The International - November 2022

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international

the

ISSN 2596-5220

MELTING MOMENTS

STARTING A BUSINESS IN DENMARK

HOW TO GET HIRED IN 4 EASY STEPS

THE ART OF SLOW LIVING

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BUILDING A HAPPY LIFE TOGETHER

SHIVANGI ON EXPECTING - AND HER NEW DANISH LIFE.

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BEING THANKFUL ALWAYS – NOT JUST AT THANKSGIVING... I’M NOT AN AMERICAN, AND I’VE NEVER CELEBRATED THANKSGIVING – SO I CANNOT WRITE FROM MY CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE ABOUT THIS HOLIDAY, BUT I DO FEEL THE ACT OF GIVING THANKS APPLIES TO US ALL. I THINK INTERNATIONALS, REGARDLESS OF NATIONALITY, SHOULD TAKE THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPRESS GRATITUDE IN A MEANINGFUL MANNER IN THEIR HOST COUNTRY.

B

MEET THE TEAM

BEING GRATEFUL, IN collaboration with giving back, is good for human beings. So, I encourage you to give back to your community, regardless of what country you’re from and what country you are presently living in.

EDITOR & FOUNDER Lyndsay Jensen - lyndsay@the-intl.com

THE ACT OF GIVING THANKS AND GRATITUDE IS UNIVERSAL As you can expect, there is a privilege that accompanies living, working, and thriving in another country. That privilege often comes with financial, emotional, professional, and physical well-being. One of the things I think is essential in our journeys from country to country is to contribute intentionally and personally to our environment — by giving back. Thanksgiving is a friendly reminder to everyone to “give thanks” for the many things we have in life. In that same fashion, I think it is appropriate for us when we are abroad - we should incorporate a sense of thankfulness and gratitude to those around us, such as our local friends, colleagues, and the general population. Expressing thankfulness for what your host country has given you can be returned in pleasant and heartwarming ways. Here are my three top ways to give back now and in the future as an international:

#1 COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER Understanding the local needs allows you to give back in an area that will use your qualified skills in your community to create an impact. First, determine your capacity (time, resources, effort), find an area in need in your community and offer your assistance. Remember to volunteer in an area where you have a purpose, passion, or both your service could be more long-term than a once-off. It could be tutoring (Danes love to learn new languages), rescuing abandoned animals, working in the local charity shop (great for practising your Danish) or volunteering at the local kommune (municipality).

MANAGING DIRECTOR & PARTNER Kenneth Macalpine - kenneth@the-intl.com

CONSULTING EDITOR Conrad Egbert

GRAPHIC DESIGN The International

WRITERS TEAM of internationals now and is more inclusive than ever before – you newbies have it so much easier! Most internationals rely on the knowledge and support of others to find their feet - what a great position to be in to return the favour! Ask that new mom or dad at the local folkeskole (public school) or that new colleague at work how they’re settling in. If you hear someone speaking English in your local supermarket, ask them if they need help (that’s how I met one of my friends). Become a Social Media Ambassador with The International to share, explore and meet others in your local area, or reach out to other ambassadors when you visit their town! Granted, you’re not going to help everyone – some people don’t need it or require it, but knowing you have that support and talking to someone who has been through the ups and downs is invaluable!

#4 SHOP AND SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESS

You are working in your host country primarily because of your expertise, or your spouse has a job here. During your downtime, share your insights and help build skills and capacity. Offer skill development to members of the population who might not otherwise have access. What is the missing knowledge gap in your community? Provide workshops, webinars, or services to improve local community needs. Offering intro-level knowledge and practical applications on subject matters like leadership development, business development, global digitalisation, and trending technology are all insights that help small business owners (I know many international entrepreneurs who have started this way). Also, if you are creative and have teachable and fun hobbies, share those too. Arts and crafts, music, painting, sports, and physical wellness are all valuable experiences for all ages. Your knowledge and expertise, free of charge, go a long way in building capacity and relationships.

Not technically volunteering, but it is an immense act of giving back and supporting the local economy. Buying local is one of the biggest things we can always do to help the community in which we live. Shop at the local grocery store, local farmer, and other small businesses – but also remember to support other internationals with small businesses. Supporting local businesses helps to grow the economic infrastructure, which can lead to long-term investment in the country. Additionally, we must bring the best of ourselves into the local community - part of that is showing our expression of gratitude and respect for their culture to those we live around daily. Giving back in this respect is not an act of charity but demonstrating care by fulfilling a need in the community to which you belong. Giving back to your local community in any way possible shows you care for your host country and its people. There are so many more ways to give back – I’ve only suggested my top 4 – add to the list, and find one that fits you. If you have family, ensure your children and spouse do the same. The adage is true from my perspective — the more we give, the more we gain. Happy Thanksgiving, not just for November, but every day.

#3 BECOME AN ANCHOR FOR OTHERS

Love,

Do you remember how nervous and overwhelmed you felt when you first moved to Denmark? I do, and that was 16 years ago. Luckily Denmark has gotten used to the idea

LYNDSAY JENSEN - EDITOR & FOUNDER

#2 SHARE YOUR KNOWLEDGE

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

THE-INTL.COM

Ophelia Wu; Vanessa C Petersen; Alexandra Beck; Mariano Davies; Skyler Bentley Hall; Monika Pedersen; Sara R. Newell; Aina Masood; Susan Jessen Spiele; Michaela Medvedova; Shani Bishop; Natasha Liviero; Heather Storgaard; Lasse Frimand Jensen; Jane Elgård Petersen; Antesa Jensen; Luke Hannon

Events Coordinator Lyndsay Jensen - lyndsay@the-intl.com

COVER PICTURE Alex Flutur - www.instagram.com/creative.flutur

SOCIAL MEDIA TEAM Head of SoMe Shivangi Singh - shivangi@the-intl.com

SoMe Ambassadors Neelam Gahlaut; Michaela Medvedova; Aina Masood; Ane-Sophie Custura; Terumi Mascarenhas; Manon Coolen; Leslie Noygues; Shelly Pandey; Shivangi Singh; Ritika Jain; Pavlos Tsiakoumis; Sakib Akhter; Rashmi Jadhav; Gemma La Rocca; Isabel Pereira Lima

SALES sales@the-intl.com The International is published online 12 times a year. This issue was published on 1 November, 2022. Notice: The publishers regret that they cannot accept any liability for error or omissions contained in this publication. The opinions and views presented need not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek special counsel before acting on any information contained herein. All rights reserved. No part of this publication or contents thereof may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form without written permission from the publishers. Published by and © 2021 The International ApS. Registered in Denmark / CVR Number: 39118181


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NOVEMBER EVENTS AROUND DENMARK LYNDSAY JENSEN EVENTS COORDINATOR lyndsay@the-intl.com

ROSKILDE

ROSKILDEBEAT FB PAGE

MELLEMFOLKELIGT SAMVIRKE AARHUS FB PAGE

VISIT DENMARK - DANIEL RASMUSSEN

ZEALAND

AARHUS

3 NOVEMBER

5 NOVEMBER

LETS COOP!

SAM GHEZZI AND FRIENDS

Networking Events for Social Entrepreneurs Can't find a job that would bring you fair pay and a fulfilling sense of purpose?

RoskildeBeat would like to showcase Denmark's professional musicians who can play with the likes of top international stars. For this concert, three seasoned and talented musicians play together with Italian Sam Ghezzi. There is no doubt that Sam Ghezzi is a great singing talent, but he also masters both saxophone and harmonica. As a result, an entertaining blues, jazz and rock'n roll show are guaranteed when he plays live. On his tour in Denmark, he has teamed up with some of Denmark's best and most seasoned blues musicians, and they will play their own high-energy versions of classic blues numbers from, e.g. Ray Charles and Muddy Waters.

Want to set up a project that reflects your values and allows you to make a decent living? Consider starting a worker's cooperative!

FUNEN

That's easier said than done, you think? So then, join this event to learn from successful social entrepreneurs. Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke and Kooperationen are organising networking events for social entrepreneurs where you can meet an already functioning cooperative with an expert to discuss and ask questions.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2F0WEFVUQ

Come to hear how, through three years of cooperation, they have repeatedly learned that they support and build each other's individual skills as a team. How they bring their different strengths and approaches to a task – and therefore are successful with their projects, collaborating to come up with good, original ideas that they simultaneously make realisable and relevant for the recipient. Learn more about KOMPOSIT here: http://www.komposit-kbh.com/

JUTLAND

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/65EWRODXJ

COPENHAGEN

THE COMEDY NOMAD FB PAGE

VISIT ODENSE - JOHAN TOBIAS JOENSEN

For this event, we invite KOMPOSIT, a cooperative conservation workshop working to preserve art and cultural heritage for large and small actors.

5 NOVEMBER STAND UP COMEDY IN ENGLISH

UNSPLASH

VISIT AARHUS - PHOTOPOP

A stand up comedy show in English about failures in relationships and love with the most hilarious comedians in Europe! Laugh along as the hilarious Mike Rice and the mischievous Victor Patrascan take you through their lifes, romantic adventures, dating successes, but mostly failures, and much more…

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/28EKEIIHP

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COPENHAGEN

FOLKEKIRKEN FOR INTERNATIONALS

EBELTOFT

REE PARK SAFARI FB PAGE

CPH MUSICAL THEATER CO FB PAGE

COPENHAGEN

10 NOVEMBER

10 NOVEMBER

13 NOVEMBER

DINNER AND A SHOWTUNE

EXPERIENCE A TRADITIONAL MORTENSAFTEN IN THE WILD

ALL SAINTS JAZZ SERVICE

Dinner and a show for under 175 DKK! Join us for a delicious night of dinner and music in a cosy and intimate environment.

One of the hallmarks of Folkekirken for Internationals is their Jazz services in English. These are held regularly and are joined by some of Copenhagen's most renowned jazz musicians! Our Jazz Service is also part of the yearly Copenhagen Jazz Festival.

On Thursday, 10 November, we host the 'wildest' Mortensaften, where we combine experiences and delicious food for a unique evening where traditions are honoured with, among other things, roast duck.

We'll share highlights and favourites from some of the biggest Broadway and West End shows, full of behind-thescenes stories, trivia, and lots of laughs.

13:00 at Eliaskirken on Vesterbro FB & Insta: folkekirkenforinternationals TikTok: @ffinternationals

We begin at 17:30 at the Central Station for a welcome and dinner. After that, you will hop on a train with the Amerika Expressen, where you can see the wolves being fed, and if you're lucky, you'll catch a glimpse of the bears if they haven't gone into their den.

Come early to enjoy the Supper Club, hosted by Lamfuz Madklub, with vegan food inspired by Nepali cuisine, a blend of exotic spices and herbs with fresh seasonal organic vegetables, grains and beans. Buy tickets for dinner here: https://lamfuz.dk/madklub

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://KOBENHAVNSSTIFT.DK/ FOLKEKIRKEN-FOR-INTERNATIONALS

After that, we say goodnight to the animals and drive back to Central Station, where dessert awaits you.

CONCERT TICKETS: Adult: 95 DKK Student: 65 DKK Pre-book by sending money to MobilePay Box # 5896PH* or pay at the door (Mobilepay or cash)

Ree Park Safari makes for the perfect unforgettable experience in the exciting world of animals. It offers wild experiences and activities amongst animals from exotic parts of the world.

