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The Fordham Ram Serving The Fordham University Community Since 1918 Volume 95, Issue 15

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October O b 22, 2013

The Search for Spring Weekend Artist(s) Begins Local Community Celebrates

Hispanic Heritage Month By KRIS VENEZIA STAFF WRITER

ELIZABETH ZANGHI/THE RAM

Last year’s Spring Weekend concert featured Grouplove and Andy Grammer, a lineup that was generally well-received.

By ANDREW MORSE CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The Spring Weekend concert survey was sent out last week and, as always, it has created a buzz around campus. The survey is composed mostly of lesser-known alternative rock artists, but features a few prominent acts such as Cage the El-

ephant and The Goo Goo Dolls. Debate will continue from now until the Campus Activities Board and faculty make the official announcement of which artists are booked. However, students must take into account that the artists’ availability, budgetary concerns and the appropriateness of the music, as these all factor into the final

College Dems and Reps Face Off in Heated Debate By KATIE MEYER ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

On Thursday of last week, Fordham’s College Democrats and Republicans faced off in Flom Auditorium for their first debate of the semester. The issues under contention were Syrian intervention, current economic policies, possible voter ID laws and the Affordable Care Act. Rev. Bentley Anderson, S.J., associate professor of African and African American studies at Fordham, moderated the debate. The debate followed the same format that has been used at Fordham in the past. For each topic, both speakers were allowed two minutes for opening remarks. They then engaged in six minutes of back-andforth debate, followed by a threein this issue

OpinionPage 7 Obama Unfolds Ambitious Climate Change Resolution

Arts

Page 13

With Bloody Finale, “Breaking Bad” on the Path to TV Pantheon

Sports

Page 24

Football Beats St. Francis (Penn.) to Remain Undefeated

minute period in which the audience was allowed to ask questions. The debate concludes with one minute of closing statements from each representative. Each debate continues for roughly 10 to 15 minutes. Before the debate started, Anderson made a point of noting that the debate was to be kept friendly at all times. “We will not imitate television. The debaters, the presenters, the question and answer folks, everyone will be civil,” Anderson said. “If you’re not,” he continued, smiling, “I will cut you off at the knees.” The participants in the debate generally followed Anderson’s directions, though there were a few heated moments between debaters. The first topic discussed was whether or not the U.S. should intervene in Syria. The Republicans, represented by Luke Zaro, FCRH ‘16, president of the College Republicans, argued against intervention, while the Democrats, represented by Anthony Carl, FCRH ’16, argued for it. The Democrats spoke first. Carl argued that the situation in Syria has escalated to the point that military intervention is quickly becoming the only option. The only reason to launch a military strike, said Carl, is if the Syrian government were using chemical weapons. Since that is the case, Carl argued that a strike is the best course of action. “The Assad regime has and will continue to use all means possible SEE DEBATE, PAGE 5

decision, according to CAB members. “The basic process is having the concert meeting, then the survey, analyzing the results, submitting the artist to administration for content approval, then going to our booking agent for pricing and availability,” said Patrick McCarren, GSB ’14, CAB’s concert SEE CAB, PAGE 2

Fordham University students at Rose Hill’s campus do not need to add another class onto their schedule to learn the history of Latin influence in the area just outside the school’s gates. The Bronx County Historical Society has a collection of artifacts, including photographs and news clippings, which depict numerous stories about the Hispanic community in the Bronx. The collection contains a poster from Herman Badillo, the first Puerto Rican-born Bronx borough president who served from 1966-1970. After leaving this post, Badillo continued to represent the Bronx in Congress as a United States Representative from 1971-1977. Another part of the collection contains some history of Fordham University, which used to be known as St. John’s University until a name change in 1907. There is a list of baseball players who participated in a club ball team at

St. John’s. Many of those players came from Cuban, Puerto Rican and Dominican descent. National Hispanic Heritage Month runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. President Lyndon Johnson planted the seeds for Hispanic Heritage Month when he put Hispanic Heritage Week into effect in 1968. The week turned into a month when President Ronald Reagan made National Hispanic Heritage Month a law in August of 1988. Angel Hernandez, educator for the Bronx County Historical Society, has been working on the collection of artifacts for two years. He said in the early to mid20th century, Puerto Ricans were moved to the Bronx for a better life, and today, other Hispanic immigrants from the Dominican Republic, Cuba and Mexico continue to move to the area. “The Bronx was used as an incubator for immigrants because they come here penniless and then all of a sudden [immigrants] are owning their own businesses, SEE MUSEUM, PAGE 2

Professor’s Novel Depicts the Realities of Street Life By EDDIE MIKUS STAFF WRITER

While Fordham professors are no strangers to the task of writing and publishing books, one faculty member recently branched into a form far more different than the scholarly works usually associated with professors. Mark Naison, professor of history and African American studies, recently co-authored a novel titled Pure Bronx, which will hit stores in e-book form on Oct. 15 and will receive a print release in November. “It’s a book about two young people who are living in the Bronx, supporting their families through activities that many people regard as disreputable,” Naison said. “The young man is a drug dealer and part-time car thief. The young woman works at a strip club. They both support their mothers, their siblings and feel that, given their education levels and where they are, this is the only way they can do it by doing things which most of society looks down on. And then it’s like a crime novel. They decide to kidnap her client at the strip club and hold him for ransom, and then the whole story kind of takes off from there.” When asked how he came up with the novel, Naison explained that it was part of a genre which details the hardships of street life. “The idea is that there was this whole new form of popular fiction which started in the late 1990s,” Naison said. “Most of the books were written by people in prison

QINRUI HUA/THE RAM

Fordham professor Mark Naison’s novel, Pure Bronx, will be released Oct. 15.

about their lives in the drug business, in the underground drug business and in jail. They’re books that are not widely known by the general public, but sold enough so that you could find large numbers of them in the bookstores.” As such, Naison came up with idea of assigning the hip-hop and street literature class he was teaching to write one of these novels. “We decided to do a course that looked at this form of popular fiction, alongside of hip-hop because they came from basically the same neighborhoods,” Naison said. “So I gave a challenge to the class: Why don’t we write a book of our own in this genre? And I was taken

up on the challenge by a young woman in the class named Melissa Castillo-Garsow, who was a creative writing student at Fordham and an aspiring novelist and poet. So I made up this male character, Khalil, and she made up this female character, Rasheeda. And we just started writing back and forth. And then after we got about a hundred pages, we showed it to some people and they said, ‘You know, you could get this published.’” Naison also described the process of collaboration between him and Castillo-Garsow, who is now an American studies Ph.D. student at Yale University. SEE NAISON, PAGE 3


NEWS

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SECURITY BRIEFS Sept. 22 Rose Hill Gym An unknown person removed a TV cable connected to a DVD player from the women’s volleyball locker room. There was no forced entry or damage. Security is still investigating. Sept. 26 Fordham Road 9:30 a.m. A student on the rowing team was running west on Fordham Road and tried to cross the street during a green light. The student was struck by a car but not seriously injured. The driver left the car, yelled at the student and fled the scene. Security and NYPD are still investigating. Sept. 26 188th St. and Lorillard Pl. 6:50 a.m. A female student was inappropriately touched and grabbed by an unknown male who later fled the scene. The student was unharmed and NYPD responded. Sept. 27 Arthur Ave. 3:45 p.m. A female student was accosted by an approximately 15-year-old female who grabbed her by the hair and demanded her phone. The student screamed and the girl ran away, leaving the student unharmed and NYPD investigating to no avail. Sept. 28 Arthur Ave. 1:30 a.m. A female student standing outside Mugz’s bar was punched by another female, who said, “just think about that.” The student fell to the ground and was scraped on her shoulder and cheek. It is unknown if the other female was a Fordham student. Sept. 28 Fordham Rd. and Arthur Ave. 11:30 p.m. A student standing near a dumpster was shoved against the dumpster by an unknown man. He suffered a small laceration on his head and was treated at St. Barnabas Hospital. Sept. 29 188th St. and Lorillard Pl. 12:30 a.m. A male student was assaulted and received a lump on the side of his head. He was treated at St. Barnabas Hospital. The student had not reported details. Security is investigating the case. Sept. 29 Belmont Ave. 2:20 a.m. A student attended a house party and a few local individuals knocked on the door providing a description of the student in question. The student went outside with them and the individuals in question yelled at the student, punched him in the face and head and fled in a car with a New York license plate. Security responded and the student’s roommate called 911 and took him to the hospital. The student was not seriously injured. The NYPD is still investigating. —Complied by Katie Meyer, Assistant News Editor

October 2, 2013

Finances, Song Content, Concerns for Adminstrators FROM CAB, PAGE 2

co-chair. Booking an artist is a long process and depends on a lot of external factors. Big name performers often have their tours and festival schedules planned out well in advance. Even if a preferred artist is available on the dates of Spring Weekend, his or her recent scheduling may not make a performance at Fordham feasible. Budgetary concerns also limit who CAB and the administration can realistically bring to campus. When asked about his expectations for this year’s Spring Weekend concert, McCarren said, “I would love to see a big name artist at Fordham, but students need to remember the size of our school and the limit of our budget. We do not have an arena and cannot charge outside people. It would not make economic sense for an artist who is capable of selling out Madison Square Garden to perform on campus. The student body is not large enough to warrant the same type of artist as a larger state school.” Fordham is unique in the fact that the artist’s reputation and lyrical content are significant factors when considering who will be offered an opportunity to perform on campus. “People love to complain about not having rap artists, but this is what you sign up for coming to a

MICHAEL REZIN/THE RAM

Budgetary constraints, appropriate lyrical content and artist reputation all factor into booking Spring Weekend artists.

Jesuit school,” said McCarren. Controversial and gritty lyrics, which garner publicity for many well-known artists, dissuade Fordham administrators from allowing them to perform for the student body. Students must also take into consideration the fluctuations of the music industry as a whole. The release of a new single or album could push a potential Spring Weekend performer out of Fordham’s price range between now and the event. “A band like Of Monsters and Men was on the survey last year and this year is way out of our

budget,” McCarren said. “It’s just the way it works and there’s not much we can do about it.” CAB faced a similar dilemma during Spring Weekend of the 2011-2012 school year. Foster the People had been booked; however, their single Pumped up Kicks ascended to the top of the Billboard charts after the booking. Their newfound popularity resulted in an increase in price and new tours, which caused a scheduling conflict. CAB and faculty were left to find a new act at the last minute. When asked about specifics for this year’s performance, McCar-

ren was not able to give any definitive answers, but he is optimistic that CAB will once again book a quality show. “As far as genre of performer, I don’t think we are leaning towards any one specific genre, but definitely something that will fit the setting and that people will enjoy,” McCarren said. “Typically, it has been rock/alternative bands, but we are definitely open to other options.” CAB and Fordham administration will be working diligently over the next couple months to find an artist who will be both enjoyable and appropriate for stu-

Historical Society Creates Memories with Artifacts, Photos FROM MUSEUM, PAGE 1

making money, taking care of their families and they’re moving on,” Hernandez said. “The Bronx is like this model for immigrants to achieve the American dream, and that’s what Latinos are still doing today.” Hernandez said he is trying to paint a picture of the Bronx that explains the history and culture of the borough. “My job is to highlight that and to give people, not only New Yorkers, but the world, this new view of the Bronx,” he said. Data from the United States Census in 2010 shows that 53 percent of residents living in the Bronx are of Hispanic descent, which is compared to about 14 percent of Fordham University students who have Latin heritage. Nevin Kulangara, GSB ’15, comes from an Indian back-

KRIS VENEZIA/THE RAM

Diversity has been on the rise at Fordham, both ethnically and geographically.

ground. Both of his parents were born in the city of Kottayam, located in the southwestern part of the country. He said he has met people from all over the world in his few years at Fordham. “The diversity has been getting better over the years [at Fordham University], not just from an eth-

nic but also a geographic standpoint.” Kulangara said. “[Fordham University] has representation from more states across the country like Hawaii and Arizona, and the Fordham brand is making its name across the nation and all over the world.” Kulangara is the president and founder of the National Associa-

tion of Black Accountants chapter at Fordham University. He said while he lives off campus, he wants to have more communication with other Bronx residents. “I am a member of the community just like everyone else who lives on Lorillard Place,” Kulangara said. “But I don’t interact often with people off campus, except maybe when I go to Best Deli over the weekend.” Fordham students still have time to come visit the exhibit at the Bronx County Historical Society, as the exhibit is currently on display. Bronx residents interested in the history of Hispanic influence in the borough can also come to Angel Hernandez’s presentation titled “History of the Bronx Latino,” which will be held on Oct. 2 at 6:30 p.m.

This Week at Fordham Thursday Oct. 3 USG Town Hall on Activities Fee Campbell Commons, 5:30 p.m. The United Student Government (USG) and Budget Committee are proposing an increase in the activities fee by $15 per semester to raise the funding available to clubs by $60,000. All questions related to this initiative will be discussed in the town hall.

Thursday - Sunday Oct. 3 - 6

Friday - Sunday Oct. 4 - 6

Wednesday Oct. 9

Legally Blonde

Family Weekend

Homerathon

Collins Auditorium, 8 p.m. (2 p.m. on Oct. 6)

University-Wide, All-Day

McGinley Lawn, Noon

Family Weekend consists of numerThe Mimes and Mummers is featurous events, the main feature being ing a production of Legally Blonde, the Fordham football game against based on the book written by AmanLehigh at noon on Saturday. Activida Brown. Tickets to the show are $5 ties and games for families, lunches, with a Fordham I.D. and $12 without dinners, masses and haunted tours a Fordham I.D. Opening night, howare among the many events held durever, is free of charge for all members ing the weekend. of the audience. For more campus events, visit FordhamRam.com

The Classics Department and ΗΣΦ Classics Honor Society are sponsoring a reading of Homer’s Odyssey from beginning to end. All students, regardless of major, are encouraged to attend the event.


NEWS

October 2, 2013

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FORDHAM IN THE BRONX Amid Endorsement, Dining Venues Pinstripes and Caf Swipes: Fordham and the Yankees University Goofs on Display for on Health Ranking

‘Awesome Week’

By CONNOR RYAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

In the heat of a high-profile endorsement, Fordham officials incorrectly publicized that the university was ranked number eight on a list of best colleges for mental health Tuesday afternoon. Fordham is among 30 other universities that have met the qualifications needed to earn a JedCampus Seal — a public nod of approval from the Jed Foundation, a nationwide advocacy group that works to promote mental health and suicide prevention, administrators announced Tuesday. But no schools were ranked as part of the announcement. Fordham was listed as number eight on an alphabetized list published as part of an article by USA Today. The Fordham Ram reported the error Tuesday afternoon, but a correction had not been made as of Tuesday night. The certification, which is valid for two years, is the first nationwide program dedicated to evaluating universities’ mental health support systems, according to the foundation. “The Jed Foundation wants to celebrate those schools that are working hard to support their student body — academically and emotionally — during a very critical time in their lives,” said Phil Satow, co-founder and board chair of the foundation, in a statement. Jeffrey Ng, director of Fordham’s Counseling and Psychological Services, expressed gratitude in a statement after the endorsement was announced. “The award recognizes Fordham’s comprehensive and unified approach to promoting student health and wellness, which is only made possible through the dedication, care and hard work of countless administrators, faculty, staff, students and departments across our campuses,” Ng said. New York University, Yale University and Georgetown University joined Fordham on the list of those who have earned a certification.

By GIRISH SWAMINATH ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

COURTESY OF FORDHAM UNIVERSITY

Fordham students frequently take advantage of the Rose Hill campus’ proximity to Yankee Stadium to attend games.

By JEFFREY COLTIN BRONX CORRESPONDENT

A short man in a Yankees hat walks across the diamond. The crowd cheers. “This guy is the biggest Yankee fan that you will ever meet,” the announcer praises. “And when he was growing up, he wanted to have one job: and that was to be the Yankee announcer.” That was July 1, 2009, and Rev. Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of the University was throwing out the first pitch at Yankee Stadium. McShane reeled back and tossed the ball to Yankees catcher Jorge Posada — a little high, but we’ve all seen much worse from men half his age. McShane then blessed Posada with the sign of the cross as the organ played the Hallelujah Chorus. Fordham University and the New York Yankees are two of the Bronx’s biggest brands. They are big employers, massive landholders and longstanding institutions. Both represent the borough on an international scale. And, both bring people to the Bronx who would never visit otherwise. One of those people is Vikram Bhatia, FCRH ’14. He says he would not be at Fordham if he were not a Yankees fan. Growing up in Texas with no affinity for the Yankees, Bhatia fell for the Bronx Bombers while on vacation in India. It was 4:30 in the morning, and he couldn’t sleep. Bhatia flipped on the TV and found a live Yankees game. He says he wasn’t

a big baseball fan, but the commentators and the theme music really caught his ear. That was in July 2007. “As I became a man, and not a child,” Bhatia said, “it became not about the theme music, but about winning baseball games, and I started to like the Yankees a lot.” Ever since then, Bhatia has been a Yankees superfan. He attends about 20 games a year and rocks a Yankees hat at all times — except when he’s at Mass, he’s quick to add. Bhatia went to his first game at Yankee Stadium when he came to the Bronx to check out Fordham. But, by then, the decision was made; “If the stadium’s here, the school doesn’t matter,” Bhatia said. Bhatia is not the only one who chose Rose Hill for the local baseball team. Kayla Lombardo, FCRH ’15, says Rose Hill’s proximity to Yankee Stadium was a huge reason she chose Fordham. She says her love for the Yankees is also the reason she plays softball. Last spring, Lombardo and the rest of the Fordham Rams softball team even got to see a Yankees spring training game during a road trip to Florida. Afterward, Yankee legend Reggie Jackson chatted with the team. It was an amazing experience for an aspiring sports journalist. “I want to write for the Yankees,” Lombardo said. “It’s like my dream job.” She chose Rose Hill because of its proximity to the stadium, and she loves how easy it is to follow her fa-

vorite team. Following the Yankees is not as easy for Nolan Silbernagel, FCRH ’14. In fact, it is a job. Silbernagel covers the Yankees for WFUV, Fordham’s radio station housed in Keating Hall. He and fellow Yankees beat reporter Mack Rosenberg, FCRH ’14, get full press access to every single Yankees home game. That means a seat in the press box and clubhouse access after the game to interview stars like Derek Jeter and Robinson Cano. “It’s definitely been a dream summer,” Silbernagel said. “Couldn’t imagine anything better.” Silbernagel has been a Yankees fan for as long as he can remember, but this is his first year covering the team. WFUV has been sending student reporters to games for 17 years. Although he is the youngest guy there, Silbernagel said he has never received any special treatment. “They don’t baby you, no one there’s gonna treat you like you’re a college kid. As far as they see, you’re from a competitive radio station.” Silbernagel said the only time Fordham is ever mentioned is when Michael Kay is around. Kay is a Fordham University graduate, FCRH ’82, and — as the Yankees’ TV play-byplay broadcaster — holds the very job that young Joey McShane wanted as a kid. McShane may have ended up working for another Bronx icon, but as a University spokesman pointed out, he has a perfect ERA of 0.00 at Yankee Stadium.

