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international

the

ISSN 2596-5220

MEET THE DANISH PIE-MAKING QUEEN

BEST RUNNING APPS

UNDERSTANDING JULEFROKOST

FOOD CULTURE: BRINGING US TOGETHER

NOVEMBER 2018 - THE-INTL.COM

FREE

THOMAS MULHERN AND HIS PAPER

MISSION TO MAKE DENMARK A 'HOME' FOR ALL

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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A TIME FOR COMING TOGETHER THE SILLY SEASON IS JUST ABOUT UPON US, SIGNALING THE ALMOST-END TO YET ANOTHER YEAR. BUT, BEFORE WE FISH OUT THOSE CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS THERE IS STILL THANKSGIVING AND A WHOLE HOST OF JULEFROKOST EVENTS TO GET THROUGH - WE'LL DO OUR BEST TO HELP YOU NAVIGATE THE DANISH FESTIVITIES.

H

HALLOWEEN DECOR PACKED away, and already another theme is upon us! You might have noticed (insert heavy sarcasm) the slight Christmas angle that's hitting the stores at the moment, well it's only going to get worse! I for one love the approach of Christmas, but can never understand how the Halloween decorations land up on the same shelf as the Christmas cards and wrapping paper - it's October! Be sure to read Kay's story on "Exploring the Danish drinking culture" on page 30. Great insight into Kay's experiences as some of you will be heading off to your Danish "Julefrokost" soon - yes, even the Christmas parties are starting to roll out during November! For our American expats it's the build up to Thanksgiving, and being an Expat myself, with friends from all around the globe, I'm often invited to share this holiday season with them. Our resident foodie, Erin, shares her personal story of an American expat living in Denmark, along with yummy pie recipes on page 14. Erin has also just launched her new book - The Pie Shop Cookbook, can't wait to get my hands on a copy! Since moving to Denmark 11 years ago, I can honestly say that there has been a cultural "awakening"

for me and my family as you do tend to gravitate towards other expats. But as much as you enjoy your expat friends, it's just as important to make time for (and make) local Danish friends. Friendship is so important when you arrive here, but as an expat you

can tend to gravitate to what you know and are familiar with. Laura explains the importance of becoming friends with the Danes on page 28, and how even though it might have it's own set of challenges, it's so worth it in the end. Our cover this issue features Thomas Mulhern, owner of Globally Local, I can honestly say he's making it his mission to bring expats and Danes together to create a better Denmark. Read his remarkable journey and insight on page 8. We have two new team members this issue: Béranger Stark Morel and Gina Lorubbio. Béranger is going to talk about the ups and downs of learning Danish, and give his personal insights every issue. Gina will take us on a historic journey and explore how foods from other cultures landed in Denmark. So lots for you to read this issue - jam packed with everything you need (and want) to know. Have a great November, drink responsibly, and remember we've got you as we navigate towards the silly season!

“Family isn't always blood. It's the people in your life who want you in theirs. The ones who accept you for who you are. The ones who would do anything to see you smile and who love you

Love,

no matter what. ”

LYNDSAY JENSEN MANAGING EDITOR AND PARTNER

- Unknown

WEBSITE: THE-INTL.COM

MEET THE TEAM MANAGING EDITOR & PARTNER LYNDSAY JENSEN has twenty years' experience in the advertising and publishing industry, and holds degrees in Business and Desktop Publishing (print and repro). Born in the UK, and brought up in South Africa, she has the ability to understand different cultures, and is passionate about networking. She is a wife of twenty one years and mother to two boys aged 20 and 14. She loves travel, photography and art. lyndsay@the-intl.com

INTERN & PROOF READER LÉA SEVERINO is a Master's student in Film & Media Studies at the University of Copenhagen and an aspiring journalist. Passionate about literature and arts, she started writing culture-related articles for the newspaper of her home university in Switzerland, where she graduated with a Bachelor's in French and Cinema. lea@the-intl.com

SALES For advertising sales, please contact: sales@the-intl.com ADDRESS

The International ApS, Industrivej 14, 4683 Rønnede; +45 42676745

PRINT

Provins-Trykkeriet ApS, Vordingborg

COVER PICTURE MANAGING DIRECTOR & PARTNER KENNETH MACALPINE is a Nordic Financial Manager in the Transport industry. His education is in Finance and he has a business degree obtained in the UK. Born in Norway he moved to Denmark at the age of 22. He is of Danish Scottish ancestry and lives in southern Denmark with his large multi-national family consisting of Danish, Irish and Brazilian heritage. He is always interested in new challenges and loves to live life to the fullest. kenneth@the-intl.com

SUB-EDITOR DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER is a print and digital writer, communicator and media production manager/ editor. He has several years’ experience in the media and publishing industry, and holds a Master’s degree in media and politics from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa). He is passionate about politics, publishing and people-empowerment. He is a husband of almost two years, and has a love affair with good food and wine. david@the-intl.com

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

ADVERTISING SALES HEIDI GREVES is married, and a mother of six boys. She Moved back to Denmark five and a half years ago after 14 years in Kent, England. Born in Copenhagen to a British mother and a Danish father, Heidi has knowledge and language skills of both countries. She has experience in the tourism industry in Denmark, and sales experience in England. She loves to be creative with photography, art and baking, and loves to socialise. heidi@the-intl.com

DISTRIBUTION SATYA PRAPANCA is married, and moved to Denmark one and a half years ago from Indonesia. His previous work experience includes; subtitle translator, documentary films, photographer, and music curator in his spare time! Satya's passion is composing music with his guitar and laptop. He enjoys nothing more than taking in the beauty of Copenhagen while enjoy coffee/tea and cake at a local cafe.

Kelley McGee - www.kelleyhudson.com

DISTRIBUTION

The International is available at a range of businesses, institutions, cafés and public libraries across Denmark

SUBSCRIPTIONS

For home or corporate delivery of the printed edition please contact: distribution@the-intl.com The International is published 12 times a year. This issue was published on October 30, 2018

CVR:

39118181


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WHAT'S ON

IN NOVEMBER THE FESTIVE SEASON IS ALMOST UPON US AND THERE IS LOADS TO SEE AND DO AROUND DENMARK THAT WILL GET YOU IN THE SPIRIT. PHOTOGRAPHS VARIOUS

HILLERØD

RIDE ON

STORE DYREHAVE FORST

KLAMPENBORG

ALL AROUND DENMARK

TUBORG J-DAY

TEXT LÉA SEVERINO

2 NOVEMBER

4 NOVEMBER

4 NOVEMBER

J-DAY – INVADING CITY STREETS AND PUBS

HUBERTUS HUNT AT DYREHAVE

FOREST MARATHON AT STORE DYREHAVE FOREST

Did you know that beer is so sacred in Denmark that a ‘holy’ day has been dedicated to it? Whereas old Danes used to go to church to commemorate Jesus’ crucifixion every Friday following the vernal equinox – a tradition known as Good Friday, or Easter – modern Danes celebrate Tuborg’s Christmas beer release on the first Friday of November. Like Easter, this celebration has its own name: J-Dag (pronounce “yol-day”), in reference to Julebryg (“Christmas brew”) – a slightly darker and stronger brew than the regular pilsner. Each year on J-Dag, trucks full of Christmas beers and muscular deliverymen and women dressed like sexy Santa Clauses invade the streets to deliver samples of the precious golden liquid. Following the trucks like they were the only source of light in the dark Danish winter, Tuborg’s fervent disciples applause, sing and roar in unison: “Øl! Øl! Øl!”. Shortly put, if you wish to get insight into the deep, real, Danish culture, J-Dag is a sublime epiphany you won’t soon forget – drinking beer is just a plus!

Marking the climax of the hunting season, the famous Hubertus Hunt will take place in Dyrehave, Klampenborg. Venerated figure during the Middle Ages, Hubertus was the patron saint of hunters. His name was given to this special ‘fox hunt’ when it was created in 1900. Although the arrangement of the hunt has changed since 1900, the event still happens every first Sunday of November and can attract up to 40,000 spectators and 160 riders. While traditional fox hunting involved dogs chasing foxes, no dogs nor real foxes are running between Dyrehave’s trees anymore. It is not a hunt but merely a show where experienced riders wearing fox tails are acting the fox parts. Nobody is holding guns. So if you want to “experience the riders in beautiful and dramatic situations, flying over hedges, through the air, deep landings and not least the crossing over the black pond, where one or more riders usually take a dip in the cold muddy water”, then meet the crowd at Dyrehaven at 10am on Sunday, November 4.

Starting at Ovedrevsvejen, at the entrance of Dyrehave Forest, South of Hillerød, this race which follows nice gravel roads between the beautiful golden colours of the autumn is open for runners of all ages and all physical conditions. From two to 42 kilometres, five different itineraries and distances can be selected. It is required to pay a fee, which starts at 50 to 185 DKK, depending on the length of the route you decide to follow. Registration must be made at the latest October 28, but it is also possible to register on the day of the event, between 8 and 10am (9:30 for the marathon distance). Last but not least, a 2,000 DKK price will be awarded to the fastest runner who will be able to set a new time record! Will it be you?

WEBSITE: WWW.SKOVMARATHON.DK/ENGLISH.HTML

WEBSITE: WWW.HUBERTUSJAGT.DK/ (DANISH)

H i g h Ac ad em i c S t an d ar d s C h ri st i an E t ho s C onv en i en t l y l o cat ed i n H el l er u p

rygaards.com NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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THE FLOOD

COPENHAGEN

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

AALBORG

KUNSTEN BABY

AARHUS

6 - 10 NOVEMBER 7 NOVEMBER

8 - 13 NOVEMBER

THE FLOOD AT TEATER KATAPULT

KUNSTEN BABY AT KUNSTEN MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

THE DOCUMENTARY OF THE MONTH AT CINEMATEKET

This mini theatre concert performed on a stage entirely made out of paper will take you on an fantastic journey, “from the conception of life and a rocking horse, to Love’s strong powers, Jealousy’s yellow pains and Cornucopia’s seducing whispers”. The directors, artist and musician Claus Bregengård, in collaboration with print designer Karen Strandgaard, will make you dive into their delicate paper universe full of poetry and music. Songs by English musician (and former member of the world-famous band Genesis) Peter Gabriel will accompany the performance. This mini show only lasts 30 minutes and the tickets cost between 50 and 90 DKK.

With their severe attendant, vast white rooms full of silence and multiple “Do not touch” little signs, museums are not the first place you want to visit during a relaxed afternoon spent with a newborn child. Nevertheless, the arrival of a new (sometimes) crying baby in a family should not prevent them from having access to Art and to all the enriching experiences a museum has to offer. This is the argument made by KUNSTEN Museum Modern Art Aalborg, who has consequently made sure to reserve an exclusive ‘baby’ moment in its program. Fathers, mothers, grandparents or babysitters are welcome to the museum with their babies on Wednesday, October 7 for a guided tour that will start at 13:30. A workshop where it will be possible to print the babies’ cute little feet or hands with paint will follow. The price is 30 DKK + entrance fee (110 DKK) and there is plenty of room for baby wagons, laugh as well as cries!

As the winter is insidiously trying to get our moral down, depriving us from sunlight and warmth, Cinemateket in Copenhagen has concocted the perfect remedy to cheer us up and revitalise our souls numb with cold: the French documentary “Le Grand Bal” (Laetitia Carton, 2018) will be screened everyday from November 8 to 13. The film is about the biggest traditional folk dance festival which takes place every summer in the French countryside in Auvergne and which lasts a week. It tells a story about life, dance, joy, poetry, agility, simplicity, freedom, humanity, community, love, about the ability to let go, to create friendship. Full of energy, smiling faces and galvanising music, watching this films might produce better results on your mood than swallowing a full box of D-vitamins bought at the closest apotek. You can reserve your seat online or buy a ticket at the entrance. The price is 80 DKK.