Your name will automatically be added to a list which we will have at the door.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/5TSM4X3C5

Drinks will be available for purchase. You can also attend just the dinner or just the concert. Seating is open, so come early to get your favourite spot.

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

UNSPLASH

REE PARK SAFARI FB PAGE

CPH MUSICAL THEATER CO FB PAGE

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/1N9MB83KO


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COPENHAGEN

COPENHAGEN

TIVOLI FB PAGE

PER MORTEN ABRAHAMSEN

FOLKEKIRKEN FOR INTERNATIONALS

COPENHAGEN

15 NOVEMBER

17 NOVEMBER

18 NOV-31 DEC

MEET THE AUTHOR

GOSPEL SERVICE

CHRISTMAS IN TIVOLI

Anna Eckhoff - It's never too late to live your dream She is the mother of six and the grandmother of fourteen. At fifty-six, she swapped her career as an IT project manager to work as the head of administration in the world's hotspots. She returned to Denmark at seventy-one and started writing about her life abroad.

A regular event at Folkekirken for Internationals is Gospel services in English, as Vesterbro Gospelchoir fills the church with joyous music and incredible energy! Choir Director Lars Bak leads the band and choir, presenting an eclectic repertoire of cool, funky and meditative Gospel!

Celebrate Christmas in Tivoli Gardens and experience thousands of Christmas lights twinkling like stars. Once again, the historic garden will be filled with glittering Christmas lights, the cutest wooden houses decorated with pine branches, and snow-covered trees to create that perfect Nordic Christmas atmosphere. A magical, sparkling Christmas atmosphere is guaranteed. The garden will be decorated with more than 70,000 Christmas baubles and more than 1,000 Christmas trees covered in lights.

19:30 at Eliaskirken on Vesterbro FB & Insta: folkekirkenforinternationals TikTok: @ffinternationals

A New Beginning: Life on the Frontlines is Anna Eckhoff's captivating story about life in Iraq, Sudan, Palestine, Afghanistan, Tunisia, Libya, and Russia. An inspiring book about living your dreams, even at a late age, while those around you disapprove. The book is also about the inner development Anna Eckhoff experienced living and working on the frontlines, not least an insightful and vivid description of the many conflicts on the world's frontlines.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://KOBENHAVNSSTIFT.DK/ FOLKEKIRKEN-FOR-INTERNATIONALS

Christmas market Around 60 stalls will burst with Christmas decorations, snacks, sweets, or hot drinks to your heart's desire. To visit Tivoli's Christmas market, you must pay an entrance fee to the garden.

FOR MORE INFO: WWW.TIVOLIGARDENS.COM

Since the publication of the book's first edition, Anna Eckhoff has given almost 100 lectures on her life and various Middle Eastern themes.

TIVOLI FB PAGE

FOR MORE INFO, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: A NEW BEGINNING: LIFE ON THE FRONTLINES

UNSPLASH

Time: 19:00-20:30 Where: Skriveværkstedet Brolæggerstræde 6, 1211 Copenhagen

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KØGE

KVARTERSHUSET SYDHAVNEN FB PAGE

GRENAA

KATTEGATCENTRET FB PAGE

HOLMEGAARD VÆRK FB PAGE

HOLMEGAARD

19-20 NOVEMBER 19 NOVEMBER

23 NOV-18 DEC

HOLMEGAARD CHRISTMAS MARKET

UNDER THE SEA CHRISTMAS MARKET

CHRISTMAS AT KØGE MUSEUM

Come to the Christmas market at Holmegaard Værk, where the museum is filled with designs and handicrafts and breathes new life into the glassworks' old Christmas traditions.

Come to the huge Christmas Market in the Kattegat Center! Take the family for a day out under the sea with the big Christmas market. Enjoy the Christmas spirit, and hang out with the sharks, penguins, starfish and poinsettias while diving into a sea of exciting Christmas stalls with everything the Christmas heart desires!

Explore up to 50 stands filled with some of the country's finest artisans and designers. Here you can grab a bargain when the museum's impressive halls are filled with craftsmanship and design in all shapes and sizes - from unique art to ceramics, glass, jewellery, clothes and much more.

The snow falls gently on the old Daldorphs House in Køge Museum's idyllic museum garden when it dazzles with an authentic old-fashioned Christmas atmosphere and invites you to Christmas in the merchant's yard. Step into a time warp filled with cosy Christmas nostalgia when Køge Museum magically transforms the old Daldorphs House in the museum garden into an old-fashioned merchant's farm with everything your heart desires in terms of Christmas decorations every Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday during the lead-up to Christmas.

Admission ONLY 50 DKK - Save 20% online The price for all these Christmas delights is a bargain because the entrance to BOTH the Christmas market and the Kattegat Center costs 50 DKK - and you save 20% on your Christmas market tickets if you buy them online in our webshop!

See the entire programme here: https://bit.ly/3UO3bLP See stand holders here: https://bit.ly/3USwvkg If you want to participate with a stand yourself, you can apply here (stand holders are selected continuously): https://bit.ly/3RnvfCH

In the original shop premises from the 17th century, you can feel your way through everything from old-fashioned Bramming gnomes to nostalgic Christmas calendars, cosy calendar lights, Christmas baubles from Brink Nordic, Christmas bucks, snowmen and much, much more.

A sea of Christmas stalls On both days, from 10:00-17:00, you can shop amongst a sea of exciting Christmas stalls! Enjoy a backdrop of sharks, penguins and colourful coral fish, where you can buy an ocean of Christmas treats, ornaments, decor, calendar gifts, poinsettias, Christmas elves, Christmas baskets, Christmas socks, Christmas tree ornaments, candied apples and much, MUCH more!

Practical information: Address: Holmegaard Værk, Glasværksvej 55, 4684 Holmegaard Location: Arrivals area (café and 1st floor - we have a lift). Date and time: 19 - 20 November, 10:00-16:00 on both days. Free entry.

You can also satisfy your sweet tooth with some old-fashioned Christmas sticks and chocolate, or how about trying a good classic Christmas mustard, jam or tea? Every day, the museum also provides several old games for free use, which children and childlike souls can enjoy while Christmas shopping. For example, try shooting at a can, see how many pins you can knock over in bowling or play with wooden horseshoes, to mention a few.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2HELEELTO Activities, food and access to the exhibition building require separate purchases.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/34L56OCOP

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KVARTERSHUSET SYDHAVNEN FB PAGE

KATTEGATCENTRET FB PAGE

HOLMEGAARD VÆRK FB PAGE

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2FAMFEKGK


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BORNHOLM

GISSELFELD

GISSELFELD KLOSTER FB PAGE

BORNHOLMS JULEMARKED FB PAGE

FOLKEKIRKEN FOR INTERNATIONALS

COPENHAGEN

24 NOVEMBER

25 NOV-22 DEC

27 NOVEMBER

THANKSGIVING DINNER

CHRISTMAS MARKET IN BORNHOLM

GISSELFELD JULETORV 2022

Join Folkekirken for Internationals for a communal Thanksgiving Dinner!

In the four weekends leading up to Christmas, the town of Nexø on the island of Bornholm transforms into a beautiful Christmas town with wooden stalls, delicious Christmas treats and perfect Danish' hygge'.

Welcoming all regardless of cultural, denominational or non-denominational background. Programme for the evening: 17:00 - Arrival and welcoming people - children, families, and young are welcome, and provisions will be made to ensure everyone will feel at home. 18:00 - Dinner is served.

At the Bornholm Christmas Market, you can chat with the Bornholm craftsmen and artists selling their handmade goods in small wooden stalls. Then, taste, smell, and buy delicious food produced on Bornholm. Also, see the beautiful handmade light chains designed by the Bornholm glass artist Pernille Bülow and kept in the bright and light nordic design style.

Admissions Fee: 25 DKK per Person (children - admission FREE). We also serve vegetarian options. All proceeds go to charity, 'Project Safehouse Nigeria', helping Nigerian women who have been trafficked. Payment: MobilPay - 582890 Link for sign up: https://www.eventbrite.dk/e/thanksgiving-dinner-tickets-389403705967

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://KOBENHAVNSSTIFT.DK/ FOLKEKIRKEN-FOR-INTERNATIONALS

BORNHOLMS JULEMARKED FB PAGE

FB & Insta: folkekirkenforinternationals TikTok: @ffinternationals

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/26YXCSINZ

Come along to Denmark's loveliest Christmas square - it doesn't get better than this! Opening hours at both weekends are between 18:00-20:00. NB: The entrance closes 1 hour before. Tickets for Juletorvet can ONLY be bought at the door/entrance. Get in the proper Christmas spirit at Gisselfeld. Our biggest and proudest tradition at Gisselfeld is the annual Christmas Square, where the smell of Christmas and many inspiring stands help set the atmosphere. Juletorvet, which always takes place on the last two (full) weekends in November, offers lots of fun. Christmas atmosphere is in overdrive with pony rides, music and entertainment, and the sale of Christmas trees and decorations. Santa will always welcome children and childlike souls in "Santa's Cave" under the Castle. This year too, there will be an opportunity to enter the Castle (information about this will follow well in advance). Prices: Adults 100 DKK / Children from 6-12 years 30 DKK/ Children from 0-5 free. The ticket is valid for the Park, the Parade House and parts of the Castle, open to the public while the Christmas Square lasts and will always be decorated for the occasion.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/3WRDE6VS8

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LIVING MY BEST LIFE

WHAT STARTED AS A PERFECT PLACE FOR AN ADVENTURE IS NOW THE COUNTRY WHERE SHIVANGI IS PUTTING DOWN ROOTS.

PHOTOGRAPHS ALEX FLUTUR - WWW.INSTAGRAM.COM/CREATIVE.FLUTUR/

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IT’S A TRUTH universally acknowledged that when you first come to Denmark in the summer, you’ll like it. Luckily, the good impression lasted - and a year after she followed her husband, who got a job offer in Denmark, Shivangi Shahi is well into building her career and starting a family.

A JOYFUL MARRIAGE “My husband Ritesh and I were family friends, we knew each other, but we never actually talked until I saw him in my Facebook friend suggestions and sent him a request. I found out we had similar interests, and we started talking. He used to tell me all about his Tinder dates and how he is disappointed,” laughs Shivangi. They’ve been married for five years now. “Neither of us knows how and when we fell for each other. But it happened.” Even now, they are first and foremost friends. They play pranks and tease each other a lot. Shivangi doesn’t expect Ritesh to bring her flowers. She would much rather he brought her a pizza. “We don’t need to hide anything or make decisions that don’t involve each other.” In general, the Indian culture is very close-knit and family-oriented. If she were still living with her parents, even though she is 30, she wouldn’t be able to go out and come back late if she hadn’t informed them in advance. “And there’s a lot of nosy neighbours,” she grins. But she misses her family - even though she calls her mom three times a day - along with food and festivals. Shivangi is Hindu, so every month comes with special days to be celebrated with traditional clothing and meals - everything is more colourful.