Pure Bronx Portrays Social Justice, Economic Inequalities FROM NAISON, PAGE 1

“I’d write a chapter in Khalil’s voice, and then Melissa would write back a chapter in Rasheeda’s voice,” Naison said. “So we would have fun. Sometimes at three in the morning, I’d send her a chapter, and at six in the morning I’d get a chapter back. This was all done on email.” While Naison stated that all street lit novels follow a prescribed formula, he also explained aspects that make his novel different from others in the genre. “If you are going to write within this formula, you have to have drugs, prison, violence and poverty,” Naison said. “Some books have a social justice message and some don’t. They’re a lot like hiphop. Some of them just glorify material success through violence and courage. We decided to add a social justice element.” Naison strived to make his book unique to New York. “Our book is set in the Bronx. We have something about gen-

trification, about economic inequality,” Naison said. “What we also have that a lot of the books don’t have is something about immigration. One of the characters is African-American, the other is West Indian. There’s a major character who is African, there’s a major character who is Puerto Rican, there’s a major character who’s from Honduras, so we show the ethnic diversity of the Bronx in the book, which not all of the books do. Some of them, it’s just the characters are almost all AfricanAmerican.” Additionally, Naison said Pure Bronx’s ending differentiates it from other books in the genre. “Not all of them have a happy ending,” Naison said. “Ours has a happy ending for the characters. They get the big score and they move their families out of the South Bronx, put their younger brothers and sisters in good schools and nice apartments. They win. And they get out of the ghetto and they don’t have to sell drugs or

strip anymore.” Naison himself served as the inspiration for one of the characters in the novel, something that came about at the suggestion of the street lit author Jihad Uhuru. “He read the book and said, ‘Why don’t you add a character who is a white black studies professor, who will help solve some of these problems?’” Naison said of Jihad. “So there is a character, who is loosely modeled on me, named Nelson Temple, who is a white black studies professor at Lehman, who can do all kinds of things like move money across borders, dispose of bodies. He ultimately helps the characters solve their problems and start a new life in Canada.” Naison also spoke about how writing a novel compared to writing a scholarly work. “It’s totally different because this comes entirely out of your head,” Naison said. “It’s like fantasy. There are no guidelines on how to do it. I was trained by a lot

of pretty famous professors about how to do research on how to write a scholarly article or a scholarly book. There’s protocols that I was taught that I use in the documentation, in the style, in the organization. None of that was there with me in the fiction.” When asked how the novel would be received, Naison said that the book would be entertaining, but would not qualify as a seminal American work. “People who have read it find it very entertaining,” Naison said. “This is not great literature. It is written to a formula that exists for a lot of these books, which are themselves not great literature, but I would say, if you read, you’re not going to be bored. You’ll be on your toes waiting for what’s going to come next.” In fact, Naison said that he is in the planning stages of a sequel, (Pure Bronx 2), if the upcoming novel is well-received by critics. He also said that he would consider writing other books based on

The Student Culinary Council (SCC), in partnership with Sodexo, hosted Awesome Week from Sept. 16 to Sept. 20 with the intention of increasing awareness throughout the Fordham community about the changes made in the on-campus dining services. “[The Student Culinary Council] aimed to showcase the new on-campus dining changes through Awesome Week,” Sama Habib, GSB ’14, president of Student Culinary Council (SCC), said. “In essence, we wanted to inform students about all the changes ranging from meal plan changes to the establishment of Auntie Anne’s, Panda Express, Jamba Juice and Così.” On Sept. 16, the Marketplace hosted a block party, which brought out each of the new retail locations at Rose Hill. A student D.J. performed and free samples were given out; students also played Fordham trivia. The block party was held the following day on the Lincoln Center campus, while on Sept. 18, students who wore Fordham pride apparel received a 20 percent discount at Panda Express, Jamba Juice and Starbucks. Starbucks also provided a 50 percent discount to students on drinks every 30 minutes. On Sept. 19, Auntie Anne’s sold its pretzels at a 20 percent discount and held an Instatwist challenge. The Instatwist challenge involved Auntie Anne’s mascot, “Twistie” the pretzel, coming to campus and taking pictures with students. If students posted these pictures and tagged Fordham dining on their social media, they had a chance to win a few prizes. On Sept. 20, Così had special discounts accompanied by trivia and games. Students provided positive feedback to the SCC and Sodexo with regards to the Awesome Week events. “Students really liked the block party because they got to try all the new eateries on campus,” Habib said. “SCC is really happy with the way it all went, especially since we got a lot of new followers on Instagram and Twitter and likes on Facebook.” Students also voiced their appreciation for week long deals and incentives. “I really loved Awesome Week,” Christina Daniels, FCRH ’16, said. “It was nice to have some music in the caf. It made me want to get up and dance with everyone.” SCC is currently planning its Sustainability Farmer’s Market to provide locally grown fruits and vegetables to students. SCC is also working with Fordham Dining on OktoberFest. For more information on SCC events, follow Fordhamscc on Instagram and Twitter and like Fordhamscc on Facebook.


NEWS

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October 2, 2013

So You Want to be a Jesuit: An Inside Look into the Process By EDDIE MIKUS STAFF WRITER

Although Jesuits abound on Fordham’s campus, the average student may not know the requirements for joining the Jesuit order. “We look for one who is experienced in the tradition of the Catholic Church, so, one that he has some sort of prayer life,” said Father Thomas Scirghi S.J., who explained the requirements of becoming a Jesuit. “Two, that he is familiar with the sacraments of the Church, [and] that he practices the sacraments with some regularity. And he has to be a sociable person, likes to be with people, not a recluse. We’re not raising hermits here.” According to Scirghi, the process of becoming a Jesuit lasts more than a decade and is broken into periods called the novitiate, first studies, regency and theology. “The novitiate is a two-year period,” Scirghi said. “They adopt a regimen of prayer. They will study the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, also a very important work by Ignatius of Loyola. They also study the history of the Society of Jesus, from Ignatius of Loyola and the founding of the Jesuits up until the current day.” After learning the order’s history, the beginners are sent out into the field. “The novices are sent out various times, maybe a couple of months, maybe half a year, in different ministries,” Scirghi said. “They all do hospital ministries. In

MICHAEL REZIN/THE RAM

In order to become Jesuits, young men must commit to a process that lasts over ten years, and is broken into four distinct learning periods.

New York Province, they come to Calvary hospital here in the Bronx for terminally ill patients.” If they complete the novitiate and are approved by a provincial, a potential Jesuit receives what are called first vows, and becomes known as a scholastic. During this time, he completes the other phases of his ordination, which are each broken up into three-year blocks. “After first vows, you go off to study philosophy,” Scirghi said. That’s what we have here at Fordham at Cizsek Hall. They’re what we call philosophers, and with that philosophy, they take some theology, and that’s a three-year program.” According to Scirghi, that study is just the beginning for these young men. “After they finish that, and that’s

called first studies, then they go on to what’s called regency,” he said. “Usually, that entails teaching. So many of our guys will go to high schools, some might go to colleges for this regency. They’re living with a Jesuit community and they’re working in a Jesuit apostolate. After the three years of regency, they go to theology.” When asked, Scirghi estimated that the rate of attrition was about 50 percent and said that candidates who do not complete ordination take several different life paths. “They leave the novitiate,” Scirghi said. “Then some of them might think of entering the diocesan priesthood. They might say, ‘This is an awfully long period of time, I’d like to be ordained sooner than that.’ They might do that. Others may return to the lay life.

They may discover they want to get married and have a family, or they may discover that this living in community is not for me.’ ” Scirghi also described the process of how one could discern if he wanted to become a Jesuit. “Say a young man, one of our students, asked me about this, and I said, ‘You know, I think he might have a ‘vocation’,” Scirghi said. “I would send him to the vocation director. They would talk more in depth about this. And then, if he presses forward on it, then he’ll go through a series of interviews, usually four interviews, to discuss his potential vocation with him. And what we’re basically listening for is, ‘does he hear the Lord calling?’” Scirghi, who is returning from an academic year in Australia, said that he felt secularization

would be a challenge to new Jesuit priests. “Our society is becoming more secular, and certainly having just spent the year in Australia, Australia is a much more secular society than the United States is. Spending a year there, I wondered if I was looking at the future of America, in terms of that secular society.” Scirghi, however, said that the long period of time one spends becoming a Jesuit would be beneficial in confronting the challenge of secularization. He specifically added that this long period of study would help the Jesuit engage with the American culture. “I believe the Jesuits who are trained today are wellprepared to handle this challenge because of their preparation, their studies,” Scirghi said.

Lackie Says Goodbye to Clubs, Assumes New Position in OSL&CD By GIRISH SWAMINATH ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

In mid-August, Jennifer Lackie concluded her term as assistant director for Student Organizations and Programming in the Office of Student Leadership and Community Development. She thoroughly enjoyed her experience working with campus clubs and organizations, but she looks forward to her new role as director for the Transition Year Experience. “I really enjoyed working with all the clubs and organizations and the Campus Activities Board,” Lackie said. Lackie believes her experience as assistant director will help her in this new role. “It is wonderful helping these groups become successful and supporting them as they reach their goals,” Lackie said. “I learned a lot in the assistant director role but learning to balance multiple, competing priorities was certainly one of my biggest takeaways.” Lackie will be working with New Student Orientation, the First Year Formation program, Senior Week, senior year programming, The Maroon yearbook and other activities. She eagerly anticipates working with students to develop and enhance the quality of these programs. “Choosing one of my favorite aspects of this position is incredibly difficult,” Lackie said. “I am excited to develop the First Year Formation program more and to

build Senior Year programming. It’s been a few years since I have worked with Orientation and Senior Week, so I’m excited to work with both of those programs at Fordham as well.” Lackie looks forward to embracing the learning experiences and potential challenges associated with the multitude of responsibilities her new position entails. “My goal for my first year in this role is to get a sense of the position and learn as much as I possibly can,” Lackie said. “I am working with new students and new programs this year, so I am excited for what the year will bring.” Lackie said that she was excited the move would help her in becoming involved with a new area of the Fordham community. “Moreover, I have really enjoyed working at Fordham over the past two and a half years, and I am thrilled to continue my career at Fordham in this new role.” she said. Shannon Driscoll has replaced Lackie in her former position as assistant director for Student Organizations and Programming. Originally from Western Massachusetts, Driscoll attended College of the Holy Cross in Worcester for her undergraduate studies, where she joined the Campus Activities Board and “absolutely loved being involved and working with programming.” After graduating from College of the Holy Cross, Driscoll went to Sacred Heart University

ELIZABETH ZANGHI/THE RAM

Jennifer Lackie, formerly of the Office of Student Leadership and Community Development, looks forward to a new role.

in Fairfield, Conn., where she worked as the Student Activities Graduate Assistant. “Throughout my experiences in college and graduate school, I really enjoyed the opportunity to work with a number of different clubs and organizations on campus, and I am so glad that I can be a part of that,” Driscoll said. Driscoll says she is extremely excited to get to know Fordham students and support them in their various leadership positions in a multitude of campus clubs and organizations. “I am excited to have the opportunity to work with so many different organizations and clubs because I love helping students make their college experience

the best that it can be,” Driscoll said. “Fordham’s students have such an incredible opportunity to contribute to their community by bringing great speakers and events to campus and I'm so glad that I can be a part of that.” Driscoll has had a positive experience during her first few weeks working at Fordham interacting with students, staff and faculty. “[My transition into Fordham] has been amazing,” Driscoll said. “I have met so many students, staff and faculty and everyone has been so welcoming. Fordham has a great sense of community and I am ecstatic that I have the opportunity to be a part of it.” Driscoll encourages students

to make use of the numerous programs offered by the Fordham community. “I want students to take advantage of all of the wonderful programs and opportunities that Fordham offers and continue to bring interesting and creative event ideas to the campus,” Driscoll said. “Fordham has so many incredible groups, and I hope that I can help them meet their goals and expectations for their organizations.” There are many different aspects that Driscoll will have to manage, such as dealing with club leaders of over 100 organizations on campus, while still overseeing the Campus Activities Board.


NEWS

October 2, 2013

Page 5

Syria, Obamacare, Economy Headline Debate Rodgers on Alcohol Statistics: ’17, spoke on behalf of the Demomost Americans would be totally ‘We’re Going to Lose crats. Palumbo began by saying, unaffected. to keep itself in the seat of power, “sadly, what he [Macdonald] has He also argued that the new Someone at Some Point’ whether through conventional warjust said is not the case. What many healthcare laws would be detrimenFROM DEBATE, PAGE 1

fare or chemical warfare,” Carl said. “Intervention is the only way to work for the betterment of the international community, and more importantly, the Syrian people as a whole.” Zaro responded that the situation in Syria has no “good guys,” saying that while Assad is far from an ideal leader, at least his state was secular. Some of the rebel groups aim to create an Islamist state, which would presumably lead to the persecution of Christians. Zaro added that it is “impossible to address the use of chemical weapons with merely a military strike. An airstrike would blow up these chemical weapons strongholds, dispersing chemical and nerve agents into the air…causing the very scenario we are so desperately trying to prevent.” The next topic of the debate switched to voter ID laws. The issue revolved around the recent push for ID to be made mandatory when casting votes, with several states currently pursuing this legislation. The Republican side, represented by Tim MacDonald, FCRH ’17, first argued in defense of voter ID laws. MacDonald called Democratic opposition to the laws “fear mongering,” saying that ID laws “are not trying to take away anybody’s vote. They're just trying to…make sure that everyone’s constitutional right is exercised fairly and honestly.” He also noted that the new laws would be nothing close to the Jim Crow laws used to keep African Americans from voting during the late 1800s to mid 1900s. Next, Thomas Palumbo, FCRH

Republicans have admitted is that these laws are not intended to stop voter fraud, but rather to stop certain Americans from voting.” He cited one instance last November, when the Republican majority leader in Pennsylvania said, “Voter ID laws will ensure that Governor Romney wins the state of Pennsylvania.” The next debate centered on the controversy surrounding the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare.” Specifically, the debate was about whether it would be more detrimental to allow Obamacare to move forward or to allow for a government shutdown. Michael Billotti, FCRH ’15, president of the College Democrats, argued first. “It is an absolutely ridiculous concept that we need to be up here debating what is more detrimental to the United States, the government shutdown or allowing Obamacare to move forward,” Billotti said. He called the Republican Party’s actions “absolutely insane,” stating, “They’re willing to put the faith and credit of the U.S. economy, the world’s benchmark currency, at risk simply because they don’t want a piece of legislation to move forward as it’s supposed to…after being pushed through every branch of the government.” Tom Fink, GSB ‘16, opposed Billotti. Fink countered Billotti’s argument by noting that the average government shutdown is only six days long, with the majority of shutdowns lasting only one to three days. His point was that a government shutdown is not a terrible option;

tal to the average American, saying that recent analyses have shown that Obamacare may result in 670,000 net job losses. The last debate was centered on the economy. It was kicked off by Kenny Foulks, FCRH ’16, debate chair of the College Republicans. He contended that the economy has sharply declined during Obama’s presidency, saying that employment has not increased despite Obama’s plans and promises, and that 46.5 million people are now living in debt in the U.S., a 16 percent increase under the Obama administration. Foulks’ opponent was Anisah Assim, FCRH ’16. She argued that, in fact, the Obama administration had done much more good than harm. “The fact of the matter is, we were in a terrible, terrible economic crisis…but what Obama has done has been the best possible solution to that problem,” Assim said. Students in attendance were generally pleased with how the debate ran and how the participants argued their issues. “We were firing on all cylinders on Thursday,” Joe O’Brien, FCRH ’16, treasurer for the College Democrats, said. “The preparation of our debaters was clear with their arguments and grasp. You do well when you do your homework.” Ben Shull, FCRH ’16, treasurer for the College Republicans, was pleased with the dedication and enthusiasm the debaters brought to the table. “I think it went well,” Shull said. “I was glad to see informed young people take part in an intellectually stimulating event.”

By CONNOR RYAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

During the 2012-13 academic year, 130 Rose Hill students were transported to local hospitals for alcohol or drug-related treatment, Christopher Rodgers, dean of students at Rose Hill, said on Wednesday. The number is a slender dip from the 146 students transported during the 2011-12 year. But only a few weeks into the fall semester, this month’s number seems to have Rodgers most concerned about the start of a potentially dangerous trend. As of last week, 29 students have been evaluated by on-campus emergency personnel and transported to local hospitals for alcohol or drug-related treatment so far this month. Another 13 students were evaluated by medical personnel, but did not require additional medical assistance. “We’re playing a statistics game now,” Rodgers said, his tone unwavering. “We’re going to lose someone at some point.” He delivered the data as part of this month’s Student Life Council meeting, beside a small group of student leaders and administrators. He emphasized the direct link between the crimes reported on campus and in the surrounding area — fights, theft, sexual assault — and alcohol consumption. The number of security alert emails sent to Rose Hill students since January has increased great-

ly compared to the same period last year. Security officials attribute that spike largely to iPhone theft. “There is a connection between all of these other [crime] concerns and the way in which Fordham University students socialize around alcohol,” Rodgers said. He called on the student leaders who were present at the meeting — representatives from Rose Hill’s United Student Government, Campus Activities Board, Residence Hall Association and Commuting Students’ Association — to join his staff in order to help find “ways to communicate better with students” about the dangers of alcohol. “I understand that for you in the culture where you’re at it can be somewhat uncomfortable and awkward for you to talk about these things with your fellow students,” Rodgers said. “But you may be helping them by making yourselves a little bit uncomfortable in that moment because you may prevent something from happening on Tuesday night, Thursday night, Friday night or Saturday night that can never be taken back.” In the last few minutes of the two-hour long meeting, Rodgers again looked toward the assembled student leaders and made his final plea. “We need you, from the positions you’ve been elected to, to help us with this problem,” he said. “It is a serious problem.”

New Club Looks to Keep Students Ahead of the Digital Curve By DYLAN DEMARTINO STAFF WRITER

The Fordham Digital Business Society (FDBS) has been off to a strong start this year with a diverse line-up of events. The new Fordham club seeks to help all students use technology to develop both personal and professional skills. Founded last year and made an official Fordham club at the start of this semester, FDBS welcomes students of all majors and skill levels. Started with the mindset of helping Fordham students get ahead of the rapidly expanding tech sector in an increasingly competitive global economy, the club offers valuable resources to students looking to get the most out of their Fordham education. The semester kickoff meeting introduced the club to a larger audience and highlighted the ambitious programming goals of the organization, including hosting a series of workshops designed to help Fordham students learn new skills. The meeting also connected Fordham students with featured speaker Paul Cooney, FCRH ’12, a YouTube partnership manger with AOL. Cooney spoke about his experience working for a company that has, in many ways, reinvented

itself to become a larger player in the online content field. He also spoke about his day-to-day functions monitoring the content in AOL brand presence on YouTube. Cooney also discussed how his education at Fordham and his hard work outside the classroom helped him with his success today. Cooney stressed the importance of taking your education to the next level inside and outside of the classroom. He emphasized the importance of cultivating personalized niche skills when developing a career. “It’s important that you find something that you're passionate about and take it as far as you can so that you can build a career that makes a difference in people's lives instead of just grinding 9-to-5 and not advancing your knowledge beyond the classroom,” Cooney said. Cooney’s speech was well received by the attending students who were eager to hear of a recent student’s success. Stephen Loukellis, GSB ’14, said he “found it really inspiring to hear the perspective of a recent Fordham graduate who broke into the creative sector.” In addition to its kick-off meeting, DBS also hosted a career panel on Sept. 24, on careers emphasizing technology. Ernest and Young, JP Morgan, Alpha Sights

ELIZABETH ZANGHI / THE RAM

Fordham Digital Business Society helps students understand how technology is integrated into the professional world.

and Deloitte were all present to discuss how their companies integrate technology into their business operations. Panelists also discussed how they had built their careers by understanding and utilizing technology in the professional field. Some companies featured additional Fordham graduates in their panel personnel. The participant’s professional panel also answered student questions and presented an excellent

networking opportunity for Fordham students to gain connections to each of the present companies. The students’ overall response seemed to indicate that the opportunity to learn about how certain fields of study can increase competitiveness in the job market is a valued component of DBS’s events. “As a transfer student, I was sort of nervous about how exactly I was going to go about establishing a professional network here at

Fordham,” Miles Toth, GSB ’16, said. “But after attending DBS’ events, I feel much more confident that there are quality resources here for me to build skills and make crucial professional connections.” The Digital Business Society will be hosting its next event, the first installment of its “Industry Insights” series, on Thursday Oct. 10. It is going to feature Doug Benedicto of Chartbeat, which is a real-time web analytics company.


