The International - January 2023

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JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM the international ISSN 2596-5220 EXPERIENCING LIFE TO THE FULLEST! LEARN THE ART OF REINVENTING YOURSELF FROM BRUNO. ENERGY SECTOR CHALLENGES CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES OH, HELLO, RESOL-ACTIONS! HOW TO WIN AT LINKEDIN JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

FIVE ATTAINABLE NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS!

IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR WHEN EVERY AD, SOCIAL MEDIA POST, OR WELL-MEANING LOVED ONE QUICKLY REMINDS YOU THAT YOU NEED A FRESH DO-OVER. OF COURSE, SELF-IMPROVEMENT IS DIFFICULT ANY TIME OF YEAR, BUT YOU MAY FEEL EXTRA PRESSURE TO EMBARK ON A LIFE CHANGE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE NEW YEAR.

NNEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS get a bad rap for being unattainable. It’s been proven repeatedly that people don’t usually stick to resolutions and fall off the wagon in the first month. However, the process you take to reach the goal holds more weight than simply choosing to change.

1. MAKE MEANINGFUL RESOLUTIONS

Sticking to a resolution is far easier when it aligns with your priorities. What matters to you most in life? In what ways can your attempts at self-improvement help serve those values? For example, if having quiet time during your day is essential to you. Still, you get frustrated whenever you attempt to meditate - perhaps reading a book before bed is a more achievable intention.

Context is crucial to your plans and engaging in daily, context-specific behaviours that create a habit. If you’re mapping out how to achieve a resolution, such as improving fitness, think about how this goal fits your pre-existing routines. Maybe you throw on workout clothes right after making your bed and before brushing your teeth, and then you go for a 10-minute walk.

For people with already limited time, adding more items to your to-do list can deter self-improvement – so be realistic with your time.

2. MINI-RESOLUTION GOALS

New Year’s resolutions tend to fall under behavioural goals, where someone commits to doing something different. Jumping into a massive life change isn’t sustainable for most people, and far-reaching milestones can feel overwhelming and demanding. People often ditch their goals if they’re too easy or far too tricky, so breaking down your resolutions into more achievable targets helps people stick to them. For example, if you’re resolving to eat healthier, a first mini-goal would be to buy more fruits and vegetables. Second, try not to let these foods go bad. Next, prepare and consume those fruits and veggies three days a week and build up from there.

3. MAKE GOALS FUN

Sometimes reaching our goals feels uncomfortable and unpleasant, like those first few times at the gym or when your new hobby gets boring. When these annoying and painful moments rear their heads, people are unlikely to persist with the change. However, making these tasks or sensations more enjoyable and rewarding helps you stick with them. If you’ve vowed to read more, treat yourself to a café latte when you’re about to pick up a book. Or save your favourite podcast to enjoy while you’re on your selfimposed daily walk. Combining temptation with a chore makes it pleasurable, and you start looking forward to it instead of dreading it.

Enlist a friend with similar goals to share tips and solidarity — and make it a social event. Especially if your goal is to drink less, enlisting a friend is a means of catching up, checking off a few items on your to-do list, and socialising without the pressures of alcohol. Having a backand-forth coaching situation with someone else striving in a similar direction can be helpful.

4. IT’S OK TO SLIP UP

Inevitably, there will come a day when you break your knitting streak or need to spend money on an unexpected expense and miss your financial goal. Life happens! If

you begin to see mistakes as an opportunity for growth as opposed to failure is better positioned to move forward.

When deciding how much time you’d like to dedicate to a new hobby, incorporate a “get out of jail free” card. If you told yourself you’d practice the guitar seven days a week with three “get out of jail free” cards, you’d still meet your goal if you picked up the instrument four days a week. People are more likely to persist with their goals with these “emergency reserve” days integrated into their plans because built-in forgiveness is inherently more attainable.

5. SOMETHING NEW EACH MONTH

Who says your resolution has to be sticking to just one thing? Instead, shake things up by setting a goal to try something new and different each month. If you're a foodie, consider trying a new restaurant, recipe, or ingredient. Whatever goal you pick, start small and work up to signing up for that pottery or yoga class. Get creative, and don't forget to get your friends and family involved—they might help keep you accountable!

Aiming for self-improvement is never a bad idea, and despite the cliché of New Year’s resolutions, you shouldn’t feel deterred from wanting to better yourself. Just be clear with your intentions, set a plan with mini-goals, and don’t let setbacks steer you off the beaten path.

To end, I wish you all a happy 2023, and may all your hopes and dreams come true for you and your family.

It's not only the start of the New Year – but also The International's 5th birthday! Thank you to the team and readers for supporting us through the ups and downs of the past five years.

MEET THE TEAM

EDITOR & FOUNDER

Lyndsay Jensen - lyndsay@the-intl.com

MANAGING DIRECTOR & PARTNER

Kenneth Macalpine - kenneth@the-intl.com

CONSULTING EDITOR

Conrad Egbert

GRAPHIC DESIGN

The International

WRITERS TEAM

Ophelia Wu; Vanessa C Petersen; Alexandra Beck; Mariano Davies; Monika Pedersen; Sara R. Newell; Michaela Medvedova; Shani Bishop; Natasha Liviero; Heather Storgaard; Lasse Frimand Jensen; Jane Elgård Petersen; Antesa Jensen; Luke Hannon

Events

Lyndsay Jensen - lyndsay@the-intl.com

COVER PICTURE

Terumi Mascarenhas - www.fjordfoto.dk

SOCIAL MEDIA TEAM

Head of SoMe

Shivangi Singh - shivangi@the-intl.com

SoMe Ambassadors

Neelam Gahlaut; Michaela Medvedova; Aina Masood; Ane-Sophie Custura; Terumi Mascarenhas; Leslie Noygues; Shelly Pandey; Shivangi Singh; Ritika Jain; Pavlos Tsiakoumis; Sakib Akhter; Rashmi Jadhav; Gemma La Rocca; Isabel Pereira Lima

SALES sales@the-intl.com

The International is published online 12 times a year. This issue was published on 9 January, 2023.

Notice: The publishers regret that they cannot accept any liability for error or omissions contained in this publication. The opinions and views presented need not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek special counsel before acting on any information contained herein. All rights reserved. No part of this publication or contents thereof may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form without written permission from the publishers. Published by and © 2021 The International ApS. Registered in Denmark / CVR Number: 39118181

2 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM

VISIT COPENHAGENROLANDS VARSBERGS & DANNY SAMAROV

JANUARY EVENTS AROUND DENMARK

LYNDSAY JENSEN EVENTS COORDINATOR lyndsay@the-intl.com

ZEALAND VISIT FYN FB PAGE

FOLKEKIRKENFORINTERNATIONALS

8 JANUARY

SUNDAY SERVICE

Today we remember the three wise men who ventured on a long journey far away to find someone extraordinary. Before we go home, we will enjoy a piece of Galette de Rois and mark our church with blessed chalk, praying to be a welcoming community in 2023.

FB & Insta: folkekirkenforinternationals TikTok: @ffinternationals Find us at: Vesterbrogade 49, 1620 Copenhagen V

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://KOBENHAVNSSTIFT.DK/ FOLKEKIRKEN-FOR-INTERNATIONALS

UNSPLASH UNSPLASH UNSPLASH UNSPLASH BLABLA LANGUAGE EXCHANGEDENMARK COPENHAGEN

12 JANUARY

Let's meet new people, make friends and share languages.

ATTENTION: We do not systematically organise language groups depending on the city. Our events are focused on international meetups.