HAPPINESS… AND CONVENIENT TRAVEL It was a pleasant surprise that Shivangi took to Denmark so well and so quickly. The

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

TEXT MICHAELA MEDVEĎOVÁ

landing was soft - the issues came beforehand. “When I arrived, COVID was at its peak, so it took around six months for me to get my visa. I was in India, sitting at home. I had already resigned. It was all very complicated, and my husband was already in Denmark.” Ritesh works in IT and has always wanted to move abroad. Initially, they were applying to go to Australia. In hindsight, it would have been better for Shivangi, as being a dentist in an English-speaking country would give her more options. However, Ritesh got the offer to move to Denmark and asked his wife if it would be okay. “To be honest, I just knew Denmark was the happiest country in the world. He also said that the living conditions were better in Denmark. So we agreed to come and explore. We came here just for the experience, to travel. It’s easier to do that once you live in Europe.” In the past year, Shivangi has been to 13 European countries. A city that particularly stood out in her memory is Prague. And the following country on the bucket list? Iceland. But Denmark had also made a lasting impression, even when winter arrived. “I was told before - you will hate it. But it’s good I don’t let others’ opinions influence me.”

DEATH OF THE COFFEE DREAM Adjusting to Denmark came pretty much without cultural shocks. “I grew up watching Hollywood movies and reading novels. So it was more like I was living a fantasy.” Shivangi finds Denmark peaceful and secure. There’s no reason to worry about your safety or leave your belongings unattended. “Here, you don’t have to worry. I’ve been out running at 3 in the morning, and it’s safe. That’s the best part of living here.” Although there is a sense of security, you cannot ignore Denmark‘s notoriously high taxes and expensive coffee. “The coffee prices are insane. So many people travel between India and the US, and everyone drinks Starbucks daily. So in my mind, before I


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arrived here, I thought I’d be doing the same. And then I arrived and went to Starbucks!” Private life in Denmark provides a sense of comfort to Shivangi in contrast to India, where guests arrive uninvited. After moving here, using a calendar to make plans was the norm. “In India, guests would come to our house and say: Oh, we were passing by and thought, why don’t we stop for a cup of tea or coffee? And they would stay until dinner.” These boundaries are also visible in the work-life balance. “If you’re on leave, you’re on leave. Nobody bothers you. It’s very easy to adapt to that.” Shivangi and Ritesh are building their little piece of Danish hygge in Aalborg. Despite being the country’s fourth biggest city, it perfectly fits Shivangi’s love for smaller cities. After all, she used to live in Delhi. Aalborg gives her options - when she longs for peace and quiet, the city can be calm, and she can opt for a scenic route during her walk. But if you want to party in Aalborg, there are places to do that, too. “And people are friendly, always smiling, saying hi. So when I walked with Ritesh and everyone was greeting him, I thought, how does he know so many people? He explained this is normal here. At first, it was hard to get used to. I kept thinking, what are you doing? It was a little confusing in the beginning. When do I make eye contact? When do I smile? There was so much pressure. I remember walking with my head down for the first few months.”

BACK TO THE DENTAL BOOKS But, for an expat dentist, finding a job wasn’t easy outside of Copenhagen. To get a license to practice as a dentist in Denmark, she’ll first have to learn Danish and pass a specific language level with the highest marks. Then, she has to pass an exam at the University of Copenhagen. “It’s been a year, and I’m finishing Modul 3. And then two more to go. So I think I’m doing okay. I’ve already started studying my dental books again, so that I can start as soon as possible.” In a way, this feels like the first time she needs to learn a second language. She has studied English since she was a kid, and it felt natural. But the difficulties of Danish will be all worth it when she gets her license. “Dentistry has always been fascinating to me. A few of my relatives are dentists, so I looked up to them and went to clinics to see their work. Plus, being a doctor feels good.” Shivangi sees a fundamental difference between dentistry in India and here. “If I compare the dental prices, it’s costly to get dental treatment.” In India, she used to work with adults - in Denmark, and she’d like to work with kids and have a placement at a folkeskole.

THE SPIRIT OF VOLUNTEERING Following her husband’s career in a brand new country initially put Shivangi in a difficult position. “In the beginning, it was fascinating - you get to travel. It was summer,

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

"WHEN WE CAME, WE DIDN’T KNOW WHETHER WE WERE STAYING OR NOT. MY HUSBAND ARRIVED WITH ONE BAG, AND I ARRIVED WITH A SINGLE BOX. WE THOUGHT WE’D STAY FOR A YEAR OR TWO. BUT EVERYTHING HERE IS MUCH BETTER THAN IN ANY OTHER COUNTRY WE COULD HAVE CHOSEN." and I was happy to be here and exploring. But after a month in Denmark, I was thinking: Okay, what am I supposed to do now? Wake up and watch Netflix, is that all life has to offer me? I got bored.” So on top of focusing on learning the language, Shivangi did quite a few part-time jobs, including working in a dental clinic. She’s also been volunteering with Røde Kors. After all, in a country like Denmark, there’s no scarcity of volunteering options. “I work with old Danish colleagues, so it’s easy for me to practice my Danish - that was my motivation. Everyone in my class said to find someone or somewhere to practice. But I like this second-hand store culture in Denmark. In India, we don’t have that having second-hand clothes is frowned upon. The culture of recycling and sustainability is outstanding in Denmark.” Another venue for volunteering for Shivangi was her starting position as an Aalborg Social Media Ambassador - now, she is the Head of Social Media at The International. “I’ve always been active on Instagram. I think it was only my first week in Denmark when I was approached by the Expats in Denmark page to do a takeover. It was through that page that I got to know about The International. So I approached Lyndsay, our Editor, asking how I could apply.” The position suits her. She gets to learn a lot, and, above all else, she gets to interact with people. Building a network and gaining experience is increasingly essential for Shivangi now that it is more evident to them that they are staying in Denmark for the foreseeable future. “When we came, we didn’t know whether we were staying or not. My husband arrived with one bag, and I arrived with a single box. We thought we’d stay for a year or two. But everything here is much better than in any other country we could have chosen. So we have decided to stay and make it work.” Ritesh has just signed a contract for his new job at a company in Copenhagen. The interview process caught him by surprise. “He likes it more here than the interviews he had in India. You have extensive interviews where you have to study and answer theoretical questions about your field of work.” In the Danish interview process, the focus is much more on personal fit and employee aspirations. “He was shocked when


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he said he doesn’t know something, and they replied: It’s better you don’t know - you can learn!” The job would probably eventually see them moving to Copenhagen - but with their first baby due soon, it won’t be until next year.

A HAPPY LIFE “It’s exciting - we never actually discussed being parents. We said: we’ll see, we’ll see. But then, when we were here, everything worked out the way it should, so it’s good.” And so far, the experience of being pregnant in Denmark is very different from what it would have been in India. Her midwife trained in India and often discuss and laugh about the differences. “In India, you can get as many ultrasounds as you want - there is no limit. You are just constantly asked to gain weight and eat for two. You can’t go for a walk without being interrogated with questions like: How the hell are you still walking? Why are you still going to the gym?” It differs from what her doctor told her in Denmark - she has to swim, cycle, and walk - she shouldn’t start anything new. But if she is already lifting weights, she should continue to do so. “I can guarantee that nobody would tell me to go and lift weights when pregnant in India, and I have to explain this to my Indian friends and family constantly.” Expecting is both exciting and scary. There’s a lot that will be put on hold - like travelling. Or sleeping at night. “It’s our first child. Do we know how to navigate parenthood? Do we even know how to hold the baby?” But when their baby arrives, they know their child will grow up in a great country. “It’s so safe. I live right next to a school, so I see little kids going to school independently without their parents dropping them off. You don’t have the same freedom in India – and the education system is so different. Homework is not as important as play and interacting with the world around you. As a result, kids get the time to discover what they are good at. In India, it’s the opposite - children are constantly being tested and pressured to perform. Ritesh puts it perfectly: I don’t care if my kid studies or not. At least my kids will be happy.” THE-INTL

BUT WHEN THEIR BABY ARRIVES, THEY KNOW THEIR CHILD WILL GROW UP IN A GREAT COUNTRY. “IT’S SO SAFE. I LIVE RIGHT NEXT TO A SCHOOL, SO I SEE LITTLE KIDS GOING TO SCHOOL INDEPENDENTLY WITHOUT THEIR PARENTS DROPPING THEM OFF. YOU DON’T HAVE THE SAME FREEDOM IN INDIA – AND THE EDUCATION SYSTEM IS SO DIFFERENT."

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HOW TO GET HIRED

IN 4 EASY STEPS TALENT ACQUISITION PROFESSIONAL LUKE HANNON SHARES RELEVANT TIPS AND HINTS FOR FINDING YOUR DREAM JOB. PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT LUKE HANNON

U

UNEMPLOYMENT IN DENMARK

is the lowest it's been in 14 years, according to Statistics Denmark. However, finding a job as a non-Dane is challenging for all unless you are well-connected and informed. Even in today's multicultural Denmark, employment rates for non-Danes lag far behind native-born Danes. Let's change that, shall we? You're probably wondering, "who is this column for?" Well… it's for YOU! No matter your situation or experience, these tips are for everyone - so here goes:

“You've got to network to get work! Despite Dane's reputation for being reserved, they love a good networking event. So learn to love them too!”

TIP #1 - HAVE AN AWESOME CV People say recruiters are lazy, and research suggests that they scan a CV for only 7 seconds. That's not long to make an impact! Luckily, many simple fixes make your CV stand out from the other 99%. 1. Keep it simple! No need to get fancy. Use a template to ensure you're setting out your CV in the best way possible. I recommend Novoresume for simple, no-frills templates. 2. Keep it short! Keep it to two A4 pages max. If you're applying for a job in finance, nobody cares about the job in a sandwich shop when you were sixteen! Summarise your past five years of experience and education. Include all relevant skills and responsibilities and use industry-standard keywords.

LUKE HANNON SENIOR TALENT ACQUISITION PARTNER

TIP #3 - KNOW WHERE TO LOOK

3. Focus on impact! I always say, responsible for X means nothing if you suck at it! It's far better to say you "Managed a team of ten and increased sales by 35%" than "Managed a sales team". Summarise your responsibilities for sure, but always highlight your impact.

Once you've sorted your CV and Linkedin, it's time to get hunting. Many job boards in Denmark offer a wide range of opportunities. Of these, JobIndex and Workindenmark are the most wellknown. However, for technical jobs, it-jobbank is your best bet! If you're a student or graduate, then definitely check out Graduateland. Here you can create a profile and find various jobs matching your skills and education.

TIP #2 - STAND OUT ON LINKEDIN

TIP #4 - GET NETWORKING!

It's no secret that recruiters love Linkedin. So if you supercharge your Linkedin profile, you'll be sure to stand out! The first thing recruiters will see is your profile picture. So make it a good one. A simple headshot of you smiling is enough. Also, make sure to match the tone of your picture with the industry you're hoping to work in. I once spoke with a hiring manager who said they were finding it hard considering someone for an IT position because their Linkedin page showed them in a karate gi wielding nunchucks! So please… unless you're applying at a karate school - no nunchucks! Linkedin is a social media platform. Keyword "social". Once you've determined the companies you'd like to work for, start interacting with them. Connect with the recruiters at that company, find out their challenges and then (gently!) show them how YOU can solve them with YOUR skills and knowledge.