NEWS

Page 6

October 2, 2013

Austim Speaks U Walk Looks to Raise Awareness for Autism By GIRISH SWAMINATH ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Autism Speaks U – Fordham University hosted its annual 5K walk/run event in front of the McGinley Center on Sep. 28. The purpose of the walk/run was to raise funds for the cause and increase awareness of autism in the Fordham community. “The event served to inspire and recruit those passionate about autism advocacy to join many other dedicated students on campus to pursue our mission of bettering the lives of those affected by autism,” said Adrian Whiting, FCRH ’14, president of Autism Speaks U – Fordham University. Over 100 people participated in the walk/run, and the students’ responses to the event were very positively. The club raised $4,000 for the cause. “The responses I have heard about the event so far have all been positive,” Whiting said. “Many students have expressed their joy to be able to participate in such an event and their gratitude that we were able to host an event such as this. We, the executive board members, were very pleased about the outcome and overjoyed at the more than tripled turnout this year as compared with last year's race.” “This year’s walk/run was an incredible success,” Victoria Cipollone, FCRH ’14, vice presi-

dent of Autism Speaks U – Fordham University, said. “Running alongside my peers to help raise autism awareness was a powerful and inspirational moment for me personally. Fordham’s support of our cause proves that our students are truly men and women for others.” Sodexo and Speedy Tees NY sponsored the event and provided Autism Speaks U – Fordham University with plenty of support. “Sodexo has sponsored us for some of our other events in previous years and [The executive board of Autism Speaks U – Fordham University] is truly grateful for their support and dedication to helping us further our cause,” Whiting said. “Speedy Tees NY is a new company we used for our event shirts located in the Bronx and we would like to thank them for their help in designing and printing our shirts in a timely fashion.” Whiting strongly feels that the walk/run event helped Autism Speaks U – Fordham University reach its goal to educate the Fordham community about autism and take a step closer to transforming attitudes toward autism and similar conditions. “Through each and every one of our events, as a club, we hope to educate the university community and the surrounding Bronx community about what autism is and how we should be men and women for others,” Whiting said.

CHRISTINA FERNEINI/THE RAM

Many students turned out to run in the annual Autism Speaks U 5k and helped to raise $4,000 for autism advocacy.

“We should also learn to help those affected by autism and not treat them like they are different.” Autism Speaks U – Fordham University won the Club of the Year Award in Spring 2013; the organization is extremely active, with numerous plans for different events during this academic year. “Later in this semester, we plan to host a karaoke night at Pugsley’s and hold an educational speaker panel about new treatments in autism research with researchers from Yale School of Medicine and Albert Einstein

School of Medicine,” Whiting said. “We are also sponsoring the Fordham football game against Holy Cross on Nov. 2, at which we will be tabling. The whole game will be dedicated to autism, with the Fordham football players wearing items on their uniforms in recognition of those affected by autism.” The club’s main event, however, comes in the spring semester. “Our annual Light It Up Blue event will be held in April and we hope to light Keating bell tower up blue this year by secur-

ing sponsorship for the blue spot lights in the next few months,” Whiting said. Autism Speaks U – Fordham University hosts general meetings for all interested Fordham students and faculty the first Wednesday of each month, typically in the Keating 1st auditorium. For more information about the organization, email autismspeaks@fordham.edu, ‘like’ the club on Facebook and follow the club on Instagram and Twitter.

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October 2, 2013

opinion

Page 7

Lhota Calls Foul, Dodges City’s Issues By JOSEPH VITALE OPINION EDITOR

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

Under President Obama’s plan, new restrictions on carbon dioxide emissions will be placed on power plants in an attempt to slow a rapidly changing climate.

Can Obama Put Breaks On Climate Change? By CAMILLE DANIELICH CONTRIBUTING WRITER

President Obama has finally thrown a bone to the environmentally conscious. Disregarding Congress, the Obama administration has blazed ahead with its plan to slow climate change. The plan promises enormous reductions in power plant emissions and, most likely, a series of spats with Republican lawmakers. Obama’s time as president has been defined by a lack of attention to environmental matters, which has infuriated environmentalist groups. Many were especially upset after his poignant second inaugural address that inspired (and pacified) many, saying, “We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations.” Obama is finally offering specifics to respond to this threat. His plan, unveiled earlier this month, focuses on a 17 percent reduction in greenhouse gases by 2020. Initiatives include increased use of renewable energy sources such as solar or wind and America’s first carbon emission standards, which would apply to existing and future power plants. A main component of the plan is to promote more affordable and efficient energy. With the decline of natural gas prices, eyes are turning toward gas to wean the country off of coal. With Republican control of the House, it is no wonder that Obama has proceeded in such an aggressive manner. Republican lawmakers, especially those who represent coal producing states, have responded to the legislation with expected hostility. Some, like Senator Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), vow to block passage of the plan. The likelihood of legal action against the Environmental Protection Agency is also high, as

the stringent emissions standards can be interpreted as a ban on non-complying or new coal-based plants. Because this process could take months, the EPA must first solidify the standards before legal action can commence. Richard Fleisher, a professor of American politics at Fordham, weighed in on the partisan conflict. “I do not think that [Republicans] will be successful in stopping the regulation, but they will try. The greater threat is what the courts will do when the regulations are challenged,” Fleisher said. “My sense is that, given the Supreme Court’s decision on the power of the EPA to regulate carbon dioxide as a pollutant, these regulations will stand.” Another consideration is the adoption of lower-cost, non-coal energy which is primarily occurring through the use of natural gas. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” a method of natural gas extraction, has proved controversial in practice as opponents cite alarming declines in human and animal health near fracking sites. Gas fields created by fracking have also been associated with enormous methane gas leaks, which contribute to the mixture of

atmospheric toxins and have the potential to create serious problems. Reducing carbon emissions is certainly a step in the right direction, but there are questions concerning the output of methane swirl, making some environmentalists worry that investing in natural gas is a regression. Environmental economics professor Marc Conte notes the implications of this trend. “Due to advances in hydraulic fracturing technology, the price for coal fell significantly,” Conte said. “As a result, European nations, which had not historically been as reliant on coal to produce electricity, began to import coal from the U.S. Given the cost of complying with the new EPA proposal, it should further reduce US demand for coal, meaning that the price may fall further and international demand may increase as a result [making coal more prevalent abroad].” President Obama’s proposal aims to solve a multitude of existing environmental issues, yet its implementation also raises a host of questions.

Others, like Talia Macauley, FCRH ’16, think it is a hopeful solution. “It’s clear that enough isn’t already being done so executive initiative might actually further the green movement enough for a significant impact,” Macaulay said. As with all environmental issues, Obama’s policy to slow climate change is neither definitively positive nor negative. It is important to consider environmental factors outside of the U.S. “Even if the U.S. enacts measures to reduce its consumption of coal, there is no guarantee that coal consumption will decrease,” Conte said. Designing a strategy to make the U.S. as environmentally efficient and economically viable as possible is a massive undertaking and is often overshadowed by other issues. Yet, Obama’s vision brings a plan to slow climate change to the forefront of America’s headlines and dinner table conversations. That, in and of itself, is a small victory. Camille Danielich, FCRH ’16, is an enviornomental policy and communication and media studies double-major from Glen Ridge N.J.

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

President Obama’s recent plan has drawn criticism from various groups, among them, Republicans in Congress.

When I finished reading The New York Times' story on Bill de Blasio's days as a “young leftist,” I was as unsurprised as Joe Lhota was, well, surprised. In the 1980s, the story went, the now-mayoral candidate became an ardent supporter of the Sandinista Party, a nationalist revolutionary party in Central America. De Blasio situated himself in the midst of a polarizing political topic by joining droves of Americans traveling to Nicaragua to help create a more egalitarian society in the country. While he and his compatriots claimed humanitarianism and idealism as motives, critics believed they were more motivated to denounce President Reagan's military support of the Contras. De Blasio, despite his critiques of the violence of the Sandinista party (which has been accused of murdering upwards of 3,000 people), admits to having been driven to do activist work when he witnessed the horrid inequality in the struggling country of Nicaragua. So, the New York City public

Will de Blasio’s past obstruct the road to Gracie Mansion? advocate who ran the most liberal campaign in the Democratic primary was an activist supporting an idealistic liberation movement in Central America? Who would have guessed? Apparently, not Joe Lhota or his campaign strategists. In response, Lhota and his team immediately pounced on de Blasio, calling his campaign “straight out of the Marxist playbook” and labeling his agenda as “democratic socialist.” Lhota was able to expand on his point in an interview with The Huffinton Post. “At the moment, Bill's political philosophy is based off of the idea that the government needs to be intrusive,” Lhota said. “And he decided to pick murderers, in the form of Sandinistas.... He's predisposed to what I think are the more left-wing elements in this world and I think New Yorkers need to understand that.” Lhota is right: New Yorkers need to become aware of de Blasio's dangerous left-wing policies. New York City is no place for self-righteous liberals. In all seriousness, Lhota’s intentions seem a bit mismanaged. De Blasio has run on a campaign in attempt to end “a tale of two cities, a place where City Hall has too often catered to the interests of the elite rather than the needs of everyday New Yorkers.” De Blasio's leftist attitudes, furSEE DE BLASIO, PAGE 10


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R

Serving campus and community since 1918 The Fordham Ram is the University journal of record. The mission of The Fordham Ram is to provide a forum for the free and open exchange of ideas in service to the community and to act as a student advocate. The Fordham Ram is published and distributed free of charge every Wednesday during the academic year to the Rose Hill, Lincoln Center and Westchester campuses with a readership of 4,500. The Fordham Ram office is located in the basement of the McGinley Center, room B-52.

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Opinion Policy The Fordham Ram appreciates submissions to fordhamramletters@ gmail.com. Commentaries are printed on a space available basis. The Fordham Ram reserves the right to reject any submission for any reason, without notice. Submissions become the exclusive property of The Fordham Ram. The Fordham Ram reserves the right to edit any submissions. The opinions in The Fordham Ram’s editorials are those of the editorial board; those expressed in articles, letters, commentaries, cartoons or graphics are those of the individual author. No part of The Fordham Ram may be reproduced without written consent.

OPINION

October 2, 2013

From the Desk of Catrina Livermore, Asst. Opinion Editor After Sunday night’s finale of an epic story, I am going to do it. I am going to be the one that is bold enough to say that we are currently witnesses to a television renaissance. To be clear, I am not saying that “Breaking Bad” is the greatest show ever. Nor am I saying that television prior to the show’s inception had been less than noteworthy, or that television today doesn’t air dysfunctional programs. It would be naive of me, however, if I didn’t point out that the level of writing in television has set the bar and even elevated the reputation of TV from the “idiot box” to the place where noteworthy actors, writers and directors have found even more recognition than in their decades of experience in movies and film. Programs like NBC’s “Hannibal,” AMC’s “Breaking Bad” and Showtime’s “Homeland” have begun an evolution in television writing, acting and directing. Through improving these ele-

ments, it has directly improved the way in which audiences value their favorite show’s characters. One could claim that it’s often the audiences thirst for sex, violence and the socially controversial topics that has led to the succes of many shows. Who doesn’t enjoy a show like “Hannibal,” where the serial killer being hunted is hosting a dinner party and, unbeknownst to the viewers, serves his victims on a beautifully garnished plate? Who could question the appeal of a show that transforms the cooky dad from “Malcolm in the Middle” into a murdering drug king-pin? While these are reasons why people tune in, they are not the primary reason they come back every week. The reality is that we are not all obsessed with the sex and violence on TV. While they do offer incetives, we are really obsessed with observing the mutilation inflicted on the human psyche on a weekly basis. A closer inspection of television reveals that our fa-

vorite shows are really about “me, myself and I” or, to put it more eloquently, the Id, the Ego and the Superego. Today, television is able to portray the complexities of people and turn that potrayal into an interesting and gut-wrenching ride season after season. While writers and show runners dish out apocalyptic universes and bizarre tales of Marines becoming terrorists, those are just the slow climb to the top of the roller coaster. The real thrill of watching these shows is in seeing the characters become unhinged and take the dive into raw human emotion, endurance and self-evaluation. In a weird, sadistic way, seeing Jesse Pinkman of “Breaking Bad” lose everyone he has ever loved is irrelevant. So is watching “Homeland’s” Carrie Mathison alienate herself from friends and family. What is relavent is seeing each character’s life shatter in unfathomable ways. Water cooler chatter is not

about what actually happened in a given episode, but our persepctive and our reaction. Viewers watch shows religiously and create fan pages because they ultimately are paying homage to the qualities in characters that they empathize with or even envy. The television renaissance allows self-evaluation not only on screen but off as well. Audiences are willing to respond to characters with whom they identify. Given where television has brought us up to this point, who knows where it will take us in the future — and what wacky characters with whom we will find ourselves identifying.

EDITORIAL: Obamacare Opponents Must Accept Ruling Here we go again. As we descend into the first government shutdown in 17 years, it is hard to contain our disdain; Congress is a bigger circus than Barnum & Bailey. The Republican-led House of Representatives has voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act — or, as it is popularly known, Obamacare — over 40 times since it was passed in 2010, averaging over once per month. According to CBS, each vote to repeal Obamacare costs taxpayers $1.45 million dollars. This means that the House of Representatives has spent over $60 million attempting to repeal health care reform, not to mention the weeks of overall wasted floor time. In their latest attempt to dismantle Obamacare, Republicans in the House have caused a partial government shutdown. Unless the Democrat-controlled Senate

voted to delay implementation of Obamacare for one year, all 213 House Republicans as well as 17 Democrats threatened to allow the federal government to shut down, despite the furloughs for more than 700,000 federal workers and millions of delayed paychecks that would likely result. Delaying the implementation of Obamacare can have dire consequences. It would prevent 11 million people from signing onto health care plans by 2014 and would raise many of the premiums in the individual insurance market. Congress’ job is to legislate, not to throw temper tantrums. We at The Fordham Ram understand that many members of Congress, as well as members of our own student body, have strong reservations — if not outright hatred — regarding Obamacare. But last November, Americans went to

the polls and re-elected Barack Obama, the man who has given his name to the health care legislation, and sent his opponent, who vowed to repeal the bill, home. While Republicans in Congress are not required to favor Obamacare, they do maintain a responsibility to govern as elected officials. In a legislative system in which elected officials often claim to do everything in their power to serve the American people, doing nothing seems like the least productive option. Even conservative pundit Bill O’Reilly says that attempts to repeal Obamacare are ridiculous and need to stop. “Fanaticism on the right is also harming the country,” he said on his show on Sept. 19. “There is no way Obamacare is going to be defunded. It is not going to happen.” The merits, or lack thereof, of

Obamacare are irrelevant. The Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act last year, and Americans voted to keep its key crafter in office for another four years. Instead of futilely trying to repeal Obamacare and shutting down the government in the process, Republicans in Congress should work with President Obama and other Democrats to fi x the issues they see in this legislation. Congress is choked by partisanship. Americans elected Congress to govern. It is time to end the circus and get to work.

Editorial Policy The Fordham Ram’s editorials are selected on a weekly basis, and are meant to reflect the editorial board’s view on a particular issue.

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OPINION

Ricky Bordelon

Page 9

Reactionaries Take Page From 1984, Ban Books By MADELYN MURPHY STAFF WRITER

The Power of Protest “Wir sind ein Volk!” (We are one people!) This slogan was widely used throughout the protests of 1989, when East German citizens (primarily young people and students) rallied both for freedom from Erich Honecker’s oppressive regime and for reunification with prosperous West Germany. One could say Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev or even Pope John Paul II was the key factor in the fall of Communism in central and eastern Europe. There are good and bad arguments for all of their influences, but by ignoring the mass protests and uprisings against the establishment government that took place in Prague, Gdansk, Leipzig, etc., one would fail to grasp the entirety of this complicated era of history. The unification of Germany in 1990, which is celebrated on Oct. 3, was fueled by student protest and general discontent within East Germany. The students and youth stood up for what they thought was right, and they weren’t afraid of what Gorbachev or Honecker would do to them. Where has this great initiative and willingness to stand up for what one believe gone? Why, in recent years, have protests failed to move the moun-

A blog post has nothing on a protest. tains they moved during the Cold War? One can blame a number of factors, but one I find particularly interesting is the popularity of opinion blogs. Now anyone with a computer and the vocabulary to voice an opinion in 100 words or so can create a blog to complain and protest about whatever they want. This is what I call “online protesting,” and I use “protesting” in the weakest sense of the word. No matter what you write on your Tumblr or Wordpress or Blogspot, unless you have the fame and influence to garner thousands and thousands of followers, your words will have minimal impact. The media elite, an institution that has remained part of modern society since the invention of newspapers, controls the discourse of the nation. A blog cannot effect change in nearly the same way. If you want to change the world, or “set it on fire” as Fordham encourages us to do so often, do something. Close the laptops, step outdoors and voice your opinion in public. Take a stand, and don’t be afraid of what others might say about you or your cause. Those who went before us have set the incredible example of what a group of people with a unified cause and a clear goal can do. If you feel passionately, don’t hide behind your monitor; speak out and speak loud.

Censorship, control, oppressive authority — are these to become the criteria for the regulation of literature in America today? Is the banning of books in schools and libraries to be considered helpful and for the good of society, or are we to view it as reminiscent of Big Brother’s regime in George Orwell’s 1984? With the conclusion of Banned Books Week, we are stricken with an undeniable horror: We are still living in a world in which authorities are trying to snatch The Jungle and The Catcher and the Rye out of our hands. Recently, Alabama State Senator Bill Holtzclaw proposed that Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Toni Morrison’s novel, The Bluest Eye should be banished from libraries and school curriculums. This act of censorship is only one example, as many other cases of attempted oppression rise in Arizona, Ohio and North Carolina. As Americans, we like to envision ourselves as the pioneers for social acceptance and modernization. However, as long as we are banning books, we will remain in a state of medieval regulation. What are these authorities trying to save us from when banning these books? Supposedly, they are saving us from a variety of unsavory topics — violence, racism, extremism, religion, homosexuality, graphic sex — anything unorthodox or unpopular. Ultimately, it becomes anything that does not fit into the cookiecutter idea of what is good for the young and impressionable minds of society. And yet, has banning novels helped us in any way? Should we still try to hide J.D. Salinger’s obscene and foul Holden from sight, or do we bring him into high school English classes? Should we continue to stifle the socialist tragedy of the meatpacking industry revealed to us by Upton Sinclair in The Jungle? Have

MICHAEL REZIN/THE RAM

The proposed banning of books continues in states such as Ohio and Arizona.

we not made progressive movements when it comes to the health and quality of commercial meat? Should we stuff away Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind because of its racist language? Should we all just relish the toned-down movie adaptation of her classic? Banning socially unsettling and unorthodox novels has never helped us. These novels bring to light society’s flaws and encourage

action. Perhaps this is the real draw for authorities when it comes to censorship: the anxiety surrounding social change. Social change moves a society towards either unrest or betterment. It either shifts our vision of utopia closer or morphs our current state into a dystopia. However uncertain change is, it is not something to be banned. If we were to ban any new or unorthodox idea,

we would still be living in a society where slavery is prevalent and women are treated as second-class citizens. To censor potential social disturbances such as sex, religion or extremist political views is not the appropriate means of attaining social betterment, much less modernity. Are we, as freedom- and justice-loving Americans, to hearken back to the bonfire of the vanities in Fascist Italy or Stalin’s oppressive regime? Writing is the most powerful of our resources and can be abused, but are we to censor a novel because it has multiple graphic sex scenes? Or are we to snatch away a book because of poor language? Are we being progressive and modern Americans when we ban books, or are we being irrational and judgmental? To ban a book is not to free an individual’s mind from the dirt and filth of the author, but to enslave us in a confining darkness of ignorance and dependence. As human beings, we possess the reason and judgment to define what is just or unjust. As Americans, we have the freedom of the press — not only to write whatever we think, but also to read whatever we like. Governmental authorities do not have the power to determine what goes into our heads. Books have shaped our social vision — we promulgate our ideas, dreams, fears, passions and hopes for society through writing. Society has been altered and changed, often for the better, by books. Are we to destroy and hide art because we don’t like the elements and realities of the author’s words? I would like to hope that America is far more modern and progressive than that. As Ray Bradbury, the author of the banned Fahrenheit 451, wrote, “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” Madelyn Murphy, FCRH ’17, is an English major from Orono, Minn.

American Beauty Draws Out Ugly Truth By FELICIA CZOCHANSKI STAFF WRITER

The crowning of the 2014 Miss America has unearthed the embarrassing ignorance of American society. Within seconds of the announcement that Nina Davuluri, an Indian-American contestant from New York, had won the pageant, social media sites erupted with blatantly racist posts against the decision. Though many Americans did accept Davuluri, the unfathomable amount of backlash forces one to wonder just how far our society has come in its attempt to weed out racism. While the convenience of accessing social media in society is great for the global promotion of news and ideas, social media has a dark side. Through sites such as Facebook and Twitter, people are able to post from behind the safety of their screens, and the posts are less likely to be filtered or even re-

read before being sent into the permanence of online media. On the morning after Davuluri won the title of Miss America 2014, many users did not applaud the young woman for her huge achievement, but rather posted disgraceful comments on social media sites. “Only 4 days after 9/11 and we pick a terrorist as our Miss America,” one Twitter post said. Fortunately, there were some supporters of Davuluri who chose to fight back against these ignorant posts. Many people vigorously tweeted the facts; Davuluri was an IndianAmerican Hindu, born and raised in Syracuse, N.Y. Therefore it is bizarre and unjust to associate her with any other religious groups or stereotypes. In an interview with Fox News, Davuluri claims to have expected

the backlash on a higher scale after winning the pageant because of the criticisms she received after winning the title of Miss New York. However, she finds this opportunity to be extremely timely. Her chosen cause is to “celebrate diversity through cultural competency.” Her goal is to try and close the gap of racial ignorance in our society. The racism present in social media is not something new to the winners of this pageant who are not Caucasian. Hitherto, there have been eight AfricanAmerican winners and one Filipino winner of the Miss America title in addition to our new Indian-American Miss America. Out of the 92 Miss America pageants, the amount of glamorized diversity seems small, but it does exist, which shows that there are some parts of our country that

Beauty is in the eye of the social media user.

are moving in the right direction against racism. It is extremely unfortunate that the crowning of Nina Davuluri was not a time of pure celebration for her accomplishments and our country. However, the way the media handled the disgusting ignorance of racist social media users will benefit this issue in the future as it has shed light on Davuluri’s personal cause. Her bright outlook on the situation makes the success of closing the gap on racial ignorance seem promising, as do the thousands of people reaching out to her through social media sites to show their support. The integrity of American society has surely stumbled over this issue, yet as more people reach out positively and use social media to brighten the situation, there is no doubt that we will be able to reach a level of integrity and racial acceptance that we can take pride in. Felicia Czochanski, FCRH ’17, is from Metuchen N.J.


OPINION

Page 10

October 2, 2013

Next Step? Keeping Guns Out of Hands of Mentally Ill By JOSEPH CLINES

Stephen Fragano

STAFF WRITER

As a nation that is gradually becoming more progressive, the United States remains surprisingly primitive on the issue of guns. All rights guaranteed by the Constitution are held as sacred; however, none are so deeply sewn into our nation’s conscience as the Second Amendment. The true difficulty in addressing ing increased security measures regarding gun sales is that it is taken as an affront on American values; guns are as American as apple pie. What America needs is not a comprehensive bill or piece of legislation, but an updated understanding of gun ownership and the rights it guarantees. Gun advocates are correct in their assertions that “guns don’t kill people, people kill people,” and it is people who need to adopt a new mentality towards gun ownership, regardless of how much they value the Second Amendment. Going forward, though, the right to bear arms must be reexamined and redressed as a privilege — one that carries heavy expectations and the clearly stated possibility of revocation if these expectations are not met. Calls for more stringent gun control measures ebb and flow. They rise to a crescendo in the immediate aftermath of gun-related tragedies and begin waning as soon as the news cycle shifts. Legislation, albeit frequently limited, is too reactionary and tailored to the specific events of a given tragedy to have any lasting impact on gun ownership in America. As a result of the Newtown, Conn. tragedy, in which an assault rifle was used, new legislation was passed limiting the availability and potential payload of this type of weapon.

Part Versus Whole

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

A recent shooting at Washington Navy Yard sparked a debate about loose-regulations regarding the purchasing of guns.

Any step in the right direction is beneficial to America; however, the specific weapon of choice in said massacres is not at the crux of the issue. The true issue is the absolute impasse that the public comes to whenever the necessary discussions of gun rights arise. In the wake of the Navy Yard shootings, the dialogue’s focus has shifted to gun ownership by individuals with mental illness. Current legislation across the country varies tremendously, as arriving at a consensus is difficult given the gravity of stigmatizing an entire segment of people who can be considered mentally ill. While there is certainly no single solution for an issue so large, a comprehensive ban on gun ownership for the mentally disturbed is a necessary next move in an issue that will continue to proceed in baby steps. In weighing the pros and cons

of passing such an act the scale tips greatly in favor of the benefits. The danger of barring an individual deemed by a professional to be mentally disturbed, is that from buying a gun the person develops a new hobby and pursues other interests. The worst case scenario of perpetuating the status quo is portrayed all too routinely these days on CNN and other news networks. Public places, such as schools and movie theaters, can become warzones when weapons are put into the hands of the mentally ill. The hypothetical legislation would be far from perfect. Mental illness is a nebulous classification, and distinguishing potential killers from an innocent, but unstable, individual would be anything but an exact science. The issue of guns is too large and our legislation efforts too small, but that is no justification to quit. Just as the American public

had to embrace the new normal of increased security measures at airports and other public venues in the wake of 9/11, the time has come for our progressive society to cope with the reality of more rigid background checks and security measures when it comes to gun ownership. We will have to forego some of our liberties going forward in the interest of improved safety. Shifting the public’s perception of the Second Amendment will take generations, given the intertwined history of guns and the United States. Carrying out a bold, and necessary, ban of gun ownership for the mentally ill would certainly serve as a stepping stone that would push the overall conversation of guns in a positive and wildly overdue direction. Joseph Clines, FCRH ’14, is an economics major from Malverne N.Y.

Lhota Side-Steps Issues, Throws Jab at De Blasio FROM DE BLASIO, PAGE 7

thermore, are evident in his policies. He intends to provide universal pre-kindergarten programs by taxing New Yorkers earning over $500,000. He supports a real living wage law, as well as paid sick days and paid family leave. He wants to increase the amount of affordable housing and establish a local minimum wage.

With this in mind, is Lhota trying to convert Democrats? Is he trying to attract Independents? Or is he rounding up more Republican voters, who are outnumbered six to one by city Democrats? I am quite unsure myself. It is evident, though, that these are the policies Democratic voters are looking for considering de Blasio has won the necessary 40

percent to capture the Democratic primary. Perhaps there is a pattern of which Lhota is unaware. There are quite a few politicians in politics today who once held extreme liberal beliefs. It happens, most often, following one’s college years or some other eye-opening experience, when graduates immerse themselves in humanitar-

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio was recently the figure of a controversial profile, attracting criticism from opponents.

ian causes that are perceived as too extreme for the American mainstream. However, while some remain radical and choose to become activists, professors or organic farmers, others mold and adapt to the confines of the two-party system. Change, they learn, is more efficiently accomplished from the inside government buildings than from its steps — or somewhere in Central America. While I still doubt if de Blasio will be the mayor New York City needs, it seems that nitpicking at what he did 30 years ago will not help us decide who is the best candidate for the job. With the city’s soaring living expenses and a struggling education system, all eyes will be focused on what the mayor is doing in 2014, not what he did in 1981. People like Joe Lhota may want to call people like de Blasio extreme, but, in reality, de Blasio is far from the real thing. And when we are calling each other names, we are only side-stepping — and when we are busy sidestepping, how are we ever going to move forward? Joseph Vitale, FCRH ’16, is a political science and English double major from Staten Island, N.Y.

This past season of MLB baseball was undoubtedly a disappointing one for fans of the New York Yankees. The team’s performance was not up-to-snuff, given the normal expectations of Yankees fans who anticipate their team to at least make it to the playoffs. When winning in the postseason becomes unlikely, it is almost as if the efforts of the season were all for naught. Recently, a Yankee-less October is so rare that 2013 is only the second time in 19 years that the Bronx Bombers have not seen the postseason. You might be wondering why I decided to take the time to recount the less-than-ideal performance of my favorite baseball team in a column. The reason is that the Yankees’ end result must be contrasted with pre-season speculation about them. During a panel discussion of analysts on the YES network, led by Fordham alumnus Michael Kay, the team was predicted to have success only after the middle part of the season when their “all-stars” came back from injury. It was insinuated that if the team could stay around the .500 mark or a few games below, that they would have a good chance to make the playoffs with the return of better known players. As anyone who follows the Yankees or baseball in general might have realized, the Bombers entered the All-Star Break well above .500, playing the best baseball they’ve played all year. It was not until after most of their “best” players came back that the team began a steady decline. The baseball analysts, and Yankee fans in general, greatly awaited the return of certain players while lesser- known and younger athletes kept the team well afloat. So what does this say about people’s expectations of teams and of society? To me, this shows that people of the world, or at least Americans, are putting more value on a few better-known components of a whole rather than the team itself. In the beginning of the season, the Yankees appeared to be functioning at their highest level due to the contributions of all components of the team. The pitching and defense operated at high levels, which gave the offense, though not as great as past years, to score enough runs to win games. This is speculation, but it is possible that the pitching began to suffer upon the heavy-hitters’ return because of the higher value being put on the offensive perks that the returning players were expected to provide. There were many instances on the field that could be considered as defining moments that hindered the Yankees’ progress, but looking back, the team’s poor ending was inevitable from the start due to the reliance on individual players rather than the whole team. Teamwork and unity are important factors that shape the world, and it is interesting to see so much attention being paid to individuals. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link, but without every one of its links, it is not a chain at all.


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Cheese and Tomato ................................................................................................$2.50 $14.00 Sicilian .............................................................................................................................$2.75 BBQ Chicken Pizza Chicken cutlet in a bbq sauce ......................................................................$19.00 Alla Vodka Grilled chicken in a vodka sauce and mozzarella ........................................................$19.00 Chicken Cutlet In tomato sauce with mozzarella ...........................................................................$19.00 Chicken Pesto Zesty pesto sauce with roasted peppers over melted fresh mozzarella..........$19.00 Chicken Marsala Breast of chicken sauteed with mushrooms in marsala wine .......................$19.00 The Vegetarian Peppers, onions, garlic, mushrooms, broccoli & zucchini ....................................$19.00 Shrimp Delight Shrimp, fresh garlic and parsley............................................................................$20.50 Fisherman Special Shrimp, clams, scallops and calamari ...........................................................$28.00 Giovanni Special 5 toppings of your choice...................................................................................$20.00 Margherita Tomato, basil and mozzarella.........................................................................................$16.00 Pizza Bianca Ricotta, mozzarella, parmesan cheese.......................................................................$16.00 Quattro Formaggi Four cheeses ....................................................................................................$17.00 The Best Seller Sausage and mushrooms ......................................................................................$17.00 The Pork King Sausage, ham and salami ........................................................................................$17.00 Prosciutto Tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella, prosciutto, arugula ...................................................$18.00 Quattro Stagioni Ham, artichoke hearts, mushrooms and peppers .........................................$18.00 Primavera Broccoli, mozzarella, spinach, fresh tomatoes and sauce ...........................................$19.00 Buffalo Chicken Tender chicken pizza in a spicy buffalo sauce served with blue cheese dressing and celery....$19.00

$15.00 $17.00 $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $21.50 $29.00 $21.00 $17.00 $17.00 $18.00 $18.00 $18.00 $19.00 $19.00 $20.00 $20.00

TOPPINGS

$2 each topping Italian sausage, pepperoni, mushrooms, meatballs, ham, salami, fresh garlic, zucchini, onions, peppers, eggplant, bacon, anchovies, broccoli, spinach, olives, cherry peppers $3 each Topping Extra Cheese, broccoli rabe, portobello mushrooms, sundried tomatoes $4 each Topping Chicken, shrimp, prosciutto

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Page 12

October 2, 2013

THE GABELLI SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 2012-2013 DEAN’S LIST The Gabelli School of Business is proud to recognize the students who earned Dean’s List honors for the Fall 2012-Spring 2013 academic year.

Robert Abballe Michael Abrams Amin Afshar Rachel Mae Aguilar Patrick Ahern Raisa Ahmed Anik Akhund Christopher Alimena Kirsten Alman Kelley Alpaugh Michael Ambrose Jennifer Amoroso Alexandria Andrews Vincent Antinozzi Andriana Antonucci Michael Artiles Syed Ashekeen Elizabeth Baginski Carl Ballesteros Thomas Bannon Yanchun Bao Samantha Barbieri Conor Barry Matthew Battle Megan Baugh Julia Bednar Nicholas Belfanti Daegan Benison Julianna Bennett John Bernabei Connor Bieling Brett Biestek Zamane Bodini Jeffrey Bolte Christopher Bosco Akhil Bothra Ryan Bouchard Alexander Bourland Margaret Brain Peter Brande Carson Braun Emily Bravaco Syra Brelvi Frank Brigante Kristina Brindisi Jillian Brooks Rebecca Brown Katherine Buckle Molly Buckley Catherine Cadigan Bianca Calcagnini Kelsey Callaghan Cassandra Campana Maria Canicatti Santina Capece Nicholas Capozzi Vincent Cappucci Kaitlyn Carballeira Samantha Carey Brett Caroselli Anthony Cascione James Cattani Astrid Sofia Chacon Borges Evan Chambers Hiu Yan Chan Jennifer Chan Daniel Chapple Brian Chen Mengke Chen Zitian Cheng Patrick Cheung Nicole Chirico

Kyle Chuber Daniel Chung Nathaly Cid John Cioffi Dorina Cipollone Sean Coari Laura Cocchia Lindsay Coffey Peter Coffman Daniel Conlon James Conroy Anthony Conroy Jr. Troy Coonrad Graziella Coppola Joseph Cormio Abigail Corning Jacqueline Cosgrove Julianne Costa Kevin Coughlan Matthew Coughlin John Crelli Steven Cruz Christopher Dacchille Wendi Dai Troy D'Amico Louis D'Angelo Madeline Danza Michele Daubman Matthew De Angelis Cindy De La Rosa Seve De Respino Michael De Vito Thomas De Vito Louise deCastro Maria DeJesus Michael Dellicarpini Joseph Demarco Ryan Dember Clare Detjen Kraig Devore Vasilios Diakogeorgios Connor Diamond Andrea Kate Diano Krystle Diaz Yari Diaz Lucy DiBenedetto Anthony Dicosimo Daniel DiDomenico Jillian Diehl Bradley Dikun Kyle Dinan Thomas DiPaola Amy DiReda David Disla Jonathan Dokler Thomas Dolan Kevin Donovan James Doran Conor Duncan Ana Marie Enriquez Julia Escobar Patrick Fairfield Melanie Falk Christopher Fallon Niccolo Fedeli Megan Feerick Lea Feghali Lauren Femia Chelsea Fernandez Sydney Ferrigan James Finora Brian Fitzpatrick William Fitzpatrick

Tomas Flanagan Christian Floro Christopher Fontana Kathleen Franklin Rachel Franzluebbers Kam Fujii Pei Jie Gao Ross Garlick Christina Gaskin Andrew Gatian Alexa Gavin Thomas Geiser Bella Genkina James Gieger Gregory Giordano Jonathan Gonzalez Peder Gram Matthew Grandchamp Christoper Grande Tom Granot Benjamin Grant Matthew Grayhack Daniel Green Thomas Greenwald Jeffery Greer Lauren Gregory Kevin Grenawalt Benjamin Griffin Matthew Grover Robert Gubin James Guiney Taylor Gulbins Andrew Gulla Peishan Guo Sama Habib Abigail Harman Nailah Harris Kira Hartmann Irene Hartnett Michael Hassett Stephen Hearn Shannen Heath Andrew Hock Patrick Horan Kimberley Hoyle Xinkai Hu Tanja Hughes Lillian Hugo Justine Humenansky Christopher Huser Syeda Hussain Christine Hwang Benjamin Ilaria Nicole Iman Jennifer Irwin Cara Jacaruso Alexandra Jameson Charles Joerss Christian Jose Erlind Kaca Christopher Kane Sean Kane Shikha Kankariya Karishma Kapoor Jonathan Karanian Timothy Kazanjian Michele Keathley Jack Kelleher Jennifer Kelley Gabriella Kennedy Matthew Kennedy Shane Kennedy Leah Kirsch

James Kodi Michael Koran Kevin Kosciuk Kamila Kowalczuk Jakub Kowalski Adriana Krasniansky Nevin Kulangara Michael Kungl Alexander Kuvshinoff Sara Kyle Leona Lam Alex Lambert Michaela Lamberta Yue Lang Nicholas Larosa Jr. Eric Larson Port Lau Joseph Lauberth Christopher Leahy Jr. Alexandra Leblanc Joseph Leogrande Stephanie Leso James Levantis Clayton Lewis Weiyan Li Xiao Lin Erika Loberg Isabelle Lok Emily Lombardo Erika Longoria Stephanie Marie Lorenzo Cara Luke John Lutkewitte Natalie Madrowski Laura Mahmoudian Yasmin Mahmoudian Alexa Mancuso Nicholas Mangione Joseph Marble Christopher Margiotta Anna Markolovic Michelle Matteini Joseph Maurantonio Kevin McCahey Ryan McCann Patrick McCarthy John Mcconnell Madeline McDermott Shannon McKenna William McLellan Ryan McNally Alisha Mehndiratta Vicky Mei Xing Wen Mei Tiffany Melillo Ashley Menjivar Anne Mielke Stephanie Milano Wyatt Miller Elizabeth Milner Alexander Milo Isabelle Miner Daniel Mirandi Samantha Moerler Christina Moran Serena Moroukian Renee Morrison Robert Muller Louis Murphy Mackenzie Murphy Kevin Murray Dominic Nardone Nicholas Neocleous

Michelle Serra Stephanie Niamonitakis Joseph Sgro Brandon Nolan Margot Sikorski Sonja Nuhic Matthew Sinise Mark O'Connor Jennifer Smith Sean O'Connor Kevin Soares Erin O'Donnell Kerry Sorenson Jeffrey O'Donnell Andrew Soulas Shalyn O'Malley Jillian Stackman Robert O'Reilly John Stanley Emily Osman Brett Stewart Shawna Ostiguy Michael Stillitano Mark Pallai Jeffrey Surprenant Ashley Panny Evan Swager Bryan Parra Julie Sweet Maxwell Peara Liyin Tang Michael Peirce Maxim Tcherevik Zachary Perron Emma Teed Anthony Pesanello Neil Tennant Quynh Pham Lauren Teske Lauren Piacquadio Christian Theodoropoulos Michael Piccolo Robert Thompson Adriano Pierroz Sean Tice Andrew Pierson Erin Tierney Steven Pisciotta Samantha Timmerman Richard Podpirka Timotheos Timotheatos PariDavid Podurgiel otakis Kelly Pomer Eamon Trebilcock Alexander Ponchak Christian Trigani Shoshana Powell Jeffrey Trimmer Jr. Alex Powers Michael Turi Jennifer Puet Hannah Valentine Mark Puglia Scott Van Duyne Lena Puschra Zachary Vaughn Jason Ramirez Venona Vilajeti Andrew Ramos Laura Villaraut Ryan Ramsay Molly Visgilio Alessandra Randazzo Alexander Vivian Edward Rapp Christina Vivinetto Sydney Recchia Ryan Walsh Megan Reed Freedman Wang Matthew Regan Tiffany Wang Caroline Reichert Andrew Washburn Erica Restaino Michael Watts Christina Reyes Kevin Webster Kenneth Richardson Kincade Webster Kathleen Riedy Jennifer Whitford Marielle Rivera Erica Wills Cesar Rizo Brock Wilson Serena Robert Connor Wimsatt Blake Rodriguez Michael Winhoffer Kaitlyn Rodriguez Daniel Wolfson Kelly Rosa Marissa Wolpinsky Stephen Rubino Brian Wright Robert Salandra Christianna Wymbs Louis Salaun Jenny Xia Natalie Salerno Runcheng Xie Kristen Samuelson Baixiu Yan Christopher Sanders Ziqiu Yang Michael Sansevere Shirley Yeung Danielle Santini Angela Yu Muhammad Sarwar Anthony Yu Elan Saynay Anthony Scalfaro Xiaotong Yu Kiersten Schmidheiser Yushan Zeng Kathleen Schmitz Xinjiao Zhai Ashley Schonberger-O'Reilly Felicia Zhang David Schwartz Igor Zhang Stacie Schwartz Lu Zhang Giuseppe Scire Xiaoqian Zhang Nicholas Scover Yujia Zhang Kaitlyn Scuderi Ke Zheng Isaiah Sears Jinghong Zhou Athavan Selvendran Anel Zhuaspayeva Olivia Zralka


Page13

October 2, 2013

With Bloody Finale, Breaking Bad On a Path to TV Pantheon By MARLESSA STIVALA COPY EDITOR

While many television shows are successful enough to last multiple seasons and accumulate a number of loyal viewers, very few shows do so in such a way that they become a cultural phenomenon that change what it means to be a thought-provoking, well-written show. For five compelling seasons, “Breaking Bad,” Vince Gilligan’s award winning, critically acclaimed AMC series has proven to be both. What exactly made “Breaking Bad” so hopelessly addicting? It is understandable to think that the show’s premise is enough to attract viewers. After all, the protagonist was given a pretty bizarre setup: Walter White (Bryan Cranston, “Malcolm in the Middle”) is a high school chemistry teacher who, upon being diagnosed with lung cancer, decides to recruit former student Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul, Daydreamer) to help cook crystal meth to ensure his family’s financial stability after he is gone. While Walt’s induction into the lucrative drug world is interesting, what is truly fascinating to watch is his transformation from a sympathetic, everyday family man in a desperate situation to a ruthless, deadly drug lord who is solely concerned with himself. Of course, this progression would not be so brilliant to watch onscreen if Vince Gilligan himself were not so apt at utilizing and understanding the conecepts that made “Breaking Bad” so great. No matter what the medium is, a story’s success or failure is typically in direct correlation with how good the writing is. “Breaking Bad” is no exception. From Walt’s simple yet profound warning to “tread lightly,” to the in-

COURTESY OF MOVIEPOSTERDB.COM

The teacher turned drug dealer, and ultimate anti-hero, Walter White.

famous “I am the one who knocks” monologue, the show’s dialogue was consistently well-written and wellsuited to the characters, often leaving viewers with chills down their spine. Moments such as a character making a joke or an awkward silence amongst the White family, which would normally give the appearance of filler in another show, never seemed out of place on “Breaking Bad.” Additionally, “Breaking Bad” has become notorious for its “edge-of-your-seat” cliffhangers. As frustrating as this can usually be for the viewer, Gilli-

gan clearly knew what he was doing. He tied up the necessary loose ends from one episode while simultaneously gearing up for the next, a perfect way to leave the audience begging for more. Gilligan added layer upon layer to the show’s depth by making use of symbolism. The show’s attention to detail and deliberate use of color (Marie usually wearing the color purple and the yellow jumpsuits worn by Walt and Jesse, just to name two) often inspired fans to conjure up various theories for upcoming episodes

and character motivations. There are many other symbols throughout the series. One such example is the damaged pink teddy bear, first shown with a missing eye. Though its appearance was initially unclear and its meaning obscured, the progression of the series revealed it to be a symbol of death and destruction. It is the use of such symbolism that enabled the viewer to appreciate and analyze the show on much deeper levels. From “Friends” to “M*A*S*H,” many television shows often forget their own history. That is to say, for many shows it is common for characters’ ages to change, for characters to suddenly fade away without proper explanation, or for earlier plot points to be forgotten for the sake of a later episode’s story. This, however, was never really an issue on “Breaking Bad.” The show never seemed to forget the personalities of its characters, the journeys each one has made and often hinted early on that something would be more prevalent later. For instance, early on in the series Jesse takes a particular interest in the wellbeing of a young boy. At first this seems to be a mere pleasant subplot, but this interest ultimately served to establish a key aspect of Jesse’s personality and desire to see innocent children well taken care of — something that will play a pivotal role later in the series. Writing may make or break a story, but having interesting, complex characters is just as important. Walt’s descent into an increasingly darker, corrupt state consistently remains center-stage, but he is far from the only character worth following. Jesse, initially little more than a drug user in need of direction in life, evolved greatly over the years to become a bit of a moral compass for the show,

the character who seemed to be most distraught and guilty over his role in assisting many of Walt’s brutal acts. Even Hank, Walt’s brother-in-law and DEA agent, was not without his shades of gray as he coped with a violent and sometimes destructive temper, among many other things. However, what really made these characters worth watching was what they did to viewers week after week: forcing them to choose between rooting for a corrupt drug lord to maintain his empire or hoping for it to crumble around him. Adeena Karasick, a communication professor at Fordham University Rose Hill, shared some insights as to what made “Breaking Bad” so successful and worth watching. “It speaks to a very contemporary obsession with morality and challenges age-old restrictive hierarchic notions regarding good and evil, as well as urging us to think about transgressing normative boundaries of behavior, and inviting the viewer to rethink how we see, how we respond,” While simultaneously addressing delicately that space between the public and private spheres, the domestic and socio/cultural,” Karasick said. Heisenberg. Albuquerque, New Mexico. Blue meth. Ricin. The pink teddy bear. Minerals. Belize. Breakfast. Separately, these terms mean very little, but to any Breaking Bad addict they help shape the intricate, fascinating world of the show. The fact that a simple word or phrase can so easily inspire deep psychological debates, thoughtful theories and complicated discussions is a true testament to the brilliance of the show and its lasting cultural impact. In the end, it is all about the show having the right chemistry and knowing how to use it well.

Social Media Survey: Facebook Reigns Supreme By ALLEGRA HOWARD CONTRIBUTING WRITER

35 percent of the sample actually preferred either one of them over anything else. It seems that, as entertaining as Instagram or Twitter may be, Facebook remains popular due to its convenience, allowing us to stay connected in various ways. The significant gap between

these three apps, Snapchat and Vine is not particularly surprising. When asked about their preferences, many students were perplexed that Vine was on the list. They did not think that people apart from celebrities really used Vine accounts. Students strictly used Snap-

chat for entertainment purposes in most cases, not as an alternative form of communication to Facebook or texting. This survey demonstrated that while people may not be using Facebook the same way they did five years ago, it will not disappear any time soon.

Favorite So s ’ cia am h l 12% rd

23%

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While many people our age seem to rant that the “Facebook era” is over and will be replaced with alternative social media services, a survey of 100 Fordham students seems to suggest oth-

erwise. Just over half of the students surveyed listed Facebook as their favorite social medium, as opposed to apps commonly hailed as the next big thing: Instagram and Twitter. Most of the students interviewed had both Instagram and Twitter accounts; however, only

9%

5% 51%

Facebook Instagram Twitter Snapchat

Vine ELAINA WEBER/THE RAM

CHRISTINA FERNEINI/THE RAM

As the popularity of apps continues to rise, competition for a spot in our phones leads to multiple options.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Page 14

October 2, 2013

Dining Out: Viva Herbals Pizza By ALLEGRA HOWARD CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Viva Herbals Pizzeria is a downright unattractive hole-in-thewall. The walls are a sickly yellow, the green painted floors are peeling, and the seats, tables, countertops, store refrigerators and outof-date ATM machine awkwardly cram the tiny space. If I had not seen the obviously displayed “A” on its health and sanitation certificate, I would have stayed clear of the place when I first saw it as a freshman. Instead, I tried one of their vegan pizza slices and have been hooked ever since. The rave reviews on Yelp! were not kidding. Unlike Slice or Palà, that weakly imitate pizza by substituting the cheese with bland soy alternatives, Viva Herbals Pizzeria offers a variety of substantial and organic vegan pizzas with creative, healthy and extremely generous toppings that would delight vegans, vegetarians and omnivores alike. Pretty much any of the vegan flavors are a good choice, with perfectly soft crusts and a slight crunch, but the restaurant also offers cheese, kosher and gluten-free options. You even have the option of creating your own pizza. One slice is also about twice as large as a slice from the Marketplace and will definitely fill anyone up. More importantly, each slice of pizza only costs about $5 to $6, a steal for vegan pizza in New York. Though I haven’t yet

ALLEGRA HOWARD/THE RAM

Although Viva Herbal Pizza is located far downtown in the Village, it is admittedly worth the subway ride due to its varied menu and delicious ingredients.

tried them, the soups and stuffed Portobello mushrooms sound delicious. For the price of certain pizzas or larger orders, I suggest seeing their menu on Yelp! Do not, however, come to Viva Herbal Pizzeria for something sweet. I love the delicious homemade juices like Mango and Super Green, but each measly 15 oz. bottle costs a discouraging $5. The soggy peanut butter and chocolate cake — that did not have enough chocolate — was too disappointing for $5 and the $8 ice cream is decent, but there are definitely

better options elsewhere in New York City. The enormous homemade sandwich cookies are worth the $3, but they are only mildly sweet and sometimes dry. The Viva Herbals Pizzeria employees are not as friendly as Fordham’s Sodexo employees, but they are still accommodating and quick. Instead, the restaurant’s charm comes from its simple and down-to-earth feel. Though I have rarely seen all the seats taken, there are plenty of nearby places to sit and eat if it ever happens. In fact, Viva Herbals Pizzeria

is located just a few blocks away from busy Union Square. There are plenty of restaurants, clothing stores, bookstores (including the famous Strand), bars, cinemas, churches and more, and I especially love visiting Forbidden Planet while I am in the area. The restaurant’s close proximity to Washington Square Park and Union Square is a big plus, particularly if you enjoy peoplewatching. If you are particularly lucky, you might see the Float Riders dance group performing in the station on your way home.

Admittedly, Viva Herbals Pizzeria is one long 4 train trip away, but I can honestly say it is well worth the journey. Overall Location Food Quality Atmosphere Hospitality Price $$ (Out of 5 ’s)

Interested in writing restaurant and food reviews? Email: fordhamramculture@gmail.com

Are Designer Handbags Worth the Cost? By KELSEY SCHAPPELL CONTRIBUTING WRITER

As a college student on a budget, I am pretty frugal but I will occasionally drop some extra cash on concert tickets or a slice of pizza that is bigger than my face. I will never, however, splurge on a designer purse. Never. And, I will never understand why people do. I cannot tell a lie. I have a Coach bag. It is turquoise and patent leather with “C”’s all over it. I bought it with a gift card last Christmas at the Coach Outlet in Atlantic City for $86. The original price was over $400. Since then, I have used this bag maybe five times, and that is being generous. Frankly, using it makes me nervous. I am afraid I will get it dirty or rip it or somehow jam the zipper and never be able to open it again. Also, I hate bringing it on the subway. When I do, I clutch it in my lap like it is my child so no one makes the mistake of thinking I actually have money in there and attempts to rob me. That is an ordeal I would rather not have to experience. Now, I am not totally opposed to all name-brand things. For the $86 I spent on my Coach bag, I could have bought a nice pair of Hunter rain boots that would keep my feet dry (unlike the $9 ones I got at WalMart). Or, I could have bought a LifeProof case for my iPhone that would better protect

ELIZABETH ZANGHI/THE RAM

Some trends come and go with the season, but people will always question the obsession with designer handbags.

it from falls than the $5 one I currently have. Sometimes it is better to splurge for quality, especially on items that will be used every day. Alex Chan, FCRH ’15, agrees. “I’d rather spend $300 on an iPhone than on a purse because I use my iPhone all the time,” Chan said. “I’d only use the purse a few times a week.” She brings up another good point — “Fashion trends go in and

out.” A classic pair of black rain boots will never really go out of style, but it’s different with bags. So basically, in a few years, my Coach bag could possibly be “so 2000 and late,” and I would never even want to be seen with it. That is not a gamble I would like to make. But, Kayti Greer, GSB 2015, disagrees. “Classics like Louis Vuitton and

Burberry are smart, classic,and lasting brands,” she said. If these bags are anything like black rain boots, it is likely they may never stray far from what is considered to be “in.” But, sometimes that means they will be considered boring. Take, for example, the Longchamp bags. It is a plain, solid-colored bag with brown leather handles. Right now they are going for over $100 online, and they’re

probably the plainest bag I have ever seen. I would rather use a trash bag – it’s still plain, but it is bigger and cheaper. Greer again disagrees. “What impresses me so much about the industry is the detail that goes into everything. Because high fashion is so competitive, brands must have high quality items and fresh designs,” she explained. She is not wrong. There are unique, name brand logos both name-brand but they tend to break the bank. The Marc Jacobs Carolyn Crocodile bag, for example, is classic, elegant and one of the company’s “most popular” items, according to consumer website HubPages. The price is $38,000. Yes, three zeros is correct. With designer bags, the buyer is going to have to choose among style, quality and price. A buyer will never find a relatively inexpensive, name-brand bag that is both well-made and uniquely stylish. You may, however, find a nonname brand bag that is all three. I did. I bought it from Target when I was in middle school for $12.99. It is red and white checkered with a happy face made out of bacon and eggs on it (the eggs are the eyes and the bacon is the mouth, in case you could not picture it). I have never been afraid to carry it in public, and it’s lasted me over six years. I still get compliments on this bag on a daily basis.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 2, 2013

Page 15

Editor’s Pick: David Carr By CONNOR RYAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Twenty minutes into “Page One: Inside the New York Times,” a documentary that was released two years ago about the newspaper, one thing becomes strikingly clear: David Carr is not your typical Timesman. The first time the audience sees Carr on assignment in the movie, he is interviewing the founders of Vice magazine. The “unlikely” partnership of CNN and the youth-centered, quirky magazine was the subject of Carr’s weekly column for the Times. “I don’t do corporate portraitures,” Carr said as he quickly simplified the spiraling question. “What the f--- is going on that you’re doing business with CNN?” Soon the discussion turned toward “The Vice Guide to Liberia” as Shane Smith, CEO and co-founder of Vice, compared the Times’ surfing coverage to the reports on cannibalism Vice produced. In turn, he opened himself up to an ugly episode of open fire. “Before you ever went there, we’ve had reporters there reporting on genocide after genocide and just ‘cause you put on a f---ing safari helmet and looked at some poop [referring to the beaches in West Africa that

have become breeding grounds for human excrement], doesn’t give you the right to insult what we do,” Carr said straight-faced to an apologetic Smith. Carr is consistently present throughout the 92-minute documentary, directed by Andrew Rossi, as the film dedicates itself to assessing the rocky ground of journalism through the sharp sense of the Times’ Media Desk. It is Carr’s quick wit and protective nature over the Times that steal the spotlight. On the surface, Carr is simply another ink-producer, a journalist with an agenda. But a few columns, YouTube videos and tweets later, any passive reader could easily gather that Carr is, himself, a story worthy of redemption. In July 2008, Carr published Me and My Girls, a revealing article that chronicled the history of a drug-addicted, single parent of twins on welfare — his own past. “Having suffered through drug addiction in the 20s and 30s, landing in jail for cocaine possession, raising two children as a single parent and eventually ending up at The New York Times, I know what it’s like to come out on the other side when the odds are stacked up against you,” Carr said in

the documentary. And while his “textured” background of drugs seems to be far behind him, the good of what has, most likely, always been inside of David Carr consistently seeps onto the page through his honest language and the relentlessness of his reporting. He fights for the interviews that matter, defends the Times against attacks from slick 20-somethings who bash mainstream media and seeks to serve his reader the simple truth. Carr does not write to rack up Google hits or collect digital “followers,” but instead remains grounded to the fundamental pillars upon which journalism was founded: to inform the reader in a spirit of genuine benefit through fair reporting — whatever that may entail. He is part of a dying breed in today’s fast-paced, tumultuous media industry. “I arrived at The New York Times late in my professional life and I have an immigrant’s love of the place,” Carr said in the documentary. “ The chip that was implanted in me when I arrived, let’s call it New York Times exceptionalism, leads me to conclude that of course, we will survive.” This article was originally printed in The Fordham Ram in Volumne 94, issue 4.

Sleigh Bells Record Release Party When: Saturday, Oct. 1 What time: 11 p.m. Where: Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleeker Street Price: $30 Sleigh Bells released their sophomore album, Reign of Terror, on Feb. 21st, 2012 on Mom + Pop Music. Produced by guitarist Derek Miller, and written by Miller and singer Alexis Krauss, Reign of Terror was the highly anticipated follow up to 2010’s Treats, an album whose deft, stylish combination of genres, sounds, and dynamics was simply unprecedented. Now the band is releasing their third album called Bitter Rivals. The first single off the new album, “You Don’t Get Me Twice” plays to the band’s old strengths: hand claps, distorted vocal s and crunchy guitar hooks. Be on the look out for tour dates as they are planning to play Terminal Five this fall.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

Better Out Than In: An Artist’s Residency on the Street of New York When: The Month of October What time: All day Where: Various spots throughout the city Price: Free Fordham graduate and graffiti artist Banksy is launching a new project on the streets of New York. Beginning Oct. 1, he will be tagging a new spot somewhere in the city each day. In addition, those who wish to go on a tour of the locations can go to http://www.banksyny.com/home/index where they can find the toll-free number of the audio tour. Check it out! — COMPILED BY JACK MACGREGOR ASSISTANT ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

COURTESY OF FLIKR

In his autobiography The Night of the Gun, Carr details his past struggles with drug addiction and single parenthood.