The best way to understand how we work is to check our Youtube channel (link below) or to participate in an event.

https://www.youtube.com/c/BlaBlaExchange/videos

You must buy at least one drink if the event happens in a private place (bar, café, restaurant, hostel, etc.)

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/4JVSDMU8N

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JUTLAND
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13 JANUARY

IMMART DINNER - FROM ENCOUNTERS TO FRIENDSHIPS

There is much talk in the corporate world about the increasing need people have to form friendships at work and how this can increase productivity. However, artists often work alone, and forming friendships with "work" peers can be challenging when arriving in a new country. Also, did you know: "While past studies have suggested that there is a link between creativity and fame, Ingram and Banerjee found, in contrast, that there was no such correlation for these artists. Rather, artists with a large and diverse network of contacts were most likely to be famous, regardless of how creative their art was. Specifically, an artist's greatest predictor of fame was having a network of contacts from various countries. Ingram believes this indicates that the artist was cosmopolitan and could reach different markets or develop ideas inspired by foreign cultures."

Extract from: https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-artists-famous-friends-originality-work

Feel like talking more about these subjects? Then join us for the first IMMART Dinner of the year! Julie Smith Belton is inviting members of the IMMART Network to her home in Roskilde for a meal and conversations about how we move from experiencing multiple encounters to establishing solid friendships.

BONUS: IMMART Network member Chris Rini is exhibiting his work at Kunstsmedjen at Musicon in Roskilde.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/3E4K6KWB9

13-15 JANUARY HANDICRAFT FAIR

For three creative and inspiring days, you can experience and try out the latest trends and products in needlework. You will find a lot of creative fair stands and many people who are also passionate about needlework.

You can also participate in exciting workshops, lectures and competitions.

Opening hours:

Friday 10:00-17:00

Saturday 10:00-17:00 Sunday 10:00-16:00

Read more at www.aohmesse.dk

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2DTTF3LQM

15 JANUARY

SVENDBORG'S BIGGEST FLEA MARKET

It's time to open the doors again to the famous flea market in Midtbyhallen.

Packed with stallholders and the highest quality of items on sale - everything your heart desires.

There are always many visitors - entrance only costs 30 DKK, and children are free. A great family activity for all. Toast, cooldrink, cake and other goodies are also sold in the hall.

If you'd like a table to sell your products, it only costs 150 DKK and 250 DKK for two tables. Remember to book your table, as it always sells out quickly.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2MSAFCCVP

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19 JANUARY TOUR OF THE BOTANICAL GARDEN

Experience the Botanical Gardens on a guided tour of Denmark's largest collection of rare plants worldwide.

On tour, we go outdoors to the romantic garden, inside the greenhouses and the famous Victorian Palm House from 1874. The route passes several of the garden's highlights and is adjusted according to the season and the day's weather.

The theme of the tour follows the changing seasons in the garden. We focus on a holiday or special event in the world of plants.

As a unique feature, the tour goes through the garden's conservation greenhouses with Seidenfaden's famous orchids and other rare plant collections that are generally unavailable to the public.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2BCGSO0ZN

21 JANUARY REPAIR CAFÉ AMAGER

Repair Café Amager is open on the third Saturday of the month from 12:00-15:00 in Remiseparkens Nærgenbrugsstation, #Lykkebazaren, Urmagerstien 26, 2300 CPH.

We lobby against the use-and-throw-away culture one repair at a time! So come and have your defective electronics or textiles repaired, which would otherwise be discarded - completely free of charge!

Would you like to volunteer? Feel free to turn up and have a chat with us or send an email to caroline@miljopunktamager.dk

Please be aware: We do not respond to email inquiries regarding repairs.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2YKKBMMB5

21-22 JANUARY

FLEA MARKET

Lots of exciting stalls, both new and old, for all! Pets, home, leisure etc. There are no limits to what our stands can offer!

We have private stallholders who sell various affordable items they no longer need.

So come and visit us, get a bargain, and have a break with a cup of tea/coffee, cake and snacks.

There will also be a stand from the organisers - the sales from this stand will go directly to improvements on the house, so come out and support a good cause.

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/5U8UXJ1P7

A value-driven community that welcomes students ages 4-16.

Rygaards has a strong reputation of a rich educational experience with a nurturing atmosphere where students learn to think for themselves, find their own voice, and engage with the world with confidence and curiosity.

• High academic standards

• Christian ethos

• Beautiful campus, located in Hellerup

• Global community

• NEASC accreditation

• Cambridge Assessment International Education Learn more at rygaards.com

5 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
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21 JANUARY

THE GROOVE EXPERIENCE -

MANIFESTATION

THROUGH MOVEMENT

Join us for a dynamically interactive and creative group dance experience! Nurture your body, mind, heart and soul.

Would you like to welcome 2023 with kind intentions by using creative body movement as a portal to powerful manifestation?

If yes, you are invited to join the next GROOVE Dancefloor experience, where we will focus on getting out of our heads (thinking) and coming home into our bodies (feeling). We will learn not to care about how we look when we dance but how we feel and what emotions need healthy expression and nurturing.

If you have ever tried setting new years resolutions, you know that we can't talk ourselves towards our goals. We need to FEEL safe in our bodies first to MOVE towards more intentional action. And FEELING safe is what we practice at GROOVE class using dance to connect with our soul's deepest desires.

Prepare for some meditative songs combined with energetic and juicy tracks to get the blood flowing!

The programme includes the following: 1. An introduction to the Groove method, principles, and values 2. Warm-up 3. Core dancing 4. Cool down and stillness 5. Closing - Sharing circle and reflections

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/3IBRJU2GV

22 JANUARY JAZZ SERVICE

One of the hallmarks of Folkekirken for Internationals is our Jazz Service in English. These are held regularly, and we are joined by some of Copenhagen's most renowned jazz musicians! Our Jazz Service is also integral to the annual Copenhagen Jazz Festival, both in summer and winter.

FB & Insta: folkekirkenforinternationals TikTok: @ffinternationals Find us at: Vesterbrogade 49, 1620 Copenhagen V

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://KOBENHAVNSSTIFT.DK/ FOLKEKIRKEN-FOR-INTERNATIONALS

27 JANUARY

THE LIVING LIGHT FESTIVAL

Turn off the lights and explore Kulturstrøget's many crevices of glittering experiences for this year's Light Festival in Roskilde.

This year, the Light Festival will feature various exhibits and events powered by renewable energy sources, recycling and candlelight.

On the programme, you will find, among other things, a laser party with the Fire Truck from Dream City, a lighting experience powered by solar-charged batteries by Båll og Brand and, for the little ones, a workshop with visual artist Nanna Starck, where you can make your own fire hat. See the full programme here: http://xn--kulturstrget-3jb. roskilde.dk/.../lysfest/program/

FOR MORE INFO: HTTPS://FB.ME/E/2BNAYLEEU

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HERNING

ART

27 JANUARY

ART HERNING 2023

Art Herning is celebrating its 25th anniversary!

Denmark's leading art fair opens its doors for the 25th time from 27-29 January 2023.

The fair takes place in: MCH Herning Kongrescenter.

Østergade 37 7400 Herning

Meet some of Denmark's leading galleries, which bring hundreds of works from international, nationally known and new talented artists. The range in the works is extensive - both in terms of the price range, genre and expression.

Art Herning is organised in collaboration with Danish Galleries.

Read more about Art Herning here: www.artherning.dk

FLEA MARKET

Join us for Køge's largest stalls and flea market in Køge Hallerne.

Experience vendors from all over the country - 180 stands! Wonderful market atmosphere and much more.