You've got to network to get work! Despite Dane's reputation for being reserved, they love a good networking event. So learn to love them too! I recommend starting small. Look on Meetup for smaller events that match your job search. If you're at university, enquire about networking events on campus or in your local area. Preparing is half the battle, so research the people attending and take note of the people you'd like to meet. Then, once you've done your prep, show up with your biggest smile and your fanciest business cards and start making connections. Don't stand in the corner - get out there and talk to people. And follow up afterwards. Always follow up and nurture these newlymade relationships. You'll never regret this last part! On the contrary, applying these tips will improve your chances of finding the job you've always wanted. So stay tuned for next month! THE-INTL

Luke is a Senior Talent Acquisition Partner at SYBO Games, t he comp a ny b e h i nd t he smash-hit game Subway Surfers. Based in Copenhagen (by way of London)!, he has been working to make SYBO grow. He spends his time finding the best talent that the games community has to offer! He is always keen to build relationships by bringing passion and enthusiasm to the recruitment process. An advocate of Employer Branding, Luke works with the talented people at SYBO to let the world know how great a place it is to work. When he's not hiring awesome talents for SYBO or cycling (he does live in Copenhagen, after all!), he's busy reading his favourite books and channelling his inner Hemingway as a writer! @Luke Hannon @ Hannon Recruits

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THROWING CAUTION TO THE WIND - PART 1 A COLUMN DEVOTED TO DECONSTRUCTING AND DEMYSTIFYING IMMIGRATION AND INTEGRATION IN DENMARK, ONE DISRUPTIVELY UNCOMFORTABLE AND EMBARRASSINGLY TRIVIAL EMOTIONAL MELTDOWN AT A TIME.

PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT ANTESA JENSEN

I

IF YOU’RE ANYTHING like me, you came to Denmark believing — at least on some level — that you were about to move to The Happiest Place on Earth (cue the Disneyland theme music). The place where social welfare systems go to thrive and where everyone — even the cows — has their every possible need fulfilled. Partially deluded in the naive fantasy world of global political propaganda, it’s easy to think life in Denmark must be a fairytale. I mean, it’s the home of Hans Christian Andersen, the actual author of most of the fairytales you grew up with. Coincidence? I don’t think so! As an outsider, you can’t help but imagine what it will be like to live amongst these happiest of humans. And by imagine, I mean you start coming up with a lot of unchecked assumptions based on your own interpretation of “happiness” without ever reading the fine print of that Happiness Index Report (which, as it turns out, isn’t actually measuring joy, but rather contentedness and sense of security). There is a BIG DIFFERENCE, but you remain blissfully ignorant about those details until you arrive. Without realising it, somewhere along the way, those pesky unchecked assumptions have solidified into a painfully long laundry list of unconscious, yet enormously great, expectations. You’ll surely think this is trivial (or maybe you won’t), but here’s a prime example: I felt genuinely assaulted by how windy it was here and spent the better part of my first 18 months in the country attempting to convince my Danish colleagues that I had been deceived. I may have even accused my then-Danish boyfriend of withholding this vital information from me before moving (you can imagine his surprise at that accusation!). Nowhere was it disclosed that Denmark was, in fact, THIS windy. A reality which is only amplified when you have to commute everywhere on your bike, which indeed impeded my happiness.

ANTESA JENSEN EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EXPERT, AUTHOR & SPEAKER

Dramatic? Yes. But I felt emotionally unprepared for how awful it is to ride my bike to work on a rainy, windy winter day. It is like being shot in the face with a million BB guns all at once kind of awful. And I grew up in Seattle. It rains nine months of the year in Seattle. Being the problem-solver I was, this singular “problem” opened up a rabbit hole I had no choice but to go down. As a result, I became entirely preoccupied with finding solutions to cope. What’s the best weather app to predictably know when it will rain down to the minute so I know if I am better off taking the S-Tog (train) today? A: Non-existent because the rain is impossible to predict due to the wind, but yr.no is the most accurate. What’s the best brand of waterproof mascara? A: With enough rain, all of them will run. Have you tried eyelash extensions? At which speed must you ride your bike to avoid sweating through your work clothes during your commute but still hit all the green lights, and how to not freeze all day long because of sweat-soaked clothes? A: I’m now clear I sweat more than most

Danes combined, and also: did you know most offices have showers?! Is there such a thing as rain gear that both repels rain and prevents you from sweating profusely due to not ventilating well? A: Not if you sweat like I do, no. Is it possible to somehow not be so impacted by humidity so I won’t sweat as much? A: No. Perhaps you might consider moving to The Atlas Mountains in Morocco instead? As you can imagine, this whole experience did nothing more than reveal to me one of what ended up being MANY unchecked assumptions I had made about what living abroad, and more importantly, living in Denmark, was going to be like. I mean, how did I not consider the wind, and more precisely, Danes’ favourite topic of conversation, the weather, before relocating? And more importantly, why couldn’t I just embrace reality? For whatever reason I. Could. Not. Let. It. Go. Perhaps if I focused on it and obsessed over it enough, I could somehow change the weather. And until that happened, I just got resentful… at Denmark. Stay tuned for part 2 in our upcoming December issue. THE-INTL

American Antesa lives in Copenhagen. In her professional capacity, she works as a coach and teacher with individuals and companies and facilitates the deconstruction, demystification, and disarming of the emotional landscape. As a writer and speaker, Antesa's demonstrable depth in communication mastery pierces through complexity to get straight to the heart of things. Her book, Caught Shining — a memoir in prose, a user's guide for how to live fully in experience — will be published in 2023. @antesa @antesa @antesajensen @antesa @antesajensen.com

"THE PLACE WHERE SOCIAL WELFARE SYSTEMS GO TO THRIVE AND WHERE EVERYONE — EVEN THE COWS — HAS THEIR EVERY POSSIBLE NEED FULFILLED."

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BEATING THE NOVEMBER BLUES SCANDINAVIAN WINTER CAN BE A REAL SOUL EATER, WITH A CLOCK MOVED BACKWARDS AND THE DAYS GETTING DARK EARLIER AND EARLIER. YOUR MOTIVATION FOR THE DAY SEEMS TO HAVE VANISHED IN THE GREY, CLOUDY WEATHER AND NOTHING SEEMS TO MAKE YOU FEEL ENERGISED. YOU ARE NOT ALONE! MANY PEOPLE EXPERIENCE THE NOVEMBER BLUES AND THE ACCOMPANYING LETHARGY. SO IN THIS PIECE, I’LL GIVE YOU 4 TIPS TO COMBAT IT!

PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

BE ACTIVE THROUGH THE DARK DAYS The wind is picking up, and there is always a threat of rain. It never seems to be the ideal weather to leave your home. Would you rather curl up on the sofa, bingewatch a Netflix series or read a book? NEJ! Stop! Even in the face of possible gloomy weather, get in those daily steps! Movement will increase your serotonin levels and reduce cortisol (stress) in your body. Staying active doesn’t need to be complicated or leave you dripping in sweat. Something as simple as a daily walk in the cool fresh air will improve your mood. So here’s your friendly sign to get your boots on and outside today! After all, the weather here is what they call unpredictable, which in my mind, means there is a 50/50 chance that it will not rain.

GET EXCITED ABOUT THE SMALL STUFF Motivate yourself with small things for the week. Prepare healthy, beautiful food that you like to eat, and treat yourself to a glass of bubbly or that Ben & Jerry’s you’ve been saving in the freezer. Book yourself a massage at the local spa. Meet up with friends and plan small highlights you can look forward to with a smile. Try something you have meant to try for ages, like indoor trampolining, laser tag or yoga! Things that make you smile and feel all fuzzy inside are the best to keep the winter blues away and are healthy for the soul.

CAN YOU FEEL THE LIGHT (LOVE) TONIGHT? An essential factor in the November blues is the lack of light during the day. We get up, work in the dark, and come back home in the dark. Our time is spent mainly indoors, and natural light is therefore hardly available. We tend to forget the importance of Vitamin D that our bodies require to not feel lazy and tired. So, get out in

TEXT ALEXANDRA BECK

the fresh air as much as possible: wrap yourself up in weather-appropriate clothing and use any workday breaks to get out, stretch your legs, and breathe in some fresh air… all this will help your body and mind to become active again, even in overcast skies. Planning an extended walk is a great way to use some of your free time during the weekend. Don’t like going outdoors alone? Get some friends to come along with you, or find an outdoor workout crew that will keep you accountable to get outside and exercise for your entire body’s benefit.

ESCAPE THE NOVEMBER BLUES How about a short trip with those few vacation days you have left for the year? There are many reasonable offers online - if you book in good time, it won’t have to cost an arm and a leg. A short getaway to some other city, country or just across the bridge will change the scenery and refresh your mind and body, so you can come back energised and more motivated. Whether swooshing down the slopes, walking on a beach, discovering a new city or simply taking a restorative self-care weekend to a SPA retreat, getting away from the daily routine will significantly affect your mindset. So get booking - even if the trip doesn’t happen soon, it will give you something to look forward to and feel great about. THE-INTL

ALEXANDRA BECK PERSONAL TRAINER & NUTRITION COACH Alex is a Swiss/Brit mom and wife who has lived in Copenhagen since 2009. She switched from corporate life in communications to the independent life of an outdoor personal and group fitness trainer. She coaches people of all ages and fitness levels to find fun and consistency in movement through individual and group workouts. Delivering entertainment and spreading group fitness magic is her superpower. Alex encourages you to high-five her if you see her in the capital!

@alexbeck.fit @alexbeck.fit @alexbeck.fit

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JUTL AND

A PLACE TO CALL HOME TO LIVE A GOOD FAMILY LIFE, IT IS ESSENTIAL TO HAVE A WORK-LIFE BALANCE WITH A GOOD JOB AND A WIDE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE FAMILY - NORTH DENMARK OFFERS ALL OF THIS.

PHOTOGRAPHS VISITNORDVESTKYSTEN

TEXT LASSE FRIMAND JENSEN

T

THIS BEAUTIFUL REGION of Denmark offers everything from great communities, association life, and nature experiences to sports or clubs for specific interests or hobbies, whether you are an adult, adolescent, or child. Building on trust, great public service and a rich association life, northern Denmark is a great place to live, satisfying both career and leisure time.

EDUCATION IN THE COUNTRY Public schools have high-quality and skilled teachers in cities and land districts. Even though living in the major cities has a lot of appeal, living in the countryside has a lot of advantages too. In terms of schools, one of the advantages is that when there are fewer children, it contributes to a closely connected neighbourhood, which helps build communities with strong social coherence. In other words, the schools in the land district offer less anonymity than the city schools and life and can create good inclusion and civic engagement in the community and associations from children and parents alike. Furthermore, infrastructure and transportation options are available in the countryside, making it possible to travel to school every day.

LEISURE TIME FOR THE FAMILY In North Denmark, there are a lot of cultural possibilities and activities for the whole family. Moreover, in the different municipalities, there are plenty of opportunities to pursue hobbies and special interests in anything from arts, music or video games to associations in life or sports - there’s something for everyone! People get to experience unique and varied sports. For example, in Klitmøller, northern Denmark, you can try surfing on one of the best surfing beaches in Denmark named Cold Hawaii. Or take a biking tour or hiking trip in the beautiful surrounding nature of Nationalpark Thy. In Aalborg, the international NGO called “Game” offers excellent sports events and training in everything from climbing, street basket and football to parkour for a small entry fee. Their mission is to strengthen equality in opportunities, gender, health, and the general livelihood and work on creating inclusion and engagement in society. It does so through a youth-led street sport and culture initiative. Experiencing the nature of northern Denmark is worthwhile. Visiting the long sandy beaches at the western sea and feeling the forces of nature or taking a trip to the top of Denmark in Skagen is popular with many visitors. Here you will find old fisherman’s houses, famous Danish paintings, restaurants, shopping, and a great atmosphere at the harbour. It is also popular to take

LASSE FRIMAND JENSEN TEAM MANAGER AND CITY COUNCIL MEMBER

a hike in the beautiful surroundings of the forest Rold Skov and walk around the lakes.