Send tips, event listings or comments to fordhamramculture@gmail.com.

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WHO’S THAT KID? NINA SYNNESTVEDT A MEMBER OF FCRH ‘14 MAJOR: ART HISTORY HOMETOWN: ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL Describe yourself in a couple sentences for the readers. 4 ft 11 and ¾; brown hair and brown eyes, shoe size 5 ½ or 6. Dance floors are my kryptonite and “Total Eclipse of the Heart” is by far my favorite karaoke song. What is your favorite aspect of Fordham and why? I love that Fordham is the perfect environment to try new things, whether it be through taking interesting classes, clubs and intramurals, and working at internships and jobs. A friend once said to me, “Life begins when you are outside of your comfort zone,” so every year at Fordham, I have tried something completely new for at least a semester because I wanted to make the most out of living at Fordham.

that not many people know? In high school I was on the drumline for the marching band. It was a lot of fun being on the drumline, but marching band was not as fun. What is your favorite class at Fordham? I am taking a photography class this semester and I am shooting with my dad’s manual camera from the 70’s. I have never taken a photography class before so sitting in the dark room and rolling my film are still terrifying to me, but seeing a developed roll of film is one of the most rewarding feelings. What is a personal goal you already have or would like to

accomplish over your four years here? It would be great if I can win a Fordham blanket at BINGO this year because all of the times I have played BINGO I have never won; it’s a love/hate relationship. What show, food, artist or movie would you consider your “guilty pleasure”? I love Josh Groban. His voice swaddles me. What is your favorite movie and why? My favorite movie is “When Harry Met Sally”. I believe that the best relationships spring from friendships and this movie is a great representation of that. What is your favorite album released in 2013? Vampire Weekend’s album Modern Vampires of the City. Do you have plans, career or otherwise, for post-college life? My goal is to work and have a paycheck; whoever will hire me, really. If it in the arts realm, that would be

October 2, 2013 a major plus. What activities, clubs, projects or organizations are you involved with at school? Freshmen and sophomore year I was on the Fordham Sailing team. I volunteered at POTS for a semester during sophomore year. My junior year I was in a few F.E.T. productions and this year I am a new member of F.E.T.’s Free Pizza Sketch Comedy Group. If you were stranded on a desert island, what would you bring with you? If the island were located in a warm climate I would bring my hammock. I could just hook it up between two trees and lounge until someone saved me. If you could go back to your first day at Fordham, what advice would you give yourself? Move-in day my freshmen year was my birthday so I would advise myself to buy a cake and have an impromptu birthday party. Also to invite anyone, everyone is looking to meet people freshman year.

If there was one thing about Fordham you could change what would it be? I would change the opening date of that Chipotle everyone keeps jabbering about! I would be very grateful (along with the rest of the student body) if it opened on campus ASAP. What is your favorite thing to do in New York City? One of my favorite things to do in New York City is thrift shopping. I map out where the good thrift stores are and I am always on the look out for fun things for my wardrobe and funky dress-up apparel, especially over-the-top Christmas sweaters (I have three). What is something about you

MICHAEL REZIN/THE RAM

From FET shows to Sketch comedy, Nina’s gift of laughter has only made her hungrier for an on-campus Chipotle.

Bespectacled Guitar Master Plays Beacon Theater By JOHN BONAZZO STAFF WRITER

On Thursday night, concertgoers at the Beacon Theatre had fine privilege of attending a Joe Satriani concert. A relatively unknown figure in popular music, Satriani does not write “mainstream” or “pop” music, songs that have choruses and verses… and words. No, Mr. Satriani is simply a guitar virtuouso and his concerts are a pleasantly surprising event. Most people go to a concert to hear an artist’s classic songs, his bread and butter, the songs that got you interested in the first place. So when the man starts playing songs from his new album, most people head to the popcorn stand. Satriani started off the show with the opening track from his new album Unstoppable Motion. What followed was simply beautiful music. Satriani is simply one of the greatest rock composers of all time. Not only is his music insanely difficult to play, but it is also beautiful. The nature scenes that played as a backdrop to the concert wouldn’t have been more appropriate at a Lincoln Center

symphony at all. No, Mr. Satriani worked his magic on the guitar to create beautiful and artistic music. A clue that Satriani is not the average guitarist is on full display as he picks the guitar during a solo with his teeth, still firing away with note after sweet note in his solos. Next he took his hand out of the normal position it would be in on the fret board

and seemed to play it like a piano. His final trick was even more intimidating. He took both hands and tapped notes up and down the fret board, playing in multiple octaves at once. So who is Joe Satriani, the man? How did he achieve his guitar mastery? The story goes that he learned of Jimi Hendrix’s death during his high school football practice at age 14, and promptly

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

McJagger invited Satriani to play lead guitar on then ex-Stone’s first solo tour.

announced to his coach that he was quitting to become a guitarist. Among some circles of guitar connoisseurists, Satriani is often touted as the number one guitar player of all time, and gave lessons to four of the other “top 10,” including Kirk Hammet of Metallica (2) and Steve Vai (3), whom he attended high school with. Satriani has 14 albums, and has worked with Mick Jagger, Deep Purple, and Dream Theater. Maybe Satriani’s greatest performance of the night was a song called “Satch Boogie.” Satriani led the crowd through his mindblowing explosion of musical ability with ease, seeming to barely try to conjure the notes. Afterwards, he said that the song always leaves his head spinning. I was a statement made for us mortals in the crowd to feel better about ourselves; all we could do is laugh as the man came back from whatever dimension he’d traveled to and geared up for his next performance. Satriani’s music is beautiful, and his atmospheric concerts are enough to make one wish he or she could take all of Justin Beiber’s money and just give it to Satriani — lump sum, tax-free.

Karen Hill I don’t get the stigma of the “psycho” girlfriend. Is she really crazy or is she just crazy in love? Either way, can you really blame her? This may come as surprising to the boys reading this, but sometimes the boyfriend is responsible for her current lack of sanity. The thing about psycho girlfriends is that they give and give to their boyfriends. They try to put his happiness before their own. More often than not, the boyfriend stops reciprocating her efforts. When someone gives all they have to give to someone but receives nothing in return, that person becomes depleted. Being depleted is exhausting. Trying to fight through exhaustion makes people delirious. Do you see the chain of events clearly now? Guys, you need to listen to your girlfriends more often. It will spare your relationship. If you notice problems, try to sit down and just talk through them. A little bit of fighting is okay, but constant fighting is not. If there is constant fighting over little things, do not brush it off onto your psychotic girlfriend. There is something structurally wrong in your relationship, and it is not the fault of just one party. Girlfriends are also often accused of being too nosy — reading texts, checking pockets, hacking Facebook. The underlying issue here is trust. Honestly, if you have nothing to hide, let her look at your phone and tell her it is a one-time thing. When she finds nothing, she should be fairly satisfied. It is innate to the human character to be curious. If people were not curious we never would have invented the wheel, stepped on the moon or found out that Liam is cheating on Miley. So do not dismiss her curiosity as insanity, because we are all curious. Psycho girlfriends have a tendency to be clingy and to want attention. Well, why don’t you show her some attention? Goodness forbid that someone you chose to be with loves you so much that she want hugs, kisses and some time of day. If she is too demanding, tell her. Do not push her away. Confused and under the belief that you don’t want her, she will get upset and depressed. Upset and depressed, she will come off as crazy. Whatever you do, do not call your girlfriend a psychopath. You have not seen your girlfriend act like a true psychopath until you have called her psychopath. No one wants to hear that, and it is insulting. If she was not offthe-rocker before, she will most certainly be storming the wall of your sanity and patience next. It hurts to find out that your way of showing your love for someone has been interpreted as acts of desperation and psychosis. Don’t just call her crazy, break up with her and leave her stranded. She clearly loves you, and you loved her once too.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 2, 2013

Page 17

Ram Reviews

Don Jon

Film Review

Film Review

By JAKE KRING-SCHREIFELS STAFF WRITER

His values in life are simple: his body, his pad, his ride, his family, his church, his boys, his girls and his porn. This is what initially defines Jon Martello Jr. (affectionately known as Don Jon and played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt), but in reality, this list, or more specifically hierarchical pyramid, is in inverse order. Porn dictates his New Jersey life, and the others fill in the gaps in their own systematic way. We know this because of the film’s opening images, which consist primarily of lurid videos and photos of women with a particular physique in particularly explicit poses. This is Gordon-Levitt’s directorial debut, and it is clear he has an ability to tell a story with both his actors and his camera. Typically, he has played lovesick and damaged characters: puppy-eyed in (500) Days of Summer and cancer-struck in 50/50. But here he is damaged differently, growling and vocalizing down an octave, emotionally disconnected and confidently seductive. This movie is like a dark sitcom without the laugh track. For one thing, there are the limited amount of set pieces Jon cycles through on a daily basis: his gym, his church, his club and his apartment. There are the Sunday family dinners with dad (Tony Danza, “Who’s the Boss?”) throwing more F-Bombs than the quarterbacks he watches on his big screen, with mom (Glenne Headly, Mr. Holland’s Opus) mediating her two men, and his sister (Brie Larson, Short Term 12) glued to her phone. Most of the time, Jon rides home from the club with a new lady to have sex, but mostly to complain about it. He confesses that watching porn is a much more enjoyable form of orgasm. The amount he mastur-

COURTESY OF MOVIEPOSTERDB.COM

bates to his MacBook varies each week. The laptop’s startup sound, he admits, turns him on, a gimmicky Pavlov’s dog used to signify another round of voyeuristic pleasure. These deeds are recited in a confessional to a blank priest, who comically issues arbitrary numbers of Hail Mary’s and Our Fathers for Jon’s differing amounts of sexual transgressions. Then, one night Jon sees his 10 by the bar, a curvy figure in red named Barbara (Scarlett Johansson, Lost in Translation) who is wary of his short game and delays his impulsive, infatuated proceedings. They go on dinner dates and to the movie theater, and Jon disrupts his cyclical routine, rejuvenated with his latest attachment. She’s a romantic with dresses and lipsticks in candy colors, a trophy wife wannabe. She even gets Jon to go to night school to elevate himself out of the service industry. The film premiered in Sundance with the title Don Jon’s Addiction, but its shortened name implies a hesitancy to associate itself with a

deeply rooted, systematic problem. Don Jon ducks away from the severe critical analysis that comes with an exposition of addiction, presenting a character who claims, “It’s not like I can’t stop,” when confronted with his habitual practice. The side effects of his disease do not plunge into the chilling internal Manhattan under which Michael Fassbender’s character in Shame hides and stares coldly. Jon suggests his addiction is more an obsession, but quitting cold turkey, even for his relationship’s future, is not as easy as he claims it is. So what to make of GordonLevitt’s performance as Jon? He is not interested in promoting himself as a George Clooney do-it-all auteur whose primary goal comes in bold brushstrokes and promotional headshots. He triumphantly cares for the details, making ruffled hair and church tardiness the key minute details of his transformation. It is admirable. This is neither a giant leap into directing, nor a bold claim about pornography. It is a careful, pleasurable, sexy first step.

Rush

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The men responsible for Rush’s sometimes-uncontrollable pace are James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth, The Avengers) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl, Inglorious Basterds), two titans of auto racing with two very different personalities that lead to a bitter rivalry. Formula One, unlike NASCAR, distinguishes itself with hairpin turns and narrow speedways. Drivers slip into their cars, or coffins, as many believe. With every turn, a swipe at death that makes some drivers never feel more alive. In order to delve into a character study of the two lead men, director Ron Howard realizes the need to establish the atmosphere of a sport so radically and inherently dangerous. Weaving through a grainy, almost permanently dusty filter, Howard gets intimate with his speeding mis-

siles of metal, providing first person perspectives as drivers barrel through turns to a subtly pumping Hans Zimmer score. At one point, Hunt visualizes an upcoming track, shifts phantom gears and presses imaginary petals as he storms through the blurry course. It doesn’t hurt the movie to have two fine emerging actors jockeying for position in the same film. Hemsworth, whose claim to fame comes in his demi-god status in his portrayal of “Thor,” slips effortlessly into Hunt’s charismatic flavor. Meanwhile Bruhl, whose most recognizable role for Americans came in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, matches Hemsworth with a frustrated confidence, electrifying in his diligent persona. To see a film saturated with life and color and energy and equal amounts of star power is refreshing. If Rush doesn’t cover the entirety of its dynamic pair, it at least corrals its most essential elements: the tire shredding and heart-bursting excitement of the Formula One lifestyle.

characteristically lackluster feature. Nothing Was The Same proves that Drake’s artistry and influence in rap, and music as a whole, continues to rise with no sign of faltering. Drake is a tortured soul who writes introspective, emotional songs about loneli-

ness, troubled relationships and the dizzying heights and pitfalls of fame. It is an exhilarating change for the genre in that it has crossover appeal and, like some of the best music, the audience can see themselves in his songs.

By JAKE KRING-SCHREIFELS STAFF WRITER

Music Review

Nothing Was The Same - Drake By NICOLE HORTON STAFF WRITER

Drake’s third album Nothing Was The Same is a portrait of the musician at the top of his game: an artist who, along with the help of his longtime producer Noah “40” Shebib, created a style defined by a seamless blend of rap, R&B and pop. As evident in the hook filled, catchy single “Started From the Bottom,” Drake had his own struggles and personal journey, even if he lived in a suburb rather than the urban communities where rap was established and popularized. Like Lil’ Wayne and Kanye West, Drake cannot rap about the gang-filled streets of Hollygrove or the South Side of Chicago, but he fights back against critics who say this makes his craft illegitimate. In the introductory six-minute track “Tuscan Leather,” Drake comes out strong in three verses without a hook. “This is nothing for the radio/ But they’ll still play it though/ Cuz it’s the new Drizzy Drake, that’s just

the way it go.” Drake’s braggadocio, in contrast to the reflective melancholy of other tracks, shows that he is at an artistic level where he wants to put out music that he is passionate about rather than worrying about critical reception. Drake acknowledges the allure of fame and how money has changed him in one of the edgier, more intense tracks, “Worst Behavior.” He directs the song to his mother, “This ain’t the son you raised who used to take the Acura/ 5 a.m. then go and shoot Degrassi up on Morningside.” Drake’s music is his personal therapy in which he talks to himself, often in circles. “From Time” is a poignant standout track featuring a simple piano melody and the ethereal voice of Jhene Aiko. Drake laments, “I want to get back to that kid I was in the basement.” He goes on to detail his anxiety about reaching his goal of being the best rapper in the game. Then he talks about his complex relationship with his father and his mother’s plaguing unhappiness, showing that his

past and family are never far from his mind. In “Too Much” Drake reveals how fame has changed his relationship with his family: “All my family from the M-Town that I’ve been ‘round, started treating me like ‘him’ now / Like we don’t know each other, we ain’t grow together, we just friends now.” Drake’s last two albums feature several collaborations with fellow rappers, such as Lil’ Wayne, Nicki Minaj, Kendrick Lamar and Rick Ross. In addition to his collaboration with Jhene Aiko, Jay-Z is the only other artist featured on this album. Compared to “Light Up,” their collaboration on Drake’s first album Thank Me Later, “Pound Cake/ Paris Morton Music 2” pales in comparison. Jay Z’s first line is, “I had Benzes ‘fore you had braces,” and he goes on to use “cake” as a rhyme seven lines in a row. By the end of his verse, the listener will think the oft-mentioned cake has gotten stale. While the audience can relate to Drake’s songs from this album, Jay-Z separates and dates himself in his un-

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October 2, 2013

Sports

Page 19

Volleyball Splits First Two Conference Matches, Record Stands at 8-9 By TARA SLEDJESKI STAFF WRITER

After getting off to a 7-8 start this season, the Fordham volleyball team returned home to the Rose Hill Gym this past week to begin Atlantic 10 conference play. The Rams faced their first two A-10 opponents of the season in Rhode Island and George Mason and, despite struggles against Rhode Island, walked away with the win against George Mason. The Sept. 27 game against Rhode Island was the Rams’ second home

game of the season, but they were still looking to move to 2-0 at home after a win against Hofstra earlier in the month. Unfortunately, Rhode Island had other plans for the team and the Rams moved to 1-1 on the season at home following a 3-0 loss. The first set against Rhode Island started well for Fordham, and it kept things close before the visitors got on a run that put them up 2111 before taking the set 25-15. The second set was much of the same story as, once again, things were kept close before a Rhode Island run propelled them to a 25-16 win.

The third set also went in Rhode Island’s favor in the end, 25-14. Senior Lisa Hipp led the team in kills against Rhode Island with seven. Senior Sarah Konkel had a team leading seven assists while senior Maria Rodenberg’s 10 digs led the team. Following the loss to Rhode Island, the Rams were back in action, taking on George Mason on Sept. 28 at home. The 3-1 win by the Rams was marked by a variety of firsts. George Mason’s trip to Rose Hill was its first as an A-10 opponent, while the win itself was the

first conference win for the Rams’ first year head coach Gini Ullery. All four sets in the game were close between the two teams. George Mason took the first set 25-21 before the Rams won three straight to take the game. The Rams’ winning set scores were 2518, 25-22 and 25-22. Once again Hipp led the team with 25 kills, while Konkel had a team-leading 55 assists. Konkel, Hipp and Emily Atwood all tied with 13 digs for the most on the team against George Mason. After the win, Coach Ullery at-

tributed her team’s strong play to their fight. “We had the fight. We left it all on the court,” Ullery said. “After last night (the Rhode Island loss) we had a real long talk with the girls about just competing and leaving it all out there and they did tonight.” The Rams now have a quiet week coming up with just a home game against Duquesne on Saturday, Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. With a 1-1 conference record and 8-9 record overall, the Rams currently sit third in the A-10 standings.

ALLY WHITE/THE RAM

Fordham was swept by Rhode Island on Friday night but rebounded the next night to defeat George Mason, 3-1. This is the Patriots’ first season competing as a member of the Atlantic 10.

Women’s Soccer Defeats Rhode Island, 3-1, In Atlantic 10 Opener By JAKE GROGAN STAFF WRITER

Fordham opened up conference play this past Sunday at Rose Hill against Rhode Island, then 5-5, and handed URI its first conference loss of the season. The 3-1 victory came thanks to upperclass presence on offense, as junior Maria Lorena Canicatti scored twice while senior Kelsey Dougherty Howard netted her fourth of the season. Canicatti broke the 0-0 tie in the 21st minute after taking a shot from 10 yards out that found its way in to the left side of the goal. Rhode Island would tie the game four minutes later thanks to a rare mishandled ball by junior goalkeeper Ally White. The Rams went up 2-1 in the 53rd minute, after Dougherty Howard scored off of a skillful pass from junior Jessica Widmann. The scoring would continue just 22 seconds later. Widmann tied up a Rhode Island defender in a fight for the ball, allowing Canicatti to steal the ball from the distracted defender and tally her second goal of the game and of the season. Fordham would hold on to win 3-1. Dougherty Howard is clearly establishing herself as one of, if not the best, offensive weapons on this Rams team. Canicatti and freshman Nicol Natale have also

established themselves as capable scorers, while Widmann seems to be involved in most plays that produce offensive success. Such production will be welcomed when the Rams travel to La Salle to take on the 8-2 Explorers, who have only allowed 10 goals all season. “La Salle has always been a very strong team, but all we need to do defensively is exactly what we have been doing lately,” said White, when asked about the team’s defensive preparation for the Explorers. “If we stay strong against the ball and keep them away from our net, we will be successful this weekend.” White, who improved to 3-32 on Sunday, played well behind a defense that gave up just three shots on goal throughout the contest. Like the offense, the defense will have to be near flawless come Oct. 4 when going against a team that has scored 19 goals on the season. La Salle looks to be Fordham’s toughest opponent during the regular season, making a win that much more appealing to a team looking to set itself apart in conference play. Momentum certainly helps. White said as much when asked about the team’s win on Sunday, saying: “This Sunday’s win was a great way to bounce back and start a new season off right. We are into the crucial part of the season and

ANDREW ESOLDI/THE RAM

Maria Lorena Canicatti scored Fordham’s first goal of the game in the team’s 3-1 win against Rhode Island.

beating Rhode Island 3-1 is a great confidence booster.” Confidence will certainly be key this Friday. Embracing the role of the underdog is no easy task, as it requires a level of play that is de-

pendent on tenacity and a will to win greater than that of the opponent’s. Beating La Salle will take great offensive and defensive execution as well as the ability to cash in on game changing opportuni-

ties, whether they be presented or created. While difficult to achieve, a 2-0 conference record is certainly a possibility for a Rams team that looks ready to succeed in big ways.


SPORTS

Page 20

AL Blog

American League Awards

October 2, 2013

Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/theram_sports

Varsity Scores & Stats

COURESTY OF WIKIMEDIA

Miguel Cabrera, who won his third straight batting title this year, is the likely MVP.

By MATT McCORMACK STAFF WRITER

As the 2013 baseball season draws to a close, it is safe to say that the American League had its fair share of surprises. I have heard many people say that this has been one of the craziest years of baseball in a while. I usually cringe when I hear people make these types of hyperbolic claims. Recently it seems like every year, people talk about how this one was the weirdest season yet. The truth is, baseball is probably the most unpredictable of the four major sports. Anything can happen throughout a 162game season. Virtually every year there are mid-level and lower tier teams that come out of nowhere to make the playoffs, and there are teams with high expectations that ultimately fall flat. To be honest, the craziest baseball season that occurs will be one where every preseason prediction comes true. That concludes my mini-rant; now on to my 2013 AL awards. AL MVP: Miguel Cabrera. This was definitely the easiest pick I had to make, despite his late season injuries. If his season ended in August, he probably would still be chosen as AL MVP. His .348 average led the league, while he finished second in both home runs (44) and RBI (137). Without doubt, Cabrera is the best pure hitter of this generation and a first ballot Hall of Famer. Mike Trout certainly had another fantastic year, but his numbers don’t quite stack up to Cabrera’s. Additionally, Cabrera led his team to a division championship while Trout’s team spent the majority of the year stuck at the bottom of its

division. AL Cy Young: Max Scherzer. Now this was a much tougher decision to make. I was torn (and still am) between Scherzer and Yu Darvish, who actually finished with a slightly lower ERA and 37 more strikeouts. However, I feel that Scherzer’s pristine 21-3 record, in this sabermetrics-crazed era, will actually be held against him. As absurd as that sounds, baseball “experts” love to disparage the ever popular “win” statistic, preferring obscure stats such as WAR (Wins Above Replacement), BABIP (Batting Average on Balls in Play) and DIP% (Defense-independent ERA Ratio). All mocking aside, these sabermetricians do have a point: the win is vastly overrated, and it all depends on the quality of your team’s offense. Scherzer has averaged much more run support than Darvish (5.59 runs per game to 4.09). Despite this, Scherzer actually holds his own in these sabermetric statistics; he has both a higher WAR and lower WHIP than Darvish. It definitely is a very close call. I just hope Scherzer does not have to apologize for his win-loss record. AL Rookie of the Year: Wil Myers. This is much less exciting than the NL Rookie of the Year Race, which pits phenom pitcher against phenom batter, Jose Fernandez against Yasiel Puig. In a way I’m happy not to be forced to make that decision. Myers has had a nice year, but it pales in comparison to Fernandez and Puig. Not to disparage Myers’ season; he has played a large role in fueling the Rays’ run to the postseason. Let’s just say that if Myers was a rookie last year, a certain Angel would have steamrolled him.

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Max Scherzer, a 21-game winner this season, is likely to win the AL Cy Young.

Football Fordham 14 0 3 21 38 St. Francis 0 6 14 0 20 (FOR) M. Nebirch 253yds 3TDs C. Koonce 126yds TD T. Jones 118yds TD (SFU) M. Ward 79yds INT K. Harbridge 291yds 3TDs B. Neal 12tkls sack Men’s Soccer Fordham 0 0 0 Temple 0 1 1 Goals: M. Mahoney (TU) 75’ Shots: FOR- 10 TU- 12 Columbia 0 2 2 Fordham 0 0 0 Goals: A. Matarazzo (COL) 52’ A. Tinari (COL) 83’ Shots: FOR- 8 COL- 14

Women’s Soccer Volleyball Princeton 1 2 3 Fordham 15 16 14 0 Fordham 0 1 1 Rhode Island 25 25 25 3 Goals: E. Hoglund (PRIN) 30’ (FOR) L. Hipp 7 kills T. Lussi (PRIN) 75’ M. Rodenberg 10 digs T. Lussi (PRIN) 78’ S. Konkel 13 assists K. Dougherty Howard (FOR) (URI) C. Steffen 10 kills 82’ F. Darnold 11 digs Shots: FOR- 9 C. Kinnan 30 assists PRIN- 13 Fordham 21 25 25 25 3 Rhode Island 1 0 1 Geo. Mason 25 18 22 22 1 Fordham 12 3 (FOR) L. Hipp 25 kills Goals: M. Canicatti (FOR) 21’ B. O’Neil 13 digs A. Stanton (URI) 26’ L. Ritchie 27 assists K. Dougherty Howard (FOR) (GMU) M. Martin 13 kills 53’ B. Moore 17 digs M. Canicatti (FOR) 53’ T. Price 34 assists Shots: FOR- 12 URI- 3 Men’s Tennis NY Tech 4 Fordham 3 Adelphi 2 Fordham 5

Athletes of the Week Each week The Fordham Ram’s Sports editors honor one male athlete and one female athlete for their on-field performance as its “Athletes of the Week.”

Freshman

Kelsey Dougherty Howard Senior

Football

Soccer

Jorge Solano

Solano got the Rams’ matchup againt St. Francis (Pa.) off to a great start, returning the opening kickoff 96 yards for a touchdown. He finished the day with 107 return yards.

Dougherty Howard scored a pair of goals on the week. She scored the lone goal in the Princeton game and the goahead goal in the Rams’ matchup with Rhode Island.

News & Notes

• Fordham football jumped up three spots in the FCS Coaches’ Poll this week and now sits at No. 13. The Rams take on No. 10 Lehigh in a highly anticipated matchup this weekend. • The football team has scored 198 points in its first five games, a new school record. • A pair of women’s tennis players took home the “B“ doubles title at the 2013 Eastern Championship. Juniors Anika Novacek and Bella Genika defeated three other doubles pairings for the title. • The Atlantic 10 Conference announced the women’s basketball conference schedule this week. The Fordham schedule includes three nationally televised games; two games on the CBS Sports Network and one on ESPNU. • Former Fordham pitcher Nick Martinez was named the Texas Rangers Minor League Pitcher of the Month for August/September. Martinez had a combined 3-0 record with a 0.95 ERA for the Double-A Frisco Roughriders and the Advanced-A Myrtle Beach Pelicans.


SPORTS

October 2, 2013

Page 21

Mariano Rivera: A Legend in More Ways than One By MACK ROSENBERG CONTRIBUTING WRITER

You may not be a baseball fan. You may not even be a sports fan, but you should still take note when Mariano Rivera exits stage left this fall after a 19-year career as the greatest closer in baseball history. He stands for all that is right in sports. Anyone who participates in any team-oriented activity should model themselves after him. Sure, his statistical feats are probably the reason he is so well-liked by baseball fans young and old, but this is a man whose success story is intriguing because of where he started and how he rose up from a poor childhood to become the person he is today. He played baseball with milk cartons for gloves and tree branches for bats while growing up in a small fishing village in Panama. That is a very difficult childhood to imagine, and it is where Rivera gets his humble nature. He knows where he came from, and there is no doubt he takes that with him wherever he goes. Mo is the definition of what it means to be a team player. First of all, he respects the game. In a day and age when just about every player in baseball can be connected to performance enhancing drugs, no one will ever utter his name in the same sentence as the word “steroids.” He is the ultimate teammate. When news broke over the summer about Alex Rodriguez and the eventual ban from baseball he would be facing for use of performance enhancing drugs, the media wondered how other Yankee players would react.

When asked for his thoughts on the scandal, Mo was all class. He gave full support to his teammate while at the same time accepting the fact that the whole story has not been told yet and said “we need to see what happens.” Mariano, and the way he carries himself, do not resemble the personality of some star we put on a mantle. He embodies a real, down-to-earth human being. He is not a larger than life figure. In fact, he is more than approachable. Covering the Yankees for WFUV, I got used to being around Mo after games, and he was always surprised when reporters wanted to talk to him after a game. It was never about him. Nolan Silbernagel, FCRH ‘14, my colleague on the Yankees beat for WFUV, echoes those same sentiments. “He never looked down on anyone despite everything he had done,” Silbernagel said. “Whenever people would ask him about his milestones, he would just say that the bottom line is it means we won the game. That’s all he cared about.” Rivera’s attitude about winning, and even losing, is admirable. An example of this came earlier in the season, when he blew three straight saves. Fans cringed as they watched. If any other pitcher was on the mound, it is safe to say he would not have been given much of a chance with fans after that. However, this is a man who knows how to handle failure. For Mo, it is simple: get back out there the next day and execute. This is the message that so many players in baseball, whether pitchers or position players, live by, including

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

Mariano Rivera announced in March that this would be his final season. He holds the all-time record for saves with 652.

Jonathon Broxton, the former closer for the Los Angeles Dodgers who spoke with Rivera in 2010. One year prior, in game four of the 2009 National League Championship Series, Broxton blew a save against the Philadelphia Phillies. A crucial point in the game came when Broxton walked Matt Stairs on four pitches to set up a Philadelphia walkoff win. The backstory here is that Broxton had faced Stairs a year earlier in

2008, and Stairs hit a home run. Mo did his homework and met Broxton at Dodger Stadium in LA. The two immediately began talking about the at-bat against Stairs. Rivera asked the Dodger closer why he walked Stairs. Broxton shrugged with no answer. Rivera then gave him the answer, which was that Broxton had the 2008 at-bat in the back of his mind and didn’t want to make another mistake. The great Rivera, in a father-son

moment, then said to Broxton, “One thing you have to do as a closer is if a guy beats you the day before, he has to be the guy you want to face the next day. It’s OK, you got me, but let’s go again.” Most would agree this strategy is one that has worked for the past 19 seasons. Mariano Rivera is a reminder of what it means to be a genuine team player, as well as a reminder that the all-around good guy in sports never

The Ram’s Sports Editors’ Predictions for the MLB Playoffs Dan Gartland, Exec. Sports Editor AL Champ: Detroit Tigers NL Champ: Los Angeles Dodgers World Series: Tigers in 6 Boston and Detroit have the two highest-scoring offenses in the majors. The Red Sox have a wellrounded offense, with a strong lineup from top to bottom, which will make them dangerous in October. The Tigers rely more on one player, but that player is the best hitter in the world: Miguel Cabrera. If he plays as well in the playoffs as he did in the regular season, it will be tough to stop the Tigers. If he takes his game to another level, the other teams might as well go home. If he struggles — and here’s where the Tigers have an advantage over the Red Sox — Detroit’s strong pitching can keep the Tigers afloat. I mean, statistically speaking, Justin Verlander was the Tigers’ thirdbest starter this season, which goes to show how deep this staff is. Pitching is also why I like the Dodgers. The Cardinals also have a great chance to win the pennant, even without Allen Craig, but the Dodgers have Clayton Kershaw. Kershaw deserves to win the Cy Young after posting a 1.88 ERA and 0.92 WHIP, and having a dominant pitcher like that is incredibly valuable in the playoffs. The Los Angeles offense is nothing to sneeze at either. Hanley Ramirez only played half the season but still managed to record 20 home runs and 57 RBIs

while batting .345. Adrian Gonzalez and Andre Ethier swing the bat well, too. Plus, everyone knows what Yasiel Puig is capable of. Don’t forget, this is a team that went on a 46-10 tear from June 22 to Aug. 23. Matt Rosenfeld, Sports Editor AL Champ: Boston Red Sox NL Champ: Los Angeles Dodgers World Series: Dodgers in 7 It was a tough baseball year for me. As a die-hard Yankees fan, it was brutal to watch teams like the Pirates and Athletics dominate while my beloved Yankees suffered. That being said, I have to pick a World Series winner. As much as it pains me to say it, the Red Sox have been the class of the American League this year. I truly do “fear the beard” and think the Sox will edge out the Tigers in the ALCS. As for the National League, a piece of me wants to say the Pirates will have a miracle run and prove all the haters wrong, but I don’t actually believe that will happen. I see the Dodgers defeating the Cardinals in the NLCS to move on to their first World Series since 1988. In a coastal matchup between classic baseball franchises, I have to give the trophy to the Dodgers. Yes, part of this is bias against the Red Sox, but part of it is a feeling that this is the Dodgers’ year. Why? PuigMania and Clayton Kershaw. Adrian Gonzalez and Hanley Ramirez getting revenge on the team that traded

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

Clayton Kershaw is the front-runner for the National League Cy Young award. He had the lowest ERA in baseball this year.

them. Plus, how can you pick against Magic Johnson? It’s the Dodgers’ year. Max Prinz, Assistant Sports Editor AL Champ: Detroit Tigers NL Champ: Los Angeles Dodgers World Series: Tigers in 6 At the end of the baseball season, the players who had the best years

are the award winners. Shouldn’t it follow that the teams who have award winners are the best teams? It doesn’t always work that way, but I’m betting that it will this year. The Los Angeles Dodgers have a pair of final candidates for two end of season awards. While he probably won’t win Rookie of the Year, Yasiel Puig has caught the entire baseball world’s attention with his fantastic play. Additionally, many experts

have Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw on not just their ballot for Cy Young, but for MVP as well. In the American League, the Tigers have two players likely to pick up the MVP and Cy Young awards. Miguel Cabrera won his third straight batting title and Max Scherzer just finished a fantastic 21-win season. This is the year the Tigers’ award winners bring home a World Series trophy too.


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Kearns’ Kickoff Loyalty can lead to painful moments for sports fans, and nobody knows this better than Cleveland football and baseball fans. After all, Cleveland’s most famous sports moments are “The Decision”, “The Drive” and “The Fumble.” Thankfully, the Indians and Browns are finally giving Cleveland reasons to cheer. Things looked bleak on Sept. 18. The Browns had started 0-2 and traded their star running back Trent Richardson for a 2014 first round draft pick. Long-suffering fans threatened to protest, while third string QB Brian Hoyer was named the starter after Brandon Weeden got injured. Meanwhile, the Indians had just lost two of three games in Kansas City, falling behind Texas and Tampa Bay in the American League wild card race. Questions surfaced about Cleveland’s shaky bullpen and the inexperience across the Indians lineup. Despite manager Terry Francona’s brilliance, nobody would have been shocked if the Indians failed to fulfill their October dreams. The turnarounds for both teams have been equal parts swift and uplifting. The Indians finished their season with a 10-game winning streak to surge past the Texas Rangers and Tampa Bay Rays in the AL playoff race. The game that exemplifies Cleveland’s season occurred on Sept. 24. The Indians entered the ninth inning with a 3-2 edge over the White Sox, but the lead evaporated after two Chicago homers. With two outs in the ninth, Francona brought Jason Giambi off the bench to pinchhit, and Giambi drilled an improbable two-run shot for the 5-4 Indians victory. The Indians don’t have any marquee players but will cause problems for any opponent, especially the Red Sox. Meanwhile, the Browns have risen to first place behind the heroics of hometown quarterback Brian Hoyer. With miniscule expectations, Cleveland visited Minnesota and rallied past the Vikings behind three touchdown catches by Jordan Cameron. Last Sunday, the Bengals came to Lake Erie seeking another win in the Buckeye State battle, but Cleveland’s defense dictated the game, forcing two turnovers in a convincing 17-6 win. Hoyer now has an eye-popping 590 yards and five TD passes in his first two NFL starts, and the defense looks better than it has in years. For two nights, Cleveland will be the center of the sports world. Its Indians will be playing in front of a sellout crowd Oct. 2, and would advance to face the Boston Red Sox in the AL Division Series with a win. On Oct. 3, the Browns host the Buffalo Bills for sole possession of first place in the AFC North. This might be the biggest sporting week for Cleveland since 2007, the last year either team enjoyed a winning season. No city needs this athletic renaissance more than Cleveland, whose fans have suffered several lifetimes’ worth of heartbreak in the past 30 years. For all we know, the Indians and Browns may suffer gutwrenching home defeats and return the city to its depressing equilibrium. In the meantime, Cleveland and its loyal fans get my shout-out because they deserve the love. — Dominic Kearns

SPORTS

Senior Profile: Julian Nagel

ELIZABETH ZANGHI/THE RAM

Nagel came over to the United States from Kiel, Germany where he attended Kieler Gelehrtenschule for high school.

By MAX PRINZ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Julian Nagel came to Fordham after competing in the highest level youth league in Germany. Last season he was tied for the team lead in points with six. The Fordham Ram: You’re originally from Germany right? How did you end up at Fordham? Julian Nagel: I played soccer in Germany in U19 Bundesliga which is the highest youth league in Germany, and I was one of the only kids who finished the highest form of high school. In Germany there are three different types and only if you finish the highest one can you go and study in Germany or in America. Someone came and said to me there was the possibility to get scholarships in the U.S. and told me to take a look at that. So I started Googling soccer scholarships in the U.S. and the first company that came up I contacted. I took an evaluation test and they thought I was good enough to get a scholarship. They made a profile for me with photos and videos so coaches could start looking at me. I got like 20 to 30 offers from all around the country, Nebraska, Ohio, whatever. But, I always wanted to go to a big city. Most of the people I knew wanted to go just for a year to learn the language and go back. But I wanted to go and maybe stay, so I looked for a place I would love. I knew I wanted a big city because I’m from a small town back home and I didn’t want the same thing. Then, about two weeks before the deadline, Fordham contacted me and I thought it looked really good, said yes and here I am. TFR: What’s been your favorite part of going to school at Fordham? JN: Well, of course, a great part, in my opinion, is that it’s so close to the city. That was one of the major things that made me come here, that it’s so convenient to go into the city. This year is the first year that I have taken a Lincoln Center class, for example, and it’s

a cool thing to go back and forth between the Bronx and the city. Another great thing is that it’s like a family here. Back in Europe, every university is set up kind of like NYU. You don’t have a campus; you have buildings all around the city and you live in your apartment. You go to class and you go back to your apartment; you don’t really have anything to do with the people in your class. At Fordham it’s different because you live on a campus that is gated and everybody goes to class with each other and everybody lives with each other. I think that’s a great part of Fordham, that you have a family.

If I go back, I would still like to play soccer, but you start working at a job and probably don’t have time to do it on a high level. This is kind of like my goodbye to my whole life. When I was younger, I spent every minute playing soccer. I practiced even more than I do now. It’s a really weird feeling. But on the other hand, I’m ready for a new start. My interests shifted from just focusing on soccer to doing something else in my life. It’s a sad goodbye, but I’m happy to start something else.

TFR: What’s the biggest difference between playing soccer here and playing soccer in Germany?

JN: I started games in my freshman year, so I’ve already been a big part of the team from my freshman year on. I feel like my role didn’t really change over the last four years because I’ve always been a big part of the team. Obviously having a scholarship and being from Europe they know I bring something different to the team than probably anyone else. I don’t think my roles changed, it’s always been a big role and I’ve always been involved.

JN: The differences are actually huge. European soccer, and German soccer in general, is really offense-oriented. There are a lot of goals and you never know how the game is going to end. If there’s a 5-1 game nobody is really surprised. Over here, everything is all about the defense. I think there are two games I’ve played in the last three years that have ended with a one goal difference, which is really weird. I think that’s because everybody is so focused on defense. There’s one goal in the game and that makes the big difference. Back in Germany there could be a 4-0 or a 6-0 and it’s not that big of a deal, while here it feels like that’s a huge deal. I think that’s one of the reasons why soccer’s not that popular. There’s one chance in the whole game to cheer. TFR: What’s it like knowing this is your last season? JN: It’s weird. Thinking about it and looking back, I’ve been here for more than three years and it flew by like crazy. When I came from Europe I didn’t choose to become a professional soccer player because I wanted to study. Coming here was the only possibility to do both on a high level. I knew that this was going to be the last four years of my life where I could play soccer on an almost professional level.

TFR: How has your role changed over your four years?

TFR: What has been your favorite soccer moment at Fordham? JN: I scored a free kick goal last year, against VCU I think. That was really good because we haven’t scored a free kick goal ever that I can remember. I don’t know when the last time that we scored one was, and that was to tie the game. It was a great experience and a great celebration. That was definitely one of the best moments I’ve had. TFR: Do you have any plans for after graduation? JN: Not yet. I haven’t decided on staying or going back home yet because I’m not sure what’s coming up. We’ll see. I know that eventually I’m probably going to live in Europe. I don’t think I’m going to start a life here and become an American. But I’m not sure if I’ll start working here and then go back or what. It’s going to be a tough decision.

October 2, 2013

Deuce’s Wild As we enter the MLB playoffs, it’s anyone’s game. In fact, it’s so tight that the last spot on the American League side had to be decided with a 163rd game. Baseball is not dead, as a Monday New York Times article proclaimed. In fact, it’s just the opposite. Baseball is thriving. This year’s postseason is a familiar story. There’s the team that bought all the best players (Dodgers), the boring, all-around solid team (Cardinals), the bounce-back team (Red Sox) and the Cinderella (Pirates; first appearance in 21 years). And each team has components that are compelling to watch. The Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw is far and away the best pitcher in baseball, Pirates starter Francisco Liriano finally stayed healthy for a full year and dominated, Matt Carpenter of the Cardinals came out of nowhere to post near-MVP numbers and Jarrod Saltalamacchia, with whom some Sox fans were finished a year ago, posted a .273 average and 14 home runs. How about a potential Rookie of the Year getting traded mid-season? Jose Iglesias was dealt from Boston to Detroit this summer, and if both advance to the next round, the two teams will face each other. There are endless storylines to talk about this postseason. It is going to be great television. To me, the Dodgers have what it takes to win it all. We’ve seen the Yankees buy championships, why can’t Los Angeles? They have one of the league’s best players in Hanley Ramirez, a sparkplug in Yasiel Puig, consistency in Adrian Gonzalez and a well-rounded rotation around Kershaw. The only eyesores in the Dodgers’ lineup are Mark Ellis and AJ Ellis; at least, one would think. Both are hitting at least .270 this year, low for the high-powered L.A. lineup. The most telling is the stretch they had a few months ago, winning 37 of 45 games. It shows the chemistry needed by an assembled cast of stars like this one. Often times the pieces don’t fit, as the Yankees learned for a stretch in the early 2000s, and it’s a struggle. It hurts when so much money is invested in a club that is not clicking, but the Dodgers have been music to Magic Johnson’s ears. I’m picking the Dodgers to win the World Series and I think they’ll meet the A’s there. Even though it’d be a West Coast affair, I do believe this would be good for the game of baseball. The Oakland Coliseum, recently condemned by Bud Selig, would be rocking. The moneyball talk would be at an all-time high. Jonah Hill would be pumping his fist. Fine, maybe not that last one, but you get my point. The A’s need to get to the World Series to put the perfect bow on what has been one of their most competitive seasons in recent history. There would really be nothing more perfect. Still, I wouldn’t give them too much of a shot to beat Los Angeles. Clayton Kershaw won’t allow more than six earned runs this postseason. The Dodgers will win the World Series. Mark it down. — Kenny Ducey


October 2, 2013

Novacek and Genkina Win Tournament at West Point

SPORTS

Page 23

By MATT ROSENFELD SPORTS EDITOR

MICAHEL HAYES/THE RAM

Anika Novacek was part of the B Doubles team that won the title on Sunday.

By TARA CANGIALOSI CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The Fordham women’s tennis team was back in action this past weekend as the Rams competed in the 2013 Eastern Championship from Sept. 27 to Sept. 29 at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y. The highlight of the invitational for the Rams came on Sunday, when the junior duo of Anika Novacek and Bella Genkina captured the “B” doubles tournament with an 8-6 win over Stony Brook’s Becky Shtilkind and Cassandra Dix. In their journey to the finals, the pair defeated teams from Albany and Army both by a score of 8-3. In the semifinal match, Novacek and Genkina rallied to beat Illinois’ Julia Jamieson and Emily Barretta 8-5, earning them a spot in the finals, where they were ultimately victorious. Also in the B doubles tournament, freshman Destiny Grunin teamed up with Army’s Kelly Daniel, where they fell to Sacred Heart 8-7 (4). In the back draw, the pair dropped their match to Quinnipiac’s Ariana Launie and Daniella Reyes in a close score of 8-7 (5). In other doubles action, juniors Elliesa Ball and Sarah Ali played in A doubles, where they fell to Seton Hall’s Roccio Portela-Berrio and Chloe Sher by a score of 8-7 (3). Also, the junior-senior combination of Julie Leong and Angelika Dabu won its first match in C doubles, defeating Seton Hall’s Hannah Liljkevist and Madison Shoemaker 8-7 (4), but fell 8-4 to Stony Brook’s Louise Badoche and Nadie Smergut in the round of 16. On the singles court, Ball bounced back from her 6-3, 6-2 first round loss to LIU’s Sanne Louwers to win the back draw of the first singles tournament. After her initial loss, Ball moved into the

back draw, where she beat Sacred Heart’s Katie DeReinzo 8-5, Stony Brook’s Jackie Altan Sarni 8-4 and Connecticut’s Srna Stosljevic 8-6 in the finals. “Ball winning the A back draw after taking a first round loss showed what a great competitor she is,” Coach Bette-Ann Liguori said. In second singles, Novacek bettered Marielle Campbell from Marist with a 6-4, 6-4 win before losing to Julia Jamison of Illinois in the round of 16, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Dabu played in the second singles as well, but dropped her first round match to Bryant’s Ryan Brown 7-5, 5-7, 10-3. Both Leong and Grunin competed in the third singles tournament, with Leong falling to UConn’s Shea Flanagan in the round of 16, 6-4, 6-3, while Grunin handily defeated Sacred Heart’s Mariah Wardus 6-1, 6-0 in the round of 32. In the back draw, Leong fell to Albany’s Cat Crummey 8-4, and Grunin dropped her match to Sydney Young from Quinnipiac in three sets, 6-0, 3-6, 10-1. Genkina got as far as the semifinals in fourth singles. In the opening round, she defeated Albany’s Mirelle Hermans 6-2, 6-2, and then bettered Alexandra Landert from Seton Hall by the same score. In the semifinals, Genkina lost to Lisa Setyon of Stony Brook 6-2, 6-1. Although the team only placed first in one title at the Eastern Championship, its performance was strong. “This tournament has such a high level of play that to be in the finals of any of the draws is a great accomplishment,” Liguori said. “All in all, I’m pleased with our showing.” The Rams will take on Seton Hall next in their second dual match of the year on Oct. 6 at noon on the Hawthorne/Rooney Courts.

On Sunday, one of the most critically-acclaimed television shows in history, “Breaking Bad,” ended with a bang. Walter White and company exited stage right in tremendous fashion and certainly left all of us “Breaking Bad” fans satisfied. Mr. White had gone from a regular man, schoolteacher and father to borderline insane drug lord. Walter White truly did break bad. Sunday was also Week 4 of the NFL, closing the first quarter of the NFL season. While there have been many surprises, including the 0-4 Giants and Steelers, a few teams have managed to exceed expectations. Like every other year, five or six teams are surprising the league and threatening to change the landscape of the playoffs later in the year. In honor of the late “Breaking Bad,” I will tell you about two teams that are off to a hot start that you can definitely expect to “break bad” and finish the season much worse off than they had started: Tennessee Titans — The Titans currently sit at 3-1 and are tied with the Colts for the lead in the AFC South. Led by second year quarterback Jake Locker, who suffered a right hip injury in yesterday’s win over the Jets, the Titans have been the product of an easy early season schedule. Wins over the 2-2, but perennially hapless, Jets and the 0-4 Steelers, along with a close win at home over the Chargers, have led to a good start. The next three games for the Titans are: at home against the 4-0 Chiefs, at the 4-0 Seahawks, who are nearly impossible to beat in Seattle and home against the 49ers. It’s not crazy to think the 3-1 Titans could find themselves at 3-4 heading into their Week 8 bye. They also find themselves top in the league in turnover margin at +9. While they could be having a good season in the turnover department, it

is much more likely that they will fall back to earth a bit, another sign that the Titans might not be the best going forward. Furthermore, the Titans already rank 29th in the NFL for offense and that was with Locker at the helm. Now with Locker out for four to eight weeks and Ryan Fitzpatrick leading the way, it is hard to imagine the Titans being able to score enough to maintain their winning ways and earn themselves a playoff spot. Chicago Bears — The Bears are another 3-1 team through a quarter of the season who I can easily see “breaking bad” as the season heads into the fall and winter. Simply put, the Bears have been on the right side of the turnover stats thus far, and that worries me. Sitting at fifth in the league at +5, the Bears are secretly a team that could find themselves in trouble in that department heading forward. Why, you ask? You’d expect a team that leads the league in takeaways to have much better than a +5 turnover margin, right? That’s the problem. The Bears turn the ball over far too much for me to feel confident

in them going forward. It is hard to sustain a rate of 3.5 takeaways per game. It is much more likely that Jay Cutler continues to throw too many interceptions, though. The Bears quarterback already has six this year, second to only Eli Manning in the NFC. Cutler has been an interception-prone quarterback his whole career and I don’t see that stopping all of a sudden after four games. While I don’t see the Bears tanking this season by any means, I would not be surprised to see them finish third behind Green Bay and Detroit in the secretly tough NFC North. While the Chiefs, Dolphins and Colts are all candidates to have their seasons become a lot less successful than they are now, the Titans and Bears have the characteristics that make it hard to believe that they will sustain their success. Surely no turn from good to bad will be as epic or as memorable as Walter White’s was, but you can count on the Tennessee Titans and Chicago Bears doing their best imitation.

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

Jay Cutler’s knack for turning the ball over does not bode well for the Bears.

Upcoming Varsity Schedule Home games in CAPS

Thursday Oct. 3

Friday Oct. 4

Saturday Oct. 5

Sunday Oct. 6

Monday Oct. 7

Tuesday Oct. 8

Wednesday Oct. 9

LEHIGH 12 p.m.

Football

Men’s Soccer SAINT JOSEPH’S 1 p.m.

at La Salle 7 p.m.

Women’s Soccer

SETON HALL 12 p.m.

Women’s Tennis at Columbia Invitational All Day

Men’s Tennis

at Army, Marist, Iona 9 a.m.

Rowing Water Polo Golf Volleyball

BINGHAMTON 7 p.m.

at Whittier 3 p.m.

at Gary Troyer Tournament All Day at Yale Invitational All Day DUQUESNE 7 p.m.

at St. Francis (N.Y.) 7:30 p.m.


Sports

Page 24

October 2, 2013

Victory Over St. Francis (Pa.) Sets Up Showdown With Lehigh By DAN GARTLAND EXECUTIVE SPORTS EDITOR

And the Rams keep rolling. Fordham, ranked 16th in both FCS polls, dispatched St. Francis (Pa.) on the road Saturday afternoon. The Rams improved to 5-0 on the year, setting up a clash with Lehigh (4-0) at Jack Coffey Field this coming Saturday. Fordham wasted no time getting on the board, as freshman receiver Jorge Solano returned the opening kickoff 96 yards for a touchdown. The Rams would eventually surrender the lead when a 71-yard touchdown run by the Red Flash’s stellar redshirt senior running back Kyle Harbridge put St. Francis up 20-17 with 3:21 left in the third quarter. Fordham responded with three unanswered touchdowns and came away with a 38-20 victory. Redshirt sophomore quarterback Michael Nebrich continued his strong season, passing for 253 yards with four touchdowns on the afternoon. He and Solano earned honorable mentions from the Patriot League for their performances. Harbridge racked up a whopping 291 rushing yards in the game on 29 carries and scored all three of his team’s touchdowns. He even passed the ball for a twopoint conversion after one of his scores. Harbridge ranks second in the FCS in rushing yards with 753, despite having played one fewer game than the others on the top of the leaderboard. He leads in rushing yards per game by a wide

ALLY WHITE/THE RAM

Carlton Koonce had his third consecutive 100-yard game. He recorded 126 yards on the ground and scored a touchdown. He also had 21 receiving yards.

margin with 188.3. Fordham head coach Joe Moorhead called Harbridge “a tremendous running back”. “They’re going to run the ball 50 or 60 times a game, and when they do that you have to commit a lot of people to the box, and we had nine men committed,” Moorhead continued. “We stopped him for minimal gains for most of the game, but if you’re out of a gap, or you miss a tackle against a guy like that and you’ve got that many people committed to the box, the run is going to split and go a long way.” Moorhead also said that while he was upset with the number of yards the Rams allowed on the

ground, he was pleased that they only gave up 20 points. Fordham’s matchup against Lehigh should be different. The Mountain Hawks’ offensive attack relies much more heavily on the pass. Lehigh is averaging 388.8 passing yards per game, compared to 121 on the ground. The Rams’ defense performs much better against the pass than against the run. Fordham ranks 13th in the FCS in passing yards allowed per game, but 86th in rushing defense. “I think they have featured the pass but are capable of running the ball, too,” Moorhead said. “Their offensive coordinator does an unbelievable job using the weapons

at his disposal… While our primary focus might be to stop the pass, we can’t be mindful to forget the run, because they can run it at you, too.” Lehigh’s come-from-behind victory over No. 7 New Hampshire earned the Mountain Hawks a boost in this weeks’ polls. They come in at No. 13 in The Sports Network poll and No. 10 in the coaches’ poll. Fordham ranks 12th and 13th in each poll, respectively. The game falls on Fordham’s Family Weekend and a large crowd is expected. It will also be broadcast nationally on the CBS Sports Network. Saturday afternoon will be the

second time this season that a ranked team will visit Jack Coffey Field. The first was on Sept. 7 when Fordham beat No. 8 Villanova, 27-24. This time around, though, the Rams are not considered the underdog. “It does not feel different,” Moorhead said of being the favorite. “I talked to the team and I said, ‘Whoever has beaten Lehigh here, raise your hand,’ and no one’s hand went up. None of our players on our current roster have beaten Lehigh and myself, as a player and as a coach, I’ve never beaten Lehigh. We may be the prohibitive favorite on paper, but until we beat them, we’re the underdog.”

Slump Continues for Men’s Soccer; Rams Lose Fifth Straight Match By MAX PRINZ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

The Fordham men’s soccer team lost a pair of matches last week, dropping its record to 2-6 on the year. The team has now lost five straight matches and four of those five were decided by one goal; the Rams have been mired in quite a slump. After suffering a one goal defeat at home to the Stony Brook Seawolves, the Rams traveled to Philadelphia to take on Temple. The match began fairly evenly, as both teams recorded five first half shots and neither team was able to separate from the other. The Rams got a huge chance to take the lead in the second half, but junior Ollie Kelly’s shot in the 60th minute hit the crossbar. Temple would score in the 75th minute off of a feed from the corner, giving the Owls a 1-0 win and the Rams their fourth consecutive one-goal loss. The match against Columbia offered yet another tough challenge for Fordham. The Lions entered the match on a four game winning streak, quite the opposite of the Rams’ equally long losing streak. Compounding the challenge was the loss of senior Nathaniel Bekoe, who was injured in the Temple game. “I think the frustrating part right now is we’ve had guys in and out of the lineup through injury,” head

coach Jim McElderry said. “It’s been really tough to get a continuity within our starting lineup and our rotation system has changed game to game. It’s tough for guys to jump in and out and play as well as they are capable of.” Those streaks clearly meant nothing in the first half as both teams were held scoreless. The Rams registered six first half shots to Columbia’s five. Both teams were awarded a pair of corner kicks and both goalkeepers made a pair of saves. The first half was very much neck and neck. The second half, though, would continue the relative streaks of both teams. “I thought for the first half we played really well,” McElderry said. “I thought we were as good as them, created a couple more chances than them, but then the game changed.” Columbia would score in the 52nd minute of the match. The Lions made a deep run into their attacking third that drew a foul on Fordham. Antonio Matarazzo took the free kick from 24 yards out and put it in the back of the net to give Columbia a 1-0 lead. “I thought we made an unneccessary foul and they scored on the direct free kick, which has happened to us a couple times this year, which is disappointing,” McElderry said. “Then we were just chasing the game.” The Rams showed a great deal of

ELIZABETH ZANGHI/THE RAM

The Rams’ record stands at 2-6, following a five-game losing streak. They can rebound against Manhattan Wednesday.

resolve, pressing an attack of their own and trying to find an equalizer. Fordham earned a free kick in the 53rd minute and another in the 60th, but was unable to convert to tie the game. The Lions took advantage of the Rams’ willingness to press and added an insurance goal in the 83rd minute. The second half clearly wore down the Rams, as Columbia would finish with a 14-8 advantage in shots. “The second goal we conceded I

wasn’t too worried about because we were pressing and you’ve got to take a chance,” McElderry said. “We played very well for the first half but we’ve got to find ways to put together a whole game if we want to be successful.” The team put forth an impressive effort, but was unable to break out of its slump against a very hot Columbia team, losing 2-0. “To be honest, the guys have put forward a great effort and I

don’t have too many complaints,” McElderry said. “In some ways I wish I did because I’d have something to be angry about.” The Rams will look to end their losing streak this week as they take on rival Manhattan on Oct. 2 and St. Louis on Oct. 11. “The guys have trained hard and I expect that to continue,” McElderry said. “Hopefully we can get going when our conference season starts in two weeks. “


Volume 95, Issue 15