WEBSITE: WWW.KATAPULT.DK/KALENDER/THE-FLOOD/

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KUNSTEN MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

CINEMATEKET LE GRAND BAL

WEBSITE: WWW.DFI.DK/CINEMATEKET/BIOGRAF/ ALLE-FILM/FILM/LE-GRAND-BAL

KUNSTEN MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

KATAPULT THEATRE

KATAPULT THEATRE

WEBSITE: WWW.KUNSTEN.DK/DA/INDHOLD/ KUNSTEN-BABY-1819


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ALL AROUND DENMARK

ODENSE

ODENSE KONCERTHUS

LONDON BAR

CHRISTIANSHAVNS FÆRGECAFÉ

AARHUS

9 NOVEMBER

10 NOVEMBER

16 NOVEMBER

JULEFROKOST FOR SINGLES AT LONDON BAR

MORTENSAFTEN AT THE RESTAURANT – OR AT HOME

INTERNATIONAL DANCE NIGHT AT CONCERT HALL

Christmas is coming and, while the traditional Christmas duck will soon be on its way to the slaughterhouse, leverpostej, kartoffelsalat and karrysild are already here, waiting patiently in their plates to be eaten. Brace your stomach because julefrokost season has started and, since Danes love to share liver paté with every single person they know (anybody among colleagues, sport team, ancient school mates, family or closest friends) it can last up to three months! To open this season on a fun note, we suggest our ‘single’ readers to visit London Bar in Aarhus where a special julefrokost for singles will be held. Seats will be equally distributed between women and men and can be reserved online for 300 DKK. Who knows, maybe this is your chance to meet The One who will save your heart by agreeing to eat up your portion of leverpostej?

While Saint Martin’s Day is a famous harvest feast celebrated in many countries on November 11, Danes have their own version of it called “Mortensaften”, which basically consists of eating a big roasted goose on the evening of November 10. Why do Danes celebrate Martin’s Day a few hours before everybody else, you may ask? Do they want to prove the world they are more pünktlich than the most precise Swiss watch? Danes themselves may express doubts regarding the origins of the feast and, for many, Mortensaften is today mostly an excuse to share a good meal in good company. Therefore, restaurants around Denmark will propose special goose dishes and festive atmosphere on their menus. If the restaurant is not your thing, you can of course cook goose yourself following a traditional Danish recipe or, even better, ask your Danish friends to prepare it for you. Only remember one thing: showing up at a Danish dinner less then 10 minutes in advance might be considered as impolitely late. Therefore keep your Swiss, Hm sorry, your Danish watch close!

Salsa, tango, swing, Lindy hop, ballet and even Danish folk dances: these are all the different types of body languages that will be spoken during the International Dance Night which will take place on Friday, November 16 at Odense Koncerthus. The five different performances will be presented by Danglish comedian Conrad Molden, assuring the audience’s laugh and joyful mood. Musical interludes will be taken care of by gospel choir SoulSingers. Participants are encouraged to wear dancing shoes and to join the afterparty at Café Kræz where they will be invited to shake their booties until the end of the night. Tickets can be purchased online for 90 DKK. The show starts at 19:00.

WEBSITE: WWW.LONDONBAR.DK/EVENTS/

WEBSITE: WWW.BILLETTO.DK/EN/E/ INTERNATIONAL-NIGHT-2018-TICKETS-309985

“Learning Danish is expanding your horizon”

Ganesh, medical doctor from Madurai.

Sign up for intensive Danish courses in Hellerup and Lyngby sprogcenterhellerup.dk

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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ESBJERG

VEJLE

ISTOCK PHOTO

ISTOCK PHOTO

AUTUMN JAZZ FESTIVAL AT NATIONAL MUSEUM

COPENHAGEN

23 - 25 NOVEMBER 25 NOVEMBER

29 NOVEMBER

AUTUMN JAZZ FESTIVAL AT NATIONAL MUSEUM

BRUNCH CONCERT AT VESTER VEDSTED VINGÅRD

EXPAT DINNER AT VEJLE LIBRARY

Have you ever imagined that Justin Bieber might be the next Louis Armstrong and Rihanna the ‘2.0’ Billie Holiday? Noting that all famous “Jazz Standards” that are being played and re-played in jazz clubs today are “for the most part just pop songs from the 1930 and 1940 that jazz artists started to make their own versions of,” Niels Lan Doky says International Jazz Collective have had the idea to ‘update’ the old jazz repertoire by adapting this concept to 2018. Picking popular songs from the international contemporary hit parade, from artists such as Beyoncé, Rihanna, Coldplay, Amy Winehouse, Adele or even Justin Bieber, the jazz collective make the attempt to predict what might become tomorrow’s new jazz standards. This concert mixing pop and jazz will happen on Friday, November 23 and is part of the Autumn Jazz Festival that will take place at the National Museum of Denmark on November 23, 24 & 25. Tickets cost between 195 and 1795 (full festival) DKK.

There are four excellent reasons to attend this event: The charming location. Vester Vedsted Vingård is a vineyard situated 8km South from Ribe, close to the sea, 1km away from the beautiful Wadden Sea National Park. With their approximately 10,000 vines, the family who own this green oasis produce white, rosé as well as red wine. But that is not all! The food. Focusing on sustainability, organic, local and tasty products, they also prepare homemade pastries and other delicious dishes, accompanied with fresh herbs from the garden. Brewing beer, liquor and snaps is also on their agenda. All of this is made in total respect and love with the nature. The music. Not only will your bellies will be treated, but also your ears! Lively nordic folk harmonies will be performed by two young and talented Danish musicians who met at the Syddansk Music Conservatory: Nathasja playing the violin and Tobias the piano. Finally, the lucky chance that all these elements are reunited at the same place and time!

Vejle Library is offering you the opportunity to meet internationals as well as local Danes during an expat potluck dinner starting at 6pm on November 29. Participants are invited to bring nice homemade dishes perfumed with the flavours of their home countries. This mix of cultures and spices will be shared around the table in a friendly atmosphere. Any kind of food, from starter to dessert, will be received with joy and appetite. The event is free and is open for everybody; children as well as adults are welcome.

WEBSITE: WWW.JAZZ.DK/EN/CPHJAZZ/CONCERTS/54177/

WEBSITE: WWW.VEJLEBIB.DK/ARRANGEMENTER/ ARRANGEMENTER-VOKSEN/EXPAT-DINNER-0

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VISITESBJERG

VEJLE BIBLIOTEK

VISITESBJERG.DK

VEJLE BIBLIOTEK

NIELS LAN DOKY - GAFFA

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF DENMARK

WEBSITE: WWW.VVVINGAARD.DK/19034296


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MAKING A SUCCESS OF A FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS The International's Claire Ross-Brown sits down exclusively with Stockforsa Invest founder LG Håkansson. PHOTOGRAPHS DANIEL ASKOLIN

L

L-G HÅKANSSON FOUNDED Stockforsa Invest in 1997, but his journey began many years before this. Today, the third Håkansson generation is active with Stockforsa Invest - www.stockforsa. com, which consists of both specialised and traditional activities within very different sectors. The latest acquisition is a new hotel, “Hoors Gastgifwaregard,” which is a completely re-modernised hotel, yet has kept it’s charm and even has an English pub which I completely fell in love with! I have always been fascinated with family-owned businesses and one night whilst having dinner with L-G Håkansson, I became truly inspired by his story of how he started his journey. Here LG Håkansson, whom everyone calls LG tells me about his journey:

Q

HOW DID YOUR JOURNEY BEGIN? WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO START YOUR OWN BUSINESS?

The trip started already when I was seven years old and our home in our apartment block burned down. I gathered the toys that had been burnt with the firemen's approval, cleaned them and then sold them to the children in the local neighborhood. Business was already in my blood. Some years later, I wanted to take a medical education but my grades were not good enough, so I took an economics education instead, where we had a fantastic teacher by the name of “Lennart Hanesjö,” who inspired me to do something incredible with business. He taught and helped us students start a business, which we ran throughout our school duration. At the same time, I started my first company already at 16 years of age; this was an international import and export business. Because I was so young, I had to seek approval from the government, which I was successful in doing. My first import became a door “spy glass/peep hole” that I bought for seven Swedish Kroner and sold for 99 kroner. I earned 60,000 DKK in my first year, which was a lot of money at that time - (a new car cost 15,000 DKK) this became my starting capital for my future business.

Q

WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS YOU HAVE LEARNED ABOUT DOING BUSINESS AND ALSO ADAPTING WITH THE EVER-CHANGING ENVIRONMENT THAT WE LIVE IN? The number one criteria is to understand the market and to create a large network of trusted people who can help in different situations. Take a deep interest in the industry in which one is investing in and make a thorough due diligence of the entire market. Lastly, always be up to date on what is happening globally, both within society and on the political front.

TEXT CLAIRE ROSS-BROWN

Q

YOUR THREE SONS ALL WORK WITH YOUR COMPANY AND EACH ARE VERY TALENTED IN THEIR OWN RIGHT - WAS THIS A CONSCIOUS DECISION ON THEIR PART AND YOURS, OR WAS IT SOMETHING THAT HAPPENED ORGANICALLY? I've always talked about my business as they were growing up and they had a natural curiosity and became interested in listening and asking questions. It was a natural progression of them becoming more and more involved in the family business and today we all make important decisions together at our Board meetings in Bastun, Sweden. I always hoped that my sons would take over CEPA as my father started in 1946, which would mean that the 3rd generation would survive the company, which is unique since only 1 out of 1,000 companies survive the 3th generation. A little funny thing to mention is that my wife Rosita was tired of constantly talking business, so about one year ago, she took over the CEO role at HöörsGästis - www.hoorsgastis.se, which is our hotel - and is now deeply involved and a key person in the family business.

Q

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE ANY ENTREPRENEURS OUT THERE IN ORDER TO SUCCEED WITH THEIR OWN BUSINESS?

Create a large network within the industry you are in and stay in touch with it”. Immerse yourself and learn the industry's various aspects, something that I lived daily when I jumped from industry to industry, resulting in owning different companies in different industries. My own starting point is that both parties in a partnership need to benefit. It creates a “win-win” which leads to the building of your own strong personal brand that, again, opens up for new business. And lastly, the most important thing in being successful, are your “co-workers” only employ the best, it may cost in the short run, but well worth it in the long run – just like in football, if you want to play in Champions-League, it will cost you – but absolutely worth it! THE-INTL

CLAIRE ROSS-BROWN BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF FINTECH COMPANY CASHWORKS Claire has over 26 years', experience working as both a business consultant and actress/singer. She has worked as a Headhunter in London city with Investment Banks, produced an album and invests in companies. Claire is a true Londoner, yet considers Denmark her home, where she lives with her family. She loves to run, box, snowboard and wakeboard. Her column in The International is about Entrepreneurship, interesting businesses and key business

BEST BUSINESS ADVICE: "CREATE A LARGE NETWORK WITHIN THE INDUSTRY YOU ARE IN AND STAY IN TOUCH WITH IT".

people, board member of www.boernogungeinoed.dk

www.cashworks.ch

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A MAN ON A MISSION TO MAKE DENMARK TRULY INCLUSIVE

MANAGING DIRECTOR OF THE COMPANY GLOBALLY LOCAL, THOMAS MULHERN CHATS TO ‘THE INTERNATIONAL’ ABOUT ADJUSTING TO LIFE IN DENMARK, AND WHAT MORE NEEDS TO BE DONE IN ORDER TO CREATE THE CONDITIONS FOR CREATING A GLOBAL DANISH SOCIETY.

PHOTOGRAPHS KELLEY HUDSON - WWW.KELLEYHUDSON.COM TEXT DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER

O

ON A MISSION to make Denmark a more inclusive and innovative place to live and work, American-born and raised Thomas Mulhern, wants to create a place with the potential of a thriving global community contributing to the local Danish society. “I moved around quite a bit growing up, but was always deeply entrenched in the American cultural paradigm. Though I was always interested in other cultures and what motivated human behavior,” says Mulhern of his passion and innovative thinking for inclusivity and fostering a ‘glocal’ society. He says that this ultimately led to a Bachelor´s degree in philosophy in New England, and eventually go on to complete his post-graduate studies abroad in Louvain, Belgium. “And I’ve been living abroad as an expat ever since.” This was when he met his now Danish wife, who eventually led him to Denmark in 2011. “We had met at graduate school in Belgium and after living there for some time, I decided to give Denmark a shot when my wife had completed law school and was going to start her career in Copenhagen,” Mulhern explains. Open-minded about his move to Denmark, Mulhern says that he was excited at the prospect of a new adventure and culture to explore – but his excitement soon turned to

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anxiety and a realisation that there was a lot of work to be done if he was going to integrate into his ‘new’ society. “After the honeymoon stage, which was quite literal in my case, as I got married right before moving to Denmark, the reality and symptoms of culture shock hit me within the first six months, as I quickly realised I was living in a country where I did not know the language, was not aware of the cultural norms, and had no established network. I realised that I was going to have to truly work hard to make Denmark my home,” he explains. Aside from his “loss of my independence due to not being able to communicate in Danish”, Mulhern smiles saying that his first winter was also a big eye-opener – or chilling experience – that he struggled with initially. “I made it a priority to learn Danish; where I attended night classes twice a week for two and a half years straight. I also committed to stepping out of my comfort zone and allowing myself to make mistakes during this process. As a result, I was able to slowly win back my voice, and thus my independence regardless of whom I was speaking to,” Mulhern says.


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"WE NEED TO CREATE A SOCIETY WHERE DANES AND EXPATS CAN INSPIRE EACH OTHER IN ORDER TO HELP DENMARK REACH ITS FULL POTENTIAL," SAYS MULHERN WHO WENT ON TO FOUND GLOBALLY LOCAL WHICH AIMS TO ASSIST EXPATS AND GLOBAL DANES MEANINGFULLY INTEGRATE IN DENMARK, WHILE HELPING DANISH ORGANISATIONS BECOME MORE ATTRACTIVE PLACES FOR GLOBAL TALENT TO THRIVE AND STAY.

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11 INTEGRATION AND INTERNATIONALISATION HAND-IN-HAND Although he had lived abroad for a few years before moving to Denmark, Mulhern says that there were certain cultural adjustments he had to make upon arrival in Denmark. “The power distance in Denmark is much lower than in the United States. This is a crucial difference between Danes and Americans. The American culture priorities uniqueness and exceptionalism which entail inequality; whereas in Denmark, these traits are less valued, and inequality is to be avoided.” It is this tendency towards consensus building that he hoped to maximise at Institut Sankt Joseph as International Department Head. “I worked to create the first fully Danish/English bilingual school program in Denmark. Danes and expats alike were able to move outside their comfort zones and break down the barriers of segregation and assimilation. In its place we were able to succeed in creating a hybrid culture where authentic integration was possible for expat and Global Danish families and authentic internationalisation was possible for Danes seeking a more global approach,” he says. His program with the school motivated him to dream bigger and aim for a more ambitious goal – extending his vision of a “Global Danish” community to Denmark as a whole. “I believe to do this we need to create a society where Danes and expats can inspire each other in order to help Denmark reach its full potential,” says Mulhern who went on to found Globally Local which aims to assist Expats and Global Danes meaningfully integrate in Denmark, while helping Danish organisations become more attractive places for global talent to thrive and stay. “It became clear to me over the past five years that the guiding principles that have underpinned the vision I implemented at the school; that being providing programs that provide – simultaneous integration for expats/global Danes and internationalisation for Danes – could be exported and utilised by different stakeholders within the Danish society.” Mulhern says that he wants to achieve a “triple-win” for Danish society; benefiting individual families, organisations, and the society as whole. As a bi-product of this, securing the global talent that is so vital to the success of the country going forward. Mulhern says that he thinks it’s important for expats and indeed repats to better integrate into Danish society because it’s directly correlated to enhanced well-being. “The more well-being that expats and repats are able to experience, the better the quality of life they will live, the better performance will be had at work, and the more they will be incentivised to contribute to the society that has created the conditions for this happy home. In other words, successful integration is a win for expats, repats, organisations and the society,” Mulhern says. Unfortunately, he feels that Danish authorities, civil society and business are not doing enough to welcome and make expats and repats feel at home in Denmark. “Until Danish authorities and organisations are themselves more willing to step outside of their linguistic and cultural comfort zones, and be open to being and doing in different ways, the fundamental barrier to integration will remain intact. That is confusing integration with assimilation and thereby creating either/or dilemmas where expats and repats have to choose between assimilation and segregation. “It is crucial that programs are created where families have the flexibility to succeed both in Denmark and abroad, and most importantly, create programs where global and local families can come together, equally belong and feel good about calling Denmark their home. That is what I will continue to fight for together with those who support the globally local movement,” he says. THE-INTL

THOMAS’ TOP 5 TIPS FOR EXPATS ADJUSTING TO LIFE IN DENMARK Mulhern offers this advice for those of you who are new to

www.cis.dk

Before long, you’ll belong Settling into a new country can be challenging – especially for the nonworking spouse. We know, from studies and from experience, that a successful posting depends on the happiness of the entire family – and our school is home to a very active, warm and welcoming community. Our PTA offers a wide range of opportunities: newcomers network, Spring Fair, Halloween, Yoga, Activities Fair, Wine and Cheese Evening, Dads’ Club and Ladies’ Night Out. Dedicated parents coach our sports teams, run our boy scouts and serve on the school Board. At CIS the whole family finds a place to grow roots and make friends. So to quote one of our parents: “I came for the job, but we stayed for the school.”

Denmark, and looking better integrate into your new ‘home’:

#1 #2

Step outside of your linguistic and cultural

comfort zones

#3

Network with repats, as they are great bridge builders

between Expats and local Danes.

Be open to being and doing in new ways.

#4 Do not give up your global perspective in order to assimilate

#5

Break out of your expat bubble and dare to share your

talents to make the society a more dynamic home.

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RASMUS FLINDT PEDERSEN

LIOR ZILBERSTEIN

TUALA HJARNØ

CHRISTIAN LINDGREN

THE BENEFIT OF GLOBAL DANISH EDUCATION Threading the needle - the path to mobility, stability, continuity and flexibility.

H

PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER; ISTOCK PHOTO

HOW DO WE provide expat and repat families mobility, stability, continuity and flexibility all at once? Bilingual education, has been proven to bring expat, Danish repat, multicultural and Danish families together to not only learn Danish and English, but also, promote integration and internationalisation simultaneously. In doing so, these diverse families have been given the flexibility to succeed in Denmark and abroad. The more families I speak to - whether they are located in Copenhagen, Aarhus, London, San Francisco or Shanghai - the more I am convinced that providing bilingual education (Danish/English) both in Denmark and in cities abroad, provides the unique platform for giving expat and repat families mobility, continuity, stability and flexibilty in one swoop. This has a direct impact on mitigating the factors that make moving to and from Denmark less attractive. Decades of research have documented the gift that bilingual education is. What we can see is that students participating in bilingual education have an enhanced ability to ignore irrelevant information, improved memory function, greater awareness of the nature of language itself, the ability to identify ambiguity to a greater degree and, improved inter-cultural skills. If bilingual education offers these type of benefits, why hasn´t it taken on a more widespread role in Europe. It has! Bilingual education is certainly not a new idea in the educational sector. It is spreading in countries like Italy and in Spain. In addition, The Netherlands alone has around 130 bilingual schools with instruction both in Dutch and English. However, Scandinavia, and Denmark included, have not overseen the spread of bilingual education as a viable alternative to standard monolingual education. It is quite interesting indeed that the Dutch and the Danes are both highly talented nations with regards to English language competencies,

and yet have such different priorities in terms of educational choice. Unfortunately, the lack of bilingual educational choice has put many expat, Danish repat and multicultural families in a quite difficult position of having to choose between a Danish or an interntional school. Many times, this choice has felt like, and has been, a choice between assimilation or segregation while living in Denmark. The choice of either becoming Danish or living separately in a bubble have created system-

Hello Goddag

Hey

Hej Hi

Dav

ic barriers that make it more difficult for Danes to internationalise and Global Danes and expats to integrate. The consequences of these policies stand in direct contrast to the ostensible strategy of attracting and retaining highly talented workers and their families from abroad.

BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS The question then becomes, how can the Danish society break down these self-erected barriers that stand in the way of authentic integration and global mobility? The short answer is to launch a national and international bilingual education movement, taking inspiration from what the Dutch have done so successfully. This hybrid model offers a unique recipe that calls for si-

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TEXT THOMAS MULHERN

multaneous integration and internationalisation for the diverse groups that make up the Danish society. What does simultaneous integration and internationalisation look like? These concepts taken together can be seen as the process whereby those of diverse backgrounds can learn, socialize and simply “be” together and thus, contribute in a dynamic and innovative way. To integrate fully in Denmark, one needs to cultivate Danish skills, but this does not need to be at the expense of one´s English competencies. To be international in Denmark, one needs to cultivate a global perspective, but this does not need to occur at the expense of participating actively in the Danish society. Many families have question marks in terms of their future plans, and find comfort in the stability that goes with knowing that their children will transition nicely into a program if/when they leave Denmark. Though not all families will leave Denmark, and it is therefore equally important that the Danish language and cultural immersion that goes with being part of the rich Danish pedagogical tradition is maintained. Bilingual education has the potential for families to meet both of these objectives. This is essentially about providing flexibility here and now, but also for the future. Bilingual education, and its underlying core principles of simultaneous integration and internationalisation can overcome the either/or dilemma that faces many Danish, expat, Danish repat and multicultural families. It is truly value-added education, and the need both in Denmark and abroad has been clearly demonstrated. The time has come to thread the needle; and give expat and repat families the mobility to succeed abroad, the stability to maintain language and culture, continuity that comes with transferring to similar systems and the flexibility to thrive both in Denmark and abroad. THE-INTL

THOMAS MULHERN MANAGING DIRECTOR, GLOBALLY LOCAL Thomas is the former International Department Head at Institut Sankt Joseph, where he led the first fully bilingual Danish/English educational program in Denmark. He is himself an expat, married to a Danish repat and father to a Danish/American. Thomas has experienced first-hand the barriers that make integration in Denmark so difficult, but has also learned the tools to breaking down these barriers and what it takes to integrate, and make Denmark a lasting home. Globally Local uses innovative services to internationalise organisations, and integrate expats and Danish repats.

www.globallylocal.dk


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WHEN I GROW UP,

I WANT TO BE AN ASTRONAUT When Andreas Mogensen, Denmark's first (and only!) man who ever ventured into space comes back to visit the pupils of the school he graduated from 23 years ago, all the stars he met up there almost seem pale in comparison to the ones shining in the student’s eyes. PHOTOGRAPHS MAJA GIANNOCCARO

TEXT

LÉA SEVERINO

A

ANDREA MOGENSEN, BORN in 1976, graduated from Copenhagen International School (CIS) in 1995. Fourteen years and a PhD degree in aerospace engineering later, aged 33, he was selected as one of six new astronauts at the European Space Agency (ESA), winning his place by beating no less than 8,000 other applicants. Tough competition! Although he was told that he might

have to wait up to ten long years before being assigned on a mission, his waiting time ended up lasting only four years. In 2013, a job as an aerospace engineer at the International Space Station (ISS) was assigned to him. His trip to space was fixed for 2015, letting him the two mandatory years of intensive training before setting off. Shortly before flying to the International Space Station, Andreas Mogensen was given a T-shirt by a class of 3nd grade children who were studying a unit about space at CIS. Mogensen promised to take the piece of clothes with him during his journey and to bring it back afterwards. Keeping his words, the astronaut came back three years later to CIS in order to share his spatial experience with the overexcited children, give them the symbolic

piece of white fabric back and, incidentally, sign a few dozens of autographs. It all starts with a dream. And with "the idea that if others can do it, I can also do it", announces Mogensen when a young 3rd grade schoolgirl from CIS asks him what gave him the confidence to go into space. Once you have the dream, what you then need to add is a little drop of luck. Since the European Space Agency only recruits new astronauts every 10-15 years, Mogensen explains, a tiny bit of luck "to be the right age at the right time" is indeed a useful ingredient to have if you wish your Becoming-an-astronaut recipe to succeed. Moreover, an immensely huge amount of hard work and, finally, a good deal of tenacity should of course not be forgotten. Modest, Mogensen does not mention

these last two crucial ingredients and rather focuses his presentation on the fun, crazy details of his space odyssey. A video showing his fellow astronauts playing with gravity inside the space station, spinning around and giggling like kids, makes the audience laugh. A picture taken from the sky revealing a wonderful aurora, floating above Canada with its many vivid colours, blue, green, orange, red, gold, dazzles the children who respond with loud "Oooh!" and "Aaaah" signifiers of their sincere amazement. The show reaches his climax when Mogensen, after describing how beautiful the view of Earth seen from Cupola – the observatory module built at the space station – is, projects the photo of a wellknown landscape, looking like the profile of a man with a big potato-like nose.

"Does anybody recognise this place?" he smiles. Children are delighted. Grown-ups are children. A dream has come true. In a corner of the room, a teacher whispers to his colleague’s ear, thrilled: "I am as excited as the children are!" At the end of a jolly Q&A session, where crucial questions were addressed such as "How did you go the toilets when you were in space?", or more romantic ones such as "Did your life in space change your perspective of life on earth?" Mogensen finally concluded: "I loved every minute and hope to go back”. Useless is to say that everybody in the room wishes that the Danish astronaut’s hopes will come true. A new T-shirt has been given to him. The dream goes on. THE-INTL

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A CULTURE OF COOKING

CREATIVE DIRECTOR AND PARTNER AT THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY, ERIN CHAPMAN, SAYS THAT IN THE USA, PIE IS TRULY A PART OF EVERY AMERICANS’ DNA. NOW, IN DENMARK SHE HOPES TO EXPOSE DANES AND EXPATS TO A SLICE OF THE MIDWEST UNITED STATES IN THE HEART OF COPENHAGEN.

PHOTOGRAPHS ERIN CHAPMAN TEXT DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER

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ERIN CHAPMAN GREW

up in the US states of Illinois and Wisconsin, granddaughter to grandparents (and great-grandparents) who were farmers and business owners. Her parents owned a Northwoods resort in Wisconsin where tourists from all around would come to stay in cabins on the lake, and where new families arrived every Saturday throughout the summers. Chapman became adaptable, and made new friends quickly. Her sociable life would stand her in good stead when she first came to Denmark following her graduating as a design major. “I first came to Denmark to visit back in 1993 – I was a young college student coming to Europe for the first time, and I had met a Danish guy in school (typical story!) But after my first visit, I kept coming back each year and, in 1996, I decided to stay a little longer and attended DIS – Denmark’s exchange program for American university students. That was a pivotal semester for me, where I felt the needed to explore Copenhagen – and Europe – more. I had 2 big suitcases, a pocketful of money I saved up, and I told my parents I’d be gone ’2 years tops! I promise…’ – cut to present day! 24-years on, Chapman has had the opportunity to be an art director, sing in a band, start her own creative business, publish cookbooks, work as a voiceover artist for international companies, write music for Lego, and most recently co-found The American Pie Company in 2015 – and still finds herself living, happily, in Denmark. “Amid all this madness, I met my wonderful Danish husband here in Denmark, and our daughter was also born here. At one point, husband, Brian, and I packed up and moved out to California, thinking we were meant to live in the USA. We tried it for about a year and a half and then realised that Copenhagen was where we belonged – it

was where we wanted to raise our daughter and call home,” says Chapman of her adventures in Denmark. So, what inspired Chapman to start up The American Pie Company – her love for baking she says – obviously! “With over 20 years’ experience in the advertising industry, including running my own creative business for 10 years, I specialised in brand building and image development for lifestyle, food and fashion clientele on both national and international levels. But at the end of the day, I loved to come home and cook or bake. Merging this love for food and art direction, I began to get more into food styling, cookbook design and recipe development, which led to co-authoring two cookbooks for the Danish market,” she explains. “My own love for comfort food began with growing up on my grandparents’ farms, practicing family recipes, enjoying the abundance of my dad’s vegetable gardens each year, and inheriting my mom’s ‘baking-to-relax’ tendencies,” she goes on to say. Through many exciting twists and turns in her creative career, Chapman was able to solidify this obsession and nostalgia into a brick-and-mortar reality, partnering with Dorte Prip to open Denmark’s first pie shop. As she travelled more, and learned to appreciate her surroundings living in Denmark, she inadvertently grew a deeper appreciation for her American roots. “At times I could not shake my homesickness and so I started to bake pie. It was the simplest way I could think of to harness familiar smells and flavours, and helped eased the longing for ‘home’. As time passed, and Denmark became my ‘other home’, my pie appreciation had turned into a full-blown obsession.”

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16 FOOD FROM THE HEART Chapman has just launched her new cookbook, The Pie Shop Cookbook. “I started to teach pie baking classes at the start of 2018 in our kitchen at the pie shop, and each and every class is a unique experience for me. We always have an international mix of attendants. In one class, we literally had seven different countries represented in an eight-person class. Isn’t that amazing? Pie brings us all together! Therefore, we felt now was time I write a new cookbook based on all the sweet pies at The American Pie Company, plus more seasonal favourites.” This is Chapman’s third book, but one that completely encompasses her “food heart” she says. “I am deeply nostalgic and I was raised to appreciate simple things – that working hard pays off, to be adaptable, and when it’s time to eat, you sit down and enjoy your meal with your family or friends. That is exactly what pie is to me: it’s simple, it’s rustic, it’s versatile and it’s down-to-earth.” “I also wanted to have fun with this book, so I included a third element: every recipe has a curated “Song of Choice”. At the pie shop, we take great care in ensuring the old-school authentic vibe, and our music playlists are a big part of this. From old blues riffs and jazz crooners, to country bluegrass classics, I hope it takes readers on a little Americana journey as they bake,” she goes on to say. Chapman says that November is the busiest month at The American Pie Company, as Thanksgiving falls on the 4th Thursday of November in America. In the spirit of Thanksgiving, Chapman has shared with us two recipes from her new cookbook. ”While this is America’s most widely celebrated holiday, the Danes have grown a curiosity over the last few years. And, Thanksgiving wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without pumpkin pie! At the pie shop, we like to do a twist on classic pumpkin pie, and make it a bit more like a cheesecake – it’s become one of our best sellers for the autumn season.” The second recipe is for a cranberry custard pie baked classic butter crust. ”Cranberries are native to North America, and I grew up with a friend whose parents ran a cranberry marsh. It was fascinating to see how the cranberries were harvested each autumn. This pie has a lovely sweet vanilla custard that offsets the tartness of the cranberries – it’s a wonderful combination, perfect as a complement to the traditional meal for the Danish holiday, Mortens Aften, or as an alternative to Danish Christmas dessert.” THE-INTL

"I AM DEEPLY NOSTALGIC AND I WAS RAISED TO APPRECIATE SIMPLE THINGS - THAT WORKING HARD PAYS OFF, TO BE ADAPTABLE, AND WHEN IT'S TIME TO EAT, YOU SIT DOWN AND ENJOY YOUR MEAL WITH YOUR FAMILY OR FRIENDS."

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PIMPED OUT PUMPKIN PIE THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY’S THANKSGIVING ICON WITH A TWIST: SWEET SWIRLED PUMPKIN CREAM CHEESE FILLING AND A BLEND OF SPICES BAKED IN A COOKIE CRUST.

CRUST:

PIE SHOP TIP:

If the pie bakes too long in the oven, the center can crack. To prevent this, be sure to check on your pie about 20-22 min into its baking time. Give it a wiggle. If it’s still too liquidy in the center, bake it another 3-5 min and check again. When you have just a slight jiggle in the center, remove from the oven and it will firm as it cools, for a beautiful smooth finish.

200g digestive cookies or graham crackers, finely ground (1 cup) 50g sugar 80g butter, melted

FILLING:

225g sugar 300g cream cheese 50g flour 1 can pure pumpkin purée (425g /15oz can) 3 eggs 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 teaspoon nutmeg 1 teaspoon ginger ½ teaspoon ground cloves 2-3 tablespoons milk

FOR THE CRUST:

Grind the cookies to a fine crumb mixture in a food processor or blender. In a mixing bowl, add the cookie crumb mixture, sugar and melted butter, and stir until combined. Pour the cookie mixture into a ca. 23-24 cm (9-inch) pie pan and press evenly onto the bottom and up the sides. Chill until ready to fill.

FILLING:

Preheat the oven to 1600C. Using a stand mixer or hand mixer, beat the sugar, cream cheese and flour until smooth. Take out 3 heaped tablespoons of the cream cheese mixture and set aside in a small bowl (you will use this later for the swirl). Next, blend in the pumpkin purée to the cream cheese mixture, and then mix in the eggs one at a time. Add the cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves and mix until combined. Pour the filling into the prepared cookie crust.

SWIRL & BAKE:

Using the remaining small bowl of the white cream cheese mixture, add 2-3 tablespoons of milk and stir until it’s smooth and slightly more thin in consistency. Drizzle the white mixture back and forth in a swirling, snake shape over the top of the pumpkin filling. Then, take a knife and do the same swirling motion and cut through the white swirls to make a marbling effect on the top of the pie. Bake the pie on the middle rack for 25-35 minutes, until the sides of the filling are firm and the center wiggles just a bit when you shake the pan slightly. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Place in refrigerator to chill and firm. Serve chilled with a side of fresh whipped cream and a dash of spice.

N BE NOTE: THIS IS YOUR PIE, SO YOU CA AS CREATIVE AS YOU LIKE.

WHERE TO BUY? The American Pie Company offers a wide array of piebaking paraphernalia, including Libby’s 100% Pure Pumpkin Purée, pie pans, aprons, pastry blenders, and more! Available in the pie shop or online at www.theamericanpieco.com

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PIE SHOP TIP:

You can decorate any baked open pie with pie crust cutouts. Simply roll out a round of dough, or use leftover dough you’ve trimmed away, and cut out shapes. Remember to keep the dough chilled for easier workability. Place the cutouts on a lined baking sheet, brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar. Bake at 1750C for about 15-18 minutes or until golden brown. Allow to cool, then decorate the baked pie as you wish.

THE LAKE HOUSE CRANBERRY CUSTARD A SEASONAL FAVOURITE IN MY REGION BACK HOME IN AMERICA: TART JUICY CRANBERRIES WITH A HINT OF ORANGE BAKED OVER A SWEET VANILLA CREAM CUSTARD IN A CLASSIC CRUST.

CRUST: 115g butter, cold 150g flour 1 teaspoon sugar 1 /4 teaspoon salt 50 ml, cold water

FILLING: 350g cranberries, fresh or frozen 340g sugar 250ml heavy cream 3 eggs 40g flour 2 teaspoons orange zest 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract ½ teaspoon salt Beaten egg for brushing crust

FOR THE CRUST: Cut the cold butter into cubes, and keep chilled in the refrigerator. Whisk together the flour, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Place cold butter cubes into the flour mixture and, using a pastry blender, begin to cut the butter into the flour mixture until smaller chunks form. You can also use a fork to cut the butter into the flour, but it takes a bit longer. Continue to do this until you have a mixture with pea-sized butter chunks and few larger grape-sized butter chunks left in it. Drizzle in half the cold water and, using a rubber spatula, begin to bring the dough together by pressing it against the side of the bowl. Add the rest of the cold water until you’ve added enough to just incorporate the dough. (If you feel it’s still a bit dry add another tablespoon or two.) Use your hands to finish bringing the dough together, working quickly so the butter chunks won’t melt in the warmth of your hands, but pressing hard enough so you don’t have any pockets or dry spots in the center of your dough. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 3 days. To roll out the dough, flour a clean surface and using a rolling pin, start to roll out the chilled dough from the center and out, in different angles, rotating and lifting it occasionally to keep it from sticking to the surface. Once the dough has been rolled out to approximately the correct size, you can measure it by turning over your pie pan and ensuring there is at least 6-8 cm (2-3 inches) of extra dough around the edge of the pan. Place the dough into the pan, and ease the dough into the bottom and sides of the pan. Trim any uneven edges of the dough with scissors leaving 4-5cm (2 inch) overhang. Roll the edges under and crimp or flute by pinching between your fingers. Chill the prepared pie shell until you’re ready to fill and bake.

FEAR OF BAKING? Take a pie baking class! The American Pie Company offers an array of pie baking classes where you make your own pie from the butter pie crust to the filling and topping it off. Classes are small for a more cosy atmosphere, and not only do you get to take your freshly baked pie home to share with family and friends, but you’ll nibble on savoury and sweet pies throughout the class! See more at theamericanpieco.com

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FILLING & ASSEMBLING: Preheat the oven to 1750C. Rinse the cranberries and pat dry. If using frozen cranberries, allow to thaw and pat dry. Pour the cranberries into the bottom of the prepared pie shell. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, cream, eggs, flour, orange zest, vanilla, and salt until thoroughly combined. Pour the mixture over the top of the cranberries (the cranberries will float to the top).

FINISH & BAKE: Brush the crust with egg wash and bake for 45-50 minutes, or until filling is set and the crust is golden brown. If your crust begins to brown too soon, cover pie with foil and continue to bake. Allow to cool completely. Chill until ready to serve.


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AS SERIOUS AS A

HEART ATTACK If we are to truly transform our health now, we need to lose the drama and look at the data before it's too late.

PHOTOGRAPHS ISTOCK PHOTO

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TEXT ED LEY

way to answer. Just clear, simple, relaxed communication. Contrast this however with the pre-trauma narrative, the conversation with the same person before that major health scare. You would think you were talking to two different people. In this conversation they tell me; the doctor has recently told them they are really healthy for their age. They feel pretty good, they walk everywhere, they eat a lot salad, they don’t drink much, they aren’t too stressed. All statements that don’t align with the energy, skin, size, shape, eyes, blood pressure, resting heart rate, movement of the person who is saying them. To put it bluntly - ignoring the data and creating an over riding story. I need you to understand, I’m not judging here or saying anything negative about anyone. I’ve been the smoker unwilling to connect it to my cough, I’ve been the broke personal trainer unwilling to connect it to my poor marketing.

I MUST HAVE done two thousand of these by now - the initial consultation. A fancy name for what is essentially a first date. No heavy commitment, just a coffee and a chance to see if we get on before anyone makes any sort of commitment they feel like they can’t back out of. I start always with the same question, “So what made you want to meet me?” The response is always the description of a 'coming to Jesus' moment. One out of ten perhaps comes from a place of self-awareness around what life might be like 10 years from now, but nine out of 10 come with a body count.

“My dad died at same age as I will be next year”. “One of my friends died of a heart attack and he was likely the best of us”. Most common of all though is, “I had a heart attack six months ago.” (health scare, doctors warning). What follows is often a unique and enjoyable conversation, but each one has the same DNA. There was sign post, after sign post, after sign post each unequivocally reassuring the driver of the inevitable destination. Major health problems. This, quite surprisingly, is not a difficult conversation, there is little strain, avoidance of subjects or time spent clearly thinking up the best

CHANGE IS SEEN AS A THREAT TO OUR BRAIN AND THUS IT AIDS US IN BUILDING ELABORATE STORIES TO PROTECT US FROM HAVING TO MAKE ONE.

ED LEY HEALTH COACH, CONSULTANT, WRITER AND SPEAKER. Ed owns a private

BEING THE CHANGE We are all of us prone to cognitive bias. Our brains in effect show us the world we wish to see. We make illogical interpretations, inaccurate judgments, we distort reality to support continuing with our current lifestyle. 20, 30, 40 years of saying it’ll get better soon though is a long time. Change is seen as a threat to our brain and thus it aids us in building elaborate stories to protect us from having to make one. Change also never occurs until the pain of not changing is greater than the pain of staying the same. The truth is that we aren’t ignorant but we are seeing the data and treating it like a hot oven, we feel the burn and don’t touch it again. Just like a business that fails to accept that it’s marketing and advertising isn’t producing the desired result but continues in the same course of action will eventually end up bankrupt, it is our actions that produce our reality. It is our narrative that allows us to continue with those actions. If we can pause for a moment though. If we can look past the drama and the stories and look at the raw data in front of us and the facts and figures attached to that data. We can change the narrative. Before its too late. Not said with conde scension or without compassion, but with tough love. THE-INTL

health coaching and personal training studio in Hellerup alongside his wife Christina. They use neuroscience techniques to help their clients build habits to move towards their goals in a way that works for them. To find out more visit our website.

www. absolute health.net

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BREAKING THE RULES Whether it be using public transport, naming your child or parking your car, Denmark has a few rules worth knowing about. Rules which are normally diligently observed as a result of the hefty fines and penalty fees incurred if broken.

PHOTOGRAPHS KERI BLOOMFIELD / ISTOCK PHOTO

I

I RECEIVED MY first afgift (a penalty fee) a few weeks ago: a 695 DKK penalty for forgetting to set my P-skive (a type of parking display clock) in the car. A spontaneous trip to the supermarket in the car for a free bolle at Føtex, quickly became one of the most expensive bread rolls my daughter will ever eat in her life (and she’s only three). If you’ve experienced something similar, you’ll know my pain. But on the positive, because it’s important to look on the positive, Bilingual Backpack Baby (BBB) thought the bolle “smagte meget godt” (tasted very good). Aside from the financial damage, it’s never a great feeling being fined or told off for breaking a rule – especially when you’re unaware of them. So, let me help you avoid this by sharing some of the rules definitely worth knowing about if you are living in Denmark.

JAYWALKING The art of crossing the road when it’s showing a red pedestrian light is known as jaywalking and is a common sight around the world. But not in Denmark. It was one of the

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TEXT KERI BLOOMFIELD

most curious sights I remember when I first moved to Denmark: people standing at a crossing patiently waiting for the green man, when there was no traffic for miles. But with the risk of receiving a 700 DKK fine, and quite possibly having a bike lodged somewhere you rather it wasn’t, it slowly began to make sense why people wait without fail, for the green man. Three years later and I too now diligently stand waiting for the green man.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT Denmark has an open metro and train system. Meaning they trust you to buy a ticket before you get on public transport. No one will check it when you board the train. Instead, spot checks are carried out and if you are caught traveling without a ticket then you run the risk of receiving a fare evasion ticket of around 750 DKK. The penalties are high to keep the incentive high to follow the rules. The Metro Service in Copenhagen had over 63 million passengers last year and only 0.1 per cent received fines for fare evasion.

The downside is, should you innocently make an error, such as what often happens to visitors or new residents, it will prove nearly impossible to explain or justify your way out of the fine. A recent visitor to Copenhagen, Nikki Johnson, learnt this lesson the hard way. Having paid for two tickets she mistakenly took only one ticket and a receipt from the ticket machine, leaving the second ticket behind. An honest mistake for which she had to pay a 700 DKK fee for, even after providing bank transaction statements proving she had paid the correct amount. And she’s not alone, with many others having experienced similar situations. If you’re a regular user of public transport, research their rules. Including if they have any glemt kort systems, which is something DSB offers that protects you if you forget your travel card.

CYCLING With the high volume of cyclists in Denmark it probably


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comes as no surprise that there are also many rules and fines which apply when you are on a bike. Although you could be forgiven for being confused, as you will see most of these rules being broken on a regular basis.

FINES: Using a handheld mobile phone while cycling Cycling through a red light Cycling the wrong way down the street Cycling across a pedestrian crossing Cycling without hands on the handlebars Cycling without lights at night Not indicating/showing your intention (turning left, right or stop)

1,000 DKK fine 1,000 DKK fine 1,000 DKK fine 700 DKK fine 700 DKK fine 700 DKK fine 700 DKK fine

YOU CAN FIND A FULL LIST OF CYCLING RULES HERE WWW.CYKLISTFORBUNDET.DK/ALT-OM-CYKLING/LOVE-OG-REGLER/BOEDETAKSTER

PARKING Every car in Denmark must have a P-skive (a parking display clock). Every time you park your car you need to display what the time is on it. A totally foreign concept to me coming from a country where parking is monitored by putting chalk on the tyres. Which is probably equally bizarre sounding to those who haven’t experienced that before. The P-skive in our car is a manual one, but after receiving my recent 695 DKK ticket for forgetting to set it, I’m now wishing for an electronic one for Christmas. And at a mere 250 DKK I’d highly recommend everyone else does the same as it will automatically set the time when you park the car and severely reduce your risk of receiving any fines. The rules governing parking in Denmark are set by various organisations and enforced by additional agencies. A good app to download to help manage parking is ‘Easypark’. I truly hope this summary helps you avoid any unnecessary fines. However, if all else fails I can guarantee that there is nothing quite like a 695 DKK penalty fee to help you remember the rules for next time. THE-INTL

IF YOU'RE A REGULAR USER OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT, RESEARCH THEIR RULES. INCLUDING IF THEY HAVE ANY GLEMT KORT SYSTEMS, WHICH IS SOMETHING DSB OFFERS THAT PROTECTS YOU IF YOU FORGET YOUR CARD.

KERI BLOOMFIELD BLOGGER Keri Bloomfield is a connector, writer, event manager and blogger currently living in Copenhagen. Originally from New Zealand she was recently employed by her daughter (Bilingual Backpack Baby) as editor, writer, photographer and social media manager to document their adventures living in Denmark. Prior to this job posting, Keri navigated a corporate life in New Zealand and England working in the field of event management and people management. She is strongly passionate about healthy workplaces (and pastries). Now based in Denmark Keri is on her way to becoming bilingual (she hopes) and is the co-organiser of ‘Post A Letter Copenhagen’. A monthly event held at ENIGMA Museum of Post & Communication in Østerbro. Entry is by donation and in return attendees are able to write letters to anywhere in the world for free. She recently initiated a project for volunteer writers to write to lonely elderly people all over the world. This is part of Keri’s greater goal to encourage more thoughtful and meaningful communication in the world. You can read and follow Keri’s adventures in Copenhagen with her Danish partner and daughter, and learn more about Post A Letter Copenhagen, by visiting: www.bilingualbackpackbaby.com www.postalettercopenhagen.com

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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COME RUN WITH ME If you are looking to get more out of your run, why not use an app that can track your run, coach you, motivate you with music, keep you safe and much more. To keep things simple, I’ve rounded up my favourites, based on the kind of runner they’d be perfect for. Get the most out of your miles. PHOTOGRAPHS VARIOUS

TEXT SUZAAN SAUERMAN

BEGINNER RUNNERS HUMAN

BEST FOR MOTIVATION Human isn’t the most advanced activity tracker on this list, but it wins points as a strong motivator. The app works in the background and tracks the time you spend being active (running, walking and cycling), and nudges you to hit your “Daily 30”, or 30 minutes of exercise per day. Yet for the competitive runners out there, the biggest motivation actually comes from other people. Human compares your data to other nearby users to create a leaderboard of who’s exercising nearby, so you can see how you rank against your neighbours.

FREE ON iOS AND ANDROID.

PACER

BEST FOR STARTING A REGULAR RUNNING ROUTINE This app is centred on step-counting but it’s a great launching point into developing a running habit, too. Like Human, Pacer works in the background, logging your steps as you move around during the day to give you a picture of your activity level. Unlike Human, you can also track runs with GPS and join group challenges, and if you opt for the Premium version, you can access training plans with video workouts.

FREE ON iOS AND ANDROID

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ADVANCED RUNNERS STRAVA

BEST FOR TRACKING RUNS WITH A STRONG SOCIAL ELEMENT Wildly popular among cyclists and runners, Strava is a great choice for casual milers and pros alike. It offers in-depth GPS tracking, works with a variety of GPS devices, and tracks all kinds of metrics (especially if you opt for a Premium membership for a small monthly fee). It’s also known for its popular segments feature, which shows how you stack up against other runners on the same route. Premium users also get access to Beacon, a safety option that allows three designated contacts to monitor your location while you’re out running. FREE ON iOS AND ANDROID


23

EXTRA MOTIVATION RACEFULLY

BEST FOR VIRTUAL RUNNING

EDITOR'S TOP PICK! THIS IS MY PERSONAL FAVOURITE NIKE + RUN CLUB APP

Running buddy just moved to the other side of the world? No problem, Racefully has your back. This clever app lets you run virtually, in real time, with your own tribe of race mates from anywhere on the planet. Invite fellow runners on a run date and during the session the app’s audio commentary keeps everyone updated about how they’re doing in the group. For the competitive among you, there are leader boards, badges and achievements to unlock, too. FREE ON iOS

NIKE + RUN CLUB

BEST FOR RUN TRACKING, PHOTO SHARING AND AUDIO COACHING Engineered specifically for runners, the Nike+ Run Club app goes beyond basic tracking with several motivation and coaching features, such as end-ofrun cheers from top athletes, built-in photo sharing that overlays your run stats with a photo from your route, and audio-based workouts from top Nike coaches to help guide you along the way. Plus, the audio-coached runs feature a Spotify integration so you can lay the coach’s cues over your favourite playlist—the best of both worlds. Latest up-

SUZAAN SAUERMAN LIFESTYLE TECH ADVISOR

dates include the integration of coached runs with

Suzaan has spend the past 18

the likes of Sir Mo Farah, and the option to listen to

years working around the world

a mindfulness session from

for various technology brands,

people behind Headspace

leading & transforming global mar-

whilst running.

keting organisations, develop-

FREE ON iOS AND ANDROID

ing innovative product portfolio’s, driving digital transformation and consumer driven product experi-

CHARITY MILES

BEST FOR RUNNING FOR A CAUSE

FOR SAFETY

ences. Today she is a consultant, advisor & investor in lifestyle consumer technology, helping vari-

The link between charity and running is now even

ous brands to create people-centric

stronger, thanks to this award-winning app that lets

experiences, instead of technolo-

you earn money as you log your miles. Money is do-

gy-centric. She is also a tech col-

nated by brands sponsoring the app (Johnson & John-

umnist writer & keynote speaker/

son is among the larger companies featured) and you

panellist at various global technol-

can choose to donate to a charity of your choice from

ogy & lifestyle events. A self confessed tech geek, who

a list of (currently) 40, including Save The Children, WWF, RED. So far, the app

has been travelling, working and

has raised over US$2m (13m

living in all the continents of the world, is driven by curiosity in all

DKK). FREE ON iOS AND

aspects of life. In her spare time

ANDROID

ROADID

BEST FOR AUTOMATICALLY GETTING HELP IN CASE OF AN ACCIDENT This handy app lets you share your location with friends and family, and it sends them an SOS message with your location if you stop moving for five minutes and don’t respond to the app’s alert. Better yet, your contacts don’t even need the

she likes to keep fit by running almost everyday & also training at The Wolfpack Gym. She has a passion for food & wine, and always scouting the best cup of coffee when travelling to new cities. Suzaan lives in Copenhagen, was born in South Africa and is a British citizen.

@suzaansauerman

RoadID app to use it - they get alerts via text or email.

@suzaansauerman

FREE ON iOS AND ANDROID

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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BLOGGER COLUMN

MY YEAR OF

LEARNING

DANISH

Each year, many expats attend Danish classes with the aim to become better in Danish and eventually pass the national exam. Béranger Stark Morel shares his journey into learning Danish in Denmark.

PHOTOGRAPHS ISTOCK PHOTO

F

FOUR YEARS AGO, I moved to Denmark with my Danish wife. Two years ago, I made the decision that it was time to seriously consider learning Danish to reach a level of fluency. The main reason I did it was to become fully integrated into the Danish society. At least I wanted to be able to listen, understand, read and talk. In other words, my aim was to add more freedom into my everyday Danish life. After careful consideration, I decided to quit my permanent job and take a twelve month break to study Danish. In order to achieve this pretty ambitious goal, I chose to use my time wisely and promised myself that the only acceptable outcome would be speaking Danish.

BACK TO SCHOOL Firstly, this meant attending a language school twelve hours a week where all lessons would be in Danish. A great aspect of going to school is however that you are not alone. Many expats are in the same situation as you, so you can expect to meet people from various countries who have different professional backgrounds. I was very impressed by the level of dedication and motivation from everyone in my class. The school network is vital for you to improve in Danish and stay focused when times are tough. On a few occasions I lost focus, because the learning felt too intense and I had to remind myself why I was doing it. My fellow students went through the same phases, so I was not alone in this journey. We pushed each other and succeeded together.

ish became tasks I quickly integrated into my daily routine. No better way than having fun while learning. It keeps you informed with the latest news in Denmark and is a great way to start a conversation with Danes. Just pay attention around yourself at work, in the street, in the public transports and, in shops. You are surrounded by Danish and can use it to your advantage.

GETTING A JOB Finally, getting a job was the missing link to apply what I learnt at school. I found a part-time job in the wine bar “Le Petit” in the market place “Torvehallerne” (Copenhagen). The first couple of months were very challenging. Coming from a school environment where you have time to think, to a face-to-face situation, is not at all the same. I had to listen carefully, understand what clients asked for, make conversation and of course, do my job at the same time! Many of the students in my class worked in bars, because it was a great opportunity to improve and get instant feedback on the language. Looking back into the journey I started, I am so proud I did it and managed to pass the final exam. Let’s be honest, it is a challenging journey, but extremely rewarding and worth trying. THE-INTL

BÉRANGER STARK MOREL SALES EXECUTIVE & BLOGGER Béranger is a French expat living in Copenhagen since 2014. He works in sales at Trustpilot. In his spare time, Béranger also manages the blog @ LearnDanishBlog where he shares his tips and personal experience about the process of learning Danish in Denmark.

LEARNING NEVER STOPS Learning Danish also implied doing my homework and dedicating time to learn new vocabulary. In order for this project to be a success, studying at home and being serious was essential. Every lesson at school brought its fair share of new vocabulary to learn and remember. I allocated time on a daily basis to learn and repeat vocabulary. By doing so, my vocabulary grew very quickly, which enabled me to understand conversations that took place at school, at work and in the public space. Reading, watching television and listening to the radio in Dan-

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www.learn-danish.com


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A TASTE

OF INDIA IN DENMARK Cardamom from India finds home in Scandinavian Treats. How ingredients from around the world have become a beloved part of Danish culture – and a reminder that you can, too.

U

PHOTOGRAPHS GINA LORUBBIO / ISTOCK PHOTO

TEXT GINA LORUBBIO

UPON MOVING TO

Denmark, I noticed cardamom…in everything. At least, it appears more often here than in my home country of the U.S. The flavour pops up in many Danish treats: æbleskiver (spherical pancakes), birthday buns, pandekager (flat pancakes), and more. But how did cardamom get here? The spice certainly doesn't grow in the Scandinavian climate, but these northern countries have adopted it into their food culture. In fact, Swedes use 60% more cardamom per capita than US residents.

GINA LORUBBIO ARTIST & WRITER

CARDAMOM’S INDIAN ORIGIN If you trace the origin of cardamom, you’ll find yourself in India, the place that gave us many of our everyday spices. I invited Pramod Kumar Sharma, who has just moved to Denmark from India (with only two suitcases: one with Indian food and spices, and the other with everything else), to teach me a cardamom-based dish. Pramod says, “In India, ‘sweet’ means milk, and we add cardamom to most of the milk-based sweets.” The two make an excellent pair; cardamom lends a citrusy, minty flavour, and milk delivers it smoothly to every corner of the dish. He showed me how to make kheer, a rice pudding reminiscent of the Danish Christmas dessert risalamande. We began by simmering a handful of basmati rice in a pot of milk. Pramod instructed me to crush the entire green cardamom pod – skin and all – in a mortar and pestle. Once the skin separated neatly from the dark brown seeds, Pramod took the skin and dropped it into steep with the milk for maximum flavor permeation. When the rice became tender and

Gina is an artist and food tour leader the milk thickened, we tossed in toasted nuts, plump raisins, and the freshly ground cardamom seeds. We scooped the kheer into bowls and tasted it. Citrusy cardamom had deliciously seeped into every bite!

THE MOORS INTRODUCE CARDAMOM TO EUROPE From India, as is the story of many spices in cabinets around the world, people began carrying cardamom along trade routes. A common belief is that the Vikings found cardamom in the bazaars of Constantinople, but cardamom's presence in Scandinavia dates back farther than that. A closer look shows that the Moors (a Muslim people with Arab, Spanish, and Berber ancestry) introduced cardamom to Europe when they arrived on the Iberian Peninsula in the 700s. Centuries later, cardamom appeared in a cookbook written by a Danish monk. The recipes were clearly Moorish, which suggests that cardamom came to Scandinavia by way of Moorish cuisine.

A DANISH BAKING DELIGHT In modern Scandinavia, cardamom has found a firm place in baked goods. One of the best examples is the praised kardemomme snurre (cardamom bun) at Juno the Bakery in Copenhagen. If you have the pleasure of visiting, you’ll be rewarded with an artfully braided knot of buttery dough covered in big flecks of cardamom. I got one for myself the other day (research!), and upon opening the bag, the scent immediately released. Cardamom is a spice that would not like to be contained. It seeps so deeply into its medium, making you wonder what plain buns or milk ever tasted like without it. It even flavours the air, which spills out from the tiny storefront onto the sidewalk, inviting everyone in. Next time you walk by a pastry case — especially if you’re having one of those days where you wonder if you’ll ever fit in — grab a bun and know that, in time, like cardamom, you can find a home here. THE-INTL

in Copenhagen. Upon arrival from the US, she created an art series called ‘How to Fall in Love with Denmark through Food in 100 Days.’ She’s currently creating a special Christmas food series and launching a food tour for expats. To buy her art, join a food tour, or follow the next series, visit: www.AmericanHeirloomProject.com

@americanheirloom on Instagram

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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JUTLAND

SAILING THROUGH LIFE

IN DENMARK

Clubs and Associations in Denmark – the cornerstone of Danish culture and your pathway to expanding your personal network. How becoming a member of the Aarhus Sailing Club enriched the life of Tiny Maerschalk more than she could have imagined. PHOTOGRAPHS TINY MAERSCHALK

W

TEXT INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY

WITH A DEGREE in Danish in my backpocket, I swapped the quiet village of Waarloos in Flanders, Belgium for the second largest city in Denmark where I planned to stay for a year. That deadline expired a while ago. Four jobs, another degree, a husband and two daughters later, I still live in Aarhus and have dedicated my life to improving conditions for expats and repats with Denmark’s leading network for internationals, International Community. At one point I was complaining on how difficult it was getting to know the Danes. No matter how hard I tried, I felt like I was talking to a deaf man’s ears. The Danes I interacted with were all polite and friendly, however I never managed to forge a friendship. What was I doing wrong? How to crack the cultural code? Then I got a good piece of advice. I had to immerse myself more into Danish culture and find the Danes on their own turf. I was told to find a leisure activity and become member of a club or association. In Aarhus, the sea is only a stone’s throw, and from away where you can see dinghies and yachts on the bay all day long. The closeness to the sea and the marinas reminded me of a childhood memory. When I was little, my family’s summer holiday destination was the Belgian seaside. I still remember being a little girl holding my father’s hand while strolling along the harbour to watch sailing yachts. We would indulge in fantasy on the destinations they set course on, and weave up stories on how they ventured on new adventures. I realised that this favourite pastime activity on the docks as a child had set a lasting footprint. I now no longer wanted to sit on the quay, I wanted to set sail myself. I signed up with Aarhus Sailing Club’s sailing school and embarked on a new adventure. Never could I have imagined that becoming a member of a Danish club would have such an impact on my life in Denmark. A hidden door to Danish

society slid open little by little and from just living here, I soon felt a sense of belonging. Being part of Aarhus Sailing Club has given me more than I could have ever expected. During the past ten years my membership of Aarhus Sailing Club has resulted in acquiring sailing skills, a polo shirt, a volunteer job as a sailing instructor, two jobs, a husband (and subsequently two children), a sweater, countless nautical miles on the Danish waters and last, but not least, lasting friendships with Danes. Once you have a Danish friend, you have a friend for life. My advice to you is to define a spare time interest and find a club or association where you can learn, enjoy and develop your skills together with others. Voluntary clubs and associations in Denmark range from sports clubs, cultural associations and socio-hu-

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

manitarian associations to political and religious associations. With about two thirds of Danes belonging to one or more clubs or associations, this is where you find the Danes and they are more than willing to interact with you, as you will have a common interest building a relationship. With no less than 16,500 voluntary clubs and associations in Denmark, you should be able to find one matching your interest. THE-INTL

SIGN UP DO YOU HAVE TROUBLE FINDING A CLUB OR ASSOCIATION IN THE AARHUS AREA? THEN TURN TO INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY. One of our services is coupling internationals with a local club or association. Just tell us what piques your interest, and we will help you find a club or association matching your interests. Last year International Community created 548 matches between internationals and local clubs and associations. You can find the sign-up page on our website.

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY We offer a wide range of events, seminars and online activities that help internationals get settled in Denmark. Learn more at internationalcommunity.dk or follow us on Facebook @InternationalCommunityAarhus and Instagram @internationalcommunityaarhus. www.erhvervaarhus.dk www.international community.dk


27

BREXIT HOPE FOR EXPATS Soothing the concerns of Brits living abroad.

PHOTOGRAPHS ISTOCKPHOTO

I

IT MUST HAVE come as a relief to Brits living in Denmark to hear PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen reassure them over their future status in the country after the UK leaves the EU in March 2019. He made the remarks during the opening of Parliament, saying: “In six months, Great Britain will leave the EU. I see this as a tragedy, but it is the decision of the British people. I hope we reach a good and balanced deal that will at least ease the worst effects of Brexit,” adding that the Danish government is working on the assumption that there will be no deal between the UK and Denmark over trade. “We are employing customs officers and preparing the system. But I want to make it abundantly clear that no matter the end result of the negotiations, we will of course look after the thousands of British citizens living in Denmark today.” Denmark isn’t the only EU country to soothe the concerns of Brits abroad, with France also coming out and saying that expats will be allowed to stay on in the event of a no-deal Brexit. France’s European Affairs Minister Nathalie Loiseau has unveiled draft legislation to “ensure that, in the absence of an agreement on 30 March 2019, Britons living in France do not find themselves brutally denied their legal status.”

DO YOU FEEL REASSURED? Protect your Money with an FX Provider One thing’s for sure with Brexit is the fact that nobody knows what will happen to exchange rates. As we know, the value of one currency compared to another can change in the blink of an eye. We were reminded of this when British voters opted to leave the EU in the referendum of 2016. Immediately after the vote, the Pound lost over 10% of its value against the Euro, the US Dollar and,

of course, the Danish Krone. Could such extreme currency volatility happen again? Sudden shifts in the exchange rate can be a worry for people moving from one country to another, or for those who rely on regular payments from abroad, such as a pension or paying international school fees. Yet, most of this uncertainty can be

TEXT JASON HEPPENSTALL

don’t need to worry about big swings in the exchange rate and protecting your overseas transfers if you use an FX provider.

SAS TO FORGE A NEW POST-BREXIT LINK Eagle-eyed readers will have noticed that I live in Cornwall, the UK. If you didn’t know, it’s a rocky and dramatically scenic promontory sticking out into the At-

JASON HEPPENSTALL CURRENCY ANALYST AND ECONOMICS WRITER, TORFX.

Jason spent almost 10 years living and working in Denmark as an English teacher and news editor. With a degree in economics and years of experience in writing for the The Express, Jason also has a thorough knowledge of expat life in Denmark, and can convincingly say rød grød med fløde to the satisfaction of the average Dane. avoided – and easily. Most people don’t realise that foreign currency providers, such as TorFX, allow you to fix the exchange rate up to two years in advance. Risk managers working for big companies use FX (foreign exchange) brokers all the time to avoid volatility and get better exchange rates than those offered by the banks. But it’s not just risk managers and men wearing pinstripe suits that can use an FX broker these days – you can download an app to your smartphone and conduct seamless transfers in a couple of taps. So, whatever happens with Brexit, you

lantic, and is home to TV’s Poldark, Cornish pasties and TorFX. In some welcome news, SAS has announced that it will be providing direct Copenhagen to Cornwall flights as of next year. More details will be provided soon, they say. THE-INTL

He is married to a Copenhagener and they live together in Cornwall, UK, with their two children.

www. torfx.com

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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THOMAS HØYRUP CHRISTENSEN

MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

TIVOLI - PETER NØRBY

THE DANES REALLY DO HAVE HEARTS OF GOLD One of the biggest challenges when moving to a new country, especially Denmark, is making friends. But Danes on the surface aren’t that easy to get close with, Laura Wintemute explains… PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER / MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN / ISTOCKPHOTO

E

EVEN THOUGH I

was an adult when I moved here, you could say I “grew up” in Denmark. I was 36 years young when I moved to Denmark and had to start my life from scratch. I moved here with my fiancé and began my ascent into Danish life. I learned how to drive (again), got married, bought a house, had a baby, got a job, all while learning Danish, I have experienced almost everything that happens in a ‘young’ adult’s life, in Denmark. And I did it ALL in Danish. After a decade of living in Denmark, my social life has naturally been split between two groups. I have my Danish life with my Danish friends and family, and my Expat life with my International friends. Then I have a handful of special friends who are always there. The groups rarely mix, I’ve tried, but each are equally important to me. My Danish life is as follows. I live in suburbia, and I am literally the ONLY non-Dane in my neighbourhood. However, that hasn’t stopped me from building a great social network here. I am a member of our Home Owners Association, and the Pædagogisk Udvalg at our daughters’ school. I am also a member of a cross fit group, and a running group of local moms’ in our area. We communicate in Danish (well Danglish). I am so happy with where I live, and with my Danish friends and network. Recently I read about the Inter Nations Survey in the Expat Insider which showed that Denmark was ranked very low in its ability to make expats feel welcome. I’d like to take this opportunity to defend my Danish friends and family, and comment on this as everyone seems to be talking about it. While it’s easy to place the blame on the locals, I feel very strongly that nobody owes anybody anything. Everything I have, I’ve worked for. My relationships with my new friends in Denmark weren’t ordered out of a catalogue. They were cul-

tivated by myself based on a desire to fit in to my new community and home. Nobody forced me to move to a new country. I came here willing and able. While I sound like I’m making excuses for the Danes, I’m not. Any more than I would make excuses for any other country being terrible at something. What I am saying, is that what you put into life, you get back out of it. I wasn’t expecting it to be easy. Anything that is

TEXT LAURA WINTEMUTE

don’t know anyone. Maybe that’s the Canadian in me, or just the “Wintemute”. There are so many ways to develop a social network. It doesn’t matter if you are from Denmark or Canada or Mars. You can’t do it from your sofa. You need to try! If you have children, get involved in local sports activities. Join fitness groups, go to local events and ask about your municipality activities. Watch for street parties in your

LAURA WINTEMUTE OWNER, HOMESTEAD

"STOP BLAMING THE DANES FOR YOUR LACK OF INITIATIVE. MAKE THE FIRST MOVE, INVITE THEM OVER FOR DINNER!" worth it, takes effort. Trust me, learning Danish takes effort! Getting a Dane to be warm and fuzzy to strangers takes some effort, but when you break through the aloof and albeit cool exterior, inside you find the most loyal hearts of gold that you can count on for life. Being Canadian, it’s in my nature to be friendly and outgoing. I always make the first move and step out of my comfort zone by attending different activities where I

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

neighbourhood. Become a volunteer and start learning Danish. To say that Danes as a population, are un-friendly, would be like saying ALL Canadians are friendly, or all Italians are romantic. It’s simply not true. What is true, is everyone’s desire to feel welcome. If you need a little help or advice on how to build and cultivate your own new Danish relationships, give me a call. Homestead is all about helping you feel welcome. THE-INTL

Laura was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. At a very young age she knew that she wanted to travel. At the age of 22, she packed her bags and moved to the tropical Cayman Islands. This launched her journey as an expat. In the Cayman Islands she learned how to interact with people from all walks of life, all nationalities and all cultures. She worked in the hotel concierge service, hotel management and, eventually, opened her own restaurants. In her eighth year of living in the Cayman’s, she met her Danish husband-tobe. Shortly thereafter, they moved to Whistler, Canada, where Laura managed a 5-star restaurant. One year later they settled in Denmark where she married and had a daughter. In 2012, she started working for a relocation company. It was a job that encapsulated both Laura’s experience as an expat and her love of helping people. She learned everything there was to know about relocation to Denmark and built a good network. After six years’ experience in relocation, she wanted to take her expertise to the next level and started Homestead – welcoming international working expats and their families to Denmark.

www.homesteaddenmark.com


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B e s t BEAUTY BUYS OUR BEAUTY EDITOR'S TOP 10 BEAUTY PRODUCTS OF 2018 Many fantastic, exciting and bizarre beauty products have been launched this year; here is my personal Top 10 of products from 2018 (note that some of them are older, but I’ve only discovered them this year). Tried and tested for you, ready to be added to your Christmas list. You can thank me later!

1

5

3

6

7

8

BARBARA MENSAH

10

BEAUTY EDITOR & MAKEUP ARTIST

4

9

2

1. BIORÉ SELF HEATING MASK - 75 DKK,

WWW.MATAS.DK This one-minute mask warms up and opens up the pores. It draws out and dissolves all dirt, oils and toxins. In my opinion, it is better than most masks out there on the market. It’s easy to use: once it is on and has worked its magic, all you have to do is rinse it off with water and it will reveal a super clean and invigorated, cool and fresh looking face.

2. BUXOM DIVINE GODDESS LUMINISER (VENUS) -

229 DKK, WWW.HOUSEOFSTARS.DK This little gem is a genius that can be worn on legs, arms, shoulders and pretty much any part of your body you want to see glowing. It adds a luxurious luminosity to the skin and, if mixed with your foundation or tinted moisturiser, gives a very subtle and delicate glow. Great product for everyday use.

3. TARTE SHAPE TAPE CONCEALER - 235 DKK,

WWW.TARTECOSMETICS.COM Must-have product for anyone serious about their makeup. All the make-up scene is crazy about it and yes, I can also vouch for this super concealer. It triples up as a concealer, contour and highlighter as it comes in fourteen shades. Long wearing and, for a full coverage product, it manages to keep the skin hydrated whilst hiding blemishes and concealing.

4. FENTY BEAUTY’S MATCH STIX TRIO - 430 DKK,

WWW.SEPHORA.DK Rihanna has hit us with this very affordable trio of highlighter and contour sticks. For the price, it is an A+. It is creamy, blends in well and is easy to use. What more can you ask for?

5. MARIO BADESCU FACIAL SPRAY WITH ALOE,

HERBS AND ROSEWATER - 129 DKK, WWW.FRUUGO.DK Probably the best toner and facial spray I’ve tested this year. Works best for me after a shower. Helps to keep sensitive skins at bay and, for the price, the amount you get is unreal.

6. ANASTASIA BEVERLY HILLS – BROW WIZ (SOFT

BROWN) - 199 DKK, WWW.SEPHORA.DK If you have uneven, unshaped eyebrows, then these will be your saviours. It’s the go-to brow product. Gives great fill out and undeniable precision. Expensive, but worth it.

7. DIOR - HYDRA LIFE SORBET RICH CRÈME -

460 DKK, WWW.MAGASIN.DK A sorbet that moisturises, nourishes and rebalances the natural defence of the skin. Any product that can do all this, I’m definitely a fan of. Extremely good for dry skins. However, the price tag may have you digging into your pockets for extra change.

8. TOO FACED – BETTER THAN SEX WATERPROOF MASCARA - 205 DKK, WWW.SEPHORA.DK The best mascara I’ve tried so far. If you’ve never tried another mascara, this must be the last you try. This waterproof edition of the range has become the top selling in the USA and is quickly collecting fans worldwide. Thickens, lengthens ands curls only after one coat. It’s thick, it’s full and not clumpy: everything a good mascara is supposed to be. 9. AVENE - TOLÉRANCE EXTRÊME CREAM -

120 DKK, WWW.APOPRO.DK Great daily moisturiser for sensitive skins. Perfect for those who suffer from redness and general skin irritations. Good for ageing and dry skins. This cream is perfect. It does the job well and keeps skin happy and moisturised.

Barbara was born in England, London with her origins in Ghana. She has been a makeup artist for over 10 years. She moved to Copenhagen in 2017 with her Danish husband and son after living in Stockholm, Sweden. Barbara is currently working as a freelance makeup artist, and is travelling between the UK and Denmark for make-up bookings. You can follow Barbara’s life here in Denmark on YouTube – Barbara Mensah Vlogs. Facebook: www. facebook.com/ barbaramensahvlogs Instagram: @itsbarbaramensah Bookings: barbaramensahvlogs@gmail.com

10. TATA HARPER REGENERATING CLEANSER -

569 DKK WWW.PURESHOP.DK A daily cleanser containing 100 per cent natural ingredients with 83 per cent being certified organic. Need I say more? So much goodness in one bottle. It is probably one of the most instagrammed beauty product, and comes beautifully packaged. This cleanser works very well and smells absolutely divine. Expensive, but you get what you pay for.

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BEER DRINKING TEENS AND RUBBER-LEGGED BOSSES EXPLORING THE DANISH DRINKING CULTURE.

I

It’s nearly Christmas, which is peak season for Danish drinking culture. Gløgg mix has appeared in the supermarket aisles, packaged as tiny bags of spices, raisins, and tiny slivered almonds – just add heat, wine, and brandy. Crystal snaps glasses are being taken out of the cupboard where they have stood since Easter, ready to be filled with strong liquor for toasts. And the police and street crews are probably still cleaning up from J-day, the early November evening that that celebrates release of the year’s potent holiday beer.

WINE AS AN INFORMAL CURRENCY Alcohol is an intrinsic part of Danish culture: there are few other places where you can start your day with a “morning bitter” (Gammel Dansk, a spicy aquivit) and finish dessert in the evening with chocolate rum balls (romkugler). And “a good bottle of red wine” is an informal currency in Denmark. If a neighbour feeds your cat while you travel or an acquaintance proofreads your resumé, two bottles of red is considered a good way to say thank you for services rendered without getting the tax authorities involved. In fact, alcohol is not only a key part of Danish culture but finances other parts of Danish culture. The classical statues and impressionist paintings at the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek are bought and maintained with Carlsberg beer profits. Even The Little Mermaid herself was financed by beer money: she was commissioned in 1909 by Carl Jacobsen, the “Carl” behind Carlsberg.

OPTIONAL VOMITING Drinking in Denmark starts young: according to the World Health organization, Danish teenagers get drunk three times as often as the average European in their age group. When I stage my “How to Live in Denmark Game Show” for companies and community groups, one of the questions I ask the Danish contestants is, “At what age should a child be

PHOTOGRAPHS ISTOCKPHOTO

TEXT KAY XANDER MELLISH

able to openly drink beer at home?” The answer is usually 13, 14, or 15, which tends to shock contestants from southern Europe, the US, or India and China. But most Danish parents believe that it’s good for kids to learn about alcohol at a young age, and that an acceptable learning curve involves a few drunken episodes (with optional vomiting) so teenagers can learn their own limits.

A TIP FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES Non-Danes can struggle with the Danish drinking culture; I know I do. Although I enjoy a glass of wine with dinner or a cocktail after a long workday, I don’t like to get drunk. But getting drunk is not only acceptable but expected, particularly at holiday time. The Danes usually don’t drink small amounts of alcohol, paced through the week. Going out for a beer or two on, say, a Tuesday evening is seen as slightly suspicious and perhaps a sign of an alcohol problem. Proper drinking is done in volume, on weekends, and forgiven and forgotten when the work week begins. For non-Danes, it can be shocking to see adult professionals hammered to the extent of being out of control. In particular, it can be troubling to see your supervisor rubber-legged and disco dancing after too much to drink at one of the notorious Danish office Christmas parties. My recommendation to non-Danes who are dreading these parties: Hang out with people who have to drive home – they can’t drink at all - and then leave early. By 9pm or so, the other partygoers will be so drunk that they won’t even notice you are missing. THE-INTL

"GETTING DRUNK IS NOT ONLY ACCEPTABLE BUT EXPECTED, PARTICULARLY AT HOLIDAY TIME."

KAY XANDER MELLISH KEYNOTE SPEAKER, BLOGGER “HOW TO LIVE IN DENMARK”

Kay is the author the books of “How to Live in Denmark” and “How to Work in Denmark”, both available on Amazon and Saxo.com. She is also a keynote speaker who has held seminars on fitting into Danish culture all over the country. You can book kay at: www.events.howtoliveindenmark.com

www.howtoliveindenmark.com

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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WINTER IS COMING…

OUR FAVOURITE FANTASY READS You know it is, and even though we have to wait until spring before the last season of 'Game of Thrones' airs, do not despair; there are other epic fantasies to tide you over in the dark days ahead.

SUSAN JESSEN SPIELE LIBRARIAN Susan is a librarian at Roskilde Library, and in charge of the English section. She does English events all year; everything from expat dinners and pub quizzes, to karaoke nights and book talks. She is also busy with Roskilde Horror, a club dedicated to scaring the town.

DID YOU KNOW?

A TRULY EPIC FANTASY

MY ALL-TIME FAVOURITE!

STORYTELLING AT ITS BEST

BLOODY AND REALISTIC

WHEEL OF TIME BY ROBERT JORDAN

THE FIONAVAR TAPESTRY BY GUY GAVRIEL KAY

THE CHRONICLES OF THOMAS COVENANT BY STEPHEN R. DONALDSEN

A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE BY GEORGE R.R. MARTIN

Thomas Covenant, an

Inspired by the War of

embittered and cyni-

the Roses and featuring

cal writer afflicted with

a host of strong charac-

leprosy and shunned by

ters, this story is about

in English covering

society, is fated to be-

a few families fighting

come the heroic savior

almost any subject,

for the throne and an

of The Land, an al-

otherworldly threat ris-

ternate world. Refus-

ing in the far north of

mist and Nation-

ing to accept this role

the kingdom. A lot of

he struggles to make

people die, so don’t get

al Geographic to

sense of this new re-

too attached!

An attack by mythical Trollocs drives three

Five men and women

friends from their lit-

find themselves flung

tle village on a long

into the land of Fiona-

journey. Aided and at-

var, First of all Worlds.

tacked in turn, they

They have been called

desperately try to find

there by a mage and

out what is happen-

quickly find themselves

ing and why they are

drawn into a war. The

targeted. This is only

fallen god has been

the beginning of a far-

freed and all the worlds

reaching battle.

are in danger.

ality.

RB Digital is a great online service many libraries subscribe to. It contains nearly 400 of the most popular magazines

from T he Econo-

Cosmopolitan and Country Living. You can download as many as you like and keep them – for free of course. Just check your local library and see if it subscribes.

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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Wait, what!? You didn’t choose Studieskolen? Ask anyone - where do you get the best Danish classes? We know the answer. We have been teaching Danish to foreigners for more than 40 years with great results. If fast progression, outstanding teachers and the best study environment is what you are looking for - go for the best. Go for Studieskolen. Find our new courses on studieskolen.dk/dansk Follow us /studieskolen

NOVEMBER 2018 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

Profile for The International Denmark

The International - November 2018  

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