 Team Manager at

AMUSEMENT ACTIVITIES North Denmark offers a wide variety of amusement activities for the whole family. For example, in Aalborg, you can visit Aalborg Zoo, where you can experience exotic animals from around the world. At the Zoo, there are activities or lectures about the animals, and families can bring their food or enjoy the food from the restaurants or cafeterias. Another activity for the whole family is Fårup Sommerland. Fårup Sommerland is an amusement park “in the woods”, with more than 60 rides and amusements, with everything from wild rollercoasters to a children’s Tivoli to a waterpark. Their newest ride, “Fønix”, is 40 meters tall and has a maximum speed of 95 km/h, which makes it Denmark’s fastest, tallest, and largest rollercoaster. It is even possible to make an overnight trip and stay in Hotel Fårup, located inside the park. For people interested in marine animals and maritime, the Nordsøen Oceanarium is a great place to visit with the family. Nordsøen Oceanarium is northern Europe’s largest aquarium and houses a broad section of animals and plants from the North Sea. Overall, North Denmark provides a fun and social activities for the entire family satisfying everyday activities and special occasions or holiday trips. We at International House North Denmark see the good family life as one of our region’s most vital “selling points” when it comes to attracting international citizens, so check out this website if you want to learn more about it visit: www.ihnd.dk THE-INTL

International House North Denmark.  City Council member in Aalborg Municipality.  Group chairman for the Social Democratic Party in Aalborg.  Chairman of DANVA and Port of Aalborg.  Father of three kids and married to Kirstine.  Worked and lived in Africa as an expat.  Takes an active part as a volunteer for the international community.  Believes in international solidarity and wants the international community in Aalborg to be more aware of their rights.

lassefj.dk lassefj.dk lassefj.dk AALBORG ZOO FB PAGE

FÅRUP SOMMERLAND FB PAGE

VISITNORDVESTKYSTEN FB PAGE

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CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING IN A DANISH ORGANISATION PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT JANE ELGÅRD PETERSEN

Demonstrating leadership competency across cultural boundaries is no easy task - our cultural detective, Jane, delves deeper into this topic.

Y

YEARS OF CULTURAL nuances have impacted the way civilisation operates. Nuggets of wisdom, passed from generation to generation, come together to form the slowly evolving backbone of a society. Leaders must understand and embrace the culture of the people they intend to lead, which will bring joy and its own set of challenges. Joy, because you, as a Danish leader, will learn different ways to communicate and cooperate, which can be an eye-opener in a Danish company. However, the challenges can be significant in how we work together – and more time may be needed to solve potential problems. Danes are among the most congenial of cultures, being neither too aggressive nor passive. They tend to go for a logical line of argumentation. The typical profile of a Dane is that they are tolerant and good listeners. However, do not misjudge them, as they will always focus on the facts. Their casual, laid-back stance does not interfere with their drive to complete the task. The Danish organisational structure is flat compared to decision-making structures in many other cultures. However, Danes are also known for being blunt. They expect horizontal communication to be taken for granted and the few hierarchical influences that may come into play to be transparent. Heavy persuasion is taboo, and too much lobbying can be met with suspicion. Managers of all levels share decision-making, troubleshooting, and democratic procedures. Though top managers can exert considerable pressure, Danes are skilful in maintaining a decidedly friendly atmosphere during a discussion. Networking is always an excellent way to learn more. You can achieve a lot, regardless of your organisational level. It gives you an excellent opportunity to learn more about your new colleagues and open communication to share good ideas. As a manager, it will allow you to utilise these good ideas to help make effective decisions. Another plus of networking is learning how other departments in the organisation operate so you can ensure the most effective utilisation of all resources across the board. In addition, you will have an excellent opportunity to use the different cultural sectors in the organisation - different approaches can bring new ideas to the table! Locals and internationals can also learn how other organisations make decisions and work with others outside the organisation. Leaders need to pay attention to what motivates multiple cultures in the company. For example, Danes enjoy a relaxed atmosphere and often use humour. Likewise, there is an expectation that business discussions should be laced with humour. Danish managers can help newly appointed colleagues (locals

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

JANE ELGÅRD PETERSEN CULTURAL DETECTIVE Jane is a local and grew up in Denmark, apart from a "DANES LOVE ANECDOTES - AND WE HAVE MANY OF THEM IN DANISH. BUT UNFORTUNATELY, DANISH COLLEAGUES, INCLUDING LEADERS, OFTEN USE IDIOMS THAT CAN BE CHALLENGING TO TRANSLATE INTO ENGLISH."

few long-term stays abroad,

and internationals) in their first weeks by letting them introduce themselves and how they handle their given tasks to their colleagues. This will give more insight into how newcomers think, and the new colleagues will feel welcomed and accepted in the company. Danes love anecdotes - and we have many of them in Danish. But unfortunately, Danish colleagues, including leaders, often use idioms that can be challenging to translate into English. As a result, misunderstandings can happen, which can make the international colleague feel uncomfortable – and a little lost. In this instance, leaders and colleagues must be cautious so that such situations do not occur and that Danish wit and humour are explained in more detail. With the help of good leaders and supportive colleagues, I believe they will help you navigate the pitfalls and sometimes what might seem like “strange” humour that you might encounter in Danish workplaces. You’re not alone, and it’s not the Danish way to make you feel uncomfortable. So if you’re unsure of something, talk to your colleagues and leaders – and I’m sure you will come to enjoy your new job in no time. God arbejdslyst (enjoy your work). THE-INTL

cating internationals to Den-

whilst travelling extensively. For the last 10 years, her business has supported relomark and helping businesses onboard their employees. She loves a challenge and feels there are many different expectations of moving to Denmark, depending on who you are and where you come from. kulturdetektiven.dk linkedin


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FOOD ART

MELTING MOMENTS A WONDERFULLY BUTTERY SHORTBREAD-INSPIRED TEA TIME TREAT. PHOTOGRAPHS & TEXT: NATASHA LIVIERO / UNSPLASH

MELTING MOMENTS MAKES APPROXIMATELY 40 INGREDIENTS: 350g salted butter, room temperature 80g confectioners sugar 10ml vanilla extract 280g cake flour 75g corn flour/cornstarch confectioners sugar for dusting

LEMON BUTTERCREAM INGREDIENTS: 80g unsalted butter, room temperature 110g confectioners sugar 15-20ml lemon juice zest of a lemon (to taste) pinch of salt

METHOD: 1. Set oven to 1800C or 1600C fan-assisted. 2. Line baking trays with baking paper. 3. Cream the butter, confectioners sugar and vanilla with a paddle attachment until light and creamy. 4. In a separate bowl, sift the flour together. 5. Add the flour to the butter mixture and blend until a soft dough forms. 6. Chill the dough for a few minutes until it is firm enough to work with. 7. Weigh the dough into 8g portions, then roll each portion into a ball before pressing it lightly with the back of a fork (if the dough is sticky, dip the fork in flour before pressing down on the dough). 8. Chill the dough for 30 minutes to prevent the biscuits from spreading too much when in the oven. 9. Bake for approximately 15 minutes or until a light golden colour. 10. Remove the biscuits from the hot tray and cool them on a wire rack. 11. To prepare the lemon buttercream, whisk together all the ingredients and place them into a piping bag with a plain tip nozzle. 12. Once the biscuits have cooled, sandwich them together with the lemon butter filling. 13. Store in an air-tight container and dust with confectioners sugar before serving.

NATASHA LIVIERO - PASTRY CHEF Natasha is a recently qualified pastry chef who is South African by birth and Croatian by blood. She spent many years working for a wellness publication but did an about-turn at the beginning of 2020 when she joined a culinary school to fulfil a lifelong dream to study patisserie. She’s passionate about European patisserie and loves spending time in the kitchen experimenting with recipes (while quibbling with her feline friends), and is always on the hunt for interesting new cookbooks. natashaliviero

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FALL IN LOVE WITH COOLER WEATHER

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THE WORD 'BLASPHEMY' comes to mind as I read the above title out loud. Being a Floridian for the last 17 years has spoiled my tolerance for chilly temperatures. However, this Florida girl has dormant Boston roots embedded with a strong sense of fashion memory. Spoiler Alert…I absolutely love fall fashion and hope to tempt you too.

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#1 Leather lovers Don't ignore this sign to dust off your favourite leather pieces. Whether rocking a genuine or PU (polyurethane) leather jacket..you will surely give the Fall foliage a run for the aesthetics. Oversized blazers, motor/biker styles, and studded goth are all trends making waves this autumn of 2022. So pair your leather blazer with wide-leg leather pants for the ultimate monochrome level.

#2 Wild...wild...west 'Yeehaw'...Western fashion is back! Along with the surge of Y2K trends, the cowboy look is returning to the rodeo. Everything from embellished hats to contemporary riding chaps ('hey, that rhymed')...is making its way to cooler weather. Of course, the easiest pivot into westward style is the cowboy boot. For a modern cowgirl look, pair your boots with a statement jacket that keeps you warm.

#3 Bomber and a bag of chips The 'Top Gun' sequel seemed to have had a lasting effect on its fans. Bomber and varsity jackets can be seen all over the fashion pages. An added plus is that the bomber jacket is the perfect segue into cooler temps. I joined the trend by raiding my little brother's closet and pairing his thrift bomber jacket with a pair of cargo pants. "Ready to take flight?"

#4 Faux fur fall

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Most faux fur jackets are almost undetectable to the real ones and have an attractive price point. However, once the leaves start changing colours…it's time to air out your most cherished coat. Fur is also a great way to brave the cold in style. Fur is a universal pop to any outfit, even if you decide to rock animal prints or neutrals.

#5 Dopamine dressing We all feel the effects of the seasons changing…shorter days and longer nights. Dopamine dressing is the idea that our clothes can improve our moods. Wearing bright colours and bold patterns can be a quick mood booster. This style of dressing can include contrasting layers and bohemian undertones. So if wearing your everyday sweatshirt with a sequin skirt and fur boots makes you smile… THEN DO IT!

Upcycled and oversized Reducing one's carbon footprint is vital, especially in the fashion industry. Upcycling and thrifting are no longer done in silence but out loud and in mainstream fashion. Vintage fashion styles bombard our 'for you' pages and seamlessly transition to fall weather. I implore you to visit your local thrift store, find the men's section, and go wild. Oversized jackets, sweaters, and shirts are perfect for the ideal harvest looks. THE-INTL

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VANESSA PETERSEN JEWELRY DESIGNER OWNER OF STYLEFREED Dubbed the 'Jill Of All Trades', Vanessa hails from the sunshine state of Florida. After visiting Copenhagen several times as a former International Flight Attendant, she permanently settled in Denmark in 2017 with her husband. Currently, Vanessa is the owner of the hand-crafted jewellery brand, the Style Freed. She creates personalised jewellery centred around healing crystals worldwide. Being a creative "mompreneur' has also allowed Vanessa to focus on her son's developmental journey with autism in Denmark. @stylefreed @thestylefreed @stylefreed

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DENMARK'S FORGOTTEN

IMMIGRATION HISTORY EXPLORING THE RICH LEGACY OF INTERNATIONALS IN DENMARK.

PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT HEATHER STORGAARD

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WHEN DISCUSSING THE challenges faced by internationals in Denmark, I am often told by Danes that Denmark is a very homogeneous country and isn't used to immigration. When I first accepted this, I wondered how accurate it was. But, of course, every international experiencing a new country is a kind of a pioneer. Still, the more I read, the more I realised that as a community, we have a long history and heritage in Denmark than it first seemed.

Denmark has also received refugees for a long time, accepting those fleeing religious or political persecution.

THE NORTH SEA AND THE BALTIC Geographically, my native country sits just across the North Sea from Denmark. Back when travel by ship was quicker than over land, the journey to Denmark could be easier than neighbouring England. As the Scottish King was married to a Danish Princess, Scots were considered automatic citizens of the Kingdom of Denmark for a time! Especially after Brexit, that sounds like a deal our ancestors should never have given up. These Scots lived lives as varied as modern-day internationals. Thomas Kingo was half Scottish, half Danish, with a dad and a surname from the Scottish Kingdom of Fife. He became a bishop and hymn writer, whose songs are still included in the High School Song Book issued to all Danish children. Linguists and historians believe that you can hear his roots, as Kingo used slightly odd Danish due to the Scots' influence on his language. Also over the sea, Polish women in the early 20th century travelled across the Baltic to do seasonal work on Lolland. They have had a noticeable effect on the heritage of Lolland, as Polish-Danish families made their homes there for over 100 years.

REFUGEES AND RELIGIOUS MINORITIES Denmark has also received refugees for a long time, accepting those fleeing religious or political persecution. For example, in the 17th century, Fredericia in Southern Jutland was designated as a town where religious minorities could claim asylum and enjoy religious freedom, allowing Jewish, Catholics and, most prominently, French Huguenots to settle there. Not far from there, the charming UNESCO world heritage town Christiansfeld was founded by a religious order in the 18th century. The Moravian Brethren had been invited to move to Denmark to build a town after the King saw how economically prosperous they were. The town is famous for its honey cakes, also originally introduced by these internationals, who came most prominently from the modern-day territories of Germany, the Netherlands and Czechia.

THE GOLD COAST CONNECTION During the slave trade, Denmark had several trading posts on

the Gold Coast, modern-day Ghana, and a colony in the Danish West Indies. Records from Accra show how Danish men entered into relationships with local upper-class women, creating a hybrid Danish-African society. Many of these Afro-European children grew up to also marry Danes. Some found their way to Denmark, as some Afro-Danish children from the Caribbean did. Their reception varied - some were educated and settled in Denmark, while others felt unwelcome. Although they did not make up huge numbers, in terms of history, I believe it's important to point out that black and mixed-race people have been present in Denmark for centuries.

LEGACY I hope you feel a sense of kinship with the internationals who made Denmark their home over the last few hundred years. While they may not be so present in Danish public memory, they left behind a rich legacy of song, literature and even an entire town for us to enjoy and celebrate as we follow in their footsteps. Nella Larsen was born in the USA to a mother from Denmark and a father from the Danish West Indies (now US Virgin Islands). Her 1928 semi-autobiographical novel Quicksand discusses her identity as a mixed-race, Danish-American woman living in the USA and Copenhagen. Her discussions about race, Danish language challenges, and the struggle for acceptance in Denmark continue to be relatable today. Daughters of the Trade by Pernille Ipsen explores the DanishAfrican families and society over the centuries of Danish presence in Accra during the slave trade and doesn't shy from covering complicated topics. Visit Thomas Kingos Church in Odense and if your Danish is good enough, listen to a hymn to see if you can tell where Kingo made some second-generation immigrant language slip-ups! Christiansfeld is a whole town built by immigrants to Denmark, offering beautiful surroundings and tasty honey cake to those who visit. THE-INTL

HEATHER STORGAARD WRITER Heather Storgaard comes from Northern Scotland, grew up in Switzerland, and lived in England and Germany. She met her Danish and soon-tobe British husband back in 2017, and they now split their time between Central Scotland and Helgenæs, a peninsula in rural Eastern Jutland. Languages and cultural studies are a big passion, leading Heather to pursue a degree in Culture and Heritage and a career in photography and translation. @heatherstorgaard

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LEAVE COPENHAGEN AND DISCOVER

SOME UNIQUE PLACES WRITER SHANI BISHOP EXPLORES AREAS OFF THE BEATEN TRACK IN DENMARK. PHOTOGRAPHS VARIOUS

TEXT SHANI BISHOP

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MANY EXPATS LIVE in the main cities in Denmark or nearby. Some expats rarely venture out of the city, as Copenhagen has a lot to offer. However, if expats knew of the treasures beyond city limits, many would be tempted to travel or live there.

THE GIANTS

When friends visited, I would encourage them to balance seeing the traditional sights in Copenhagen with 'real' Denmark. My kids and I loved finding the Hidden Giants by Thomas Dambo. We ticked them off one by one. Thomas Dambo built loads during the pandemic, so there will be one near you. Allerød has a new one called Hannah Halerød.

Many people venture north of Copenhagen to visit Louisana, which is impressive, but I'd also recommend: Kronberg castle, The Danish Museum of Science and Technology and the Maritime Museum of Denmark in Helsingør. They are all easily a day out, but food options are limited, so take your lunch with you. The Technology Museum is jam-packed with buses, planes and trains, which children love exploring. A day trip to Helsingør is always good, and it has the best open sandwiches I have ever tasted. The cheese shop is also one of my favourites. If you'd like to know more, I'd suggest you join the North Zealand community FB page or check out Visit North Zealand. Other hidden treasures are the nature playgrounds. These are playgrounds made entirely of wood and are usually hidden away. My favourite of these is Egjhorten Naturlegeplads - read more here but know that the photos do not do it justice! You need a car to get to it, but it's worth it as it's incredible. There are wooden huts where you can have BBQs, swings, trails and sculptures. We had many happy times there as well as birthday parties. It's also one of the sites where you can sleep overnight. You can book shelters all over Denmark, but book early as they go fast.

CRAZY ABOUT THE VIKINGS? If you love a bit of Viking history, you'll be spoiled for choice in Denmark. I enjoyed The Viking Ship Museum

NATURLEGEPLADSEN EGHJORTEN FB PAGE

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THOMAS DANBO FB PAGE

THE USUAL SUSPECTS?

in Roskilde, the burial ship at Vikingmuseum Ladby, the Trelleborg Viking Fortress on the way to Jutland and The Jelling Monuments in Jutland. All of these were brilliant and worth making a memorable trip for. Most of them have great children's areas where the kids can try on costumes.

EXPLORING PANCAKE ISLAND Welcome to the new family destination spot of Lolland! This beautiful part of Denmark offers outstanding countryside, walks, fun and exploration for children, and a social community with an expanding international scene.

"MY KIDS AND I LOVED FINDING THE HIDD E N G I A N T S BY T H O M A S DA M B O. W E TICKED THEM OFF ONE BY ONE." MARIELYST BEACH Marielyst Strand is a child-friendly beach with shallow, calm water and several sandbanks. LABYRINTH Get lost in nature and find your way. A day in the maze is entertaining for the whole family.

The top four must-do's while visiting include: MUSEUMSBANEN A train runs on a preserved railway line on a scenic section between Maribo and Bandholm.

VIKINGEBORGEN TRELLEBORG FB PAGE

MARIBO MINIATURE TOWN About 60 small and larger cultural buildings can be seen within the framework of the displayed town environment. THE-INTL

LABYRINT LOLLAND-FALSTER FB PAGE


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NOVEMBER IS PACKED WITH CELEBRATIONS PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT MONIKA PEDERSEN

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THE CLOCKS HAVE gone back, and the days are becoming shorter, but this does not deter November from being a busy month for festivities in an international school. Of course, not all celebrations are happy ones, but they are undoubtedly memorable moments which provide a teachable moment and encourage an appreciation of the broadness of the world around them.

"The most beautiful festival on the international calendar is Diwali. It is the Hindu festival of lights, symbolising the victory of light over darkness."

HALLOWEEN

The very tail end of October brought Halloween. Though not a Danish tradition but an American one, its popularity has grown in recent years. It is firmly planted in every middle and primary school child’s calendar. Any discerning teacher knows that pumpkin carving is a must within the primary classroom or the art room. An ample supply of pumpkins, knives, and creative designs must be ready. An afternoon of carving and creating is truly relished by students. In addition to pumpkins, Halloween provided a wonderful opportunity to dress up, and students loved it. A lot of time and thought goes into planning the ‘perfect’ costume. Originally the preference was for the typical characters associated with Halloween, such as witches, black cats, spiders, ghosts, and ghouls. This has now broadened to include a plethora of hero costumes, including spiderman, batman and robin, wonder woman, or characters from Star Wars or other sci-fi favourites, to mention a few. The excitement created by the costumes is always intense as students parade around the playground or corridors, grade level by grade level. And no Halloween is complete without a trick-or-treat evening around the local neighbourhood, where candies and monies are collected.

DIWALI The most beautiful festival on the international calendar is Diwali. It is the Hindu festival of lights, symbolising the victory of light over darkness. The tradition is that entire cities are decked with lights, candles and illuminations. It is a time when families gather to exchange gifts and elaborate sweets. It is as glamorous as Christmas in south Asia, and the celebrations last several days. At school, 4 November is often celebrated with a colourful assembly, with parents and students in traditional dress and dances and tasting the unique sweets. It is an uplifting celebration.

11 NOVEMBER In sombre contrast, Remembrance Day, with the traditional one or two minutes of silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month (11:00, 11 November) that marks the moment when the armistice became effective, is an important calendar date. Teachings to raise awareness among young people of the sacrifices made by others to provide the freedom many of us enjoy today are common themes of the day. For many Brits, the poppy is something missed here in Denmark. However, some people, like myself, keep it safe and bring it out yearly. It interests students, so time is used to explain the remembrance poppy and its significance.

MONIKA PEDERSEN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR Monika comes from the London area of the UK, where she worked in the state system and the international school Also celebrated on 11 November is the Danish tradition of Sankt Mortenaften (Saint Martin’s Day). Sankt Morten was a monk who supported livestock and beggars. He worked in Tours, France, and the villagers wanted to appoint him as their Bishop. However, Morten did not want this, so he hid in a goose shed, but the geese exposed him, and Morten had to take up the office of Bishop. As revenge, he decreed that a goose must be slaughtered as a sacrifice once a year. As geese were expensive, the duck was used as a cheaper replacement. The tradition came over to Denmark in 1616, and after 11 November, goose or duck was eaten.

THANKSGIVING A much-loved tradition is the American Thanksgiving, celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November. The day recognises the founding fathers’ harvest feast shared with the English pilgrims and Wampanoag people. The celebratory Thanksgiving meal typically includes turkey, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, gravy, bread stuffing, cranberries, and greens, followed by pumpkin pie for dessert. Often, the parent committee hosts a thanksgiving lunch, and the entire school population enjoys a communal meal in the school canteen. These are just a few of the common celebrations, but it is evident that November is a month rich in international culture. It is a vibrant time that paves the way for further excitement brought by the countdown to Christmas. THE-INTL

system, as an English teacher of 11-18 students and then a section leader. She has also worked in Germany and now in Denmark. She has an overview of the British, International, and American educational systems and is currently learning about the Danish system. She has been in education for 32 years and continues to enjoy the profession. She has relocated to Copenhagen as she is married to a Dane. She enjoys jogging, waterside walks, and cooking. @monikapedersen @monikapedersen @monikapedersen

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THE DANISH ILLUSION THE DANISH WELFARE SYSTEM IS ON THE BRINK OF COLLAPSE, AND THAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN THE MAIN FOCUS OF THE GENERAL ELECTION.

PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH / ANJA EKSTRØM

TEXT MONICA LYLLOFF

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DENMARK'S WELFARE SYSTEM is often referred to as one of the best in the world - not only in international surveys such as Gallup's World Happiness Poll but also by celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey and former Democratic political contender in the USA Bernie Sanders. However, although the Danish welfare system looks fantastic on paper, the reality of it in 2022 is another story altogether. Denmark is a welfare society and a democracy under the rule of law. At least, this is the story that Danes grow up with. However, if we are unfortunate enough to need help from the welfare system one day, we quickly find out this fairy tale welfare society that we grew up being told about is nothing but an illusion. The illusion of a well-functioning welfare system is kept alive by politicians in the Danish parliament and the municipalities, who are highly skilled at telling a narrative to the general public that the Danish welfare system is fantastic, amongst the best in the world, and that it is something that politicians prioritise. Past governments, as well as the current one, have not prioritised the welfare system that we Danes are so proud of. Consequently, the Danish welfare system is quickly disintegrating and on a direct route towards collapsing altogether. Our daycares are so overcrowded and understaffed that our children are neglected; our elementary schools are so overcrowded and understaffed that children with special needs run away from school or don't go to school at all - sometimes up to years at a time. In addition, municipal job centres put impossible and often irresponsible demands on unemployed people who are ill and have a disability. Psychiatric departments are massively underfinanced and short-staffed and have such poor work environments, and these departments are on the brink of collapse. In general, work conditions at hospital departments are so poor that nurses leave public hospitals to work in private hospitals or temp agencies, resulting in a massive staff shortage countrywide. Nursing homes are so understaffed that the elderly are neglected, as seen in a recent documentary on TV2. Disability services are so poor and inaccessible that more people with disabilities are forced into a life of insolation and deprived of the right to function as a part of Danish society. The general election should have been about rethinking and rebuilding the entire foundation of our welfare system because the current one is falling apart. Danish politicians need to accept our welfare system's current state and act based on this knowledge. My distrust of Danish politicians did not appear overnight. My mistrust comes from years of experience with politicians who promised to make a difference before being elected - and I believed they meant it. But as soon as they were elected into office, the majority suffered collective amnesia and made ever-changing excuses for their lack of action. I am sick and tired of listening to politicians who compete with each other about who can be the toughest and who can make the blindest promises. I am sick and tired of watching politicians play the blame game while they collectively refuse to take real responsibility for the state of our welfare system and for changing it. I hope that at least one of the politicians will have enough courage to work towards rethinking and rebuilding our entire welfare system. How amazing would it be if politicians could find the courage and take responsibility to work towards creating real change? Of course, it would be necessary to start by making entirely new social structures - structures where Danish municipalities are not the primary stakeholder in all welfare services and where we citizens aren't passed back and forth between munici-

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palities and regions, as is the case right now. Needed more than anything else is a total review of how much money is used on administration by Danish municipalities and regions. This knowledge should be used to create a new financing model, which separates the responsibility for making decisions about help and the responsibility for financing this help. Decision-making should be placed in the hands of the experts with the proper knowledge and at the right time. I hope that after this election, the elected politicians are brave enough to rethink how we organise our welfare system and how it is run. But, unfortunately, making fundamental changes will require not only courage but it will also require time and considerable financial investments. I firmly believe that if politicians do away with illusions, work towards real change, and invest in a completely new welfare system, it will be the best return on investment that Denmark has seen in modern times. It remains to be seen who will receive my vote by the time this article goes live. But one thing is for sure - my vote will be placed where there is the most substantial possibility for accurate, comprehensive, and long-term change. THE-INTL

MONICA LYLLOFF IS A LAWYER, WIFE, MOTHER AND CO-FOUNDER OF #ENMILLIONSTEMMER (#ONEMILLIONVOICES).


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'OPLEV DNA' KULTURNATTEN EVENT UNIVERSITY OUTREACH FOR ALL AGES

PHOTOGRAPHS YING LIU / UNSPLASH

TEXT SKYLER BENTLEY HALL

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EACH YEAR, ON a Friday night before the school autumn holiday, the 'Kulturnatten association' creates a festive evening where the city works together to create joy and inspiration for people of all ages. More than 250 museums, theatres, libraries, churches, and parks are open to the public at locations in Valby, Carlsberg, Sydhavn, Frederiksberg, Østerbro, Vesterbro, Kødbyen, Nørrebro, Nordvest, Nordhavn, Islands Brygge, Amagerbro, Christianshavn and Holmen. In addition, visitors can experience the city while Ying conducts research in the Center for Chromosome Stability (CCS), funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF). She is passionate about conveying her research interests to the public, and what better way to do so than through the annual Culture Night?

SKYLER BENTLEY HALL

OPLEV DNA EXHIBITION After moving to Denmark in 2010, Ying established a research group at the University of Copenhagen to understand how human cells counteract stress during DNA replication. Since 2018, Ying has organised the 'Oplev DNA' exhibition in the Maersk tower on Kulturnatten. In this event, about ten CCS scientists (PhD students, postdocs, associate or full professors) participate in this 'mini-laboratory' to guide visitors through different activities. The key activities of this minilab include observing chromosomes under microscopes, observing a model chromosome, watching videos of cells dividing, and extracting DNA from fruits using household materials. In addition, the CCS scientists guide visitors to perform various activities. For example, in the 'DNA extraction from tomatoes or bananas' activity, each visitor will be supervised by a CCS scientist to carry out a simple protocol that would allow the DNA to be released from the fruit cells.

CCS SCIENTIFIC MISSION The scientific mission of the CCS is to understand how cells minimise the damage that can generate chromosomal instability. There are currently seven research groups in CCS and around forty-five scientists from more than eighteen countries. One of the missions of the CCS is to communicate with the public about their research findings, which could improve public awareness of the causes of diseases and inspire interest in biological research for younger generations. Copenhagen Culture night is the perfect forum for the CCS's outreach activities.

ENGAGING PARTICIPANTS OF ALL AGES Starting in 2018, CCS prepared five different activities for their exhibition. They made colourful accompanying posters (with text in both Danish and English) so that visitors could understand the content and purpose of the activities. To their surprise, nearly all the activities in the first minilab were popular during the whole evening of Culture Night. The visitors were fascinated by the fact that they could extract DNA from tomatoes within fifteen minutes using household materials or see human chromosomes under microscopes, just like real scientists in the laboratories! Over time,

EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANT Skyler is originally from Canada, and after living in Switzerland for several years, she transitioned to Denmark they have kept similar "THIS EVENT IS A FANTASTIC EXactivities in their minilPERIENCE FOR ALL THE CCS SCIab since these are so ENTISTS INVOLVED. WE ALL FELT well attended and apT H AT O U R H A R D W O R K WA S preciated by visitors. GREATLY REWARDED BY THE ENNotably, the minilab of THUSIASM AND CURIOSITY OF 'Oplev DNA' is a univerTHE VISITORS! THAT'S WHY WE sal event without genHAVE BEEN CARRYING ON RUNder, age or language barriers. The activities NING THIS MINILAB, AND ALWAYS include p articip ants LOOKING FORWARD TO MEETaged three and a half to ING THE PUBLIC ON THIS SPECIAL more than seventy-five. EVENING" - YING LIU, ASSOCIATE The 'DNA extraction' PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF activity has been most COPENHAGEN popular with children, although some have not yet learned English. Their parents were excellent translators for non-Danish CCS scientists who gave English instructions during this activity.

with her husband and son all proud Canadians. Skyler has worked in the education sector for three decades and found her true passion for supporting students with their educational journey. As the Founder of Bentley Hall Educational Consulting, she advises on career and university options globally. Skyler enjoys spending time with family, exploring new cultures, and embracing the hygge lifestyle in beautiful Denmark. bentleyhall.ca instagram.com/skylerbent

QUESTIONS TO PONDER Ying's team believes that through this experience, the public is keen to improve their knowledge of diseases such as cancer, infertility, or age-related dementia, all of which are highly relevant to the research focus of the CCS. In addition, visitors have raised interesting questions; for example, 'do longer telomeres allow people to live longer?'; 'why do people develop cancer when they don't have any hereditary mutations and have a healthy lifestyle?'; 'can we use gene editing to cure cancer or genetic diseases?'. THE-INTL

leyhall/ facebook.com/skyler.bent leyhall

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TWAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT…

SUSAN JESSEN SPIELE LIBRARIAN Susan is a librarian at Roskilde Library, and in charge of the English section. She does

Many horror stories started this way, and we knew what was coming, yet we kept reading. This winter will be darker than usual so why not ramp it up and make the worst of it. Enjoy!

BEAUTY AND HORROR INTERTWINED

PRIMAL, UNCANNY AND LYRICAL

VICIOUS, EMPATHIC AND FUNNY

CHILLING, POIGNANT AND HUMAN

REPRIEVE

OLD COUNTRY

THE FINAL GIRL

WHEN THINGS

BY GRADY HENDRIX

STORIES INSPIRED

BY JAMES HAN MATTSON

Quigley House is a fullcontact escape room where actors are permitted to lay hands on the guests. A group tries to finish and win 60.000 dollars, but an actual murder interferes, and true horror might not lie with monsters but humans.

BY MATT QUARY Harry and Sasha buy a remote farm unseen, longing for a simple rural life in the middle of nowhere. The farm and nature are all they hoped for until a neighbour warns them they are not alone. Something is coming for them.

SUPPORT GROUP

The final girl is the survivor of a serial killer. Lynnette is one, and she has been meeting with five others and a therapist regularly for a decade. Then, one day one of them doesn’t show up - somebody out there has found them.

English events all year; everything from expat dinners and pub quizzes, to karaoke nights and book talks.

GET DARK

BY SHIRLEY JACKSON Whether you know of Shirley Jackson’s writing, this anthology will satisfy most readers. It has many of the hallmarks she was and is loved for today; dark emotions, the terror of the supernatural and strange.