Opening hours: Saturday 10:00-16:00 Sunday 10:00-15:00

Address: Stadium 2B, 4600 Køge

Payment options:

1. Some vendors/exhibitors accept MobilePay, but not all.

2. You can withdraw money at the entrance using a Dankort but not a master card.

3. The entrance where you can pay in cash or use Dankort and Mobilepay.

Entrance: Entrance is 35 DKK for adults, and children under 12 are free when accompanied by an adult.

FYI:

If you want a stand (sales are going fast, so don't wait too long).

You can book a stand for one or both days. The stands can be ordered on our website: https://jharrangementer.dk/bliv-udstiller/koege.aspx - or you are welcome to call us at 27281708.

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KØGEHALLERNE FB PAGE ART HERNING FB PAGE KØGEHALLERNE FB PAGE ART ESCAPE STUDIOS & CAFÉ FB PAGE HERNING ART HERNING FB PAGE KØGE COPENHAGEN ART ESCAPE STUDIOS & CAFÉ FB PAGE

RECYCLED CANVASPOP-UP PAINTING NIGHTS!

Come and play with textures, acrylics, palette knife techniques and more and repurpose an old canvas (painting)give it new life and a new home.

You can illustrate on top of an existing image, paint it over and start again, build texture with paste, make a collage, or just enjoy the process of abstract creation.

All materials are included.

Come ready to get creative, recycle and give NEW meaning to an old artwork.

As usual, the first drink of the evening is on the house!

Book your seat here: http://bit.ly/3UC4H3l

Note: this is not a guided event. But don't worry – our artists will get you started!

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31 JANUARY
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28-29 JANUARY
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SSWITCHING YOUR CAREER, switching the country you live in - all that can be scary. But Bruno Freitas Brandão shows that with the right mindset, nothing can stop you. Having followed his passions and then his husband, Bruno’s extensive travelling has led him to Denmark, where he’s been exploring all the opportunities the country has to offer.

FROM SÃO PAULO TO THE WORLD

Born in São Paulo, Brazil, Bruno could hardly be further away from home. And not just geographically. “It’s very different. Brazil is a big country, and parts of it differ very much. São Paulo is a huge city, so I was raised in this concrete jungle. Thankfully, my family has a farm, so we were always connected with nature.”

Bruno’s fascination with nature - specifically the ocean, as Brazil has a vast coastline - left a significant mark on his life. He pursued oceanography at university with an aptitude for science and a natural curiosity about nature.

His growing up influenced his life in different ways, too. “I was glad that my family had the money to travel abroad. My parents always tried to travel within Brazil one year and abroad the other year.” So Bruno visited the Amazon forest and the highest waterfall in the world. He has been to many countries in South America, Mexico, and Europe thanks to his Portuguese family from his grandfather’s side. “I could see the world, which helped me live outside my bubble. I have always sought out different cultures. My mother sent me to do an exchange in New Zealand for two months. I was alone, we didn’t have smartphones then, so I couldn’t talk to them.”

Despite an impressive travel resume, Bruno has not yet lost his wanderlust. On his bucket list is most of Africa and more of South Asia. In addition, he wants to learn more about different cultures. “Brazil is a colonised country. We have a lot of European and American influences, but not others. We don’t learn about it. My family always

taught me to have this need to learn things.”

Luckily, his husband shares this love for travelling. “We don’t give gifts at birthdays or anniversaries - we prefer giving experiences. So, for example, I gave him a trip to Disney for our second anniversary because he’d never been.” They also visited Bruno’s favourite place - Japan - together with Bruno’s family. “We did a road trip on the main island, visiting different cities, staying in traditional hotels, and eating traditional food. It was a special trip - my husband and I were already engaged at that point, and we bought our rings there because we love the Japanese culture.”

A BREAK IN THE KITCHEN

With all the travelling and exploration of other countries, one might feel like Bruno misses Brazil. “I miss having my family and friends close. I miss taking care of my nephew and niece. But I don’t miss Brazil and living in São Paulo anymore. It’s a huge city, and there’s the issue of security. It’s nice because you can get anything you want – if you’re looking for a Korean barbecue at three in the morning, you’ll get it! On the other side, it’s stressful to walk around. The commute is two hours with a car, and metros are always fully packed. I don’t think I could adapt anymore.”

The first time Bruno left São Paulo for a longer period was to go to university to study oceanography. And that’s where he met his now-husband - they started dating in his third year of school.

Bruno used to work with marine mammals. Twice, he went to Antarctica, studying and working with elephant seals. But he didn’t have a good relationship with his boss, so he switched his focus to aquaculture and worked with fish farms. That’s when he left for Japan to do his Master’s… at the precise time the tsunami hit Tokyo. The samples he was supposed to be working with were lost, and he ultimately returned to Brazil.

“My dream after that was to open a fish farm in the mountains, but I didn’t have a

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HAVE YOU EVER WANTED TO REINVENT YOURSELF? IN THAT CASE, BRUNO FREITAS BRANDÃO AND HIS STORY ARE A TEXTBOOK PIECE OF INSPIRATION FOR YOU. LIVING OUTSIDE OF YOUR BUBBLE
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good business plan that would work in Brazil. That’s when my mom suggested I take a break, a sabbatical year, to realise what I wanted to work with. She said I’m still young, and if I want to change my career, I should just change my career. So I decided to go to France.”

Bruno’s always wanted to learn French. His hobby was cooking - he’d always loved seeing his grandmother cooking. So he found a good exchange school to help him learn the language and professionalise his cooking with a gastronomy course.

At the time of his departure to France, Bruno’s now-husband was finishing his Master’s in the south of Brazil. They thought having a long-distance relationship would not work out, so they decided to break up. “I went to France, started studying French, and I was working in the kitchen - I was happy. Then I discovered he was going to Germany for a PhD position. So we met up and restarted our relationship.” When Bruno’s year in France was up, he returned to Brazil while his partner stayed in Germany for four years. But this time, older and more mature, they decided to pursue a long-distance relationship - and this time, they made it.

A DANISH CHANGE

When Bruno returned to Brazil, I tried working in the kitchen, but it was too stressful, so he pivoted again and tried his hand at his late grandfather’s public transportation company. “They started with trainee positions for me, my brother, and my cousins in case we wanted to take over the company someday. I was unhappy and stressed, living in São Paulo – it wasn’t for me.”

On the upside, he was finally living with his partner, who had returned from Germany, and they decided to get married. “We had a wedding at a beach, and our best friend performed the ceremony - it was beautiful.”

They didn’t just start their life together - another significant change was coming. Bruno’s husband was offered a job in Denmark. “He interned in Denmark and fell in love with the country. He told me: let’s move there, let’s move there. So I said: Okay, if you find a position there, we can move because I have double citizenship - I’m also Portuguese.” They chose Roskilde as their city to settle down in because of its proximity to the job and Copenhagen, and they simply love it. While the pair is considering buying a house in the future somewhere on the outskirts of Copenhagen, for now, Roskilde is home.

FINDING YOUR FOOTING

Staying idle isn’t in Bruno’s nature. With a new country came yet another chance to reinvent himself and try his hand at a different project.

This time, it was a bookshop.

“I met a friend in Danish classes, and we really connected. His dream was to have a bookshop. My dream was to have a cafe. So we opened a bookshop cafe focusing on Spanish and Portuguese literature.” They followed the entire process, from creating a business plan and talking to business owners with similar ventures to getting funding - and opening Cervantes Boghandel.

The first few months brought in crowds, but it was challenging to keep that up. “People look for Spanish books, but not enough to have a physical shop. And a lot of people read on tablets. We would probably have to focus more on the coffee, but that wasn’t our thing. We were spending our hours in the shop, not taking any salaries because the business was breaking even. So we decided to close at the end of October 2022 and continue online.” Bruno is still very grateful for this experience and learned a lot.

And just as they started talking about closing the shop, a Brazilian cafe opened up, and they were looking for chefs - enter Bruno!

“I started a few months ago. It’s so nice. It’s very slow food, so it’s not as stressful as other restaurants. And the owners are taking my food suggestions and creating new menus. So I really enjoy it.”

Copenhagen is becoming a famous food scene full of exciting restaurants offering international food. “If you’re European, opening a new business in Denmark is very easy. I think this also helps bring these different cultures into the gastronomy of Copenhagen.” In Bruno’s experience, Danes are also very open-minded and want to try new things. “Even with our bookshop - they couldn’t speak Spanish or Portuguese, but they were curious and came in. Of course, they wouldn’t eat, for example, Chinese food every day, but they will try new things.”

And a chef’s opinion on Danish cuisine? “I learned to like some things. For example, I enjoy flæskesteg because it is similar to Brazilian food. Some foods are interesting here - they pickle everything. I understand this was to make the food last longer, but it’s not the best for me,” laughs Bruno.

RESPECT FOR THE LANGUAGE

Pickled food was not the most significant cultural shock by far.

Moving to Denmark from a characteristically sunny Brazil during winter was challenging, and Bruno missed the sun. But this was offset by how organised Denmark is and how much trust there is in society. “It was difficult to understand how everything works in the beginning. I had to learn it all from the basics again. But we are adaptable, my husband and I, and now we enjoy the country.”

But Brazilians are much more open, touchy, and huggers. “My husband was already living in Germany for years, so it was a better adjustment for him. He always says that Danes are much more open than Germans. It’s effortless to become best friends with

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"STAYING IDLE ISN’T IN BRUNO’S NATURE. WITH A NEW COUNTRY CAME YET ANOTHER CHANCE TO REINVENT HIMSELF AND TRY HIS HAND AT A DIFFERENT PROJECT."

someone in Brazil. Here, you must take the time to get to know the person. But I soon learned that when you become friends with a Dane, you really have a friend for life.”

Having a physical bookshop helped him interact with more Danes - and learn Danish much better than in class. “I’m not a fan of the language school system – I felt they focused on you passing the module tests and exams. I didn’t feel the focus was on you actually learning the language. So, in the bookshop, when a customer arrived speaking Danish, I would answer in my broken Danish - in the end, I felt I learned more.”

Bruno’s no stranger to learning languages quickly. He learned Spanish and English, could speak French after two or three months and even started learning Japanese. However, Danish has proven to be a more significant challenge. “It’s not perfect - I’m still missing a lot of vocabulary. It’s a difficult languagenot grammatically; I think it’s even easier than English, but the problem is the phonetics. In the Nordic countries, it’s much easier for them to switch to English.” That was completely different in France, where people did not speak English to Bruno - so learning French was accelerated.

“But I think it’s a thing of respect. We chose to live in Denmark, so it’s basic respect to know the language, and when you learn a country’s language, you learn about the culture behind it.”

THE NEXT ADVENTURE

Even if Bruno and his husband ever move, it would be to a country similar to Denmark, not back to Brazil. “We also see how Danes raise their kids. It’s amazing, and the kids can sleep outside in a pram, and nothing happens! In Brazil, we’d lose the baby and all parental rights.”

They were talking about maybe adopting a child, and here would be one of the best places to raise a family.

“I’ve had a really amazing life and have experienced a lot. I’m happy here, ready to settle down, have a family, and just focus on that.” Maybe that will be their next adventure. THE-INTL

11 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
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HOW TO WIN AT LINKEDIN:

5 TIPS TO PERFECT YOUR LINKEDIN PROFILE

IIT'S NOT WHO you know that matters - it's who knows you.

It's no secret that recruiters love Linkedin. In fact, 59% of companies in Denmark use Linkedin as their primary source of finding candidates. After eight years in recruitment, I've seen thousands of Linkedin profiles. Here's how to make yours stand out!

TIP #1 - BE PICTURE PERFECT

Your profile picture is the first thing a recruiter sees, even before they go on your profile. Years ago, I had a serious discussion with a Hiring Manager about whether to invite someone to an interview. The problem? Their Linkedin page showed the candidate in a karate gi wielding nunchucks!

Like it or not, appearances matter. Make your profile picture friendly, welcoming and professional. A headshot of you smiling is enough. No group photos. There will be plenty of opportunities to show your personality at the interview, but for now, it's best to play it safe. You've got one shot to make a first impression –so make it a good one!

TIP #2 - HOOK THEM WITH YOUR HEADLINE

Your headline is your personal ad to Linkedin's 850 million users. An awesome headline is the best way to grab a recruiter's attention. You have 220 characters to introduce yourself. Make them count. There's a simple formula you can use to create your own headline:

Job title + skills + unique selling point + relevant keywords + call to action = Your kickass headline.

Here is a straightforward example below: Senior Software Engineer I Team Lead I Java, Python, JavaScript I SCRUM Master I Contact For Contract Positions

This headline is great because it concisely shows a recruiter:  Their job experience (Software Engineer and Team Lead)  Their skills (Java, Python, JavaScript), a USP (SCRUM Master)  A call to action (Contact me for contract positions).

It gives the recruiter everything they need to decide if they should contact this person for their job.

Recruiters on Linkedin use keyword searches to find candidates for their jobs. Including these keywords in your headline will increase your chances of a higher ranking in your profile. Hook them with the headline, and reel them in with your experience!

TIP #3

- ARE YOU EXPERIENCED?

You've hooked the recruiter, and they're looking at your profile! Congrats! Now you need to reel them in! It's time to show the recruiter how YOU, with YOUR skills and experience, are the right person for the job. Many people claim that Linkedin profiles have

replaced the CV. I disagree, but the same rules apply. Treat this section like your CV. Set out your experience clearly and concisely. Use the most common keywords to increase the chance of appearing high in searches. Most importantly, highlight the impact of your work. No, you weren't "responsible for marketing". Instead, you "managed Facebook and Google Ads campaigns for your company, overseeing an annual budget of $2m". Show your impact, and you'll give the recruiter no choice but to get in touch!

TIP #4

- SKILLS PAY THE BILLS!

So why not show off your skills section? At the bottom of your profile, you can self-select up to 50 skills to show what you can do. Make sure to use the skills you want to represent yourself first. If you're a marketer, select marketing as your first skill. Next, get your colleagues to endorse you for these skills - the more endorsements, the better! Remember that recruiters often search for candidates based on their skills, so make the most of the 50! Perfect this section and be the first person the recruiter contacts!

TIP #5

- HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

What better way to show you can do a job well than being recommended? Under the recommendations section, you can ask your connections to recommend you. Had a great relationship with a previous manager? Ask for a recommendation! Did fantastic work on a client project? Ask the client if they'd be kind enough to give you a recommendation! An excellent recommendation could be the difference between being hired or not! That's it! My five tips to perfect your Linkedin profile! Applying these tips will hugely improve your chances of finding the job you've always dreamed of. Stay tuned for next month! THE-INTL

PARTNER

Luke is a Senior Talent Acquisition Partner at SYBO Games, the company behind the smash-hit game Subway Surfers. Based in Copenhagen (by way of London)!, he has been working to make SYBO grow. He spends his time finding the best talent that the games community has to offer!

He is always keen to build relationships by bringing passion and enthusiasm to the recruitment process. An advocate of Employer Branding, Luke works with the talented people at SYBO to let the world know how great a place it is to work.

When he's not hiring awesome talents for SYBO or cycling (he does live in Copenhagen, after all!), he's busy reading his favourite books and channelling his inner Hemingway as a writer!

