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PRESENTS

T

AUSTEN! ’S R E H T O M UR GR AND O Y ’T N S I HIS


Production of

by

KATE HAMILL adapted from the novel by

JANE AUSTEN World premiere production co-produced by Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival and Primary Stages; June 24, 2017, Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival

Artistic Director

Managing Director

DAVIS MCCALLUM

KATE LIBERMAN

November 19, 2017, Primary Stages

Artistic Director

Managing Director

ANDREW LEYNSE

SHANE D. HUDSON

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE received a presentation as part of The Other Season at Seattle Repertory Theatre 2016-2017. Š2020. This video recording was produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service and Kate Hamill. All rights reserved. This performance is authorized for noncommercial use only. By accepting the video recording, you agree not to authorize or permit the video recording to be copied, distributed, broadcast, telecast or otherwise exploited, in whole or in part, in any media now known or hereafter developed. WARNING: Federal law provides severe civil and criminal penalties for the unauthorized reproduction, distribution or exhibition of copyrighted motion pictures, videotapes or videodiscs. Criminal copyright infringement is investigated by the FBI and may constitute a felony with a maximum penalty of up to five years in prison and/or a $250,000.00 fine.

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Director

Choreographer

Jessica Walck

Emma Canalese

Stage Manager/Production Assistant

Season Dramaturg

Andrew Meador

Ricki Baker

July 9-11, 2020 Executive Artistic Director, Bryce Alexander Director of Education, Hester Kamin Education Stage Manager, Kenzie Currie

MEDIA SPONSOR:

This project is sponsored in part by the Department of State. Division of Cultural Affairs, The Florida Council of Arts & Culture and the State of Florida

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Cast

(in alphabetical order) Lady Catherine De Bourgh…...................................................K .C. A LLEN Wickham…......................................................................CHRIST I A N BOFF Mr. Bennet…......................................................................E THAN BRENDEL Dance Ensemble / Lizzy Understudy…................................ A BBY CI A BATON Dance Ensemble….............................................................VERONICA DA N A Jan e B e n n e t…............................................................ D A N I E L L A F L O M S e r va n t…........................................................... A B R I A G I G A N T E Mar y Benne t…...........................................................G I S Z E L L E K I R TO N Servant…...............................................................................K ARLI KNEPFLER Mr. Bingley….................................................................L A NDON L I BBE Y Mr s. Bennet…...............................................................I S A B E L M O R R I S Miss Bingley…..................................................................K RISTEN NOBLE Lizzy Bennet…...................................................................OLIVIA PETERSEN Charlot te Lucas…..............................................................RY L E E P R I C E Ser vant / Mr s. Long….......................................................... B A IL E Y R EU M M r. C o llin s…...................................................................K E N N Y T R A N Lydia Bennet….....................................................................P R E S L I E T R U E Mr. Dar cy…............................................................... . . D O M I N I C Y O U N G

Crew Chor eogr apher…...........................................................Emma C analese Stage Manager/ Production Assistant…............................. Andrew Meador Director/ Film Editor…........................................................Jessica Walck

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THE DOLLAR$

Sense of It!

A man’s status in 19th century British society was based on the land he held - land was a symbol both of wealth and of social rank. Simply put, land equaled affluence and influence! To make certain a man’s descendants received the inheritance that was due to them, a system known as primogeniture was created. Primogeniture means that all the land in each generation’s possession must always be left (or “entailed”) to the eldest son in the family, not divided among siblings. Also, an entail meant that this eldest son couldn’t mortgage, divide, or sell his inheritance. It had to be held for his eldest son, and on and on… The idea was that by leaving the land to the eldest son, the estate would remain intact for future generations.  But what if there were no sons?  Just such a “disaster” is an important part of the plot of Pride and Prejudice. And it’s exactly why Mr. Collins, a cousin of Mr. Bennet, stands to inherit Longbourn and all of Mr. Bennet’s land. Think about it: Mr. Bennet has only daughters, no sons. Because of primogeniture, the girls cannot inherit their father’s estate…nor can their husbands, if and when they marry. Jane and Elizabeth try hard - and often -  to explain the law of entails to their mother; but on this subject, Mrs. Bennet is beyond the reach of reason. In the play, she rails bitterly against the cruelty of taking an estate away from a family of daughters in favor of “a man whom nobody cared anything about.” For her part,  Mrs. Bennet would even like Lizzy to marry Mr. Collins to save Longbourn.  And primogeniture explains why Mrs. Bennet is so intent on seeing her daughters marry “well” - they will have NO inheritance and will lose their home! The richer the suitor, the happier Mrs. Bennet is about the prospect of one of her daughters marrying him! It also explains why there’s so much conversation in the play about Bingley and Darcy’s income. Bingley was said to have 5,000 British pounds per year….equal to nearly 375,000 pounds today or about $450,000. And Mr. Darcy was even richer with 10,000 British pounds per year, almost 700,000  pounds today, or more than $900,000 annually! (By the way, the practice of primogeniture remained in effect until 1925, when it was changed by law.) 5


PRIDE

PREJUDICE

for ALL!

For sure, this is not your grandmother’s Jane Austen! Bold, surprising, boisterous, and timely, Kate Hamill’s Pride and Prejudice is a modern romp that explores the absurdities and thrills of finding one’s perfect (or imperfect) match. The outspoken Lizzy Bennet is determined never to marry, despite mounting pressure from all around  her. But how can she possibly resist love when the handsome, amusing, and impossibly aggravating Mr. Darcy manages to pop up at every turn?  What else has the capacity to turn us into greater fools than the high-stakes game of love that brings out all of our pride and prejudice? This is a play that warns strongly against judging others—a particularly apt cautionary tale in our current age of internet shaming. Here’s an interesting exercise to try after you’ve seen the play: see what happens when you divide the characters into two groups - those who exemplified PRIDE and those who displayed PREJUDICE. You’ll have a really hard time! Some of the most telling aspects of these characters - and one of Kate Hamill’s most insightful observations - is that all of the characters display both pride and prejudice.

Here are a few to get you started: MR. BENNET - Droll, funny, and sarcastic, he is as proud as he can be of Lizzy, his irreverent, intelligent daughter. At the same time, he displays prejudice toward vapid, air-headed people, often including members of his own family. DARCY - Believes that “pride where there is a real superiority of mind may be justified.” Yet, his prejudice toward Wickham is close to the surface and rooted in their shared history. LIZZY - Admitting that because Darcy injured her pride, she says she “endlessly indulged my own cleverness, all in the service of my prejudice.” LADY CATHERINE - Everything is beneath her…that’s a sign of her pride! Nothing is beneath her attention…and here is her prejudice! What other examples of pride and prejudice in the play can you identify?

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THE PLAYWRIGHT THE PLAY When Kate Hamill’s comedic farce Pride and Prejudice premiered a few years ago at the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival, Hamill, herself an accomplished actor, played the role of Lizzy Bennet, while her real-life partner, Jason O’Connell was Mr. Darcy. The New York Times wrote at the time, “It hasn’t met a rib it can’t tickle!” Hamill actually began writing innovative, contemporary plays based on classic novels because she was bothered by the lack of “meaty” roles for women on stage, especially in adaptations of the English literature classics she loved so much. She once told an interviewer, “Oh God! I’m gonna have to write them myself…aren’t I?” She’s passionate about creating feminist, femalecentered classics stories that feature complicated women. Hamill grew up on a dairy farm in Lansing, NY - a town she described as having more cows than people. (She proudly admits that she still knows how to milk a cow, though not well. Apparently, both she and the cow “get very nervous!”) The entire family prized reading and literature, and Kate went on to earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Ithaca College. Many of her plays have been performed on some of the most prestigious stages in the country: the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, as well as the Guthrie and the Folger theaters, to name a few. The Wall Street Journal named Hamill Playwright of the Year in 2017; and in the 2018-2019 season, Hamill was one of the country’s five most-produced playwrights. Hamill is an avowed feminist with a great eye and ear for the absurd even as she examines serious social and gender issues. Her playful, humorous style draws us in, makes us laugh, and always makes a point! Like a laser, she focuses on getting to the bottom of “Who Wants What?” in relationships. Courtship and marriage are seen by this playwright as a “love game that we’re all trying to win!” Pride and Prejudice, a thoroughly entertaining play about manners, courtship, and relationships that’s firmly rooted in the 18th century, and has much to say to contemporary audiences.

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A Woman’s World? Not Quite!

How remarkable it is to look back at the lives of young English women in the era of Pride and Prejudice through the lens of contemporary young women. Education choices, equal rights, glass ceilings, personal freedom, deciding when (or even if) to marry or have children - are all very real today, yet they have virtually nothing to do with the lives of the young women in the play.  Viewed through today’s eyes, the struggles of the Bennet sisters can actually seem trivial. BUT…. The world of Pride and Prejudice, so quaint to us now, presented enormous challenges to those who were required by societal norms to follow an unforgiving and strict code of behavior. For example, when attending a ball, a young woman quite literally wasn’t supposed to move until she was asked to dance. She remained rigid, alone or in a small group of other females, until a young man approached to reserve or request a dance. Class distinctions were important; there was little mixing of the upper class with the working class. The young women of privilege typically spent their time not in school or at professional jobs, but in making themselves into appealing prospects for marriage: dressing well, painting, calling on friends, drinking tea, playing parlor games, being ‘decorative’. Singing and playing the pianoforte after dinner were especially important gifts since they gave a young woman a chance to ‘own’ the limelight and distinguish herself from the competition, thus improving her “prospects.”

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Keep in mind what Bingley says about women, “All of you play instruments and embroider purses and do a whole lot of fiddly little arts.”

And Lizzy, always outspoken, accurately replies, “Those are, of course, almost the only occupations allowed to us.”

Think about the ages of the Bennet sisters: Jane is 22, Lizzy is 20, Lydia and Mary are even younger. Yet all were expected to learn quickly and become accomplished at husband-catching. In their universe, the standards were oh-so different from those of today. Then, young women who reached the ripe old age of 23 and were neither engaged or married were thought of as old maids with few prospects and precious little hope for the future. A huge part of a young woman’s occupation in the world of the play was playing - and hopefully winning - “catching and gaming,” the sport of “getting” a man. And all of this unfolds within the strictures of a behavior code where one false step could easily condemn a young woman to ruin and “pollute her forever.” Loss of virtue was irretrievable. After all, a lady cannot be too irreproachable in her behavior. As the play tells us, the woman’s goal was to “hurry up and get him to the altar. She has the rest of her life to fall in love!”

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CAST BIOGRAPHIES K.C. Allen (Lady Catherine De Bourgh) is a 15-year-old student at Lely High School. She has been a part of The Naples Players since 2016, both on and offstage. She is an LTM member and thanks everyone at TNP, including her fellow LTMs, for putting up with her for so long. Your service is appreciated. K.C.’s most recent credits include I Never Saw Another Butterfly and Once on this Island JR as Agwe. Enjoy the show! Christian Boff ( Mr. Wickham) has been doing theatre for seven years, mainly up in New York. His last show with KidzAct was Frozen Jr. He has received a lead role four times. He has also done dance for two years and counting, and voice lessons in the summer. Ethan Brendel (Mr. Bennet) is a 16-yearold at Naples High School. He likes hanging out with friends and going to the beach.

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Abby Ciabaton ( Ensemble / Lizzy Understudy) is a junior at Barron Collier High School and is so excited to be in another per formance with TNP! Her favorite shows she’s performed in include Bye Bye Birdie, White Christmas, and Newsies. She wants to thank the incredible cast and crew for this fantastic experience. Veronica Dana (Ensemble) is 14. She has been doing theatre since 5th grade, and since then she has done many shows including The Wizard of Oz, Macbeth, I Never Saw Another Butterfly, and many others. Thank you so much for your time! Daniella Flom (Jane Bennet) Daniella is a 14-year-old student at The Village School. Besides doing theatre, she loves to read and draw. She would like to thank Jessica for all of her hard work that went into making this show happen and she’d like to thank the cast for making her first play so much fun!


CAST BIOGRAPHIES Abria Gigante (Servant) is a 15-year-old student at Gulf Coast High School. She has been in The Man Who Came To Dinner, Footloose, and Treasure Island. Thank you and please enjoy the show!

Landon Libbey ( Mr. Bingley ) is a 10 th grader at Gulf Coast High School. This will be his first show at TNP and he cannot wait to participate in Pride & Prejudice. Enjoy the show!

Karli Knepfler ( Ser vant ) is a senior at Estero High School. She is ver y excited to be a par t of this production. She would like to thank Jessica, Kenzie, Andrew, and ever yone that has worked hard to make this show amazing.

Isabel Morris ( Mrs. Bennet) is a junior at Palmet to Ridge High School. She has participated in shows such as Into the Woods as Cinderella and Les MisÊrables as Ensemble, and is incredibly excited to now play the role of Mrs. Bennet. She wishes to thank the entire cast and crew for this memorable experience and hopes you enjoy the show! 

Giszelle Kirton (Mary Bennet) is extremely excited to be performing as Mary Bennet in Pride and Prejudice ! A graduating senior at The Village School, she plans to pursue acting and screenwriting in university. She would like to thank all of her teachers at KidzAct for giving her the education and motivation to pursue her dreams, and her family for always believing in her.

K risten Noble (Miss Bingley) is 15 years old and is so exited to appear in Pride and Prejudice. She has appeared in 22 previous productions at va r iou s lo c al t he a t er s . F avo r i t e r ole s include Bye Bye Birdie ( K im MacAf fee ) , Frozen ( Elsa ) , and Alice in Wonderland ( Alice ) . She would like to thank Jessica, A ndrew, Emma, and the rest of the cast and crew for overcoming the odds and making this show happen.

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CAST BIOGRAPHIES Olivia Petersen (Lizzy Bennet) is a sophomo r e a t B a r r o n C ollier High S chool. She loves musical theatre, some her most recent productions including :  I Never Saw Another Butterfly ( Raja), Les Misérables ( Madame Thénardier) and Macbeth ( Lady Macbeth ) . She hopes for everyone to enjoy the show. Her cat has OCD.

Kenny Tran ( Mr. Collins) is a 16-yearold junior at Gulf Coast H i g h S c h o o l. T hi s w ill be his second acting experience at The Naples P layer s , a n d he is exci t e d t o t ell t he stor y with his peers. His previous credits include Oliver/As You Like It, Ensemble / Hairspray and Wes Warnicker/ Footloose. Please enjoy the show !

Rylee Price (Charlotte Lucas) is 18 years old and just graduated from Gulf Coast High School. She is planning on attending Florida State University in the fall with a major in psychology. She is so excited that her last KidzAct show got to be streamed regardless of everything that’s going on and would like to thank everyone at TNP who has helped her learn and grow.

Preslie True ( Lydia Bennet) is a junior at Gulf Coast High School. She has just finished p er f o r ming in I nto the Woods as Jack’s mother. She’s excited to be playing Lydia and hopes you enjoy the show!

Bailey Reum ( Ser vant / Mr s. Long ) is excited to be in her first show on the Blackburn stage! She was last seen in I Never Saw Another Butterfly. She’d like to thank her friends, family, and the TNP staff for all of their support. Enjoy the show!

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Dominic Young ( Mr. Darcy) is 17 years old and a junior at Gulf C oast High School. His previous credits include A r p a d / S h e Lo v e s M e, Ren McCormack /Footloose, Link Larkin / Hairspray, and most recently Baker/Into the Woods. He’s also performed in both the adult and teen productions of Mamma Mia ! and Chicago. This is his first play. Enjoy the show!


CREW

BIOGRAPHIES

Emma Canalese ( Choreographer) is a graduate of The Western Australian Academy of the Performing Arts and The Neighborhood Playhouse, NY and associate member of the Stage Director s and Choreographer s S ociet y ( S D C ) . D ir e c t o r ia l a nd ch o r e o gr a phic work includes Einstein and Mileva (World Premiere at Theatre Row, NY ), Peter and The Starcatcher ( T he N a ple s P layer s , nominated for Best Director of a Musical, Broadway World Regional Awards), Silent Sky ( The Naples Players, Naples Florida Weekly Top Pick) Hollywood, Hollywood ( Midtown International Theatre Festival, nominated for Best Direction and Best Choreography), Yellowpants (SOLOCOM at The Pit, NY ), America ( Downtown Urban Theatre Festival, winner of Best Audience Award), Thick Gnat Hands, The Brazilian Dilemma, Stick, Stiff , Any Given School Day, Twenty (Collective NY ), The Tempest: Remixed (Teatro Heckscher, NY ), A Sense of Purpose On Sunday’s ( IO Myers Theatre at UNSW, Aust ), Par amnesia ( Seymour Centre with One Extra Dance, Aust), The Magic Flute (Talent Unlimited), Oklahoma

and Mame (Stagedoor Manor). She is cowriter and director of the play A 100 Years of the History of Dance, that completed its first Australian tour in 2019 and was a Western Australian Critics Choice winner at Fringe World Festival 2020 in Per th, Western Australia. As a teaching artist, engagements include The Papermill Playhouse Conservatory and Intensive Summer Programs, StageDoor Manor, Rutgers-RSAC and UNSW Dance and Drama Dept. Andrew Meador (Stage Manager/Production Assistant ) just recently graduated from Gulf Coast High School and finished h i s f i r s t y e a r a t F S W. He is excited for the future as he will be attending PACE University NYC for Stage Management. He first got on stage with The Naples Players four years ago with Catch Me If You Can Teen, but has since pursued working the technical side of theater. His most recent SM credits include KidzAct’s Frozen Jr and Shakespeare’s As You Like It. He wants to thank Jessica and the cast for persevering through this show in these changing times.

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CREW

BIOGRAPHIES BIOGRAPHIES

Jessica Walck ( Director/ Film Editor) has been an active member of The Naples Players since 2004 and now serves as the o r g a niz a t i o n’s A s s o c i a t e A r t i s t i c Director. She began her career at TNP instructing and directing in the KidzAct program. She would like to thank this cast for their unwavering dedication to this production, especially when we had to completely change gears and film it. She is inspired by their tenacity and passion. Recent KidzAct directing credits are You Can’t Take It With You and Junie B. Jones the Musical Jr. Recent TNP directing credits include Making God Laugh, Escanaba in da Moonlight, Don’t Dress For Dinner and the World Premiere production of June & Jason’s Survival Guide to Divorce. Recent acting credits include Becky in the virtual production of Becky’s New Car, Adelaide/Guys & Dolls and Ellen/Jenna in Maple and Vine. Jessica is a proud graduate of The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre in NYC.

SPECIAL THANKS Sharon True, Owen True, Maddie Brendel, Craig Walck, MaryAnne McAvoy McKerrow, Suzanne Kirton, Melissa Flom, Brad Van Houten, Kenzie Currie. And to the families of the actors for providing them a quiet space to film throughout the process.

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OUR MISSION The Naples Players continually seeks to enrich, educate and entertain our community through a superior theatre experience. We are a premier community theatre, seeking to inspire passion for the performing arts through unparalleled access to the process, experience, and conversations surrounding the arts and our community. Thank you for supporting our mission!

701 5th Avenue South | Naples, FL 34102 | 239.263.7990

www.NaplesPlayers.org