DID YOU KNOW? Pub quizzes are a thing in Denmark, too, and here at Roskilde Library, we do them in English. The next one is Friday, 25th of November, from 19:00-22:00. You can gather your team (max six people) or come alone - we will help you find a team. There will, of course, be a bar and free tickets here: Pub quiz at the library! | Roskilde Bibliotekerne

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THE ART OF SLOW LIVING GUIDE TO SELF- DEVELOPMENT (PART 11)

PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT AINA MASOOD

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OVER THE LAST ten months, I have shared ways of creating a healthy self-image and focusing on ourselves. One of the motives for doing this was to bring focus as a community to our inner world and away from the demands of the external world. I remember mentioning multiple times that it is a long and slow process. I believe it is essential to get these reminders because we often forget this simple yet powerful fact and end up in a vicious spiral of self-doubt and negative thinking. Mental well-being is defined as a combination of how we feel and how we function. These involve the state of our physical bodies and our minds which are in communication on deeper levels than we can fathom. We rely on the optimal functioning of our bodies and minds to be fully functioning individuals in society. Therefore, you will find different chapters in the self-development guide that focus on how to look after our emotional, mental, and physical health. Some of the topics covered talk about: SOME OF THE TOPICS COVERED TALK ABOUT: #1 Self-compassion #2 Self-discovery #3 Identifying your core values #4 How to take care of your body? #5 Investing in yourself #6 Building and maintaining habits #7 Learning to name our emotions I want to add one more thing to these topics before we wrap it up. That one thing is the importance of slowness and stillness in our lives. The COVID pandemic forced us to slow down and reflect in a world obsessed with speed. I believe it is a beautiful concept I would like to stay with for a long time. Research suggests that we get more pleasure and health from our foods if they are cooked and consumed at a reasonable pace. Slowness and the art of stillness help us notice and appreciate the little things in the world, and it is one of the essential ingredients to living a whole life and getting to know yourself better. Many great western and eastern philosophers have discussed the importance and dilemma of slowing down. For example, Milan Kundera wrote in 1996, “When things happen too fast, nobody can be certain about anything, anything at all, not even himself.” And the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard highlighted the sad reality of the world in this quote, “Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it.”

"MOST MEN PURSUE PLEASURE WITH SUCH BREATHLESS HASTE THAT THEY HURRY PAST IT."

AINA MASOOD PSYCHOTHERAPIST

HOW CAN YOU PRACTICE THE ART OF STILLNESS AND SLOWING DOWN? #1 Start slowly: humans are plagued with rushing anything

#2

#3

#4

#5

and everything they can, so the first thing to remember here is that you can not just bring your life to a halt and feel successful in your quest to slowness. So it would help if you started with small things. Sit with yourself for 1 minute per day. Do absolutely nothing. Observe what happens in your body, where your mind flows, and what urgency feels like. Eat your meals slowly. Set aside time to enjoy the flavour, texture, and joy that your food brings into your life. Savour it. Set aside time every week to practice silence. This could look like removing all sounds from your environment for a mere 5 minutes or sitting comfortably, closing your eyes, and taking deep breaths for 15 minutes. You decide how long you want to do it; I am only sharing examples. Try to talk about Mental Health Walks where you stroll and engage all five of your senses.

Conclusively, remember that the practices mentioned here are only to help you start the process of bringing slowness and stillness into your life. You can continue with these by increasing the time or trying something different. As we move into the winter months, the universe demands us to slow down; maybe, we can listen to it this year and start our practice of experimenting with slowness. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about deepening your practice of slowness. THE-INTL

Aina is the founder and C.E.O. of R.A.I.N. (Recognise, Accept, Investigate, Nurture). This company helps universities and companies take care of the mental health of their colleagues and employees. Aina has completed her master’s in clinical psychology in Pakistan. She has lived in the U.S.A. for six months and has been in Denmark since 2019. Passionate about mental health and destigmatising mental health problems, she is working towards helping individuals and organisations be healthier, happier, and more productive. She accomplishes this by working with international clients via Skype, conducting workshops/webinars with various organisations, and researching and writing. In addition, she is a professional photographer who uses her pictures to reflect on her daily life and share them on her blog. A psychologist, writer, speaker, mental health advocate, photographer, explorer, volunteer, and wife, Aina is making her way through the world and narrating her life story. https://www.linkedin.com/ in/ainamasood/ https://www.instagram. com/ayena_reflections/

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GETTING READY FOR A LONG WINTER PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT OPHELIA WU

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FALLING LEAVES, CRISPY

wind and shorter days are all so romantic, but it’s also a reminder of winter slowly creeping in. So as you admire the beautiful green leaves turning red and golden, you might as well mentally prepare for another long winter. For someone coming from Asia, despite having lived in Europe for over 15 years, when the genetics don’t agree with the weather, there really is nothing one can do. Also, winter depression is real. There’s no one-size-fits-all solution to how to survive or thrive during winter it doesn’t matter how much you love or hate it - at some point, it is just too cold to manage. But some suggestions could help a little, just making life a little easier to navigate.

OPHELIA WU FASHION CONSULTANT & JOURNALIST

#1 MENTALLY ACCEPT AND PREPARE This sounds stupid, but the first thing to everything in life, I would argue, is acceptance. There is no point fighting against it and counteract it, especially nature - what can you do? Accepting and mentally preparing for it gives a placebo effect and some sense of knowing what’s coming along.

#2 TIME FOR A HOBBY As expats, one of the biggest frustrations for some is meeting new people and creating a social circle. Signing up for something now can build a routine, make new friends, and gives you something to look forward to regularly. When you’ve made acquaintances and met new people in these places, it is more motivating for you to leave home in the cold weather and go to classes. In that way, it keeps your lifestyle moving and exciting. We all know that feeling of reluctance to leave home when it’s -20C outside.

#3 EXERCISE AND KEEP MOVING The many benefits of regular exercise have been researched and documented. Keeping the body moving throughout winter benefits you physically, mentally, and emotionally. For those who bike, that daily dosage of exercise wakes up the body and blood circulation; for those

who don’t, it kick-starts the flow of energy in the body. Not only does it removes that stagnation, but it is also meditative when you exercise, clearing thoughts in your head and boosting your mood. If you struggle to fit it into your routine or get started, find something you enjoy doing or have always wanted to try.

#4 MAINTAIN HEALTHY EATING Nourishing your body with proper food is so underrated. When you feel your body is looked after, it gives you a sense of security that you know your body is in balance. Eating properly doesn’t always mean organic - it could be seasonal. Eat fresh seasonal fruits and vegetables, reduce alcohol intake etc… Whatever your body needs, it will tell you.

"THERE’S NO ONE-SIZE-FITS-ALL S O LU T I O N TO H OW TO S U RV I V E OR THRIVE DURING WINTER. IT DOESN’T MATTER HOW MUCH YOU LOVE OR HATE IT - AT SOME POINT, IT IS JUST TOO COLD TO MANAGE."

#6 PLAN A LITTLE HOLIDAY Getting away to a warm destination could be a great quick-fix solution. We are all different, so whatever works for you to make the winter season more manageable is your best solution. I believe being prepared will set a good mood while enjoying the hyggeligt season, in and outdoors, and of course, don’t forget those candles! THE-INTL

L i ke he r hometow n Hong Kong, Ophelia has a diverse background and upbringing. She moved to Copenhagen in 2019 after 10 years of living in London. Her fashion and journalism career began in 2007 at ELLE Hong Kong magazine, and later on as an online stylist at Net-A-Porter.com in the UK; she has worked with all sorts of creatives, brands and celebrities globally. She now works on everything fashion and communicationrelated. With her love of travelling and places her work brought her to, people she met from all walks of life inspired her to start her own business M for Minimal: a place to raise the awareness of going back to basics through conscious consumption and mindfulness with a touch of spirituality - something she has been practising since her teenage years.

#5 SOAK IN VITAMIN D As the days get shorter, soak in as much Vitamin D as possible. Whenever there’s sun, go for a walk, and be in the sunlight as much as possible. If a natural light lamp helps, get one.

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

@mforminimal.com @mforminimal.mfm @opheliawu


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HOW TO START A BUSINESS IN DENMARK GUIDING YOU THROUGH THE PROCESS WITH ADVICE FROM THE DANISH BUSINESS AUTHORITY.

PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH

TEXT MARIANO ANTHONY DAVIES

T

THE DANISH BUSINESS Authority (DBA) seeks to create the best conditions for growth companies in Europe, focusing on making it easy and attractive to run a business in Denmark. IS REGISTRATION MANDATORY? Yes, it is mandatory for companies, associations and organisations who must register to gain a CVR number (VAT or business registration number) to have a Digital Post mailbox for receiving letters from public authorities. The mailbox is free and can be set up online. Registered organisations receive important messages regarding sickness benefits, criminal records, MOT tests and financial statements in a digital mailbox. The digital mailbox will have the same status as a regular mailbox. This means that a company must check and read any new digital messages. Once a company has set up a digital mailbox, it can choose how a digital message should be processed. For example, a company can specify an e-mail address or a mobile number and receive a notification when a new message has been sent. A company will need access to the Danish NemID system to set up the digital mailbox to participate.

ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS IN DENMARK If you are a self-employed person or a business in another EU or EEA country and wish to provide services by establishing a business in Denmark, DBA has a straightforward online guide where you can read the rules. First of all, you must register your company at the DBA. After that, you can register various company and association types. Once you have chosen a company type, you can register using the self-service online form provided by DBA. The solution requires that you have a Danish social security number (CPR) and Danish eID 'NemID' access or a foreign eID, which is approved in accordance with eIDAS. Seeking help from a law firm to complete the process is advised. You must also submit the application for VAT registration in Denmark at the latest 8 days before you start doing business in Denmark. If you do not submit the application in time or not at all, or the information that you have provided is not cor-

MARIANO ANTHONY DAVIES PRESIDENT & CEO OXFORD BUSINESS SERVICES APS Mariano has over 40 years global experience as a bus ness executive. He spent ten years with KPMG, so far thirty "IF YOU ARE A SELF-EMPLOYED PERSON OR A BUSINESS IN ANOTHER EU OR EEA COUNTRY AND WISH TO PROVIDE SERVICES BY ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS IN DENMARK, DBA HAS A STRAIGHTFORWARD ONLINE GUIDE WHERE YOU CAN READ THE RULES." rect or insufficient, you may be sanctioned with a fine. Furthermore, if your company already has or intends to have employees, it is your responsibility to withhold Danish tax and labour market contributions from the wages you pay to your employees for the work they carry out in Denmark.

TEMPORARY BUSINESS IN DENMARK If you intend to work on a short-term basis in Denmark, you must follow specific Danish rules. If you are a self-employed person or have a business in another EU or EEA country and wish to carry out temporary work in Denmark on a short-term basis, you can do so without establishing a business in Denmark. Whether your business activity can be considered "short term" will depend on the nature and duration of the work in Denmark. As a rule, all services carried out in Denmark must be registered in the RUT (The Register of Foreign Service Providers). Workers posted in Denmark for a period longer than 3 months must apply for an EU residence document at the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI) after arriving in Denmark

years with British Chambers of Commerce (while also running Oxford Business Services ApS). He is a British citizen,

and no later than 3 months after entering Denmark. Additional rules may apply to workers who are citizens of a country outside the EU, the EEA or Switzerland. As a foreign company in Denmark, you will have to follow Danish rules on the working environment in the workplace. The Danish Working Environment Authority (WEA) is responsible for inspecting the working environment in Denmark. If your company has employees that carry out work for your company in Denmark, you may be obliged to pay social security contributions to the Danish State in accordance with Danish law. Your employees will be subject to Danish Social Security Law if it is not otherwise stated in EC regulation 883/2004 on the coordination of social security schemes or in conventions on social security Denmark has signed. DBA's Services Contact Point is a public service providing information to service providers from other EU and EEA countries on Denmark's relevant rules and registrations. It is only relevant if you are already established in another EU or EEA country as a business or self-employed person. THE-INTL

who grew up in Kent, went to boarding school in Sussex and has a British university education. He has been married to a Dane for over 45 years and has held over 150 official anti-Brexit speeches since 2016. He both speaks and writes Danish without difficulty. oxford-business.com

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM


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#STAND WITH UKRAINE #PEACE FOR UKRAINE

NOVEMBER 2022 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM