Page 1

international

the

ISSN 2596-5220

spring-inspired breakfast ideas

family life in denmark

your april gig-guide

raising your child in denmark

APRIL 2018 - THE-INTL.COM

MASTER-MIXER HUMBERTO MARQUES

ON LIFE AS A COPENHAGEN COCKTAIL BAR OWNER

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


2

LIFE IN DENMARK IS LIKE A BOX OF CRAYONS

LET’S ALL LEARN TO COLOUR IN TOGETHER...

T

THERE IS NO doubt that Denmark is becoming an increasingly globalised society. According to statistics, in 2016, immigrants and their descendants made up just over 14 percent of the Danish population. This of course bodes well for the internationalisation of the Danish economy, allowing the country to be more competitive in various global industries. This is however dependant on expats being able to successfully integrate into Danish society. But as many of us expats can attest to, integrating into Danish society can be somewhat of a challenge. While Denmark boasts having a fantastic work-life balance and well-functioning social welfare system, seemingly mindless tasks such as making friends and preparing yourself for the cold weather can prove quite a challenge – and that’s not even considering the language barrier. But Danes and Danish society on a whole have come a long way in welcoming, albeit a bit frosty, expats from around the world – coexisting to build a better Denmark. Just as expats have to learn a lot about Danish culture, the language and how the country operates, so Danes too can learn much from their international counterparts. This reminded me of a quote by American author, Robert Fulgham: “We could learn a lot from crayons; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box.” Take forward-thinking grocer Meny, and its decision to introduce international

sections in certain stores – although small, still a positive step towards greater integration. In this issue we delve into the many nuances of expat integration as we hear from inter-

mark home. On the cover this month is cocktail bar owner Humberto Marques, an expat of Portuguese decent, who shares his story of integration and how it resulted in a beautiful family and thriving business (page 14). Keri Bloomfield shares stories from expat moms and how they have adapted to parenting in a foreign land (page 26), and we hear how becoming a volunteer boost your chances of making Danish friends (page 20)! We also delve into some of the more practical matters of life in Denmark. Laura examines the many benefits of paying high taxes, including free, quality healthcare (page 10). Importantly, we investigate the contentious decision by government to put an end to ‘free’ Danish lessons. This is sure to be an ongoing debate, and one central to integration and socialisation (page 12). As we gear up for some warmer weather – spring is just about upon us – let me take this opportunity to encourage us all, in the spirit of a colourful crayon box, to make the most of our ‘box’ and learn to colour in together. The results can only be a better picture.

“We could learn a lot from crayons; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live

Love,

together in the same

LYNDSAY JENSEN MANAGING EDITOR AND PARTNER nationals who have experienced the ups and downs of life in Denmark, and the strategies they have employed in their bid to call Den-

box.”- Robert Fulgham,

WEBSITE: THE-INTL.COM

American author Source: www.denmark.dk

MEET THE TEAM MANAGING EDITOR & LAYOUT LYNDSAY JENSEN has twenty years' experience in the advertising and publishing industry, and holds degrees in Business and Desktop Publishing (print and repro). Born in the UK, and brought up in South Africa, she has the ability to understand different cultures, and is passionate about networking. She is a wife of twenty years and mother to two boys aged 20 and 13. She loves travel, photography and art. lyndsay@the-intl.com

ADVERTISING SALES JO JENSEN is a married mother of one from Scotland who moved to Denmark a year ago. Jo previously worked as a TV Producer in Singapore making documentaries with many companies including National Geographic, Discovery and MTV Asia. She also has experience in publishing. Jo is a Reiki Master and interested in art, film and the paranormal. jo@the-intl.com

SALES For advertising sales, please contact: sales@the-intl.com ADDRESS

The International ApS, Industrivej 14, 4683 Rønnede; +45 42676745

PRINT

Provins-Trykkeriet ApS, Vordingborg

COVER PICTURE MANAGING DIRECTOR KENNETH MACALPINE is a Nordic Financial Manager in the Transport industry. His education is in Finance and he has a business degree obtained in the UK. Born in Norway he moved to Denmark at the age of 22. He is of Danish Scottish ancestry and lives in southern Denmark with his large multi-national family consisting of Danish, Irish and Brazilian heritage. He is always interested in new challenges and loves to live life to the fullest. kenneth@the-intl.com

SUB-EDITOR DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER is a print and digital writer, communicator and media production manager/ editor. He has several years’ experience in the media and publishing industry, and holds a Master’s degree in media and politics from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa). He is passionate about politics, publishing and people-empowerment. He is a husband of almost two years, and has a love affair with good food and wine. david@the-intl.com

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

ADVERTISING SALES HEIDI GREVES is married, and a mother of six boys. She Moved back to Denmark five and a half years ago after 14 years in Kent, England. Born in Copenhagen to a British mother and a Danish father, Heidi has knowledge and language skills of both countries. She has experience in the tourism industry in Denmark, and sales experience in England. She loves to be creative with photography, art and baking, and loves to socialise. heidi@the-intl.com

DISTRIBUTION SATYA PRAPANCA is married, and moved to Denmark one and a half years ago from Indonesia. His previous work experience includes; subtitle translator, documentary films, photographer, and music curator in his spare time! Satya's passion is composing music with his guitar and laptop. He enjoys nothing more than taking in the beauty of Copenhagen while enjoy coffee/tea and cake at a local cafe.

Alexander Banck-Petersen - alexbp.dk

DISTRIBUTION

The International is available at a range of businesses, institutions, cafés and public libraries across Denmark

SUBSCRIPTIONS

For home or corporate delivery of the printed edition please contact: distribution@the-intl.com The International is published 12 times a year. This issue was published on March 27, 2018

CVR:

39118181


3

[rap]

English: Quack Romanian: Mac French: Coin Turkish: Vak Estonian: Prääks

It isn't that difficult.

Learn Danish at IA Language School

Free lessons IA Sprog / Vibevej 9-11 / 2400 Copenhagen NV Ph +45 3888 3233 / info@iasprog.dk / www.iasprog.dk APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


4

IT'S ALL HAPPENING

IN APRIL

IT'S ALL ABOUT THE EXPAT THIS APRIL, AS WE HIGHLIGHT THE MANY ACTIVITIES THAT WILL MAKE YOU FEEL AT HOME IN DENMARK. MAKE THE MOST OF THE LONGER DAYS AND WARMER WEATHER AS YOU SING YOUR WAY INTO SPRING.

COPENHAGEN

SOUND OF MUSIC

COPENHAGEN

THE ROOM

HC ANDERSEN

ODENSE

2 APR

6 APR & 20 APR

8 APR

H.C. ANDERSEN'S BIRTHDAY

THE ROOM

SOUND OF MUSIC

It’s tradition to celebrate the world-famous Danish fairytale writer’s birthday at his birthplace in Odense. Entrance is free all day on Hans Christian Andersen’s birthday on April 2nd, and everyone is welcome to participate in a small ceremony in the Memorial Hall between 1-2pm. Don’t miss out on the Hans Christian Andersen Parade and their shows in the garden in front of the house too.

THE ROOM made an inaspicious debut on a single cinema screen in Los Angeles in 2003. Described by one reviewer as “like getting stabbed in the head”, the film gradually developed an increasingly passionate following that savoured its surreal performances, cockeyed emotional logic and bizarre narrative. In the finest cult tradition it started drawing repeat customers who “got it” in the midst of a sea of clueless fellow humans. The film was buried by the establishment media but a funny thing happened on the way to the cemetery – the corpse started moving. And it’s still twitching. Over 10 years later, monthly screenings in LA, NYC and London continue to sell out. For four years, THE ROOM has played in Copenhagen to full houses the first Friday of every month.

Calling all Nuns, Goat herders, Hills, Alps, Baronesses, Brown Paper Packages tied up with String or any of your favorite things! This is your chance to sing-a-long to the most successful movie musical of all time. This is one of the funniest, most liberating nights out you will have for a long time. The SOUND OF MUSIC SING-ALONG is not just a chance to see the classic movie on the big screen - it’s a major audience participation event with subtitles for all the songs. Wave your Edelweiss, dance in the gazebo with Liesl, bark at Rolf, snuggle up with Gretel and join in earnest choruses of My Favorite Things! *RESERVATIONS can be made via jack.stevenson@ mail.dk. Please include “SOUND APR” and the number of reservations desired in the subject line of your e-mail, and you will receive confirmation with further info.

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 09:00 - 16:00 LOCATION: ODEONS KVARTER 1, 5000 ODENSE C

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

ADMISSION: 60 DKK TIME: 14:00 - 17:00 LOCATION: HUSETS BIOGRAF, RÅDHUSSTRÆDE 13, 2 TH, 1466 COPENHAGEN

SOUND OF MUSIC

THE ROOM

VISIT DENMARK

ADMISSION: 60 DKK - VARIOUS SHOWS, CHECK THE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS: WWW.HUSET-KBH.DK TIME: 19:00 - 23:00 LOCATION: HUSETS BIOGRAF , RÅDHUSSTRÆDE 13, 2 TH, 1466 COPENHAGEN


5

AARHUS

AARHUS

THE MERCHANT CAFE

MOJO'S BLUES BAR

AARHUS BRÆTSPILSCAFÉ

COPENHAGEN

9 APR

10 APR

12 APR

MOJO'S BLUES BAR

GAME NIGHT IN APRIL

AFTERNOON COFFEE

Brett Perkin's will be playing a feature set at the Monday Night Juke Joint hosted by Kira Martini, who runs the open stage into the wee hours of the morning. Brett will be playing after the feature set in this legendary Copenhagen venue, recently declared a smoke-free zone!

Game Nights are all about having a good time with board games (and of course winning). Meet and challenge other Internationals or internationally-minded Danes in a variety of board games. Bring your friends along or come alone and prepare yourself for a good time – everyone is out to meet new people! You pay 30 DKK for game rental as you sign up for the event via the website: www.aarhusbraetspilscafe.dk. So all you need to worry about on the night is purchasing your beverage and snacks! Sign up by Monday April 9 at 15:00 to secure your spot.

Join Spouse Community Aarhus for its new Coffee Afternoons, taking place every second month. This is a chance for those who need an afternoon pick-me-up to gather in the cosy surrounds of The Merchant Room to mix and mingle. This fun and informal event is a great opportunity to get to know Spouse Community: who they are and what they do, along with meeting new people all while enjoying some delicious coffee. This event is open to both members and non-members – so feel free to bring your friends! If you are interested in attending, sign up via the website www.tirnanog.dk. Entry to this event is free, attendees can purchase their own coffee, tea and refreshments from the venue. Children are welcome, however space is limited.

