bronco Gym* 7:00 p.m. – BSU vs. Hawai’i

Friday, Nov. 13 Men’s Basketball – Missoula, Montana 5:30 p.m. – Loyola Marymount Soccer – Div. I NCAA Soccer Championship Tournament

ARBITERONLINE.COM – Los Angeles, Calif. 6:30 p.m. – UCLA Swimming and Diving – West YMCA* 7:00 p.m. – Northern Arizona Women’s Basketball – Taco Bell Arena* 7:00 p.m. – Western Oregon Women’s Tennis –

Northridge, Calif. (TBA) – Matador Invitational

Saturday, Nov. 14 Football – Bronco Stadium* 1:30 p.m. – Idaho Volleyball – Bronco Gym* 7:00 p.m. – San Jose State Men’s Basketball – Missoula, Montana 7:30 p.m. – Montana

Women’s Tennis – Northridge, Calif. (TBA) – Matador Invitational Cross Country – NCAA West Regional Championships – Eugene, Oregon (TBA)

Sunday, Nov. 15 Men’s Basketball – Missoula, Montana

1:00 p.m. – North Dakota Women’s Basketball – Taco Bell Arena* 2:00 p.m. – Weber State Soccer – Div. I NCAA Soccer Championship Tournament – Los Angeles, Cal. (TBA) – San Diego/San Diego St. (Pending win vs. UCLA)

Akey seeking upset, bowl berth MATT BEDINGER Journalist

The Idaho Vandals, after starting the season 6-1, have dropped two of their last three contests heading into Saturday including their most recent loss to Fresno State. However, head coach Robb Akey still has his sights set on an elusive bowl bid for his team and starting a new winning streak. “Starting this new streak this week means also starting a new streak within the rival series. I know I’m supposed to pay homage to Boise State. We’re not supposed to line up and some people even suggest that we just take a bye week and don’t bother going to play the game because we can’t touch them. But we’re going to be there Saturday,” Akey said. Akey has beaten Boise State before, but never when he’s been at Idaho. His Idaho team is looking to break Boise State’s long winning streak in the rivalry and crush the Broncos’ BCS aspirations. “My goal is on Sunday and Saturday night that I will be the least popular individual with every administrator within the WAC conference because we’ve taken all the BCS hopes away from our conference. That’s my goal and desire,” Akey said. That task will be an uphill battle if the Vandals are without starting quarterback Nathan Enderle, who missed last week’s game with an injured throwing shoulder. Enderle is expected to be a game time decision. “Nate’s a tremendous competitor, he’s a hell of a quarterback and we’re looking forward to having him back. It will be a game time decision,” Akey said on Monday. But even without Enderle, backup Brian Reader has been able to produce, thanks to the whole team around him performing better than they did last season. The offensive line is stellar, there are three running backs that can hurt a team in different ways, the receivers contain deep threats as well as short-yardage specialists, and the defense has been much improved. “You look at the production of our running backs. You look at our protection of the quarterback and our quarterback as a trigger guy. You look at our receivers. We had one game where ten guys had a catch. The whole football team, they’re understanding how to compete and having the confidence to win going into any game,” Akey said. Akey emphasized that a marquee win against BSU was not the goal for the season, but would be crucial in achieving their season goals. “At 7-3, we’ve got a pretty good opportunity to get into a bowl game, but we need to get eight to make it more likely. That’s something that we’ve talked about very openly and I think eight now is a tremendous amount. It just so happens that we didn’t get eight taken care of against Fresno, so we’re going to try to get eight taken care of against Boise. That’s what [a win] is going to be mean.”

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CLASSIFIEDS Classifieds 7

NOVEMBER 12, 2009

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money? Start your own business now as an AVON Independent Sales Representative and you can make up to 50% profit. No quotas, no start up kit, just $10 to start and lots of support. You can sell as little or as much as you like. Get that extra income now! To find out more email me at startselling@ rocketmail.com ARBITER JOURNALIST DESCRIPTION: Arbiter Media is looking for creative, curious, agile and innovative students to serve as journalists in its newsroom. Arbiter Media is a student ran, awardwinning multi-platform media outlet, publishing content in print, online, on the radio and television; and has an established reputation for its multimedia storytelling and innovative environment. For 76 years, Arbiter Media (The Arbiter) has served as the Independent Voice of Students at Boise State University and is a learning laboratory for aspiring media and business professionals. We will train you and give you the tools, support and encouragement you need to succeed. Journalists at Arbiter Media collaborate with a team of 7 journalists and editors charged with covering their specified beats in the production of interactive multiplatform media packages and stand alone content for arbiteronline.com and our newspaper, The Arbiter. Duties of a journalist include covering news events, meetings, writing features, analysis and producing multi-media segments. We are looking for reporters who can and will work a variety of subjects and understand the value of community journalism. Photography, audio, video, skills and comfort with WordPress and social media such as Twitter and Facebook are a plus. We do not expect you to have experience in journalism ñ but we expect you to come to us with a strong sense of journalistic values (including a serious grasp of ethics, news sense, commitment to our community, decision-making, working on deadline, etc.). You will work with the rest of our team (reporters, photographers, editors, designers, etc.) from across the newsroom on long-term and rapid deadline stories. You will be taught to conceptualize, design and produce stories that are told through print and online articles, various platforms of multimedia such as video and podcasts, microsites, interactive graphics, blogs, video and other platforms of media as they emerge. Most importantly, we are looking for students who are quick learners with a lot of ideas and energy. Infectious enthusiasm is a bonus. Workaholic, overachieving, ambitious go-getters are highly encouraged to apply. Curious, inquisitive, story tellers with no fear of learning new technology, vastly expanding their knowledge of multi-platform media and pioneering the future of journalism would be absolutely batty not to apply. Journalism (and media in general) is not a job or a hobby, it is a passion. If that makes sense to you, we look forward to receiving your application. REQUIREMENTS: * Proven aptitude for quick creative thinking with acute attention to detail within demanding deadlines * An eagerness to learn ñ and teach * Strong communication skills * Ability to articulate creative ideas * An ability to manage multiple projects and meet both short-term and longterm deadlines * An understanding of different media platforms including, but not limited to: print and online media, podcasts, photo slideshows and other forms of multi-media * A healthy respect for Boise State University and its community * Curiosity ñ particularly around media and a desire to understand the stories it can tell as well as the constraints it imposes * Knowledge of social media and media aggregation sites such as Digg

or ReadIt * A love for writing and story telling. * Minimum 2.5 GPA HOURS and COMPENSATION: This is an UNPAID internship. Students are REQUIRED to take a three credit internship during which they will complete a minimum of 150 hours of work over the course of a semester, producing media for The Arbiter and arbiteronline.com. The Editor-in-Chief will make exceptions on the internship requirement on a case by case basis under special circumstances. HOW TO APPLY: Email a letter to Editor-inChief, Shannon Morgan, expressing your interest in the internship to jobs@arbiteronline.com. Students can also send a resume but it is not required. EDITOR

JOB DUTIES: Arbiter Media is looking for a student with strong communication, organizational and editing skills to serve as a Section Editor in its newsroom. Arbiter Media is a student ran awardwinning multi-platform media outlet, publishing content in print, online, on the radio and television; and has an established reputation for its multimedia storytelling and innovative environment. For 76 years, Arbiter Media (The Arbiter) has served as the Independent Voice of Students at Boise State University and is a learning laboratory for aspiring media and business professionals. We will train you and give you the tools, support and encouragement you need to succeed. Editors at Arbiter Media collaborate with a Community Content Editor and Producer in managing a team of 5-7 journalists charged with covering their specified beats as well as producing interactive multi-platform media packages and stand alone content for arbiteronline.com and our newspaper, The Arbiter. Editors ensure journalists have working knowledge of different styles of writing for a newspaper and multi-media platforms, AP-style and interviewing skills. The position involves editing, headline writing, coaching journalists, and page layout. Speed, accuracy and solid news judgment are crucial in meeting multiple deadlines. Editors assess ability of their journalists and help set goals to acquire skills, train, mentor and provide encouragement, coaching and feedback on progress. Strictly enforce daily deadlines to ensure The Arbiter is posting new content online each day and meets print production schedule. The position is responsible for collaborating with section Producers and Community Managers and fellow journalists at The Arbiter on creating media on a variety of platforms, including online and in print. Duties also include covering news events, meetings, writing features, analysis and producing multimedia segments. We will train you and give you the tools, support and encouragement you need to succeed. We are looking for students who can and will work a variety of subjects and understand the value of community journalism. Audio, video, skills and comfort with WordPress and social media such as Twitter and Facebook are a plus. A love for writing or eagerness to learn is a must. We expect you to come to us with a strong sense of journalistic values (including a serious grasp of ethics, news sense, commitment to our community, decisionmaking, working on deadline, etc.). You will work with the rest of our team (journalists, producers, photographers, designers, etc.) from across the newsroom on long-term and rapid deadline stories. You will teach journalists to conceptualize, design and produce story packages that are told through print and online articles, various platforms of multimedia such as video and podcasts, microsites, interactive graphics, blogs, video and other platforms of media as they emerge. Most importantly, we are looking for students who are quick learners with lots of ideas and energy. Infectious enthusiasm

is a bonus. Workaholic, overachieving, ambitious go-getters are highly encouraged to apply. Curious, inquisitive, story tellers with no fear of learning new technology, vastly expanding their knowledge of multi-platform media and pioneering the future of journalism would be absolutely batty not to apply. REQUIREMENTS: * Proven aptitude for quick creative thinking with acute attention to detail within demanding deadlines * An eagerness to learn ñ and teach * Strong communication skills * Ability to lead, manage and collaborate with a team comprised of students from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. * Ability to articulate creative ideas * An ability to manage multiple projects and meet both short-term and longterm deadlines * An understanding of different media platforms including, but not limited to: print and online media, podcasts, photo slideshows and other forms of multi-media * A healthy respect for Boise State University and its community * Curiosity ñ particularly around media and a desire to understand the stories it can tell as well as the constraints it imposes * Knowledge of social media and media aggregation sites such as Digg or ReadIt * A love for writing and story telling. * Minimum 2.5 GPA HOURS: 13 office hours and 5 flexhours will be dedicated to The Arbiter (18 total hours). Must be available to work Wednesdays and Sundays. COMPENSATION: This is a PAID position earning $140 per week with an opportunity to earn academic credits for work, via an internship, up to three credits. HOW TO APPLY: Email a letter to Editor-inChief, Shannon Morgan, expressing your interest in the internship to jobs@arbiteronline.com. Students can also send a resume but it’s not required ONLINE INTERACTIVE JOURNALIST JOB DUTIES:

Arbiter Media is looking for creative, curious, agile and innovative students to serve as Online Interactive Journalists and help us tell stories and improve our users’ experience on arbiteronline.com. Arbiter Media is a student ran, award-winning multiplatform media outlet, publishing content in print, online, on the radio and television; and has an established reputation for its multi-media storytelling and innovative environment. For 76 years, Arbiter Media (The Arbiter) has served as the Independent Voice of Students at Boise State University and is a learning laboratory for aspiring media and business professionals. We will train you and give you the tools, support and encouragement you need to succeed. Online Interactive Journalists at Arbiter Media serve on a team of four journalists who serve directly under the Online Editor and Online Coordinator and are charged with producing content and maximizing the potential of arbiteronline.com. You will take the lead in developing new ways to engage and interact with our audience and lead them through our stories online and in print. We do not expect you to have experience in journalism ñ but we expect you to come to us with a strong sense of journalistic values (including a serious grasp of ethics, news sense, commitment to our community, decision-making, working on deadline, etc.). You will work with the rest of our team (reporters, photographers, editors, designers, etc.) from across the newsroom on long-term and rapid deadline stories. We are looking for students who are comfortable with both interaction/development of social media platforms (e.g., Twitter and Facebook) to foster a relationship with our audience in the production of media. You will also be taught to produce media to publish on arbiteronline.com and in our printed edition, The Arbiter. You will be taught

to conceptualize, design and produce stories that are told through print and online articles, various platforms of multi-media such as video and podcasts, microsites, interactive graphics, blogs, video and other platforms of media as they emerge. We expect all employees to be self-motivated and to learn as much as possible, through their own means. Most importantly, we are looking for someone who is a quick learner with a lot of ideas and energy. You will need to stay on top of emerging trends and find out how the website and the organization can evolve by adopting those trends. Infectious enthusiasm is a bonus. We will train you and give you the tools you need to succeed. Workaholic, overachieving, ambitious go-getters are highly encouraged to apply. Curious, inquisitive, story tellers with no fear of learning new technology, vastly expanding their knowledge of multi-platform media and pioneering the future of journalism would be absolutely batty not to apply. Journalism (and media in general) is not a job or a hobby, it is a passion. If that makes sense to you, we look forward to receiving your application. REQUIREMENTS: * Proven aptitude for quick creative thinking with acute attention to detail within demanding deadlines * An eagerness to learn ñ and teach * Strong communication skills * Ability to articulate creative ideas * An ability to manage multiple projects and meet both short-term and longterm deadlines * An understanding of different platforms including, but not limited to: print and online media, podcasts, photo slideshows and other forms of multi-media * A healthy respect for Boise State University and its community * Curiosity ñ particularly around media and a desire to understand the stories it can tell as well as the constraints it imposes * Knowledge of social media and media aggregation sites such as Digg or ReadIt * A love for writing and story telling. * Minimum 2.5 GPA HOURS and COMPENSATION: This is an Students are REQUIRED to take a three credit internship during which they will complete a minimum of 150 hours of work over the course of a semester, producing media for The Arbiter and arbiteronline.com. The Editor-in-Chief will make exceptions on the internship requirement on a case by case basis under special circumstances. HOW TO APPLY: Email a letter to Editor-inChief, Shannon Morgan, expressing your interest in the internship to jobs@arbiteronline.com. Students can also send a resume but it’s not required. PHOTOJOURNALISTS

DESCRIPTION: Arbiter Media is looking for creative, curious, agile and innovative students to serve as photojournalists in our newsroom. Arbiter Media is a student ran, award-winning, multi-platform media outlet, publishing content in print, online, on the radio and television; and has an established reputation for its multi-media storytelling and innovative environment. For 76 years, Arbiter Media (The Arbiter) has served as the Independent Voice of Students at Boise State University and is a learning laboratory for aspiring media and business professionals. We will train you and give you the tools, support and encouragement you need to succeed. Photojournalists at Arbiter Media serve on a team of 5-7 journalists charged with covering their specified beats as well as producing interactive multi-platform media packages and stand along content for arbiteronline. com and our newspaper, The Arbiter. The position is responsible for capturing and editing images for Arbiter Media, produce Soundslides (photo slide shows with audio) and collaborate with fellow journalists on creating media on a variety of platforms,

including in print. Duties also include covering news events, meetings, writing features, analysis and producing multimedia segments. We will train you and give you the tools, support and encouragement you need to succeed. We are looking for students who can and will work a variety of subjects and understand the value of community journalism. Audio, video, skills and comfort with WordPress and social media such as Twitter and Facebook are a plus. A love for writing or eagerness to learn is a must. We do not expect you to have experience in journalism ñ but we expect you to come to us with a strong sense of journalistic values (including a serious grasp of ethics, news sense, commitment to our community, decision-making, working on deadline, etc.). You will work with the rest of our team (journalists, producers, editors, designers, etc.) from across the newsroom on longterm and rapid deadline stories. You will be taught to conceptualize, design and produce story packages that are told through print and online articles, various platforms of multimedia such as video and podcasts, microsites, interactive graphics, blogs, video and other platforms of media as they emerge. We expect all employees to be self-motivated and to learn as much as possible, through their own means. Most importantly, we are looking for students who are quick learners with a lot of ideas and energy. Infectious enthusiasm is a bonus. Workaholic, overachieving, ambitious go-getters are highly encouraged to apply. Curious, inquisitive, story tellers with no fear of learning new technology, vastly expanding their knowledge of multi-platform media and pioneering the future of journalism would be absolutely batty not to apply. Journalism (and media in general) is not a job or a hobby, it is a passion. If that makes sense to you, we look forward to receiving your application. QUALIFICATIONS: * Understanding proper use of a manual digital SLR camera settings * Proficiency with Windows and Macintosh environments * Basic knowledge of Microsoft Office applications * Knowledge of photo copyright laws a plus * Strong written communication skills * Photoshop CS3 for image retouch a bonus * Knowledge of image color correction methods in Photoshop CS3 a bonus * Basic audio capturing and editing skills a bonus * Basic knowledge of Soundslides a bonus * Proven aptitude for quick creative thinking with acute attention to detail within demanding deadlines * An eagerness to learn ñ and teach * Strong communication skills * Ability to articulate creative ideas * An ability to manage multiple projects and meet both short-term and longterm deadlines * An understanding of different media platforms including, but not limited to: print and online media, podcasts, photo slideshows and other forms of multi-media * A healthy respect for Boise State University and its community * Curiosity ñ particularly around media and a desire to understand the stories it can tell as well as the constraints it imposes * Knowledge of social media and media aggregation sites such as Digg or ReadIt * A love for writing and story telling. * Minimum 2.5 GPA HOURS and COMPENSATION: This is an UNPAID internship. Students are REQUIRED to take a three credit internship during which they will complete a minimum of 150 hours of work over the course of a semester, producing media for The Arbiter and arbiteronline.com. The Editor-in-Chief will make exceptions on the internship requirement on a case by case basis under special circumstances.

HOW TO APPLY: Email a letter to Editor-inChief, Shannon Morgan, expressing your interest in the internship to jobs@arbiteronline.com. Students can also send a resume but it’s not required. Receptionist

Must be enrolled in at least 12 credits at Boise State. Must have work-study. Will be answering a multi-phone line phones, making appointments using Google calendar, sending e-mails and performing general office duties as required. Experience with Macintosh preferred. Deadline for all applications are Friday 13, 2009. Apply at Jobs@arbiteronline.com

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CULTURE

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NOVEMBER 12, 2009

ARBITERONLINE.COM

Lights On All the single ladies HALEY ROBINSON Journalist

Get ready for Ignition Ignite Boise 3 inferno of ideas

SHANNON MORGAN Editor-in-Chief

What happens when 16 random people are given a stage, 20 slides that rotate every 15 seconds and five minutes to talk about whatever they want? Ignition. “Ignite Boise is put together by a handful of local entrepreneurs, geeks and generally creative people looking to contribute to Boise’s culture of ideas. (...) Ignite was started in Seattle in 2006 by Brady Forrest and Bre Pettis. Since then, hundreds of five minute talks have been given across the world. There are thriving Ignite communities in Seattle, Portland, Paris, Baltimore, NYC and now, Boise,” according to IgniteBoise.com. Boise State graduate Andrew Choifrine attended Ignite Boise 2. “I love it, I think it keeps people concise and that means it’s always interesting and if it’s not, then you move on to the next presenter,” Choufrine said. “It’s interesting people, talking about interesting things, in short bursts.” The successful event won the praise of Mayor Dave Bieter who proclaimed July 16 to be, “Ignite Boise Day,” in part because, “Ignite Boise reflects the truth that Boise is the birthplace of big ideas, the cradle of innovation, and simply the best place to lead a balanced life of meaningful work and inspirational play.” Chris Blanchard is a gradu-

ate of Boise State University and is the co-founder of Ignite Boise. Blanchard currently is professional staff in the Dean’s office of the college of social sciences and public affairs at BSU. So, what drove Blanchard to help develop a successful program like Ignite in Boise? “We thought it was a great opportunity to take the time to get some smart people to talk about things they are passionate about and try to spark some creativity to get people to think about old problems in new ways,” Blanchard said. Ignite Boise offers a great utility to students according to the associate airector of the career center at Alex Gutierrez. “I think it’s a great idea (…) looking at ideas and what other people are thinking about, but also for the connections and getting involved with different people in the community,” Gutierrez said. “Especially if you want to get connected and know what’s happening.” The event has won the heart of Boise residents and beyond. Senator Dean Cameron of Rupert described the Ignite Boise experience as, “a room filled with energetic, exciting, entrepreneurialminded people who are creative.” Cameron said. “It really causes the imagination to blossom in ways that you can be creative and have fun at the same time.”

BOB BEERS/THE ARBITER

Rob Barker, co-founder of Ignite Boise, gives the opening presentation at Ignite Boise 2, describing it as “a word of mouth movement.” Mayor Bieter’s Proclamation: “Whereas Ignite Boise was established by volunteers in early 2009 for the purpose of advancing big ideas and sparking a blaze of creativity in the City of Boise’s business and creative community; and Whereas the unique live presentation format of Ignite Boise brings together a diverse group including the valley’s artists, geeks, entrepreneurs, academics, government officials, and others to share their ideas in a fast-paced feeding frenzy of original thinking that entertains, challenges, and inspires; and, Whereas the volunteer founders and organizers of Ignite Boise staged an impressive debut event in March of ‘09 and have maintained the momentum for their second event, IgniteBoise2, in July of ‘09, while utilizing only social media tools and earned media for communication and promotion; and, Whereas Ignite Boise reflects the truth that Boise is the birthplace of big ideas, the cradle of innovation, and simply the best place to lead a balanced life of meaningful work and inspirational play; and, NOW, THEREFORE, I, DAVID H. BIETER, Mayor of the City of Boise, do hereby proclaim Thursday, July 16, 2009 IGNITE BOISE DAY”

Ignite Boise 3 speakers and topics (and Twitter handles) Every Springfield Needs a Shelbyville Kevin Richert @KevinRichert

The Farmer Who Went Postal Colleen Kohler @IPsecretary

ADD-tastic T.J. Anderson @tjsonofander

A Quick Primer on Slow-Cooked Barbecue Sherman Leibow @ShermTV

Science Quickies Woody Sobey @twsobey How to win 1-ups in Super Mario and influence people Ryan Donahue @donapuke How Eating Guinea Pigs Can Save The World (or at least part of it) Matt Miller @eatguineapigs

All Aboard the Soul Funky Train (a.k.a. Fundamentals of Supergroovalisticpro sifunkstication) Tony Harrison @tonystweetsIGNITE BOISE DAY Draining the Swamp Jeff Almeida @npja

A $1 Trillion Loaf of Bread; or Backup Your Brain Jason Denizac @jdenizac Don’t be lazy, SAVE THE PLANET! Holli High Woodings @hollihigh How To Start a Company in 52 Hours! Andre Nosalsky @an Weasel Words: How to Keep from Committing to Anything (Without Even Trying) Brian Harrison @brharrison

Mad (Wo)Men: The Women of “Mad Men,” the Modern Women Who Love Them, and How to Know Which Mad (Wo)Man You Are Lisa McGrath @tweetmcg Consider Design Justin Kuntz, Ryan Lascano and Steve Norell @justinkuntz @ryanlascano @stevenorell

Go to arbiteronline.com to watch Ignite Boise 3 live as the event unfolds at the Egyptian theatre

Hate what you see on the news? Well… it’s your fault. Thanh Tan @uscthanhtan

GLENN LANDBERG/THE ARBITER

Finn Riggins performs at the Special Events Center in the SUB Tuesday night. The band moved from Hailey to Boise in January. “The music scene in Hailey isn’t like the music scene in a city,” said Lisa Simpson, vocalist for the band. Simpson said that while the band carved out a solid niche in Hailey, most tourists aren’t there to see a band they’re not familiar with so cover bands abound. While the band is one of Idaho’s biggest, the members still find themselves needing to supplement their income with temporary work. “It’s kind-of a hunter and gatherer lifestyle,” he said. Simpson works as a developmental therapist when she’s not performing.

The decay of the nuclear family, the battle for women’s rights and the evolution of sexual freedom has reared a new kind of woman in the 21st century. She is powerful, she is independent and she has new responsibilities. No longer expected to be meek and conservative about sexual actions and ideas, women are faced with a new liberation that allows them startling power and freedom rivaling men’s. Women that have started to emerge in to the masculine world of “love-em and leaveem” are making their presence known. They aren’t afraid to say what was unheard of by women in the past. The fact that they want to have sex because it feels good or because they aren’t sleeping with men because they think that he is the love of her life. Accompanying this new way of thinking is an old stigma. Men who come home from a night of partying with stories about how many girls they hooked up with are greeted with highfives and admiration. Women placed in the same situation are greeted with degrading rumors and labels. A man who sleeps with a slew of women is a hero; a woman who sleeps with the equivalent amount of men is a slut. Aside from the risk of obtaining these unfair labels, women also need to take in to consideration other threats to their wellbeing. Women who decide to partake in this new and exciting sexual flexibility cannot neglect to consider the dangers that follow. The risk of contracting STI’s is something women and men alike have to fear. If a woman decides that she wants to have casual or promiscuous sex, she needs to have the ability to stand up for herself and make sure she is protected. Women who are sexually active should have their own means of protection and have the guts to say “no” if they are pressured in to risky behavior with which they don’t feel comfortable. Accidental pregnancy is arguably the most serious and frightening prospect for women who are sexually active. Men are not biologically tied to this accident. If a man refuses to wear a condom and suggests just “pulling out” as a lone form of birth control, women should have the intelligence and assertiveness to say “absolutely not.” If they do not have the ability to stand up for themselves, they have no business having sex in the first place. Regret is another concern women should consider before participating in this cultural revolution. In this case, the cliché phrase: “Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn’t mean you have to,” is applicable. Women who don’t believe in promiscuous sex, women who don’t feel comfortable with it, or women who want more than just sex out of a relationship should not feel that it is necessary to partake in this new trend. Being honest with oneself is vital when it comes to this decision. Accompanying the consideration for these things, women also need to be aware that they always have the ability to say “no.” They need to be confident enough in themselves and their own decisions to know that, even at the risk of sounding like a prude, it’s always their prerogative to refuse any point. To all the single ladies, it is important to recognize that it is up to each individual woman to adopt responsibility for her choices. If women are to completely shed the image of being the weaker and more submissive sex, they need to take charge of their actions and accept accountability.

The Arbiter ! arbiteronline.com


CULTURE

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NOVEMBER 12, 2009

ARBITERONLINE.COM

‘As You Like It’:

Feuding brothers, best friends, finding love The Theater Department will be performing Shakespeare’s play “As You Like It” starting Thursday. MARGRET REIMER Journalist

Director Gordon Reinhart has set the play in pre-Revolutionary colonial America. The costumes have been rented from Warner Brothers, and the scenery is representative of the forests of early America. "As You Like It" is about feuding brothers, best friends and finding love. Rosalind and Celia are best friends and cousins. The two of them flee to the forest when Rosalind’s uncle attempts to banish her from the kingdom. Rosalind falls in love with Orlando. Celia falls in love with Silvio and the court jester who has followed them into the forest falls in love with a dimwitted sheepherder named Audrey. In the end even the uncle falls in love (with God). As you like it will be presented in pre-revolutioinary colonial times The play is considered one of Shakespeare’s most crowd-pleasing works. “I’ve always been driven to do theater,” said Lina Chambers, a theater Arts major from Boise who plays Rosalind.

Chambers came from an artistic family and showed interest in theater at a young age. Her mother signed her up for drama camp when she was 7-years-old and she has stuck with it since. “My mom signed me up ... 'cause she thought I was a goofball,” Chambers said. Chambers became involved in her local community theater in high school when she found her own school’s theater program inadequate. Chambers said she's enjoying the challenges that have come with playing the character Rosalind. “She is a famous central character," said Chambers. "It’s been fun figuring out why she does the things she does. It has also been fun figuring out her relationships with Celia and Orlando.” Veronica Von Tobel, a theater major from Las Vegas, Nev plays Celia. “To really connect with a character, I feel you have to find what you love about the character and what they want," said Von Tobel. "Celia is a very loyal, self-assured person and she wants to protect and help the people around her, which makes her so much fun to play.” Gordon Reinhart, originally from Detroit, teaches Introduction to Theater and is the director of “As You Like It.” Reinhart said he started directing to become more involved in the creative process behind the plays. “I thought I could do it better," Reinhart said. "I was frustrated as an actor and I wanted more

BSU THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT.

Lina Chambers portrays Rosalind fleeing persecution and disguising herself as Ganymede in a performance of William Shakespeare’s comedy “As You Like It” by the Boise State University Department of Theatre Arts. The play will be performed Nov. 12-22 in the Danny Peterson Theatre of the Morrison Center. artistic control.” He has put a new spin on this version of “As You Like It” by setting it in pre-Revolutionary, colonial America. “Shakespeare would have been known to our founding fathers and the language was still very similar,” he said. “I think there is a problem with how Shakespeare is taught in high school," said Reinhart. "As a rule teachers can’t tell you why they teach it and students can’t tell you why they think it’s important to learn Shakespeare. A lot of people have not experienced a live play by him. In order to give Shakespeare a fair shot

you need to see it live.” “What's great about Shakespeare and 'As You Like It' in particular is that it is relatable to today's world. Of course my father's not a duke and I'm not banished to a forest, but friendship and love are universal,” said Von Tobel. See it: "As You Like It" will be playing Nov. 12-15 and Nov. 18-22 from 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Students with valid ID can buy tickets for $5 one hour before showtime. For information check the theater department Web site, https://sites.google.com/a/ boisestate.edu/theatreartsdepartment

The Arbiter ! arbiteronline.com


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CULTURE

NOVEMBER 12, 2009

ARBITERONLINE.COM

‘Resound’

Thesis exhibition opens Friday EVAN WESTERFIELD Journalist

The Bachelors of Fine Arts (BFA) candidates will open their thesis exhibition, “Resound,” in the two Visual Art Center galleries Nov. 13. “The students entering the thesis phase of their BFA sign up for my class, Art 410—Professional Practices in Art,” said professor Kirsten Furlong. “The students also work in the Visual Arts Center to learn the process of curating and organizing an exhibition.” Furlong, who is also the director of the Visual Art Center Galleries, espoused a large part of the class was spent on selecting a three faculty committee from the Art Department for each student, who oversee and help the students create the body of work shown during the thesis exhibition. The same committee evaluates the student’s work for the final portion of the thesis project.

Another part of the experience of the professional practices in Art class is the students’ designing of public relations or PR, and planning of the opening reception for the thesis exhibition. They also learn to do the installation of their own work according to professional gallery practices. The 11 students involved in both the class and the

ideas in the artwork,” said Furlong. “But it speaks more to the goal of the work having resonance with the audiences that will see it.” One of the artists on display is Jean You. A native of China, You moved to Boise five years ago and is a graphic design major. “Art should be like the music that everyone needs it, everyone appreciates it, and

of tossed dice. The communication of You’s art is done in vibrant colors, contrasting real figures or objects from everyday life against unreal backgrounds. “I draw intuitively but think formally,” You said. “I started drawing before painting. I usually had a set idea before the creative process.” You also works on the

and eight print studies of the same painting in the show. Another artist who will be on display during the exhibition is Marissa “Nobody” (a pseudonym). Nobody has recently been working in the mediums of music, fabrics, and community collaboration. “I’m very drawn to sewing and printmaking because of the intricacies to the many

I use duck tapes as one of the mediums to in contrast of the characteristics of oil paints. Also introducing new materials onto the traditional canvas is a way to express that we are living in a postmodern society. exhibition cover a variety of mediums and motifs in their work. The mediums on display range from large-scale installations, printmaking, illustration, and painting. The themes address motifs from history, to community, to identity. “The title (“Resound”) does not relate specifically to the

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everyone understands it,” You said. “I see painting and drawing as an intelligent device of communication.” You’s paintings thematically compare at times by setting traditionally unalike objects side by side. In a facial portrait the nose may be metamorphosed into the trunk of an elephant, or a baby may be set beside a set

unique medium of duct tape on canvas. “I use duck tape as one of the mediums in contrast of the characteristics of oil paints. Also introducing new materials onto the traditional canvas is a way to express that we are living in a postmodern society.” In the exhibition, You will have one display on painting

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processes,” Nobody said. “It’s similar to how people work or don’t work together, they’re all very surprising and mysterious.” A native of Brunswick, Ohio a suburb outside of Cleveland, Nobody grew up sneaking out of her parent’s house to visit the plethora of cultural activities in Cleveland. “By thirteen, I could sneak

out of the house with some skill,” Nobody said. “I spent most of my time immersing myself in the many diverse cultures, the historic Tremont Art District, and the underground music scene. Cleveland was really where I grew up or started to anyway.” Her hunt for diversity is most visible in the artists she sees as most influential. Few artists speak about spending hours hunting for under-represented artists. Though she said it is difficult to be highly influenced by the work, it helps her to maintain perspective that art is not just what is in a museum. “Resound,” the BFA thesis exhibition will open to the public on Saturday Nov. 14 and runs through Dec. 8. The Visual Art Center galleries are located in Liberal Arts Building, room 170, and the Hemingway Western Studies Building, room 110. The galleries are open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturdays from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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ZACH GANSCHOW/THE ARBITER

1. Kristi Marshall hangs various items, such as steel keys and cards, within her steel and silver sculptures.

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2. Suzanne Tornow has a series of high key oil paintings in the show. 3. Jin You has a series of paintings and prints that are on display in the LA Visual Arts Center. 4. Linda Schrocks installation features a variety of hanging materials, including crumbled sheet music. 5. Deb Jones Yensens work focuses on fabric materials in a variety of installation still lifes.

Q&A

The Arbiter talks with four bachelor of fine arts seniors before their thesis work exhibition

Marissa Nobody The Arbiter: Where are you from? Nobody: I grew up in Brunswick Ohio, a

small suburb on the outskirts of Cleveland. I really only slept there.

The Arbiter: How did you get your start

as an artist?

Nobody: My whole family is creative in many ways; most of them don’t use it in the artistic sense anymore. I’ve just recently realized I was forgetting something and now have been including music with my visual work. There’s an incredible amount of discovery and invention that is still very much a part of my process of being an artist that is directly linked to being a child. The Arbiter: What medium do you use

for your art?

Nobody: Currently I’m working with fabric, music, and community collaboration. bIt’s important to know what works for you with whatever you do and being a “medium” focused artist really kept me from being fully honest with my work. The Arbiter: What are your influences? (Family, famous artists, etc) Nobody: I’m always looking at art from those I feel are underrepresented, the kind of artists you have to dig for hours to find a single image that represents their work. My absolute favorites are the puppet maker -Scott Radke, and the printmaker - Koichi Yamamoto.

Jean You The Arbiter: What is your background? You: My name is Jean You, I am originally

from China. I moved to Boise with my family five years ago. I am a graphic design major student, and painting and drawing is my life long passion as an artist. I will be graduating next May.

The Arbiter: What is your preferred me-

dium?

You: Medium include oil, acrylic, duck tapes and printmaking. I have one 48 inch by 60 inch large painting and eight more print studies of the painting in the show. The Arbiter: What is your creative pro-

cess?

You: I draw intuitively but think formally.

I started drawing before painting. I usually had a set idea before the creative process, so my drawings are usually more precise and confident than sketches. I use duck tapes as one of the medium to in contrast of the characteristics of oil paints. Also introducing new materials onto the traditional canvas is a way to express that we are living in a postmodern society. To communicate with the idea of innovation and modernity.

The Arbiter: What do you think art is? You: Art should be like the music that ev-

eryone needs it, everyone appreciates it, and everyone understands it.

Jake Rowe The Arbiter: Where are you from? Rowe: I was born and raised in Boise, mi-

nus four years attending TVCC and University of Hawaii at Manoa.

The Arbiter: How did you get your start

as an artist?

Rowe: My start as an artist began in Junior High, West Junior High. I realized I had a talent and a love for drawing and my teacher, Mrs. Grooms, really encouraged me to continue taking formal classes and I haven’t stopped since. The Arbiter: What are you influences? (Family, famous artists, etc) Rowe: The influences of my art are first and foremost my Christian faith as well as artists like Norman Rockwell, Rembrandt, Rubens and Warhol. The Arbiter: What do you hope to do

one you graduate?

Rowe: I hope to find a job at a local Jr.

High/High School inspiring others who have a love of art to continue their education and practice and see where it takes them.

Gwen Downs The Arbiter: How did you get your start

as an artist?

Downs: There is a lot of family members who like to draw, paint, or craft works for other members of the family as gifts. It was just natural for me to see of this and want to become an artist too. The Arbiter: What medium do you use

for your art?

Downs: I use all kinds of medium in my art; I really love the challenge of a new material when I get my hands on it. The Arbiter: What are you influences? (Family, famous artists, etc) Downs: Family, friends, pets, my church, artist of all levels, life in general; they all have their place as my influence. The Arbiter: What has studying at BSU

done for your art?

Downs: The obvious should be that it has allowed me to improve on my skills where I was lacking but it has also given me opportunities to practice with new materials that gave me a good challenge to work on and push what I was good at to new levels. The Arbiter: What do you hope to do once you graduate? Downs: I want to become an art teacher so that I can inspire the next generation of artist that may enroll at BSU too someday. The Arbiter ! arbiteronline.com


JOSH RASMUSSEN/THE ARBITER


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ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2009

Taken for granted assumptions: BSU meets expectations each season Often there are those who believe that a game lost for the Broncos translates into a failed season. KIRK BELL Editor What is taken for granted is the difficulty of programs like the Boise State football team to win year-in and year-out. BSU has lost just two regular season games under the tutelage of head coach Chris Petersen against Hawai’i and Washington. In that time Petersen and company have led the Broncos there has been a BCS victory and two

bowl season upsets against now non-automatic qualifier TCU (2008 Poinsettia Bowl; 1617) and Conference USA’s East Carolina (2007 Hawaii Bowl; 38-41). Now expectations are high again on the downswing of yet another possible unscathed regular season for the Broncos (9-0, 4-0 Western Athletic Conference). What many Bronco faithful and outside onlookers fail to remember is the difficulty of constructing an undefeated season. “Winning a lot. I do think people take that for granted,” Petersen said. “And I think it’s a lot harder than people would know. Just talking to some of our friend in the business, when they get a tight win they’ll just appreciate [that] these wins are so hard to get…We need to appreciate all the wins because they are hard to get. Sometimes it looks easy but most the time it’s not.” The 2008 regular season didn’t go unnoticed

by fans but did by the BCS. The Broncos could have gone to the Fiesta Bowl ahead of Ohio State, but the argument of the more marketable Buckeyes trumped BSU’s BCS bid. This season has panned out to be much more realistic in the eyes of analysts across the nation who are touting this to be the year two nonAQ – BSU and TCU – make their appearance in the post New Year’s football games. Sophomore quarterback Kellen Moore said there was a little less pressure to win because they are more understanding of themselves as athletes and their roles. “You sort of understand how the whole progression of the season goes,” Moore said. “Maybe since we’ve been here an extra year we’ve been a little tougher on ourselves just wanting to get that much better. I think it’s just been going really well. We’ve had a lot of success and we’re excited.” ESPN analysts Mark Schlabach and Bruce

Players to watch

Nathan Enderle

Junior Quarterback 6-5/227 The third year quarterback for the Vandals has emerged as a top-10 quarterback in the nation. Enderle 152.29 passer rating and has completed 62.2 percent of his passes with 15 touchdowns this season. He has a knack of finding the right receiver and constructing comebacks late in the game

Feldman both predict both TCU and BSU going to a BCS game. Schlabach has BSU against Florida at the Sugar Bowl and TCU against Iowa in the Fiesta Bowl. Feldman posted BSU against USC at the Fiesta Bowl and TCU against Georgia Tech in the Orange Bowl. The bowl projections are opinions only by both Feldman and Schlabach and change from week to week. But the Broncos must go undefeated to reach this pinnacle moment that many analysts expect with two non-AQ BCS busters on the verge of making history. Boise State has four game remaining on their schedule with Idaho and Nevada both posing big threats. The Broncos meet the Wolf Pack at Bronco Stadium Nov. 27 and the Vandals this Saturday, Nov. 14, at Bronco Stadium. Kickoff is at 1:30 p.m. MT against UI. ARBITER FILE PHOTOS

Shiloh Keo Junior Safety 5-11/211 This standout defensive threat leads Idaho with 95 tackles. He adds to his stats with three interceptions and one forced fumble. He is a constant barrier to teams who get past the Vandals’ first line of defense.

Max Komar

Senior Wide Receiver 5-11/202 Komar has become Enderle’s favorite target to score a touchdown. He leads the Vandals with 54 receptions this season for 874 yards this season. He averages 16.2 yards per catch with an average of 87.4 yards per game.

Demaundray Woolridge

Senior Running Back 5-9/241 This big back has become a favorite when approaching the end zone with 14 rushing touchdowns. He rarely moves backward when handed the ball with 651 total yards this season. He averages 65.1 yards per game while sharing carries with fellow runningbacks Princeton McCarty and Deonte Jackson.


ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2009

The rivalry renewed:

BCS Standings

Boise State and Idaho ready to rumble KIRK BELL Editor This week marks the most exciting Boise State (9-0, 4-0 Western Athletic Conference) vs. University of Idaho (7-3, 4-2 WAC) football match-up in recent history. The last time the Vandals played close to the Broncos was 2003 at Moscow, Idaho where the Vandals held the Broncos to just 24 points, losing by just two touchdowns, 24-10. The last time the Vandals beat the Broncos was 1998 at Bronco Stadium in an overtime showdown, 35-36. Vandals’ head coach Robb Akey started the week with a comment during the weekly WAC teleconference that may have given the Broncos a little more inspiration for rivalry week. “I want to be the least popular individual with all the WAC administrators after we get done on Saturday,” Akey said. “Because if we take care of business then there’s not going to be a BCS bowl for the Boise State and no BCS money coming to the conference.” Since the Vandals have found a groove and knack for the comeback, the fans – as well as the Broncos – have something more than what has shown to be a disappointing rivalry over the past few years to look forward to. “I always think it adds a little more to it when both teams are in bowl situations and are having a lot of success. It will just add to it and it will be pretty cool,” BSU sophomore quarterback Kellen Moore said. The Broncos have noticed a stronger showing of Vandal fans coming out of the woodwork with the recent success. The display of black and gold pride has become more common with their recent success. “You actually start to see more Vandals fans coming out now,” Broncos’ junior wide receiver Austin Pettis said. “I didn’t know that a lot of my friends were a little bit Vandals fans…A couple more coming out and rooting for the Vandals this weekend. We’ll see. It’s always fun when you’ve got people going against you.”

Never downplayed for the Broncos

Even with the Broncos dominating the rivalry, it is never an overlooked on the calendar. BSU athletes get up for the game every year, noticing a different feel and excitement that might not otherwise show during other opponents. “They always play us tough,” Moore said of past contests. “Now I think that everyone else

Broncos’ cornerback Kyle Wilson deflects a pass to Vandals receiver Max Komar during their 2007 meeting at Bronco Stadium. Both players will meet for the last time this weekend at Bronco Stadium for the annual in-state rivalry game will be aware that they’re going to give us their best shot. They’ll be playing well.” Moore and the rest of the BSU squad noticed in past meetings that there is a mystique about rivalry week that makes each team put its best foot forward. Broncos’ junior safety Jeron Johnson has taken notice to the recent boom from up north. “It’s always exciting when you play in a rivalry game,” Johnson said. “I don’t care if they haven’t won a game in thirty years. If they were to come in here on a rivalry day, they’re going to give us their best shot. It just adds a little bit to it that they’re way better than what I’ve seen since I’ve been here the past four years. So it’s going to be a good game.”

Broncos following the rivalry

Some of the Broncos are a little more aware due to being close to or residents of the state. Head coach Chris Petersen heard of the rivalry being just as driven – if not more so – than the annual “Civil War,” in Oregon between the Ducks and the Beavers of Oregon State during his time with the UO program. Local product from Meridian Tyler Shoemaker, BSU sophomore wide receiver,

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MCT

grew up around the rivalry. “For as long as I can remember it’s been a big game…Idaho every year is a big game,” Shoemaker said. “It’s good to have that background to see the rivalry that’s grown.” Moore was fortunate enough to have former Bronco Dan Gore as a neighbor and heard about the rivalry before coming the Boise. Prosser is just 175 miles from Moscow, making the rivalry geographically noticeable.

Looking back – scores from past games 2008 – Moscow – Broncos 45 Vandals 10 2007 – Boise – Broncos 58 Vandals 14 2006 – Moscow – Broncos 42 Vandals 26 2005 – Boise – Broncos 70 Vandals 35 2004 – Boise – Broncos 65 Vandals 7 2003 – Moscow – Broncos 24 Vandals 10 2002 – Boise – Broncos 38 Vandals 10 2001 – Pullman – Broncos 45 Vandals 13 2000 – Boise – Broncos 66 Vandals 24 1999 – Pullman – Broncos 45 Vandals 14 1998 – Boise – Broncos 35 Vandals 36 (OT) 1997 – Moscow – Broncos 30 Vandals 23 1996 – Boise – Broncos 19 Vandals 64

Rank Team AVG. 1 Florida .9842 2 Alabama .9516 3 Texas .9234 4 TCU .8620 5 Cincinnati .8580 6 Boise State .8126 7 Georgia Tech .7552 8 LSU .6138 9 USC .5922 10 Iowa .5745 11 Ohio State .5733 12 Pittsburgh .5628 13 Oregon .5318 14 Miami FL .4712 15 Houston .4691 16 Utah .4003 17 Arizona .3363 18 Penn State .3350 19 Oklahoma State .2909 20 Wisconsin .2334 21 Virginia Tech .2331 22 Brigham Young .1236 23 Oregon State .1231 24 South Florida .1084 25 West Virginia .0653

CR 1 2 5 4 3 6 7 8 11 9 13 13 10 12 16 20 15 20 22 19 17 25 18 23 26

USA Today Poll Rank Team

Record Points

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

9-0 9-0 9-0 9-0 9-0 9-0 9-1 8-2 8-1 7-2 7-2 8-1 9-1 8-1 7-2 7-2 8-2 7-2 6-2 7-2 6-3 7-2 7-2 6-2 7-3

Florida48 Texas4 Alabama7 TCU Cincinnati Boise State Georgia Tech Ohio State Pittsburgh USC LSU Houston Iowa Utah Miami FL Oregon Penn State Oklahoma State Arizona Wisconsin Virginia Tech Brigham Young West Virginia South Florida Auburn

1460 1399 1389 1262 1224 1200 1118 944 940 847 838 766 757 688 685 665 552 530 472 341 268 216 121 106 80


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ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12,2009

Vandals Defense Jeromy Jones

Shiloh Keo

Senior 6-0/200

Junior 5-10/214

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6

Robert Siavii

Tre’Shawn Robinson

JoJo Dickson

Sophomore 6-2/195

Sophomore 5-11/243

Junior 6-1/215

1

Kenny Patten

23 Sophmore 5-9/183

Hank Bryant

Jonah Sataraka

Michael Cosgrove

Aaron Lavarias

Sophomore 6-3/222

Junior 6-2/265

Sophomore 6-4/265

Junior 6-3/262

58

4

Junior 5-11/170

99

93

Will Lawrence

Thomas Byrd

Kevin Sapien

Garrett Pendergast

Sophomore 6-6/293

Junior 6-2/293

Sophmore 5-11/284

Junior 6-4/286

Sophmore 6-4/271

59

66

62

57

Kellen Moore

11 Sophmore 6-0/187

Richie Brockel

Isaac Butts

27 Junior 6-0/195

95

Nate Potter

73

Titus Young

34

51

Austin Pettis

2

Junior 6-3/201

Tommy Gallarda

85 Junior 6-5/249

Jeremy Avery

40 27 Broncos Offense

Bosie State Roster

Senior 6-2/240

No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

NAME Kyle Wilson Austin Pettis Chris Potter Titus Young Jason Robinson D.J. Harper Mike Coughlin George Iloka Mike Tamburo Jerrell Gavins Kellen Moore Brandyn Thompson Garcia Day Joe Southwick Cedric Febis Winston Venable Aaron Burks Josh Borgman Mitch Burroughs Jamar Taylor Doug Martin Jeron Johnson Malcolm Johnson

POS CB WR WR WR S RB QB S QB CB QB CB S QB DB S WR CB WR DB RB S RB

WT 186 201 161 170 194 198 212 207 183 171 187 180 204 182 197 223 186 169 188 193 201 194 181

HT CLASS 5’10 Sr. 6’3 Jr. 5’9 Fr. 5’11 Jr. 5’11 Jr. 5’9 Jr. 6’5 Jr. 6’3 So. 5’11 Fr. 5’9 Unk 6’0 So. 5’10 Jr. 6’1 Sr. 6’1 Fr. 6’3 So. 5’11 Jr. 6’2 Fr. 5’7 Fr. 5’9 Fr. 5’11 So. 5’9 So. 5’11 Jr. 5’10 Fr.

No. 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

NAME Hunter White Matt Kaiserman Jeremy Avery Jarvis Hodge Tyler Jackson Travis Stanaway Antwon Murray Andy Silsby Tommy Smith Kirby Moore Kyle Brotzman Aaron Tevis Ebenezer Makinde Raphiel Lambert Drew Wright Richie Brockel Kharyee Marshall Matt Wilson Ricky Tjong-A-Tjoe Allen Mooney Daron Mackey Michael Choate Dan Paul

Junior 5-9/173

POS LB RB RB RB S DB CB RB LB WR PK LB CB CB FB TE DE LB DT LB LB WR LB

WT 224 188 173 203 203 188 177 221 218 196 201 228 164 200 188 240 207 212 282 211 233 190 241

HT CLASS 5’11 So. 6’0 Fr. 5’9 Jr. 5’9 Jr. 6’0 Fr. 5’11 So. 5’11 So. 5’11 Sr. 6’1 Fr. 6’2 Fr. 5’10 Jr. 6’3 So. 5’11 Fr. 5’7 Fr. 5’9 Fr. 6’2 Sr. 6’1 Fr. 6’1 So. 6’3 Fr. 5’10 Fr. 5’10 Jr. 6’0 Sr. 6’0 So.

No. 48 49 50 52 53 54 56 57 58 59 61 62 64 65 66 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77

NAME J.C. Percy Brad Elkin J.P. Nisby Derrell Acrey Zach Gholson Michael Ames John Michael Davis Garrett Pendergast Dave Wilson Will Lawrence Joe Kellogg Kevin Sapien Brenel Myers Matt Paradis Thomas Byrd Zach Waller Cory Yriarte Matt Slater Nate Potter Tom Swanson Faraji Wright Jake Broyles Spencer Gerke

POS LB P DT LB DE OL LB OL LB OL OG OG OG DT C OL OL OT OL OL OT OL OL

WT 214 201 306 235 248 281 210 271 222 293 305 286 267 275 284 289 281 290 293 273 284 257 290

HT CLASS 6’0 Fr. 6’2 Jr. 6’1 So. 6’1 Jr. 6’2 Fr. 6’4 Fr. 6’0 Fr. 6’4 So. 6’1 So. 6’2 Jr. 6’2 Fr. 6’4 Jr. 6’2 Fr. 6’1 Fr. 5’11 So. 6’5 So. 6’1 So. 6’4 Jr. 6’6 So. 6’6 Fr. 6’3 Fr. 6’4 Fr. 6’3 Fr.

No. 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

NAME Charles Leno Bronson Burrant Kyle Efaw Nick Alexander Geraldo Hiwat Sean King Jimmy Pavel Tommy Gallarda Trevor Petterson Gabe Linehan Chandler Koch Tyler Shoemaker Billy Winn Greg Grimes Chuck Hayes Shea McClellin Justin Jungblut Byron Hout Darren Koontz Jarrell Root Chase Baker Ryan Winterswyk Michael Atkinson

POS OT OG TE DE WR TE PK TE TE TE TE WR DT DT DT DE DT DE DT DE DT DE DT

WT 249 266 229 237 189 240 212 249 245 213 244 207 288 271 290 262 241 241 254 259 296 263 332

HT CLASS 6’3 Fr. 6’3 Fr. 6’4 So. 6’4 Fr. 6’4 Fr. 6’3 Jr. 5’9 Fr. 6’5 Jr. 6’2 Fr. 6’3 Fr. 6’2 Fr. 6’1 So. 6’4 So. 6’0 Fr. 6’2 So. 6’3 So. 6’4 Fr. 6’0 So. 6’3 Fr. 6’3 So. 6’1 So. 6’4 Jr. 6’0 Fr.


ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12,2009

Broncos Defense 23 8 Jeron Johnson

17 Junior 5-11/223

13 1

Junior 6-6/188

Sophmore 6-3/207

Aaron Tevis

Daron Mackey

Sophmore 6-3/228

Junior 6-1/235

36

Brandyn Thompson

Eric Greenwood

George Iloka

Junior 5-11/194

Winston Venable

Junior 5-10/180

45

Kyle Wilson

Ryan Winterswyk

Billy Winn

Chase Baker

Shea McClellin

Junior 6-4/263

Sophmore 6-4/288

Sophmore 6-1/296

Sophmore 6-3/262

98

90

97

Peter Pjorvik

Mike Iupati

Irv Stevens

Adam Juratovac

Bryce Sinclair

Senior 5-10/198

Senior 6-4/310

Senior 6-7/298

Senior 6-3/274

Senior 6-3/299

Senior 6-5/325

70

77

69

1

Senior 5-10/186

92

Max Komar

22

5

62

Preston Davis

79

Dean Rogers

35

7

Sophomore 6-1/191

Junior 6-2/250

Nathan Enderle

10 Junior 6-3/220

DeMaundray Woolridge

23 Vandals Offense Idaho Roster

Senior 5-9/241

No. 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 5 5 6 6 7 8 10 10 11 12 12 13 14 15 16 18

NAME Eric Greenwood Robert Siavii Kenneth Patten Maurice Shaw Deonte’ Jackson Korey Toomer Eric Hunter Jared Heston Shelton Miles Corey White Robert Hatchett III Jeromy Jones Preston Davis Kama Bailey Nathan Enderle Shiloh Keo Troy Vital Quin Ashley Taylor Davis Bobby Cowan Brian Reader Marsel Posey Derek Todd Cameron Charles

POS HT WR 6-6 LB 6-2 CB 5-9 WR 6-3 RB 5-8 LB 6-2 CB 5-8 LB 6-1 CB 5-9 RB 5-9 CB 5-9 S 6-1 WR 6-1 RB 5-9 QB 6-5 S 5-11 RB 6-1 S 5-11 QB 6-3 QB 6-5 QB 6-3 WR 5-10 QB 5-11 CB 6-1

WT 213 209 178 208 190 215 158 220 175 195 168 200 191 200 227 211 212 183 202 221 220 166 185 192

CLASS Jr. So. So. Jr. Jr. Jr. Jr. Fr. So. So. Fr. Sr. So. So. Jr. Jr. So. Jr. Fr. Fr. So. So. Fr. Fr.

No. 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 25 26 27 28 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 37 38 39 40 42

NAME Justin Hernandez Princeton McCarty Trey Farquhar Max Komar DeMaundray Woolridge Virdell Larkins Quincy Turner Ryan Young Brandon Artz Isaac Butts Josh Bigler Devon Sturdivant Denzell Wedgeworth Kyle Kerfoot Jeffrey Bediako Andre Robinson Conrad Scheidt Joseph Dickson Jesse Donez Shawn Tucker Brennett Rodseth Christian Whitehead Henry Asuega Paul Senescall

POS HT WR 5-8 RB 5-8 K 6-1 WR 5-11 RB 5-9 S 6-1 CB 5-8 S 5-11 S 5-10 S 6-1 CB 6-1 RB 5-11 WR 5-10 WR 5-7 LB 6-3 CB 6-1 LB 6-1 LB 6-2 CB 5-9 CB 5-9 CB 5-9 CB 5-9 DT 6-1 LB 6-1

WT 203 190 170 202 241 191 178 193 188 179 207. 216 192 159 228 190 219 229 156 164 178 151 276 229

CLASS Fr. So. Fr. Sr. Sr. Sr. Fr. Fr. Jr. Jr. Fr. Sr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Jr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr Jr.

No. 43 44 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 54 55 57 59 60 61 62 63 65 66 67 68 69

NAME Fonomanu Sekona Faleaoga Faumui Kyle Steverman Marshall Pirtz Zach Ingraham Ben Garnett Augusto Sussi John McKinley Tyler Brooks Tre’Shawn Robinson Derek Wieting Brad Marboe Andre Ferguson Justin Green Isaiah Lavea Kai Jensen Tevita Halaholo Adam Juratovac Ronald Mallory Christopher Ramos Kurt Newboles Tyrone Novikoff Guy Reynolds Jr. Irvin Stevens III

POS HT DT 6-2 DT 6-1 TE 6-6 LB 6-1 S 6-5 LB 5-10 WR 5-10 LB 6-1 LB 6-1 LB 5-11 DE 5-11 LB 6-4 LB 6-3 DE 6-2 DT 6-2 OL 6-5 OL 6-5 OL 6-3 OL 6-7 OL 5-11 OL 6-7 OL 6-7 OL 6-3 OL 6-3

WT 280 285 246 243 176 232 183 225 225 233 222 198 225 208 298 262 342 306 288 268 302 308 331 277

CLASS Jr. Sr. Jr. So. Fr. Fr. So. So. So. So. So. Fr. So. Fr. Fr. Jr. Jr. Sr. Fr. Jr. Jr. So. Fr. Sr.

No. 70 71 73 74 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 91 92 93 94 95 96 99

NAME Matt Cleveland Clell Hasenbank Bilal Liggins Jordan Johnson Mike Iupati Bryan Wilson Bryce Sinclair Michael LaGrone Taylor Elmo Patrick Mealey Landon Weaver Kevin Small Clayton Homme Kellen Beam Daniel Micheletti Daniel Hardy Peter Bjorvik Vince Keener John Novak Michael Cosgrove Larry Dugan Aaron Lavarias Charles Smith, Jr Jonah Sataraka

POS HT OL 6-4 OL 6-1 OL 6-3 OL 6-7 OL 6-6 DT 6-4 OL 6-5 TE 6-2 RB 6-3 TE 6-2 WR 5-11 TE 6-3 TE 6-5 TE 6-7 TE 6-3 WR 6-4 TE 6-4 DE 6-4 K 6-1 DT 6-4 DT 6-2 DE 6-3 DE 6-6 DE 6-2

WT 314 278 267 336 330 297 322 223 232 198 182 258 202 262 212 235 245 230 204 280 309 248 249 280

CLASS So. Jr. So. Fr. Sr. Fr. Sr. Fr. Fr. Fr. So. Sr. Fr. Jr. Fr. Jr. Sr. Fr. Fr. So. Fr. Jr. So. Jr.


6

ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2009

Broncos strive for consistency TRENT LOOTENS Producer

The Broncos inability to put together a complete game this season has the team reeling for answers, but if there was ever a time to time to do it, a game against rival Idaho would be ideal. Boise State 9-0 (4-0 Western Athletic Conference) possesses the No. 2 scoring offense in the nation and still has to answer questions about why they can’t score in the red zone. Their red zone efficiency is No. 43 nationally after converting on 43of-51 trips this season for an 84 percent average. Missed field goals and turnovers inside the red zone when they’ve had opportunities to put opponents away has haunted BSU since their first drive of the season against Oregon. “I can’t quite figure our team out in terms of how we play in spurts,” Boise State head coach Chris Petersen said. “If we can do some better things in the red zone and on the goal line we’ll make things a lot easier for ourselves.” BSU faces a different challenge than expected when the year began against the Idaho Vandals 7-3 (4-2 WAC). The Vandals’ offensive is explosive and has big play capability with multiple receivers and running backs who all contribute. BSU has to score points this weekend and convert their red zone opportunities to keep the pressure on the Vandals. Short yardage situations have also been troubling for BSU recently. They failed to convert on two third-and-one plays against Louisiana Tech last week that have put the Broncos’ run game in question. “When you play offensive football like we do that’s a big part of what we want to do,” Petersen said frustratingly. “It’s makes the game very difficult when we’re not running the ball like we want to.” Sophomore quarter back and Heisman Trophy candidate Kellen Moore still leads the nation in passing efficiency and trails by a single touchdown for the post passing TD’s by any college quarterback with 27. Case Keenum leads the country with 28 TD’s. Moore has only throw three interceptions this season for a 9-to-1 average per touchdowns thrown. Establishing the run doesn’t seem to happen for BSU until the second half of games. That’s a problem for the Broncos because it hurts their play-action-passing capabilities. If Idaho realizes BSU can’t run at any point in the game they’re likely to bring more blitzes, forcing Moore to throw with less time. If Idaho brings blitzes they’re likely to put their cornerbacks on an island against surging wide receiver Austin Pettis, who has developed into Moore’s go-to weapon when situations get tight. “He’s a reliable guy that consistently makes big plays in clutch situations. He’s a guy you can trust and go to at any time,” Moore said. Idaho’s pass defense is suspect at best, ranking No. 104 in the nation. Look for the Broncos to exploit Idaho’s weakness in that category as they given up over 254 yards per game through the air and 20 TD’s. “If we can’t run the ball we have no problem throwing it every down. We got a good guy to be able to do that,” Petersen said.

Boise State head coach Chris Petersen looks on during BSU’s homecoming game against UC Davis.

PHOTO BY JOSH JOSH RASMUSSEN/THE RASMUSSEN/THE ARBITER ARBITER


ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2009

7

BSU secondary prepared for stiff test TRENT LOOTENS Proucer

daho doesn’t try to hide who they are and Boise State is well aware of it. The Vandals have lived on the edge all season by coming back to win games late in the fourth quarter thanks to an experienced offensive group that puts up points in a hurry. For Idaho, it all starts with their offensive line led by senior guard Mike Iupati. Iupati is 6’6” 330 pounds and is the building block for an o-line that averages over 300 pounds. “He is very good. I think he’s in the Ryan Clady mold,” Boise State head coach Chris Petersen said. “I think it’s one of the better offensive lines we come across so far.” Offensively, the Vandals thrive off their triple-back combination of DeMaundray Woolridge, Princeton McCarty, and Deonte’ Jackson. Woolridge leads the group with 652 rushing yards and 14 touchdowns, while the other two have combined for 884 yards, but only four TD’s. “They start with their run game. We want to shut that down and make them one-dimensional so they have to throw the ball,” BSU senior defensive back Kyle Wilson said. Idaho’s run compliments their newly acquired air attack well. Junior quarterback Nathan Enderle has thrown for 2,404 yards this season and 15 TD’s and uses his brigade of receivers to their fullest potential. Senior wide receiver Max Komar leads Idaho with 874 yards receiving and eight TD’s receptions. Komar utilizes great hands, has a knack for getting open and works well out of the slot. “He’s (Komar) kind of a Vinny Peretta guy from them like he was for us,” Petersen said. His accompanying cast is stacked with playmakers like Daniel Hardy, Maurice Shaw, and Eric Greenwood. Greenwood stands 6’6” and has given opposing defenses trouble all year due to his towering height. Hardy and Shaw both posses deep threat capabilities and are very hard to cover one-on-one. “They take a good amount of shots downfield,”Wilson said. “That will give us defensive backs a lot of chances to make plays. We’ll just try to take them out of their comfort zone.” Idaho faces a tough decision coming into this weeks game, though. Enderle injured his rotator cuff in his throwing shoulder two weeks ago against Louisiana Tech. He did not play last week against Fresno State and the Vandals lost the game 31-21 - Idaho was down 24-0 at the half. Enderle’s replacement, sophomore Brian Reader, got better as the game went on and nearly led Idaho back from another deficit against the FSU. It’s apparent, though, that Idaho’s offense struggled without Enderle and didn’t play to the level it had in previous games with Enderle under center. “It’s obvious they have a lot of confidence in Reader,”Petersen said of both Idaho quarterbacks. “They feel very confident about his talent. Enderle has been playing really well and at a high level, his numbers back it up. They coach him really well and allow him to get the ball out of his hands.” BSU has won 10 consecutive games due to Idaho’s sluggish quarterback play, but BSU junior safety Jeron Johnson doesn’t think that matters coming into this weeks showdown. “I don’t care if they haven’t won a game in 30 years, they come in here on a rivalry day they’re going to give us their best shot. Their whole offense is playing with confidence. It’s going to be a good challenge for us this week,” Johnson said.

Boise State juniors Jeron Johnson and Brandyn Thompson prepare for their game earlier in the season against UC Davis.

JOSH RASMUSSEN/THE ARBITER


8

ARBITERONLINE.COM

THURDAY, NOVEMBER 12,2009

Go to arbiteronline to see extended coverage of the game.


November 12, 2009