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 22:00 - 03:00 LOCATION: LØNGANGSTRÆDE 21C, 1468 CPH

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 13:00 - 15:00 LOCATION: THE MERCHANT ROOM COFFEE SHOP FREDERIKSGADE 38-40, 8000 AARHUS C

THE MERCHANT CAFE

AARHUS BRÆTSPILSCAFÉ

BRETT PERKINS

ADMISSION: 30 DKK TIME: 19:00 - 21:00 LOCATION: AARHUS BRÆTSPILSCAFÉ (VESTERGADE) VESTERGADE 58A, 8000 AARHUS, DENMARK

H i g h Ac ad em i c S t an d ar d s C h ri st i an E t ho s C onv en i en t l y l o cat ed i n H el l er u p

rygaards.com APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


6

COPENHAGEN

AARHUS

ISTOCK

PIXABAY

ÅRHUS BASEBALL SOFTBALL KLUB

AARHUS

13 APR

15 APR

16 APR

AMERICAN DAYS

FIRST AID (IN ENGLISH)

DANISH HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

Now is your chance to try out the amazing American sport Baseball with all your international friends. International Community in collaboration with Århus Baseball Softball Club invite you to join them for an American afternoon of playing Baseball and Softball - and this time outdoors in the field! Whether you are a complete beginner or an experienced player, you are welcome to join! Coaches will be there to guide you and teach you how to field, catch, bat and run the bases. Gear and equipment will be provided by the club, so all you need to bring is some outdoor training shoes and clothes. Sign up before April 6th.

If you didn't get the chance to participate in the last first aid course for English speakers, you now have another shot. The course is for parents who have children between the ages of 0-8 years, and like those in Danish, is run by First-8. Coffee/tea is included in the price. The venue also sells cake at a favourable price. You can reed more about the course on their website: http://babyfabrikken.nu/arrangementer/first-aid-courses-in-english/. As well as sign up for the course via the online booking system by clicking the link "billetter".

The Danish healthcare system is universal which means that all residents in Denmark have access to public healthcare, and most services are provided free of charge. At this event you will get an overview of the Healthcare System, its structure and basic principles as well as how to navigate it. Organisers will also take a look at the system from an international’s point of view. Guest speaker is Tiny Maerschalk, Head of International Community. She is a foreigner and has experienced the system – both its positive and quirky sides. She will inform you about how the Danish healthcare system is structured and how you as a patient or a relative would normally experience it. Coffee, tea and water will be served.

ADMISSION: 400 DKK PER PERSON/ 650 DKK FOR A PARENT COUPLE TIME: 10:30 - 13:30 LOCATION: BABYFABRIKKEN, PARMAGADE 14, 2300 COPENHAGEN S

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

PIXABAY

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIMES: 17:00 - 19:00 LOCATION: FO-BYEN - STIFTEN LOUNGEN (ROOM FRB-001), FREDERIKSGADE 78B, 8000 AARHUS C

PIXABAY

PIXABAY

ÅRHUS BASEBALL SOFTBALL KLUB

PIXABAY

ÅRHUS BASEBALL SOFTBALL KLUB

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 17:00 - 19:00 LOCATION: ÅRHUS BASEBALL SOFTBALL KLUB, ÅBRINKVEJ 11, 8000 AARHUS C


7

Get Danish Education 3 for free

Want to know what your colleagues are chatting about?

Learn Danish at Studieskolen If you're a professional working in Denmark, Studieskolen offers a range of fast-track courses so you can learn Danish quickly and easily. With classes during the day and in the evening, it couldn’t be easier to find a course that fits in with your work and lifestyle. Find out more at studieskolen.dk

Follow us /studieskolen

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


8

MARIBO

KNUTHENBORG SAFARI PARK

COPENHAGEN

GREASE

PAINT BAR COPENHAGEN

COPENHAGEN

20 APR

21 APR

27 APR

PAINT BAR COPENHAGEN

GREASE SING-ALONG

KNUTHENBORG SAFARI PARK

How about an evening of painting in a relaxed social setting with wine, nice people and good music? We have everything you need to create the painting and no experience is necessary. You’ll be amazed with the artwork you have the ability to create, and what's more, you're welcome to take it home with you!

Calling all 50's freaks! The very popular movie sing-alongs continue at Husets Biograf through 2018, sponsored by club CPH-SP. Mail house manager, Jack, at jack.stevenson@mail.dk for info on what films are playing on specific nights and to make reservations. 18.30 = CAFÉ & TICKET COUNTER opens / Free (for unnumbered seating) / Cash or Mobile Pay. 19.30 = FILM AND SONG! On the 21st the venue will be screening GREASE, the story of good girl Sandy and greaser Danny, who fell in love over the summer. When they unexpectedly discover they're now in the same high school, will they be able to rekindle their romance? Come along and sing your heart out to hits including 'You're the One that I Want' and 'Summer Nights'!

Come along to the public opening of Knuthenborgs first Dinosaur Forest. Take the family and go back in time 67 million years! Be sure to keep your eyes open as there is lots of exciting things to do and see at the open day! Purchase your tickets, yearly card or family card with a discount of up to 20%. For more information, visit: www.knuthenborg.dk.

ADMISSION: 399 DKK - WWW.SMAGFOERST.DK (TICKET INCLUDES THREE FREE GLASSES OF WINE) TIME: 17:00 - 22:00 LOCATION: SMAGFØRST, NØRRE FARIMAGSGADE 61, 1364 CPH K

TIME: 10:00 - 18:00 LOCATION: KNUTHENBORG ALLÉ, 4930 MARIBO

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

PERNILLE HELSINGHOFF KNUTHENBORG SAFARI PARK

GREASE

PAINT BAR COPENHAGEN

GREASE

PIXABAY

ADMISSION: 60 DKK TIMES: FRIDAY - 19:30 - 21:30 LOCATION: HUSETS BIOGRAF,RÅDHUSSTRÆDE 13, 2 TH, 1466 KØBENHAVN


9

COPENHAGEN

ODENSE

DANSENS DAG ODENSE

BUDDHISTISK CENTER LOLLAND

COPENHAGEN SAKURA FESTIVAL

LOLLAND

27 APR - 1 MAY

28 – 29 APR

29 APR

GARDENING DAYS

CPH SAKURA FESTIVAL

DAY OF DANCE

"The garden where the teachings grow" needs our care together we can make it beautiful. Bring your loving green-fingers and gardening tools for a joyful day out in the gardens of Lolland. Register by email - lolland@buddha.dk

Copenhagen Sakura Festival brings this Japanese tradition to Copenhagen with a cultural event that takes place in Langelinie Park at the end of April. By then, the 200 cherry blossom trees in the park will be bursting with pink. At the festival, you can dive into Japanese culture and art forms such as drum shows, folk dance and martial arts. You can test your skills with workshops, listen to lectures, or you can just have a cup of tea and admire the people dressed up in beautiful kimonos.

The purpose of "The Dance Day" is to bring all dance forms together on one date, and celebrate these many art forms from different cultures. Be sure to put your best foot forward.

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 27 APRIL AT 18:00 TO 1 MAY AT 15:00 LOCATION: BUDDHISTISK CENTER LOLLAND KORTERUPVEJ 21, 4920 SØLLESTED

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 09:00 - 17:00 LOCATION: ODENSE CITY, 5000 ODENSE C

DANSENS DAG ODENSE

SCANDINAVIA STANDARD

BUDDHISTISK CENTER LOLLAND

DANSENS DAG ODENSE

ADMISSION: FREE OF CHARGE TIME: 10:30 LOCATION: LANGELINIE PARK NORDRE TOLDBOD, 1259 COPENHAGEN

YOU’RE HOME WITH US WE TAKE THE FUSS OUT OF FINDING THAT PERFECT HOME FOR YOU! DANISHHOMES.COM +45 70 15 90 07

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


10

MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

THOMAS HØYRUP CHRISTENSEN

MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

TIVOLI - PETER NØRBY

A WELFARE STATE IS A HAPPY STATE Did you know? “SKAT” not only refers to the Danish Tax system, but also translates to darling and treasure. Danish irony at its best! But when you are paying tax upward of 33% of your salary, you’d expect something good in return. Laura Wintemute leads us on a path to discover the real treasure of the Danish welfare state.

T

PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER & MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

TEXT LAURA WINTEMUTE

THE DANISH WELFARE

system (one of the strongest in the world) aims to provide security and equality of opportunity for all. How you ask? Well, the tax we pay in the form of income tax, VAT, duties and customs duties are all used for public services provided by the state, its various regions and municipalities. Danes pay high taxes to ensure that a series of necessary services such as schooling, hospital treatment, medical care, elderly care, the police force, the army, infrastructure and unemployment benefits (just to name a few) are available, no matter how much you earn. It is for this reason that I believe things in Denmark just work. The key to understanding the high levels of happiness in Denmark is to first understand the welfare systems’ ability to reduce risks, uncertainties and anxieties among its citizens, thus preventing unhappiness. The Danish welfare model provides opportunities for its citizens, regardless of their economic, social, gendered or cultural backgrounds. All citizens residing in Denmark, expats or locals, will use the public sector at one point or another and therefore as a general principle must all help pay for it. As my Danish-born and raised father-inlaw likes to put it; “We don’t just pay our

welfare benefits expats qualify for as tax-paying members of Danish society – no matter how big or small your contribution.

HEALTH CARE

"WE DON'T JUST PAY OUR TAXES, WE INVEST IN OUR SOCIETY." DANES SIMPLY HAVE LESS TO WORRY ABOUT IN DAILY LIFE THAN MOST OTHER PEOPLE AND THAT FORMS A SOLID BASIS FOR A HIGH LEVEL OF HAPPINESS.

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

taxes, we invest in our society.” Danes simply have less to worry about in daily life than most other people and that forms a solid basis for a high level of happiness. However, the tax burden is not equal for

all. The Danish tax system is progressive, meaning that the higher your income, the more tax you pay – ‘those with the broadest shoulders must bear the heaviest burden’. This issue I take a look at some of the

In Denmark there is free quality health care for everyone, with the welfare model functioning as a risk-reducing mechanism. Publicly financed health care (approximately eight percent of your taxes) covers all primary, specialist, hospital, and preventive care, as well as mental health and long-term care services. Dental services are fully covered for children under the age of 18. Another fantastic benefit for couples who are residents and have trouble conceiving, government provides assistance in the form of free insemination and invitro. In my home country this can cost upwards of 10,000 Canadian dollars!

MATERNITY LEAVE

Family is as the heart of Danish society, and this is evident in its laws being among the most generous in the world when it comes to maternity leave. In total, parents in Denmark get 52 weeks of paid parental leave, of which parents can receive up to 32 weeks of monetary support from the state. The baby's


11

father is entitled to take two weeks of leave during the first fourteen weeks after the birth of the child. Then, in the following 32 weeks both the mother and father can freely share leave between them. You can also save some of this leave for a later date, just remember to take it before your child reaches the age of nine. That’s right, you can go on maternity when your child’s in middle school!

EDUCATION/CHILD CARE Daycare and kindergarten are not free, but fees are quite fair. They are also subsidised by around 50% by the governmental child benefit scheme. Public education however is largely free, even at university level. In addition, every Danish tertiary student receives around 6,000 DKK per month from the government to support themselves during their studies for a maximum of six years! This is a huge difference from what I experienced. I worked part time throughout my studies. Once I graduated I spent the next six years paying off student loans! Personally, I believe this is well worth the tax I’m paying. I don’t have to worry about saving up for my daughter’s education. Thankfully it will be her talents and dreams that shape

benefits back in 2014. A ‘minor’ open heart surgery put me on my back for over three months. Thankfully, I received full salary and was ensured that I’d have my job when I returned. Not only would this surgery have cost me greatly in North America, I would have likely lost my job. Due to the Danish welfare system, I was able to concentrate on getting better, not stress about money or finding a new job once recovered.

TO STAY OR NOT TO STAY Most expats who have moved to Denmark for work, and fall in the “highly-paid employees” category, including the likes of professors and researchers, can choose to pay tax at a rate of 27% + labor market contributions, a total of 32.84%, for a period of 84 months without deductions of any kind. Many expats also have the misconception that this “saved tax” monies would have to be paid back if they stayed after the 84 months, this is not true. However, it costs companies greatly when their highly skilled employees decide to leave. The extension of the researcher tax scheme in January 2018, going from five to seven years will hopefully make it easier to recruit and retain

LAURA WINTEMUTE OWNER, HOMESTEAD Laura was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. At a very young age she knew that she wanted to travel. At the age of 22, she packed her bags and moved to the tropical Cayman Islands. This launched her journey

IN ADDITION TO FREE EDUCATION, EVERY DANISH TERTIARY STUDENT RECEIVES AROUND 6,000 DKK PER MONTH FROM THE GOVERNMENT TO SUPPORT THEMSELVES DURING THEIR STUDIES FOR A MAXIMUM OF SIX YEARS!

as an expat. In the Cayman Islands she learned how to interact with people from all walks of life, all nationalities and all cultures. She worked in the hotel concierge

the path of her career, and not the size of my wallet. Denmark is investing in the future of its youth by making education accessible by all. All residents with children from the ages 0-18 years receive childcare benefits. Every three months, money magically shows up in your (the mother’s) bank account! For more on the Danish education system, visit The International’s website, www.international.kk.dk.

SICK LEAVE BENEFITS Did you know you can have up to 120 days consecutive sick days without losing your job? You will of course need a doctor’s note… I have personally benefitted from the long-term sickness

these foreign specialists. After the seventh year, if employees in this category decide to stay, they will fall under the regular income taxation scheme like everyone else. In my opinion, retaining these skilled employees is not only based on how much taxes they pay, even after their seven years is complete. Although it is more beneficial for them to stay longer with 33% tax as opposed to 60%. There are so many other factors we take into consideration when deciding to put down roots in a foreign country. Do we feel at home here? Do we feel settled? Have we learned the language? Have we made Danish friends? Do we feel safe? Are we earning enough money? Will our children thrive here? If I couldn’t say yes to most of the above, it wouldn’t matter how much taxes I was paying, I would probably leave. THE-INTL

service, hotel management and, eventually, opened her own restaurants. In her eighth year of living in the Cayman’s, she met her Danish husband-to-be. Shortly thereafter, they moved to Whistler, Canada, where Laura managed a 5-star restaurant. One year later they settled in Denmark where she married and had a daughter. In 2012, she started working for a relocation company. It was a job that encapsulated both Laura’s experience as an expat and her love of helping people. She learned everything there was to know about relocation to Denmark and built a good network. After six years’ experience in relocation, she wanted to take her expertise to the next level and started Homestead – welcoming international working expats and their families to Denmark.

www.homesteaddenmark.com

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


12

THE WRITING’S ON THE WALL FOR FREE DANISH LESSONS

PROPOSED NATIONAL TAX CUTS SPELL DISASTER FOR NEWCOMERS WANTING TO LEARN DANISH FOR FREE. THE INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATES. TEXT DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


13

I

IN A BOLD move the government in February reached an agreement with the Danish People's Party that will see the country’s tax income slashed by billions. Amongst the measures the government intends taking to make up for the shortfall is a tightening-up on social welfare laws for foreigners. This includes a clamp-down on unemployment support for expats living in Denmark and the highly contentious end to free Danish lessons for foreigners.

Æ ØÅ people want to learn a language that only five million people speak if it is going to costs too much,” he asks? Qayssar is also concerned that these new measures will bring about parallel societies in Denmark, diminishing efforts by government and civil society in attempts to bring about greater integration. “The first step to integrating is learning the language, but if students have to pay excessively I think that more of them will choose not to learn the language, thus having disastrous consequences for communication between Danes and foreigners.” “I believe Danish lessons should continue to be free because most of our students already have a hard time making ends meet, and learning Danish will improve their chances of getting a well-paying job. 2,000 DKK per module is simply out of reach of many students,” concludes Lars. Are you a student currently studying at a language school? Share your thoughts

NO MORE FREE DANISH LESSONS “The recent tax agreement between the government and their supporting party, the Danish People’s Party will require selfsupporting foreigners to pay 12,000 DKK to learn Danish. The new user fees are not the first time that tighter rules have been imposed on this particular group of foreigners,” says a statement issued by The Copenhagen Language Center, who is concerned that this will have implications for integration and retention of foreign talent.

“THE FIRST STEP TO INTEGRATING IS LEARNING THE LANGUAGE, BUT IF STUDENTS HAVE TO PAY EXCESSIVELY I THINK THAT MORE OF THEM WILL CHOOSE NOT TO LEARN THE LANGUAGE, THUS HAVING DISASTROUS CONSEQUENCES FOR COMMUNICATION BETWEEN DANES AND FOREIGNERS.” Lars Skov, Principal of Danish at Studieskolen says that all students will have to pay for their Danish education from 1 July 2018. “There will no longer be completely ‘free’ Danish lessons for self-supporting foreigners. Since our students mostly study or work in Denmark, most of them will have to pay the fee,” Lars explains alluding to how the new scheme will work. This will affect in particular language schools under contract with the municipality. Lars expects the price will be around 2,000 DKK per module. “As there are five or six modules in the Danish education system, the total price will be between 10,000 and 12,000 DKK,” he says. The language school estimates that about half of the potential Danish education student cohort will struggle to pay for their Danish education.

STUDENTS RISE UP In opposition to the proposed cuts to the language learning subsidy, 1600 students signed a petition and delivered it to Copenhagen City Hall on 21 March. The memorandum outlined their dissatisfaction with the kommunes’ decision to drop the collaboration with highly qualified language schools, such as IASprog and the likes. “We just want to keep our school, which has taught Danish to foreigners for 30 years, from turning away needy students,” explained IASprog Chairman of Student Council Qayssar Jalil. After meeting with students, Badar Shah, a member of Alternativ, speaking on behalf of the committee on the Employment and Integration Commission of Copenha-

gen Municipality, said that he would bring up their protest at the next committee meeting in April. He also expressed support for their wishes, but did tell them that the decision had already been made last year and that it would be difficult to change at this stage.

on this funding conundrum with us. Visit our social media pages to get the conversation going. THE-INTL Source: www.kbh-sprogcenter.dk/en/

CAN YOU AFFORD NOT TO SPEAK DANISH? When foreigners enrol to learn Danish it is mostly to qualify for better jobs and to better integrate into Danish society at large. It is the concern of languages schools across the country, and their students, that if it becomes too expensive to learn the basics, students will not qualify for decent jobs and become even more of a drain on the welfare system. “We find it counterproductive that students will have to pay to learn Danish because students who cannot get their courses paid by their employer will be delayed in their Danish education or completely drop out. There is a great lack of certain academic candidates and skilled workers in certain industries in Denmark. If foreign students don’t learn Danish during their studies here, there is no hope that they will stay in Denmark after graduation. Something that Danish authorities shouldn’t wish to happen,” implores Lars. “It will no doubt lead to a weakening of the importance of the Danish language, and as a result fewer foreigners will want to learn Danish. If part of the élite doesn’t master Danish, the language will lose its status.” Qayssar agrees saying that the new cuts will decrease motivation to learn Danish. “I mean, why would

"IF FOREIGN STUDENTS DON’T LEARN DANISH DURING THEIR STUDIES HERE, THERE IS NO HOPE THAT THEY WILL STAY IN DENMARK AFTER GRADUATION."

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


14

MIXING IT UP WITH CURFEW IN

COPENHAGEN

THIS MONTH WE SIP COCKTAILS WITH MASTER-MIXER HUMBERTO MARQUES, AS HE SHARES HIS BAR-HOPPING JOURNEY FROM PORTUGAL TO COPENHAGEN.

PHOTOGRAPHS ALEXANDER BANCK-PETERSEN

A

AFTER SPENDING EIGHT years in Edinburgh, Scotland, working in the cocktail bar industry, Portugal-native Humberto Marques felt like he needed a change and so bucked the trend and made a move to Denmark. “Whilst all of my colleagues where making moves to the likes of London, I had a few good contacts in the industry here, and so came for a visit in 2009 and witnessed how the cocktail scene was growing in Copenhagen. To me it looked like a great opportunity, and so in 2010 I moved to Copenhagen,” Humberto explains. Humberto is now owner and manager of the classy Curfew Cocktail Bar in Copenhagen. Walking into the bar, decorated with Portuguese tiles and filled with quirky shakers, unique vintage machines and early 20th century posters – all col-

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

TEXT DAVID NOTHLING -DEMMER

lectables from his time behind the bar in the many countries he has plied his trade – you instantly get a sense of a vintage speakeasy bar, a laid-back vibe but with a modern twist. The cocktail menu is extensive – definitely one of the most extravagant in Copenhagen. It changes with the seasons and patrons can choose between a wide range of seasonal, classic, forgotten and awardwinning cocktails. It is for this reason that the bar was awarded best cocktail bar in Copenhagen in 2017 by local press.

MIXING MEMORIES It was a summer beach-job at the age of 15 that gave Humberto his first taste of cocktail mixing. “The boss had a few old cocktail books I stumbled across, and was in-

ADDITIONAL SOURCE WWW.COCKTAILSOFCOPENAHGEN.DK

trigued by the many recipes, so tired my hand at mixing. The first drink I could mix was a Negroni, as they had all the ingredients at the bar. I was only playing around, and was not serving these drinks to customers,” he jokes. It wasn't until he was 18 and began work at a local hotel as a bartender that Humberto truly discover his passion and talent for cocktail mixing. Memory and making memories is what most inspires Humberto when mixing up new and exciting cocktails. “Many things inspire me; a theme (like our seasonal menu at Curfew) – linking it to a story and background research, balancing all the elements that the story consists of. It is also memories of situations and tastes that inspire me, such as a memory of being sick in bed as a child, and my mom serving me

a herbal-infused tea (lemon verbena, eucalyptus). It can also be something as simple as a walk in the forest, and the smell of pine trees,” he says. Humberto’s passion drives him to produce a high-quality menu with great service – something that appeals to his Copenhagen market. “Curfew appeals to Copenhageners in terms of décor (vintage and attention to detail), menu, service, quality, ingredients and presentation. Also, the quality at Curfew is high, and Copenhageners likes high quality. When they finally get time to go out and have fun with their friends, they want something good – not just mediocre, and we deliver in terms of service, cocktails, and ambiance. We give our customers an experience to remember,” he attests.


15

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


16 WARMING UP AND SETTLING IN Although into his eighth year in Denmark, Humberto admits to still adjusting to life as an expat. “At first I felt a little bit lost, even though Copenhagen is small. Everything is so expensive here. Also, it takes some time before Danes warm up to you, mostly because they are a little bit reserved. My work hours are crazy and I’m mostly available during the day, where everyone else is at work,” he says. Humberto does however say that Copenhageners are very relaxed, in style and personality. “It’s normal to go out wearing sneakers and a cap." He does however confess that owning a cocktail bar comes with its perks when it comes to melting Danish hearts! Humberto is married to his Danish wife and has two beautiful daughters. “The oldest will soon be five years old and the youngest one and a half. My family has been one of the greatest rewards in making the move to Denmark,” he says. Aside from warming up to the Danes, understanding (and learning) their language was another challenging part to Humberto’s move initially. “The language is a huge challenge. But, because most Danes speak a little English, there is not massive incentive to learn Danish. This however does complicate matters as English is not mine nor the Danes native language, and as a result

some nuances, deep understanding and bonding is lost – quite a mix up! Ultimately, I think that Danes genuinely want to help expats by speaking English, but they also love it when you try and speak Danish back. Learning the language is really important for integrating, but also really difficult to learn, and making the time to learn, when you are busy and working all the time is difficult. When asked if he spoke Danish, Humberto said that he understood a little but didn’t speak the language outside of home. “I’m a perfectionist, and would rather speak bad Danish to my wife than to a stranger,” he smiles. He did attempt a language school some years back, but found it difficult working at nights to be fresh for school in the daytime. My industry also doesn't really require me to speak the language, as everyone speaks English or like me, are foreigners – and the alcohol does much of the talking!” Despite the many challenges that have confronted Humberto in adjusting to life in Copenhagen, he has come to love his new city. “I enjoy the nature outside of Copenhagen, and the smaller quirky areas of Copenhagen (markets, meat packing districts etc.). I like that Copenhagen is so small that you can get around on your bike in no time. And, I love the area around the Lakes of Copenhagen – a breath of fresh air in the middle of the city,” he says.

"I THINK THAT DANES GENUINELY WANT TO HELP EXPATS BY SPEAKING ENGLISH, BUT THEY ALSO LOVE IT WHEN YOU TRY AND SPEAK DANISH BACK."

SPRING-INSPIRED COCKTAIL Beetroot season is upon us, so I asked Humberto to put together a cocktail based on beetroot and what it pairs well with. Try this at home at your next dinner party.

BULL’S BLOOD ➥ 5cl Akvavit Aalborg Jubilæums ➥ 3cl Beetroot, freshly squeezed ➥ 1 Tarragon spring ➥ 1.5cl Fresh lemon juice ➥ 1.5cl Cacao brown liqueur ➥ 1cl acacia honey Shake all the ingredients over ice and strain into a lowball glass (before, spray the lowball glass with a peaty, smoky whisky). Garnish with a Tarragon spring and beetroot zest.

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


17

"IT'S IMPORTANT THAT YOU USE FRESH INGREDIENTS AND QUALITY SPIRITS WHEN MIXING A GOOD COCKTAIL."

www.cis.dk

Before long, you’ll belong COCKTAIL TIPS EVERY HOME BARTENDER SHOULD MASTER I asked Humberto for his top tips when it comes to mixing your own home-brews. This is what he had to say:

#1 THE STIR: It’s simple, any cocktail that contains booze and only booze should be stirred. All-liquor drinks such as the Sazerac are about clarity, and shaking introduces air, which leads to foam. To stir properly, hold a bar spoon between your thumb and first two fingers, allowing it to rotate around itself as you make circles in a mixing glass filled with ice. Remember: You’re not just mixing the drink, you’re also making it ice-cold.

#2 THE SHAKE: Any drink with non-spirit components – think citrus juice, egg whites, herbs, fruits – needs to be shaken. Cocktails like the daiquiri take a little more coaxing to combine ingredients - and they demand that aerated froth. Hold a cocktail shaker in your dominant hand with your arm at a 90-degree angle. Shake vigorously, making small circles, for 15 to 20 seconds. Don’t stop until the outside of the shaker is frosty and very cold.

Settling into a new country can be challenging – especially for the nonworking spouse. We know, from studies and from experience, that a successful posting depends on the happiness of the entire family – and our school is home to a very active, warm and welcoming community. Our PTA offers a wide range of opportunities: newcomers network, Spring Fair, Halloween, Yoga, Activities Fair, Wine and Cheese Evening, Dads’ Club and Ladies’ Night Out. Dedicated parents coach our sports teams, run our boy scouts and serve on the school Board. At CIS the whole family finds a place to grow roots and make friends. So to quote one of our parents: “I came for the job, but we stayed for the school.”

#3 THE TOOLS: GLASSWARE: The home bartender only needs three types of glasses: old-fashioned, highball, and martini.

ICE: For ice at home, a silicone cube mould is essential. SHAKER: Try get your hands on a Boston shaker. MIXING GLASS BAR SPOON: A long, thin handle is ideal for proper stirring. STRAINER: Keeps used ice in the mixing glass, not your drink. JIGGER: A baker uses measurements spoons, so should you! “It’s important that you use fresh ingredients and quality spirits when mixing a good cocktail. The knowledge of pairing flavours is also important to acquire. While I was in the United Kingdom I put together a few flavour guidelines, check them out at, www.thespruce.com,” says Humberto. Curfew also offers cocktail masterclasses by booking, so get in touch with Humberto if you and your friends want a fun evening out, learning from a pro. THE-INTL

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


18

SERVE UP YUMMY BREAKFAST OR BRUNCH – DANISH STYLE Spring has officially sprung in Denmark! This means a long string of holiday weekends where we all get to enjoy a few extra days off. What better time for getting out and enjoying the (hopefully) good weather – maybe even share a breakfast or brunch with friends and family. This month Erin Chapman dishes up her best brekkie bakes!

I

IN THE NOT so distant past, there was a time where you couldn’t really go out for breakfast in Denmark. Like, nowhere. I would sit up in bed on weekend mornings craving eggs and bacon, pancakes and waffles, giant muffins and bagels – the works – but would have to make it myself at home. Eating out in the morning, or even getting coffee to-go, just wasn’t a “thing” until about 15-20 years ago, when the Brunch Invasion landed in Denmark (and thank the coffee gods for that). Being a breakfast fan in general, I have always loved the classic Danish weekend “morgenmad” – hearty baked breads, cheese, marmalades, and perhaps a boiled egg – it's elegant and simple, and no one bakes bread like the Danes. But when the concept of Brunch arrived, it took Denmark by storm. It felt as if people were desperate for an excuse to go out and enjoy late weekend mornings – visiting with friends, or nursing a hangover – and nibbling all the delights of the breakfast/lunch combo of savoury and sweet. Danish restaurants and cafés in city centres took the task of brunch to a new level, combining the rustic qualities of the Scandinavian breakfast with classic international brunch favourites such as scrambled eggs, French toast, bacon, waffles and so much more. Since then, most cafés have ingeniously conjured up their own unique “brunch tapas” concepts, with several tasty delights on one plate, as the morning weekend crowds have grown to new heights. That said, it’s also lovely to sleep in, and then make a slow-morning breakfast in your pyjamas. Weekend breakfasts don’t have to be complex, but will do well to hit that spot of craving. Try a few of my no-stress lazy weekend breakfast dishes you can make at home. THE-INTL

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY

TEXT ERIN CHAPMAN

WORD ON THE STREET! WHAT'S YOUR FAVOURITE BREAKFAST/ BRUNCH? BUTTERMILK PANCAKES FOR BREAKFAST! FOR BRUNCH, THERE'S AN AMAZING LITTLE PLACE IN ROSKILDE RIGHT BY TREKRONER STATION: CAFE FREUNDE. GREAT BRUNCH BUFFET! - JEANNE - GULFPORT, USA

BAKED GRAPEFRUIT THIS IS A WONDERFULLY UNIQUE WAY TO SERVE GRAPEFRUIT AS A SIDE DISH FOR BRUNCH. IT MIGHT SEEM UNEXPECTED TO EAT A WARM TOASTY GRAPEFRUIT, BUT BAKING GRAPEFRUIT MAKES IT JUICIER AND SWEETER. SERVES 2-4

INGREDIENTS: 2 grapefruits, sliced in half 4 teaspoons honey 4 teaspoons raw sugar Fresh mint

WORD ON THE STREET! WHAT'S YOUR FAVOURITE BREAKFAST/BRUNCH?

the honey and sugar has melted on top. Remove from

AT HOME: HOME-MADE BREAD ROLLS WITH EGGS AND SELECTED COLD MEATS. HOWEVER, IF THERE IS TIME, BACON, MUSHROOMS AND PANCAKES WITH NUTELLA. GREAT PLACE TO EAT OUT: STEFANOS MAD OG KAFFE, COPENHAGEN -

oven, allow to cool for 5-10 minutes, and garnish with

DORTHE - COPENHAGEN

METHOD: Preheat oven to 2000C. Place the halved grapefruits cut-side up on a baking pan and using a small knife, loosen the sections of the fruit by putting a slice into the side of each section. Spread two teaspoon of honey over the surface of each grapefruit. Sprinkle two teaspoons of raw sugar on each and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the grapefruit has puffed up slightly and

fresh mint. Serve warm and enjoy.


19

ERIN CHAPMAN CO-OWNER, THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY With over 20 years’ experience in the advertising industry, working both in Denmark and USA, Erin has specialised in brand building and image development for lifestyle, food and fashion clientele at both national and international level. Erin attended DIS, Denmark’s Study Abroad programme in 1996 and made a connection with Copenhagen. She moved to Denmark permanently in 1998 with two suitcases and a pocketful of change. Working in the advertising industry she worked her way up as a senior creative, as well as a voiceover artist, and then began her own brand and design business in 2006. Merging her love for food and

DUTCH BABY THIS SUPER SIMPLE PUFFED PANCAKE HAS BEEN A FAVOURITE IN MY FAMILY FOR DECADES, AND THE “WOW” FACTOR WHEN IT PUFFS UP HUGE IN THE SKILLET IS GREAT TO SERVE TO GUESTS STRAIGHT OUT OF THE OVEN. TRY IT WITH A SQUEEZE OF FRESH LEMON JUICE AND A SPRINKLING OF POWDERED SUGAR, OR SERVE WITH FRESH BERRIES AND MAPLE SYRUP. FEEDS THE WHOLE FAMILY!

art direction, she began food styling and cookbook design for other authors, and then proceeded to continue with recipe development, publishing two cookbooks in Denmark. While living

INGREDIENTS:

in Los Angeles, Erin worked with

100g flour 150ml milk 3 eggs 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest ½ teaspoon vanilla Pinch of salt

ADD A BIT OF SALTY DANISH BACON ON THE SIDE, AND A HOT CUP OF COFFEE AND YOUR SUNDAY WILL BE COMPLETE.

several US brands on image and recipe development and upon returning to Denmark, she partnered with Dorte Prip in 2015 to introduce The American Pie Company in Copenhagen.

50g butter

Erin is happily married to her Danish husband and is the moth-

METHOD: Preheat the oven to 225 C. In a large mixing bowl add

er of a sassyfive year old daugh-

the flour, milk, eggs, lemon zest, vanilla and a pinch of

ter who speaks fluent “Danglish”.

0

salt. Blend with an electric hand mixer until smooth and there are no lumps (about 1-2 minutes). In a medium skillet that is oven-safe, melt the butter

www.theamericanpieco.com

over medium high heat. Then add the batter and let sit over medium heat for 1-2 minutes. Carefully transfer the skillet into the pre-heated oven and bake for 15-18 minutes. The Dutch baby will start to puff up very high around the edges of the skillet as it bakes – very fun to watch! Once puffed and golden brown, remove from the oven and serve immediately. It will start to fall and settle into the skillet after about a minute.

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


20

STRUGGLING WITH FRIENDS?

BECOME A VOLUNTEER… Volunteering is an easy way to get involved in your community, meet people and live new experiences. We discover just why Danes give of their time so generously and why you as an expat should get involved if you want to make a few Danish friends.

V

TEXT DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER

VOLUNTEERING OR JOINING associations is very common amongst Danes, and typically the best place for them to make new friends. Danes have a reputation of being reserved and mostly socialise with their established group of friends, so breaking into social circles can be quite a challenge for newcomers. Anders Sejerøe of Copenhagen Volunteers, a programme placing volunteers in communities, says that if you want to expand your friend base in Denmark, and become a part of your community, one of the best ways to do so is by engaging as a volunteer. “Copenhagen Volunteers is one of the easiest places to start as a volunteer. Through our volunteer programme, you can take part in both large and small events in Copenhagen, including; music festivals, sports events and much more,” says Anders. At these sorts of events you will get to meet and interact with people from your community from different backgrounds – it’s an ideal place for Danes and internationals to mix in a more informal setting.

HOW IT WORKS As a volunteer you will have the opportunity to get involved as a server of food in the likes of soup kitchens or as a steward at social gatherings and events. Copenhagen Volunteers has a list of events on their website (www.cphvolunteers.kk.dk) at which you can discover the variety of tasks needing undertaking, what the organisers expect

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

SOURCE COPENHAGEN VOLUNTEERS

of you, and what you can expect from them. Everything is both in English and Danish. “You only sign up for the tasks you want, so you do not need to commit yourself to more than you are willing,” explains Anders. The requirements for each event that you volunteer at can be very different depending on the tasks and the organisation. But everybody can volunteer – it just depends on finding the right match between interests and practicalities. “It’s important that you ask yourself the reasons for wanting to volunteer – is it to fight for a certain cause, to help a specific group of people, to engage in a local community or more of a way to socialise and get unique experiences? Contact the organisations and events where you want to participate and join in – or talk to friends and colleagues about their experiences,” says Anders. You can volunteer in many different ways, from helping out with the practicalities to organising events.

Denmark, they decided to volunteer as a means of learning more about Danish culture, to socialise with Danish folks and internationals, and make new friends. “One of our friends recommended that Copenhagen Volunteers is a place where we could do this. All the events that we have participated in have been splendid and have created many wonderful and memorable experiences. We have learnt a lot from others and we have always experienced a positive atmosphere and a friendly attitude." Anders says that for those of you wanting to get involved, visiting the Copenhagen Volunteers website or other volunteer sites such as www.frivilligjob.dk is a good starting point. See what perks your interest, and sign up! THE-INTL

WHY WE DO IT International, Zara Alam who has volunteered at the 48 Timers Festival, says that it is great to be a volunteer, “I get to meet so many people from everywhere, with different cultures and from different backgrounds, it’s just amazing,” she laughs. Sara and Sasan arrived in Denmark in 2014 on a Greencard scheme. Beginning the big challenge of a new life in

Want to get involved? Go to the following websites: www.cphvolunteers.kk.dk or www.frivilligjob.dk


21

RASMUS FLINDT PEDERSEN

LIOR ZILBERSTEIN

TUALA HJARNØ

CHRISTIAN LINDGREN

A HAPPY DENMARK IS AN INTEGRATED DENMARK How authentic integration and internationalisation can help win the battle for global talent and make Denmark a more inclusive and dynamic society along the way.

D

PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER

DENMARK IS ONE of the happiest, if not the happiest country on Earth... or so the saying goes. This statement is rooted primarily in surveys such as the World Happiness Report, in which Denmark has ranked in the top three out of 155 countries for five years running. Though one could well argue that “happiness”, in terms of the selfunderstanding that underpins the Danish mentality would be better translated as “tilfredshed” or contentness. However, the catch 22 is that the very same individual and societal contentness that is largely seen as a positive metric of success, stands as one of the fundamental barriers to integration and internationalisation efforts and thus, future economic growth here in Denmark. This very same self-satisfaction has too often helped pave the way for black and white approaches within corporate, municipal and school communities; namely providing expats and global Danes ‘repats’ a false dichotomy between assimilation or segregation. In addition, the tendencies of both expats and Danes to remain in their comfort zones, whether it be linguistically or culturally, have aided in perpetuating this trend. How can an organisation break out of this black and white mold and create hybrid models that maximise integration and internationalisation efforts? How can an organisation reap the potential benefits of having both expats and global Danes help to make Denmark a more dynamic society? Globally Local; launched in December 2017 by Thomas Mulhern, the former International Department Head at Institut

TEXT ANITA MAYNTZHUSEN & THOMAS MULHERN

Sankt Joseph and Anita Mayntzhusen, the former Director of Global Children; works to tear down the barriers that stand in the way of successful integration and internationalisation initiatives. Why shouldn't a company, municipality or school push the boundaries of their comfort zones; think differently, strive to create new systematic approaches within

to successful integration and internationalisation strategies. Schools and Universities, by having the right tools to successfully integrate (expat and Danish repat families), have the potential to increase the well-being of their students, parental groups, staff and overall quality of the school. In terms of adult students and researchers, Danish universities can experience the benefits of having foreign researchers contribute to Danish universities, while decreasing turnover costs associated with shortened contracts. If attracting, integrating and retaining highly qualified expat and Danish repat families has the potential to provide the aforementioned benefits to the Danish society, why should we not attempt to maximise this effort? Globally Local maintains that by creating shared frameworks predicated upon beRASMUS FLINDT PEDERSEN longing, for local Danes, expats and Danish repats, we make possible the conditions necessary for authentic intethe fields of talent attraction, integration, gration and thus, a feeling of home for exeducation and retention? pats and Danish repats to be a part of. Companies have the potential to bolster In essence we are talking about creating their bottom lines by reducing costs with shared experiences that unite local Danrelation to failed foreign assignments, ish, expat and Danish repat families, prowhile simultaneously enhancing the retenmote intercultural exchanges, provide crution of global talent within their organisacial networking opportunities, maintain tions. In addition, the added organisationand develop bilingual Danish and English al value that can be provided by employees communication, and allow those in the prothat have both an understanding of forcess of learning Danish to have a voice. If eign markets and have cultivated an unthese conditions are met, the barriers to derstanding of the Danish work culture, successful integration and internationalis invaluable. isation initiatives can fall away, and DenMunicipalities can implement initiatives mark will be left a more dynamic and comand establish the right conditions that lead petitive country as a result. THE-INTL

ANITA MAYNTZHUSEN & THOMAS MULHERN OWNERS, GLOBALLY LOCAL Anita is a psychologist and former head of Global Children, whose passion and competences to work with international families has been fostered through her private and professional experiences. Thomas is the former international department head at Institut Sankt Joseph. He is himself an expat, married to a Dane and father to a Danish/American. Thomas has experienced firsthand the barriers that make integration in Denmark so difficult. Globally Local works together with a variety of consultants and strategic alliances to ensure that the most tailored and comprehensive services are given to their clients.

www.globallylocal.dk

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


22

SPONSORED CONTENT

ALL YOUR INTERNATIONAL FOODS

UNDER ONE ROOF

MENY IS DENMARK'S NEW FOOD MARKET. WE'VE GOT ALL YOUR FOOD NEEDS COVERED, AND ARE ESPECIALLY PROUD OF OUR RANGE OF FRESH PRODUCE; FROM MEAT AND FISH TO DELICATESSEN AND CHEESE, FRUIT & VEGETABLES AND WINE - NOT TO MENTION OUR INTERNATIONAL SECTION IN SELECTED STORES.

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


23

M

GROCER, ALLAN COLDING ENCOURAGES ALL CUSTOMERS TO PICK UP A FREE COPY OF THE INTERNATIONAL IN THE RØNNEDE STORE EVERY MONTH!

MENY RØNNEDE HAS embraced our expat community by offering a special international section of selected food items. We aim to offer our international (and Danish) customers more than just your regular super market goods. Grocer, Allan Colding says that the inclusion of international foods has been a positive experience for all our customers who find it exciting when new goods are available. “American-style products make up the majority of the selection, but we're working on stocking our shelves with more British goods,” he says. International food items such as baking goods, flour, barbeque/grill sauces, condiments like mustard and tomato sauce, cakes, cool drinks, chocolate, dried meat, beer and soda water are all available at Meny Rønnede. What’s more we try and accommodate the needs of our international customers as best we can. “We are always willing to try get a specific item should our customers have the need or a desire for something we're not currently holding in stock. This is of course dependent on the items available from our supplier,” says Allan. Our range of food is one of the largest in the country. Meny is a mix of what you spend the most on, at prices that are affordable, and that matters. While still a small section in our stores, and considering that not all Meny shops have an international sections, our range of food is just getting bigger, and better! THE-INTL

MENY RØNNEDE OPEN: MONDAY-SUNDAY, 6:00 – 20:00 LOCATION: VORDINGBORGVEJ 517, 4683 RØNNEDE CONTACT: +45 567 12424, OR 0376350@MENY.DK

herlufsholm.dk INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

AT HERLUFSHOLM SKOLE, NÆSTVED Give your child the best of Denmark wrapped in an international education.

Herlufsholm is a boarding school located in beautiful surroundings south of Copenhagen. We offer the IB Diploma as well as a preparatory IB class, opening doors to university home and abroad. Our students are ambitious. They combine their studies here with international exchange, service work, The Duke of Edinburgh International Award, sports, arts, Model United Nations, etc. We set the framework for world citizens but it is our students who aspire to see the world. we aim to inspire and engage students small classes - student-teacher ratio is 7:1 study hall and after school tutoring to students in need of a helping hand assigned mentor who guides students and helps them set goals for personal and academic development 25 years experience with international boarders and how to make them feel at home strong alumni network with group meetings all over the world

A DANISH INTERNATIONAL

EDUCATION

Have a taste of our everyday life on Facebook: Herlufsholm Skole og Gods #myherluf @herlufsholm_skole

Summer School - in July every year for children aged 13-15 with intensive Danish Language Course or Media Project APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


24

CHRISTIAN LINDGREN

TY STANGE

CHRISTIAN LINDGREN

THE FINAL YEAR OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL This year heralds the transition from protected child in elementary school to independent youth, learning in a new way and in a new setting. Jeppe Jensen guides you and your child on the best options available for study beyond the ninth grade.

PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER

I

IT’S ABOUT TO get serious, parents. The closer your child comes to the end of elementary school, the more he or she will learn to stand on their own feet and the less you’ll be an integral part of their school life. It sounds harsh, but it isn’t, they’re just coming into their own. So, when the ninth year of elementary school sees spring, it is time to decide what to do next. As briefly mentioned in my last article, you (and your child) can choose whether they want to attend 10th grade or not – an optional year. There are two major options to choose from; a regular elementary 10th grade and a continuation school.

ELEMENTARY 10TH GRADE Students who are unsure of which path to choose education-wise; be it vocational training or higher education, students needing a little more time to mature, those wanting more focus on the three big subjects taught in Danish folkeskole (Math, English and Danish) or students wanting a different kind of learning environment all have the opportunity to attend 10th grade at a folkeskole. A lot of schools offer 10th grade along-

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

TEXT JEPPE JENSEN

side the first nine years of school, but some municipalities have chosen not to have 10th grade in every single school, but instead operate separate “campuses”. A campus is where 10th graders attend in larger numbers, so individual schools won’t have to accommodate classes of nine or ten students. This also helps to improve the teaching environment.

CONTINUATION SCHOOL Continuation schools or, as the Danish-toEnglish dictionary so aptly explains it, lower-secondary boarding school, is another option for your child. There is a great tradition for it in Denmark, and there are numerous reasons for wanting to send your children to one of these schools; focused learning, science interest, maturity, friendships, independence, alternative teaching methods or special needs. There are over 247 continuation schools in Denmark and as the other translation reveals, they are boarding schools too. Students live in single or twin rooms and share their final year of elementary school in the company of peers five days a week and on quite a few weekends. They eat, sleep,

SOURCE WWW.EFTERSKOLE.DK/EN/IN-ENGLISH

study and play together and it is rare that you hear about a bad experience. In other words, they love it. Now, parents may think that it is too much responsibility for a maturing child, but the teachers are dedicated, professional and caring, and it is a warm and embracing environment for the students. In my capacity as a teacher, I meet many students who have tried the experience (often students who major in either sports, science or music and want a year of focused learning), and their main problem, adapting to a year in school where they know few of their classmates is nullified because of their better developed social skills. If anything, continuation schools hone students’ social skills. It does not come cheap, though. There is a price dependent on your income as well as other factors. You can apply for governmental aid, individual supplementary aid, or acquire a scholarship depending on the school and your situation. If you are in a refugee or from Greenland, you can apply for scholarships. The individual supplementary aid is granted by the schools themselves, so grab the phone and give them a call. The usual charge is somewhere between 30,000 and 80,000 DKK per year. There are eight schools in Denmark where everything is taught in English. In recent years, the trend of continuation schools has changed as more and more students use the year to specialise and perfect a specific topic. Learners are deciding on this education route also because it offers and international perspective to teaching and learning. Something that is increasingly important in an ever globalising Denmark. THE-INTL

JEPPE G. JENSEN TEACHER AND FATHER Jeppe is an Upper Secondary Teacher, teaching both English and Film. He married an expat from the USA and is father to two kids, aged seven and four. He currently lives in Roskilde, but has lived in both Copenhagen and Elsinore. Jeppe has travelled extensively. First with his parents, seeing almost every European country, then as a student, spending eight months attending Glasgow University. Jeppe and his family often travel on holiday to visit family in the United States. Education is something Jeppe values highly and wishes for everyone.


25

STUDYING RELIGION AT INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

WE SIT DOWN WITH A RELIGION TEACHER AT AN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL AND DISCOVER HIS IMPRESSIONS OF THE SUBJECT AND HOW IT HELPS HIS STUDENTS BETTER UNDERSTAND THE WORLD AROUND THEM AND ITS DIFFERENT CULTURES. TEXT COPENHAGEN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

A

AS A GRADE seven student at Copenhagen International School, you will be exposed to a subject exploring religions of the world. It follows on from a unit learning about government systems and how governments operate and impact those living within and outside of their borders. The religion unit gives specific details about particular religions, but also highlights why sociologists believe religions developed in the first place and what their value is and continues to be in societies today. Studying religions has an important function in providing basic historical information about the development of peoples and states and serves as a brilliant launch pad to further understanding of what makes up a system, how to recognise key aspects of those systems, and exposure to ideas about the origins and functioning of societies and the impact this has on individuals and groups. This particular subject matter does an excellent job as well enabling students to pick up on the core similarities between things that appear to be starkly different or in contrast to one another, raising first-hand awareness that superficial understanding and over-generalisations can lead to misunderstandings and conflict. The unit is also fun in terms of its ability to reach students at multiple levels – through story-telling, through pictures, through the use of symbols and symbolism, and through analysis of politics and world power dynamics. It is a topic that enables students to take what they can from it at their own level, whether didactic instructional information or higher-level thinking about existential questions and world politics and the influences on human behaviour and interaction.

EXPLORING DIFFERENT RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS In this unit, students first explore the idea of why we should

(or should not) study religion in schools and from there get an overview of what kind of diversity we are faced with in the world and in Danish society. In so doing, students are confronted with the following questions; where are different religions practiced? What are the names of those religions and the adherents of those faiths? When did these faiths emerge and do they still have followers today? What are the key elements of a religious system and how can we recognise something more ‘organised’ than just an individual’s ideas or beliefs about something spiritual? Why does this distinction matter? Because we are living in Protestant Denmark, we then examine in-depth the origins and beliefs of Christianity and Protestantism as a way of modelling the research required to really explore what makes up a religion and how it impacts upon believers’ lives, individually, within religious communities, and across societies. After working as a class to understand this example religion, students undertake their own research projects on a religion of their choice. Their aim is to analyse how the two religions (our model one and their area of focus) impacted upon adherents’ lives. Understanding the differences and similarities in religious beliefs and its actual societal impact on persons, believers and non-believers. What followed was some dynamic discussions about how different religions can seem very diverse, even at odds with each other. However, in the end they all boil down to the same ideals and goals of community creation and streamlined social predictability for the most part, and that typically religious beliefs or ideals work towards encouraging particular behaviour or attitudes in life through the promise or hope for a better afterlife. One of the most interesting outcomes of the unit was a wall display showing a visual depiction of the various religions from students’ perspec-

tives. Taken collectively, the patterns of colours and symbols or imagery in the display of student work leant an interesting cohesive quality to religion as a whole, whether from the perspective of Islam, Christianity, or Jainism. Each student was also tasked with explaining why those visual reminders of the religion represented the religion to them, which gave further food for thought about what the ‘essence’ of world religions are from multiple perspectives.

A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CULTURE The unit also leads to a better understanding of the diversity of cultures and religious beliefs. More importantly, on a personal level for students, the unit expands into analysis of stereotypes and focuses on religious stereotypes as an example of stereotyping that takes place and its impact on individuals, communities, and society as a whole. This allows students to share their own experiences of being perceived as ‘different’ in a variety of contexts and how this has impacted them on their own personal journey. I think that the work students did on the use of symbols to further explain or expand upon religious ideas was particularly special. After some good discussions about how symbols help to further understand religions and adherents’ beliefs, students were tasked to analyse their own beliefs about religion or spirituality and to turn those ideas into their own ‘personal symbol’. They worked with their design teacher to create a design cycle for this mini-project and then chose a symbol and carved it into an eraser, creating their own personal stamp. We paired these stamps (pressed into salt dough ornaments) with descriptions of why they created the symbols they did. This resulted in a truly heart-warming display of genuine understanding of the power symbols can have in communicating deeply personal and complex understandings or ‘histories’. THE-INTL

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


26

PARENTING IN A FOREIGN LAND They say it takes a village to raise a child, but what if it’s not your village? International mothers share their stories of child rearing in Denmark with Keri Bloomfield. PHOTOGRAPHS PLAMENA APOSTOLOVA

R

RAISING CHILDREN IS a job of a lifetime and a lifetime job. A job that can be even more difficult when you’re doing it in a country that isn’t yours. The lack of close family and friends as well as trying to understand a new language and system, can make the challenge extra ordinary. If you are a new parent in Denmark, or are about to embark on this journey, learning Danish cultural norms, and building a supportive network around you, will be hugely important to ensure you remain confident in your role as a parent in your new home. I began my life in Denmark as a mother to a four-month-old baby. A baby that according to local Danish customs was being raised ‘differently’. A baby that didn’t sleep outside and that wasn’t taking Iron or Vitamin D drops. Three things that are assumed in Denmark but aren’t in my home country. One of the best pieces of advice I received early on in this jour-

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

TEXT KERI BLOOMFIELD

you will be introduced to six other new mothers who live close to you. And if you aren’t fluent in Danish, you’ll be assigned into an International Mothers Group in which the common language will be English. Your baby nurse will co-ordinate this shortly after you give birth, and it can be a valuable network for support as you begin your parenting journey. Expat mother, Julija Chernova found that one of best things about parenting in Denmark, is the infrastructure made available to moms, including these Mothers Groups. “Being introduced to five other mothers soon after the birth of my daughter was a great way to begin building a supportive network around me, especially in the early days,” Julija told me. Julija also found that everything in Denmark is generally very well designed for families with children, “from finding changing facilities to special manned playgrounds and even movie theatres where you can take your babies to. If you take advantage of them, the opportunities are endless in Denmark which helps to ensure you don’t feel isolated in a new country,” she said. Although, even with the best infrastructure, challenges still present themselves when trying to build and blend a family in an international environment. Especially when trying to reconcile two cultures and languages within one family. ney, was from our Danish baby nurse who reassuringly told me, “there is more than one way to do the right thing”. I remember these words well, because it was at a time that I was frequently being asked why my daughter, Bilingual Backpack Baby (BBB) and other children from my home country, didn’t sleep outside in their prams (barnevogne). It’s a question I still struggle to succinctly answer, other than, they just don’t. At least not to the level in which they do in Denmark. Equally, I am still unable to adequately explain to people who have not lived in Denmark why Danish babies sleep outside. They just do. For Denmark, it’s the cultural norm and for the world outside of Scandinavia, it isn’t.

BUILDING A SUPPORT NETWORK One of great things that happens when you’re a mother in Denmark is being assigned to a ‘Mothers Group’. As a new mother

BILINGUALISM In my own quest to learn Danish, I have been guilty of using BBB to improve my Danish language skills. When at the supermarket or on public transport, I’ll often talk to her using my limited vocabulary of Danish. Which, for now, matches a 2-year-olds vocabulary. Kom så. Skal vi gå hjem? Er du klar? Er du færdig? and Det ikke vores, have all became firm favourites when out and about with my daughter. Subconsciously I think I also began this habit to blend in and not be spotted as the ‘foreign mother’. It has only been recent-


27

KERI BLOOMFIELD BLOGGER

ly that I’ve questioned if it was the best thing for my daughter on our journey to becoming a bilingual family. Julia Kaiser from Liechtenstein, is an international mother and a student of Linguistics. Now living in Denmark with her Danish partner she feels strongly that confidence is key to adapting to life as a Danish mother and embracing more than one language in a family. “My advice is that you have to be confident in everything you do. Including your choices on how to raise your children bilingually. In our family we speak three languages. Our family language is English, but my partner is Danish and will speak to our son in Danish, while I also speak to him in my mother tongue. For us, it felt right to do it this way. This was our ‘norm’ and what was natural for us and what we’re working hard to be consistent about,” she explained. Recently while on a bus, Julia was asked by another passenger why she wasn’t speaking to her son in Danish, “Because I am clear on our family priorities and confident in our beliefs of raising our son in a multilingual environment, I was able to comfortably answer her question and educate her a little as well - I hope.” Julia says that being bilingual or multilingual isn’t a new thing. “It is however probably the most important thing for me to pass on in terms of culture to my son. If he knows my language as well as Danish, then he automatically has a connection to his ‘second’ home and ensures he has a much greater cultural awareness and intercultural knowledge.

ADVICE FOR RAISING A CHILD IN A VILLAGE THAT ISN’T YOURS Along with confidence, embracing the way in which things are done in Denmark has been key for Australian, Elizabeth Isaksson when taking on parenting as an expat. “Denmark embraces families, and my personal journey from pregnancy to parenthood has been relatively easy to navigate. But I have also learnt that embracing the cultural differences is key. This doesn’t mean ignoring my own cultural identity, but rather an opportunity to ask many questions and be open to trying something new. Going with the flow, being open to the new systems and tradi-

tions is really important,” she says. Arguably one of the most famous international families in Denmark is the Danish Royal family, with the Queen herself marrying an expat, as did both her children. A family, irrespective of their power and level of resources, who would have also struggled with some of the very same issues of raising an international family that we are today. It’s a nice reminder to us all of the reality of living in a global world and parenting in a foreign land. THE-INTL

IT MIGHT FEEL LIKE HARD WORK, BECAUSE IT IS HARD WORK. BUT JUST DON’T GIVE UP ON TALKING TO PEOPLE, CONNECTING WITH PEOPLE, JOINING GROUPS, AND ASKING FOR HELP. AT SOME POINT, IT WILL PAY OFF”

Keri Bloomfield is a connector, writer, event manager and blogger currently living in Copenhagen. Originally from New Zealand she was recently employed by her daughter (Bilingual Backpack Baby) as editor, writer, photographer and social media manager to document their adventures living in Denmark. Prior to this job posting, Keri navigated a corporate life in New Zealand and England working in the field of event management and people management. She is strongly passionate about healthy workplaces (and pastries). Now based in Denmark Keri is on her way to becoming bilingual (she hopes) and is the co-organiser of ‘Post A Letter Copenhagen’. A monthly event held at ENIGMA Museum of Post & Communication in Østerbro. Entry is by donation and in return attendees are able to write letters to anywhere in the world for free. She recently initiated a project for volunteer writers to write to lonely elderly people all over the world. This is part of Keri’s greater goal to encourage more thoughtful and meaningful communication in the world. You can read and follow Keri’s adventures in Copenhagen with her Danish partner and daughter, and learn more about Post A Letter Copenhagen, by visiting: www.bilingualbackpackbaby.com www.postalettercopenhagen.com

– JULIA KAISER, INTERNATIONAL MOTHER

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


28

REFRESH YOUR SMARTPHONE! Spring is upon us, and the change of season normally goes hand-in-hand with a new, improved you. The same should apply to your smartphone and the apps that are cluttering your home screen – out with the old, and in with the new. Suzaan Sauerman says that it’s time for a revamp and refresh and offers up this season’s top picks. PHOTOGRAPHS VARIOUS

TEXT SUZAAN SAUERMAN

FITNESS FUN LEADING UP TO SPRING TIME, WE START TO THINK MORE ABOUT A FITNESS REGIME AND HOW TO GET BACK INTO A ROBUST FITNESS PLAN. I HAVE HANDPICKED MY FAVOURITE FITNESS APPS WHICH WILL KEEP YOUR ROUTINE ON TRACK, NO MATTER WHERE YOU CHOOSE TO DO YOUR EXERCISE.

AAPTIV - BEST FOR COMPREHENSIVE TRAINING Aaptiv is an in-ear personal trainer that’ll take your workouts up a notch, no matter where you decide to knock them out. The app features more than 2500 audio classes, with 15 trainers creating new classes each week. At least 30 classes are added to Aaptive every week, and you get unlimited use with your subscription, so you definitely won’t find yourself doing the same workouts over and over. The app’s audio-driven instructions make it easy to follow along.

PRICE: $14.99/MONTH, $99.99/FULL YEAR FEE - IOS/ ANDROID

KEELO

BEST FOR QUICK WORKOUTS It’s tough to beat High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) when you want to get in a quick and effective workout. Keelo takes full advantage of the training strategy, providing fast-paced workouts lasting between seven and 20 minutes that will deliver results soon when done three times a week. The app has both bodyweight and equipment workouts, so whether you’re in the gym or at home, no excuses! PRICE: FREE - IOS/ANDROID

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


29

MUST HAVE HOME SCREEN APPS GET RID OF THOSE APPS THAT YOU BARELY USE, OR AREN’T WHAT YOU EXPECTED, AND REPLACE THEM WITH THIS SEASON’S BEST.

EVERNOTE Evernote is essentially a virtual notebook you have with you everywhere – perfect for downloading whatever is bouncing around in your brain. You can make notes directly in the app, save images and articles from the web and track tasks. It can also han-

SNAPSEED The best camera is the one you have on you, but the best pictures it takes might not always come out as Insta-ready as you’d

dle audio files. The best part? Everything you add to Evernote is searchable, so you can find it next week (or even five years from now), quickly and easily.

Suzaan has over 18 years experience working for various technol-

age editing from your phone. And, it’s not just just the exposure, boost the highlights, and much more. It’s a great way to get your pictures perfect without having to sit down at the computer.

PRICE: FREE - IOS/ANDROID

ogy brands, leading global mar-

EDITOR'S TOP PICK!

THIS IS A GREAT LITTLE GADGET, COMBINES FASHION AS WELL AS TECHNOLOGY.

keting organisations, developing product portfolio’s, driving digital transformation and unique retail experiences. Currently she focus-

BEOPLAY H9I These are my favourite long-haul traveling comp a n i o n s . T h e B e op l ay H9i are luxury wireless and noise-cancelling head-

es her time on wearables & hearables, helping various companies to create unique experiences that enhances lives, make us healthier and drives education through technology – to mention a few.

phones. Battery life is now

Suzaan, a self-confessed tech

around 18 hours with Blue-

geek, has travelled, worked and

tooth and ANC on, or up

lived on all the continents of the

to 24 hours with the 3.5mm

world. In her spare time she loves

wired connection. Totally

CLIPS

LIFESTYLE TECH ADVISOR

PRICE: FREE - IOS/ANDROID

like them to. With Snapseed, you can do basic imadding filters – tweak your white balance, ad-

SUZAAN SAUERMAN

new is the inclusion of proximity sensors, which are re-

to keep fit by running and training at The Wolfpack Gym. She has a passion for food & wine, always

Apple’s new Clips video app is an all-in-one pack-

sponsible for automatically

age for making video clips, editing them and shar-

pausing your music when

trying to find the best cup of cof-

ing them with friends, family, or via your social

you take the headphones

fee in the city, enjoys art galler-

media networks. Easy video controls allow you to

off, or resuming when you

ies and spending quality time with

make short videos without having to mess around

put them on. In my opinion

her friends.

with complex editing tools. Live titles make it easy

they are the most stylish

to insert captions or subtitles us-

of all the over-ear options

ing your voice, and users can ap-

on the market currently.

ply a variety of filters, effects and

Available in black or natu-

animated speech bubbles, includ-

ral leather.

ly she travels to London and San

PRICE: 3,799 DKK AT BEOPLAY.COM

Francisco on a monthly basis.

ing emoji.

PRICE: FREE - IOS

Suzaan lives in Copenhagen, was born & raised in South Africa and is a British citizen. Current-

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


30

A DAY OUT IN CENTRAL CPH We wine ‘n dine with Lonnie Castle as she takes us on a culinary and cultural journey around Copenhagen, sharing with us the many hip and happening places to get your full in the city.

most amazing cities to hang out in. After a long and cold winter everybody comes out of hibernation – longing for long sunny outdoor afternoons. The proud old lady, as we like to call Copenhagen, shines with her bright colourful buildings, the frozen canals and lakes wake up and the lawns in her parks gets covered by laughter, loving and relaxed people. Doors open up everywhere – cafés, secret backyards and new restaurants welcome you with open arms. The fact that Copenhagen is quite small (and flat) makes it really easy and very convenient to transport yourself around in the city by bicycle. Every local Copenhagener, with very few exception, transports themselves and their kids around on two wheels (bicycle lanes have rush hours here). There is no excuse to get out of your comfort zone and explore the interesting and very different neighbourhoods the city has to offer. From Østerbro to Copenhagen K over Frederiksberg and to Vesterbro, there are multiple opportunities to for discovering something new every (sunny) day. Dining, shopping and cultural happenings are all over.

BOUTIQUE IS BIG Boutique hotels are more popular than ever and they seem to pop up in every city all over the world. Copenhagen is no exception. They attract you with their homely feeling and the fact that they are a meeting point for all the worlds’ habitants almost makes you feel like a traveler in your own city. I love the energy in these

RESTAURANT GEIST

YVONNE KONÉ

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

HOTEL SANDERS

little hotels. Coffee meetings, lunching and dinner dates. They provide it all and several of them are competing with well recommended restaurants when it comes to food, service and drinks. My favourite go-to for everything above at the moment is Hotel Sanders. Nestled between Copenhagen’s royal castles, contemporary art galleries, classic theatres and historical buildings you will find Sanders, the city’s latest luxury boutique hotel. The interior is classic – yet to die for. I can spend hours checking out the customised interior design, the lamps, the tiles and the beautiful flower decorations. The atmosphere is cozy and welcoming, the coffee great and the bar TATA is tempting. Close by you will find several nice restaurants and cafés – the area around Kgs Nytorv is booming with excellent restaurants and bars. Restaurant Geist, owned by the charismatic chef Bo Beck is a must try if you want to go out and spend a bit. The food is interesting and the atmosphere is exclusive and contemporary – the place is designed by Space Copenhagen who also designed restaurant Noma (the number one restaurant in the world not so long ago). The backyard is also a little gem. Not many Copenhagen backyard restaurants

THE UNION KITCHEN

ATELIER SEPTEMBER

have a green outdoor area – it’s like being in Italy. Lille Strandstræde at the top of Nyhavn is becoming a mekka of fashion, interior, cafés and wine bars – my favourite shoe shop Yvonne Koné is located here and one of my favourite places to eat and hang out in this street is at The Union Kitchen. Hip youngsters work here and the food is great (prices decent too), and the standard of the service is way higher than in most other restaurants in the city. Cool kids, stroll a little further down the street and you will find Skt. Annæ plads – a beautifully restored area with great cafés and a playground area that your eyes actually enjoy looking at. Down the street of Gothersgade I often pop in at Atelier September for lunch or a morning meeting – they are famous for their “avocadomad” and great coffee. Beau Marche is two steps away, and just around the corner from my work space, is a French-inspired café and interior store. Here you will most likely find me sipping on a glass of rose and looking for treasures for my living room. When I am craving more wine I cross the high street “Strøget” and visit the wine bar Ved Stranden 10 – great wine and tapas. Very convenient that the owner has a restaurant around the corner, Admiralgade 26. Beautiful interior, cozy atmosphere and great people. For dessert The American Pie Company in Skindergade is the best in the west. Sweetest owner Erin spreading her love in circle-shaped pies inspired by her American heritage. THE-INTL

ADMIRALGADE 26

VED STANDEN 10

BEAU MARCHE

C

COPENHAGEN IN SPRING is one of the

TEXT LONNIE CASTLE

THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY

PHOTOGRAPHS VARIOUS; COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER

LONNIE CASTLE MARKETING MANAGER Lonnie is Danish and married to a South African wine farmer. She has lived in Copenhagen most of her life – but has recently moved up north to Humlebæk to discover farm life. She works as a marketing manager for an interior design company located in the center of Copenhagen. Her love for Copenhagen is strong and passionate – she has bicycled through its streets and parks since she was a kid and knows most areas and locals better than she knows the contents of her purse!


31

The best kept wine is… So you love your wine – most of us do! But how long can you keep loving that bottle you’ve been saving for that special occasion. This month Mathew Castle offers up his top tips on keeping that bottle preserved for even longer.

MATHEW CASTLE VITICULTURIST

MATS VINEYARD was founded in 2010 by the South African viticulturist Mathew Castle and his now Danish wife Lonnie. To pursue his dreams of establishing his own wine brand in Copenhagen, Mathew left behind him a long ca-

W

WHEN THE GREAT

Frenchman Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled on the island of Reunion after his loss at Waterloo he developed a love for South African wines from the Cape Town estate Groot Constantia. Bonaparte died in 1821. Last week a South African somelier and wine maker, and close friend, Jean Vincent, had the pleasure of tasting and re-corking a 1821 bottle of Grand Constance (Groot Constantia) with a TCA-free cork for the owner who hopes that the wine will keep for a while longer. People always ask me how long they should keep their wine. Although this wine had been re-corked once, back in 1883, 193 years is a pretty long time. Now I am not suggesting you keep your wine for that long, but it is clearly possible under the right conditions. So what are those conditions – THERE ARE MANY. Some of the more important things to consider when storing your wine include:

TEMPERATURE: The ideal temperate is between 5 and 15 0C – but most importantly there must be no variation in temperature. If it’s 7 0C keep it at 7 0C.

DARKNESS: Light destroys the wine, hence the use of cellars. Find a cool dark place to store your bottles, such as a wine cabinet or even better a wine fridge where there is little change of light getting in – and you can maintain the temperature.

reer as a viticulturist in Stellenbosch, Cape Town. He is now based

QUIET: Vibrations from mechanical sources or noise from other vibrations, even being moved around or bumped unsettles wine. Leave your wine bottles undisturbed – except when you are ready to pop the cork!

HUMIDITY: Around 50% is most desirable.

GOOD QUALITY, FAULT-FREE CORKS: This is probably the most important of all, and can sometime lead to cork taint. Up to five percent of all wines closed with a cork will have some form of cork taint when opened. There are a number of these taints, such as oxidation from air getting into the wine, as well as, and possibly most common and disastrous – TCA. Trichloroanisole is an organism found in most corks. It leads to what we know in the industry as corked wines. The problem is that not everyone can smell corked wines, especially in small quantities. It however severely taints the other flavours in the wine. You more than likely will not realise a particular bottle of wine is corked, but you don’t like it, you don’t buy it again and the producer loses a customer for life. So be mindful of this when opening your next bottle, and smell for scents of wet cardboard, as well as musty and damp basement odors. It may not be the wine that’s the problem, rather the cork. THE-INTL

in Copenhagen where the two of them import great quality wine from a few selected wineries in South Africa that are very close to Mathew´s heart and where they have spent quite some time testing the grapes together... MATS VINEYARD is creating some interesting concepts, including MATS VINEYARD WINE OF THE MONTH CLUB where Mathew will select a mixed case of wine and deliver it to your front door on a weekly or monthly basis.

www.matsvineyards.com

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


32

“An engaging Danish teacher makes all the difference”

Joanna, economist from Kuala Lumpur.

Sign up for intensive Danish courses in Hellerup and Lyngby sprogcenterhellerup.dk

APRIL 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM 1605_SH_annonce_Murmur_255x345mm_01.indd 2

23/10/17 09.46

Profile for The International Denmark

The International April 2018 issue  

Our April issue is out now! Enjoy the latest issue: - The famous cocktail bar Curfew, and it's owner Humberto Marques. - As always our pop...

The International April 2018 issue  

Our April issue is out now! Enjoy the latest issue: - The famous cocktail bar Curfew, and it's owner Humberto Marques. - As always our pop...

Profile for the-intl