@Luke Hannon

@ Hannon Recruits

@ hannonrecruits

12 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
“An awesome headline is the best way to grab a recruiter's attention. You have 220 characters to introduce yourself. Make them count.”
TALENT ACQUISITION PROFESSIONAL LUKE HANNON SHARES RELEVANT TIPS AND HINTS IN YOUR CAREER SEARCH. PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH TEXT LUKE HANNON

CAUTION TO THE WIND -

II WISH I could tell you that I bounced back quickly.

I wish I could tell you that Danish pragmatism swiftly wore off on me and seeped in through my skin and smoothed it all out and that I immediately overcame the wind (not the thing) and got a glimpse of what was going on underneath the hood (where the real thing was).

I didn’t. It didn’t.

I eventually felt so defeated by the weather (and the cyclists with rush hour bike rage that I always seemed to encounter and piss off no matter how hard I tried to follow the rules) that I started taking the S-Tog and Metro to work every day. Even though it took me longer. Even though it was more expensive.

I did it to preserve what remained of my pride (and my wardrobe). I did it to avoid being constantly triggered by an element no one else seemed to mind but which was making me feel crazy.

Here’s something important I learned during those years: when you know what you need is compassion, pragmatism feels dismissive. When you don’t know you need compassion, pragmatism feels invalidating.

Why does it work like that? I don’t know, but that’s how most people experience it, even if they can’t really articulate it that way. And that’s how I experienced it.

I wish I could tell you that I didn’t spend years generally feeling invalidated for who I was here, but I’d be lying. Because I didn’t know I needed compassion, and because I had never really been on the receiving end of the sort of compassion I needed, I just kept trying to stubbornly steamroll my feelings with pragmatism, and letting everyone else do it, too. It felt like trying to jam a square peg into a round hole at every opportunity: frustrating!

No one would’ve ever known though, because I was incredibly skilful at appearing as though all was well when all was very much so not.

I came here to live out my Hans Chris-

tian Andersen fairytale and become the self-proclaimed Queen of The Hygge — to live amongst and be with, The Happiest People in the World — and so help me, come wind and come rain, that was what I was going to get, and I was willing to fake it ‘til I made it.

Attempting to maintain that facade was quite possibly the most self-destructive thing I could do in those circumstances, but I guess I needed to go there because that’s where I went with it. Maybe if I pretended like my life wasn’t falling apart at the seams, it wouldn’t happen (spoiler alert: it eventually did. See future article: “The hygge can’t save you from an existential crisis”).

The thing about upholding a facade is that there’s a part of you that knows you’re doing it. And here’s a clue: it’s the same part of you that knows how ridiculous it is to feel totally defeated by something as trivial as the wind.

That part of me knew the earnest, pragmatic Danes were right: something about holding onto these great expectations was holding me back.

It was that classic both and situation where I was clear I had an unmet need and

I was also clear that the pathway to meeting that unmet need was to stop expecting it to be met by some source outside of myself. Even and especially in a social welfare state where the literal design of the society is that an outside source is going to meet all of your needs.

I needed to learn how to have compassion for myself.

THIS. Was the ultimate life conundrum.

And until I figured that out, I had to stick around. After all, more than anywhere else in the world, this society, and this social welfare state, were the most likely contenders for setting me up for success precisely because of the same reasons Denmark is consistently named the Happiest Place on Earth. Because when a society’s needs are met to the extent that the people as a whole feel physically comfortable and secure, there is energetic surplus to explore emotional and spiritual security (which is where compassion lives). Denmark is the perfect incubator.

Even though it would be years before I had the words to articulate any of this, I chose to throw caution to the wind, and lean in. THE-INTL

American Antesa lives in Copenhagen. In her professional capacity, she works as a coach and teacher with individuals and companies and facilitates the deconstruction, demystification, and disarming of the emotional landscape. As a writer and speaker, Antesa's demonstrable depth in communication mastery pierces through complexity to get straight to the heart of things.

Her book, Caught Shining — a memoir in prose, a user's guide for how to live fully in experience — will be published in 2023.

13 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
PART 3
A COLUMN DEVOTED TO DECONSTRUCTING AND DEMYSTIFYING IMMIGRATION AND INTEGRATION IN DENMARK, ONE DISRUPTIVELY UNCOMFORTABLE AND EMBARRASSINGLY TRIVIAL EMOTIONAL MELTDOWN AT A TIME.
THROWING
PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH TEXT ANTESA JENSEN ANTESA JENSEN EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EXPERT, AUTHOR & SPEAKER
@antesa @antesa @antesajensen @antesa @antesajensen.com "I CAME HERE TO LIVE OUT MY HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN FAIRYTALE AND BECOME THE SELF-PROCLAIMED QUEEN OF THE HYGGE”

OH, HELLO, RESOL-ACTIONS!

NOW THAT THE NEW YEAR HAS HIT, YOU MOST LIKELY HAVE HAD TIME TO LAY OUT YOUR LIST OF RESOLUTIONS FOR 2023. OUR FITNESS GURU, ALEX, LOOKS AT YOUR FITNESS RESOLUTIONS.

FFIRST AND FOREMOST, happy new year, and I hope you have had the hyggliest holidays with your loved ones! But then, I encourage you to take a step back and think about 2022.

Look back, praise all the great moments you have had, and think about a few critical successes that genuinely made a difference in your past year - whether it be career development, personal change, athletic performance, overall fitness or anything that made you particularly proud.

Now think about what drove them to their successful outcome. I am willing to bet that all of them result from your very determined actions! Let's face it, without you having taken specific actions, there would have been little to no chance of achieving the goals you set out to reach.

Sometimes we forget about what it takes to make our resolutions a reality, so this year, why don't we take a step to write down our "resol-actions" instead of our resolutions as a meaningful way to really stick to our goals? But we all know that taking the wheel of action is easier said than done.

Here are a few tips on how to make your goals seem more attainable:

1. KNOW THE LONG-TERM GOAL

Often, we come up with extremely vague New Year's resolutions - I want to lose weight, eat healthier, and improve my career. But what does that actually look like? In five years, what weight do you want to be at? What types of food are you consistently eating? Which position would you like to be in? Knowing this will help you create an actionable plan to achieve it.

2. DEVELOP A HABIT REGISTER

Consider creating a "habit register" with three categories, so you can choose a habit to start each month with. You can start simply: mind, body, and health make great categories, and as you think up habits to consider, just add them to your lists. You'll always have a choice at the beginning of each month, and you'll make progress.

3. WHAT IS HOLDING YOU BACK?

Think about some of the goals you had made in 2022 that were only partially met or not at all, then try to understand what was preventing you from reaching them. Finally, re-evaluate whether those goals are still important to you and if they are, what made you set them aside?

4. DON'T POSTPONE

Start now. No better time than today to work on those goals that have been sitting on the back burner. The time is now. Make it happen. Make this the year that you are ahead of your own game.

Take the resol-actions!

If you have some great health and fitness goals for 2023, it will be essential to have a clear plan in place. Doing so can ensure that your efforts are focused and effective.

An essential aspect of achieving these goals will be to remain consistent. This means following your plan regularly, even when you don't feel like it. For example, it can be helpful to schedule regular exercise sessions or healthy meals into your daily routine so that they become a habit.

In addition to consistency, it will be important to be patient. Achieving your health goals can take time, and you may not see results immediately. It's important to remember that progress is often slow and steady. You can eventually reach your goals by staying patient and sticking with your plan.

One way to stay motivated and on track with your health goals is to surround yourself with supportive people. This can include friends, family, and fun fitness communities who share your goals and can provide encouragement, advice, and accountability, which can be crucial in helping you stay focused and committed to your plan.

It all starts with you. Your mindset and your determination to take action. THE-INTL

Alex is a Swiss/Brit mom and wife who has lived in Copenhagen since 2009. She switched from corporate life in communications to the independent life of an outdoor personal and group fitness trainer. She coaches people of all ages and fitness levels to find fun and consistency in movement through individual and group workouts. Delivering entertainment and spreading group fitness magic is her superpower. Alex encourages you to high-five her if you see her in the capital!

@alexbeck.fit

@alexbeck.fit

@alexbeck.fit

14 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
ALEXANDRA BECK PERSONAL TRAINER & NUTRITION COACH PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH / ALEXANDRA BECK TEXT ALEXANDRA BECK

JUTLAND

ONE-POINT ENTRY FOR EXPATS AND COMPANIES IN NORTH DENMARK

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE NORTH

LLOCATED IN CENTRAL Aalborg, IHND is a one-point entry for companies and international citizens. This means that the house contains a cross-sector collaboration called International Citizens Service, which consists of the Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI), IHND and Citizen Services. An international citizen can make use of this public service typically by making an online booking with SIRI, which among other things, issues EU residence permits.

The citizen can also show up without an appointment with IHND concerning finding a career. After meeting with SIRI, you are referred to an employee from IHND, also known as a floorwalker. The employee's task is to receive the citizen and make an appointment on the same day regarding your CPR, doctor, tax and NemID/MitID at Citizen Services. The employee also informs you about business services, which focuses on helping North Jutland companies with their international workers. This includes settlement in your local area, jobs for spouses/partners, participation in host programmes, guidance on rights and duties in the Danish labour market, entrepreneurial support and leisure and cultural offerings.

Regarding leisure and cultural activities, Northern Denmark has private, public, and volunteer organisations that run social and cultural events for Danish and international residents. One of the unique pillars of IHND is our inclusion of civil society organisations in the house. There is a high diversity of organisations, some are student-focused, and others are expats, which reflects the high level of activity among university students and expats in the region.

UPCOMING EVENTS 2023

The high level of activity among the international community in Denmark is also visible in the planned events during 2023. One of the regular activities connected with IHND is ten planned job searches and LinkedIn seminars. Here you will be introduced to the basics of job searches in Denmark and get an insight into writing a CV and cover letter according to Danish requirements. You will also be introduced to LinkedIn as a platform for job searching and networking in Northern Denmark.

One of the target groups related to job seekers is accompanying spouses and partners, and there will be four events for this group during the year. Accompanying spouses will also have the chance to participate in the Career Day Fair, where other job seekers, graduates and students can meet their potential next employer. With Aalborg University, there will also be a special welcome event for the new international students, where the career programme Young professionals in Denmark will kick off.

If you want to know more about all the opportunities life in Northern Denmark offers, you can participate in the annual Internationals' Fair North Denmark. Here you will meet public authorities, relevant organisations, NGO's and much more helpful information for you as a newcomer and expat living in Northern Denmark.

One of the significant aspects of Northern Denmark is that you have a wide variety of activities for families. One example is Aalborg Zoo, which hosts diversity evenings yearly. Aalborg Municipality's Integration Counsel, Aalborg Zoo and IHND celebrate diversity by inviting all international citizens to a cosy" get together" free-of-charge evening. Many North Danish companies use this event to make a day out with the international employees' families. Still, there will also be three specific company events focussing on the potential of having international staff joining your company and the values they bring.

So 2023 is set to be ready with many international community opportunities, and I hope that many of you will grasp these opportunities! THE-INTL

Team Manager at International House North Denmark. 

City Council member in Aalborg Municipality.  Group chairman for the Social Democratic Party in Aalborg.  Chairman of DANVA and Port of Aalborg. 

Father of three kids and married to Kirstine.  Worked and lived in Africa as an expat.  Takes an active part as a volunteer for the international community.  Believes in international solidarity and wants the international community in Aalborg to be more aware of their rights.

lassefj.dk lassefj.dk lassefj.dk

15 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
DENMARK (IHND) IS A UNIQUE REGIONAL INITIATIVE THAT WORKS TO ATTRACT, WELCOME AND RETAIN THE INTERNATIONAL WORKFORCE. LASSE FRIMAND JENSEN TEAM MANAGER AND CITY COUNCIL MEMBER
PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH TEXT LASSE FRIMAND JENSEN

BODY LANGUAGE KNOW-HOW

Is a friendly hug acceptable in Denmark? Have you had some doubts, especially when you meet a Dane for the first time? Our cultural detective Jane gives us some great insight.

TTHE DANES CAN be much more private and reserved than Southern Europe or South American newcomers. Often, a handshake is the best way to meet a Dane for the first time. Before starting a business meeting, handshakes will always be the most appropriate way to welcome all the participants in a meeting.

Body language, including facial expressions and loudness of voice, gestures, and eye contact, may play an enormous role in the success of a business and social meeting. There are many differences we can discuss. For example, when a Scandinavian smiles, this usually signifies good progress - however, to a Chinese person, it may mean embarrassment. Another custom is frequent bowingthis expresses gratitude or humbleness in Japanese culture. However, it can be seen as ingratiating to Americans and some Danes.

Different cultures have different rules about making eye contact. In some cultures, direct eye contact is viewed as disrespectful if directed at those who demand greater respect due to age or social status. However, in other cultures, direct eye contact signifies trust and reliability. Denmark belongs to this latter group. Therefore, direct eye contact during communication is required. As you might have realised, there is very little hierarchy in Denmark, so no need to show extra deference to anyone, regardless of their social position or age.

Not having direct eye contact can be perceived as an exaggerated display of humility or as if you have something to hide. It may even be seen as rude as if you cannot be bothered to give your counterpart your full attention. So, while you may have intended to show more respect, such a gesture can ultimately backfire. In many countries, it is common to stand close to or touch each other when talking. This happens especially when you know the other person quite well. This is not the best way in Denmark. Standing too close or touching others may be perceived as too personal, overwhelming and intrusive. The recommendation is to keep a comfortable distance, the length of your forearm when interacting with Danes - at least as a starting point.

Recently I unintentionally made an unprofessional mistake when I put my hand on a client’s gloved hand when talking directly to her. This was not necessarily bad, but I am sure she was slightly surprised by my behaviour. When driving home, I had a bad feeling, as I did not want to offend her or lose her confidence.

IS IT EASY TO READ THE DANES?

When you hear that Danes are open and laid-back, they tend to express their emotions similarly. However, does Janteloven and the expectations of not standing out go hand in hand with emotional excessiveness? For Danes, happiness is more connected to feeling and is often private, and satisfaction is expressed as a rela-

tively calm and quiet emotion. A Danes’ response will typically not be overly excited when given a gift. It doesn’t mean they are not grateful but they tend to show their gratitude more level-headedly. Danes are mostly happy, even if they don’t show it that much.

Danes can be very secretive regarding personal gatherings, such as birthdays or anniversaries. However, when a close colleague knows it’s your birthday, you are in for a surprise – flags often appear on your desk. You are usually expected (a very typical Danish tradition) to bring a homemade cake for everyone in the office or your team to enjoy. You might have guessed it already – but Danes love eating cake! THE-INTL

JANE ELGÅRD PETERSEN CULTURAL DETECTIVE

Jane is a local and grew up in Denmark, apart from a few long-term stays abroad, whilst travelling extensively. For the last 10 years, her business has supported relocating internationals to Denmark and helping businesses onboard their employees. She loves a challenge and feels there are many different expectations of moving to Denmark, depending on who you are and where you come from.

kulturdetektiven.dk linkedin

16 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH / FREEPIK.COM TEXT JANE ELGÅRD PETERSEN

CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES

TRUFFLES ARE A GREAT WAY TO END OFF A MEAL WHEN YOU’RE LOOKING FOR SOMETHING SMALL THAT STILL HITS THE SWEET SPOT. PHOTOGRAPHS & TEXT: NATASHA LIVIERO / UNSPLASH

CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES

MAKES APPROXIMATELY 36.

INGREDIENTS:

100g hazelnuts

50g sugar

220g dark chocolate, 70%

220g cream

45g full cream milk

METHOD:

pinch of salt

30g Frangelico liqueur/rum (optional)

45g unsalted butter

cocoa powder and gold/silver dust for rolling

150g dark chocolate

30g white chocolate

1. Begin by making the hazelnut praline. Roast the nuts at 1500C for 12-15 minutes or until golden in colour. Set aside to cool on a baking tray lined with baking paper or a silpat. Next, slowly melt the sugar over medium-low heat in a heavy-based saucepan. Do not stir the sugar; shake/swirl the pan gently as the sugar begins to melt. Once the sugar has melted and is a rich caramel colour, pour it over the nuts and leave it to cool completely. Once cooled, blend until the mixture resembles sea sand. This will happen fairly quickly (beware of over-blending, or it will turn into a hazelnut paste).

2. For the truffles, begin by roughly chopping the chocolate.

3. Combine the cream and milk and heat until just boiling. Add the salt and alcohol if using.

4. Pour the cream mixture over the chocolate and leave it undisturbed for 2 minutes.

5. Gently whisk the mixture until the chocolate has dissolved.

6. Add the butter and continue to mix until the butter has dissolved and the mixture is smooth and shiny.

7. Contact cover with cling film, leave to cool at room temperature and then place in the fridge to harden for a few hours. You can leave the mixture in the fridge for up to 2 days at this stage.

8. With a teaspoon, scoop out the ganache and quickly roll it into balls. (For easier rolling, keep your hands as cool as possible, dipping them in cold water every few minutes and drying off before continuing. Rubbing cocoa powder on your hands will also help).

9. Lay the truffles on a lined baking tray and refrigerate until firm.

10. Place some cocoa powder and gold/silver dust in two separate bowls.

11. Roll a third of the truffles in the cocoa powder and a third in the gold/silver dust, then place them on baking paper in a sealable container.

12. With the remaining third of the truffles, roll them in the hazelnut praline, pressing gently to ensure it adheres. Place in the freezer whilst you melt the chocolate.

13. Melt the dark chocolate over a double boiler/microwave and then leave to cool slightly. Remove the truffles from the freezer, and with a fork, gently dip each truffle in the melted chocolate and place it on a lined tray to set.

14. Once cooled, melt the white chocolate and drizzle over the truffles.

15. Finally, sprinkle a little hazelnut praline on top of each truffle. Once cooled, place in a lined sealable container.

16. Store the truffles in the sealed containers in the fridge for up to 3 days.

NATASHA LIVIERO - PASTRY CHEF

Natasha is a recently qualified pastry chef who is South African by birth and Croatian by blood. She spent many years working for a wellness publication but did an about-turn at the beginning of 2020 when she joined a culinary school to fulfil a lifelong dream to study patisserie. She’s passionate about European patisserie and loves spending time in the kitchen experimenting with recipes (while quibbling with her feline friends), and is always on the hunt for interesting new cookbooks. natashaliviero

17 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM FOOD ART

CHEERS TO A NEW YEAR OF FASHION TRENDS

WHILE

Of course,

new year. However, I must say…2023 is filled with 'twists and turns'.

#1 Exaggerated vibes

One thing that was 'plain to see on runways in 2022 was that 2023 was going to be the year of exaggeration. From too many pockets on cargo pants, and optical illusions, to 3D Floral patterns…we will see works of art roaming the streets. Popular embellishments such as feathers, elevated crochet, and mirrored-disc ensembles will still be on repeat rotation. So when it comes to less is more…forget the 'less' part…just think MORE.

#2 Textile love language

In 2023 we continue to see bedroom talk being discussed on the streets. Romantic fabrics such as lace, tulle, and sheerness will be on public display. Heart motif structures will also be noticeable in 2023..beyond Valentine's Day. Mixing these soft elements with harder structures, such as a corset, will be love at first sight. We will touch more upon corsets later, but let's look at some great ways to introduce sheer pieces into your wardrobe.

#3 Lights, camera, ANGLES!

Earlier I hinted that 2023 was filled with 'twists' and 'turns', so let's talk about the elevation designers are giving to angles! Be prepared to see more blunt 90-degree sharp turns at the intersection of your waist and hips. It's giving Victorian in the 1800's energies but revisited for the modern day. The angles are reserved for the hips, and harsh edges can also be seen on the shoulders and sleeves. We can also apply those bold cuts to A-symmetrical skirts and thigh split hems…we will see A LOT of 'gams in 2023. I can personally say…I am excited about this trend and to finally join the world of curves.

#4 A knight's tale

With all of the worldly chaos, we have experienced…I can tell you that in 2023 we are prepared for battle…literally. Body armour seems to be a trend that will take us into the front lines of the runway. Structured metallics and glimmering golds will be the perfect pop for any ensemble. Chainmail, chest plates, and body chains are a theme seen throughout various runways. So we are ready to slay any apocalypse headed our way (knocks on chest plate). Oops...I don't want to forget spiked bras…we are also adding that to our textile infantry.

#5 Revamped grunge and low-rise denim

In 2023 we are going to see more two-day-old eyeliner and bedhead looks. Remnants of 90's grunge will be seen during Spring 2023. Looks filled with playful flannel, sweeper jeans, and monster boots…will prepare you for the hashtag 'gothic glamour'. Let's just take a quick leap into the Y2K trends that are still going strong in the new year. Denim is the law, and we will see a surge in the hues of indigo and blue. For those new to upcycling and sewing…this is our year, as DIY denim will be all the rave. Not to mention that the low-rise jean is here to stay… so we can finally dust off our trademark stamps.

Are you ready?

Keep in mind that I am a firm believer in 'honey..you are the trend'...and self-expression is a timeless style. It is always interesting to see fashion history repeating itself…with hints of contemporary tweaks along the way. Every day I sideeye my mother (if she reads this…ignore that part) for not keeping a box of her clothes for her future fashionista daughter. The underlying theme seen throughout every stitch of fabric is that 'joyful dressing' is STILL in. With that said, let me begin my new trend of 'healthier eating' in 2023 (of course, while browsing metallic pants) THE-INTL

Dubbed the 'Jill Of All Trades', Vanessa hails from the sunshine state of Florida. After visiting Copenhagen several times as a former International Flight Attendant, she permanently settled in Denmark in 2017 with her husband. Currently, Vanessa is the owner of the hand-crafted jewellery brand, the Style Freed. She creates personalised jewellery centred around healing crystals worldwide. Being a creative "mompreneur' has also allowed Vanessa to focus on her son's developmental journey with autism in Denmark.

18 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
VANESSA
@stylefreed @thestylefreed @stylefreed
I
responsibility
1 2 3 4 5
EVERYONE IS running off to uphold their new year's resolutions,
felt a
to fulfil mine. "New year…new me…right?"... "Umm…not entirely".
the first order of fashion business is highlighting some predicted trends for 2023. Tailoring, denim, and fringing styles are all trends from 2022 that we will continue to see in the

FIRE FESTIVALS

AND CELEBRATING THE VIKINGS

IIN JANUARY, THE Christmas lights go out, and winter in Northern Europe becomes bleak and dark. But was it always this way? Vikings were known for loving a good party, and sources state that they brightened up the month of January with multiple festivals known as Jul or Yule, which have now become blended with the December-based Christmas. So, what did the Old Yule entail, can we bring it back, and why should internationals even care?

OLD YULE

Unlike modern Christmas, Old Yule occurred throughout the winter period into January. Personally, I think we could do with reseparating the Christian Christmas and the Norse-Viking Yule. Who doesn't like more celebrations to brighten the winter? While Christmas is quite a family affair, descriptions of Viking celebrations were anything but. Drinking and sacrifices (maybe we can leave that one behind with the past?) were the order of the day. Supposedly, fires were lit to symbolise warmth, and sunlight would return later in the year, an important idea to cling to in Northern Europe. And these parties were not a four or five-hour affair, as we now know judging by Scandinavian Julefrokosts, but Viking parties went on for three to five days!

UP HELLY AA

In Northern Scotland, the descendants of Vikings who settled in the Northern Isles are still celebrating a modern interpretation of Yule along with their Viking heritage. The Shetland Islands lie between the north coast of the British Isles and the Faroe Islands. The islands, along with Orkney and the northern parts of mainland Scotland, were first settled by Norsemen, or Vikings, and became part of the Twin Kingdom of Denmark and Norway. In the 15th century, the Danish crown was somewhat cash-strapped, and the money needed for a Danish princess to marry the Scottish King couldn't be found. So the islands were pawned to Scotland and broadly forgotten, although occasionally Danish newspapers like to declare that if they paid the dowery today, they could take the islands back!

Across Scotland, the dark winter is brightened with a range of fire-focused festivals. Scotland continues with local festivals, starting with the UK-wide Bonfire (Guy Fawkes) Night. Many of them involve rolling burning barrels through villages or, typically in larger cities, torch-lit processions. Up in the remote North Atlantic, their Scandinavian links haven't been forgotten, and the fire festivals have become a way to celebrate that heritage. In the most famous festival in Lerwick, locals dress up as Vikings, carrying torches and a replica Viking Longship that is then set on fire.

MYTHS AND LEGENDS

Why are the Vikings such an enduring piece of history, and what makes them worth celebrating with lavish festivals? Of course, modern depictions show violence and bloodshed, but there were also traditions and a rich culture of song, writing and art that is worth remembering.

Beyond Scandinavia, Vikings also became part of the heritage of much of Europe, with their excursions, conquering and mixing with local people. Swedish Vikings fared east, travelling to Ukraine, Poland, the Baltic States and Turkey. The Danelaw in England, the mixed Scandinavian-French Dutchy of Normandy and consequently Norman conquest of southern Italy also played significant parts in early European history. It's also now accepted that mentions of "Vinland" in Norse sagas refer to Canada, with archaeological digs at L'Anse aux Meadows proof of a Viking settlement. How could all this not give rise to myths, legends and enduring fascination?

I annoy Danes by saying they're descended from the farmers who stayed at home, while many of us Internationals are the descendants of those Viking pirates who explored the world. But, even if not genetically, then certainly through our shared sense of exploration. THE-INTL

"Supposedly, fires were lit to symbolise warmth, and sunlight would return later in the year, an important idea to cling to in Northern Europe."

HEATHER STORGAARD WRITER

Heather Storgaard comes from Northern Scotland, grew up in Switzerland, and lived in England and Germany. She met her Danish and soon-tobe British husband back in 2017, and they now split their time between Central Scotland and Helgenæs, a peninsula in rural Eastern Jutland. Languages and cultural studies are a big passion, leading Heather to pursue a degree in Culture and Heritage and a career in photography and translation.

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GOOD PLACES TO VISIT IN WINTER

SHANI BISHOP'S TIPS AND HINTS FOR WINTER ACTIVITIES.

IIT’S SO IMPORTANT to get outside in the winter months. Your body may scream ‘stay in,’ but your mental and physical health will thank you for it later. After a walk or cycle, my children seem so much happier. Once we are home, they usually sit and read or play Lego alone, so it’s a good time for adults to rest.

Kids complain about going out more as they get older, so we used to cycle more and walk less in Denmark because of the amazing bike lanes. These fantastic lanes get cleared of snow and ice even when the weather is awful. My favourite routes were ones with a lovely café serving hot chocolate on route. Unfortunately, this isn’t always possible as opening hours are shorter in the winter months, but hopefully, this article will give you some ideas.

KLAMPENBORG

The cycle route from Hellerup to Klampenborg is excellent. The bike lanes are wide, and there are great views of the sea and a few monuments on the way. At the end of the route, you can stop at the beach and look over to Sweden. The beach is so popular in summer but has a different feel in winter. You can also stop at the Café Jorden Rundt near Charlottenlund Søbad, a cafe at Skovshoved Havn or on Hellerup high street. On the high street, there’s a good Lagkagehuset with lots of space to sit down. You could also pop into Books and Company, a great English language bookshop!

DYREHAVE

Sometimes we took the train to Klampenborg and cycled through the woods to Skodsborg Station or Vedbæk - the paths are good and the trees wonderful. You can stop at the Eremitage Hunting Lodge for a break and toilet stop. The Eremitage Hunting Lodge has been completely renovated, and you can go on tours once a year. It’s a short visit and well worth going as it’s splendid inside.

If you make it as far as Vedbæk, you can reward yourself with a trip to Café Rosenhuset. They serve great hot chocolate, and the views are amazing if you sit upstairs in the warmth. Alternatively, try the cafes and restaurants around Vedbæk havn.

Friends of ours used to get the train to Skovbrynet Station and then cycle through the woods to have a drink at Bryggeri Skovlys, where the setting and drinks are good.

PLAYGROUNDS

Cycling to playgrounds was always a hit with my kids. My favourites were Konditaget Lüders in Nordhavn, the Octopus in Superkilen, Nørrebro and the Legepladsen at Hauser Plads, Copenhagen. The fun starts early at Konditaget Lüders when you have to run up the stairs against the clock to get to the top (there is a lift too). The play equipment is good, and there’s a Netto below for Pizza snegel (snail) when everyone gets hungry. Konditaget Lüders has great views of the harbour, although it is a bit blowy, so wrap up warm. Superkilen Park in Nørrebro has lots of funky play equipment, but the Octopus is the best. Small children love all the different slides, which will entertain them for ag-

es. There are lots of cheap cafes in Nørrebro - I always headed for the Middle Eastern ones to try authentic Baklava.

There are a few nice little playgrounds in Copenhagen which are tucked away. For example, try Legepladsen at Hauser Plads, the dragons in Kongens Have and Legepladsen at Nikolaj Plads. Stopping at these certainly makes going into the city more enjoyable for little ones. THE-INTL

20 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
"IT’S SO IMPORTANT TO GET OUTSIDE IN THE WINTER MONTHS. YOUR BODY MAY SCREAM ‘STAY IN,’ BUT YOUR MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH WILL THANK YOU FOR IT LATER."

JANUARY, SHINE YOUR LIGHT ON US!

AAS THE AMBERS of New Year's Eve fade, the New Year rolls in and with it, the tradition in Denmark of jumping off a chair to welcome the incoming year. There is a definite sense of excitement and jubilation about the beginning of another year, which one hopes will bring many exciting opportunities.

TRADITIONS

Some celebrate New Year's Day by braving the cold waters. Hordes of people gather on the banks of the bathing areas in Copenhagen or at their nearest beach to participate in a very fresh, early morning swim. The belief is that it casts off the cobwebs of the previous year and leaves the body fresh for the new one. However, this is not for everyone, so perhaps the Copenhagen parade later in the day is a more relaxing option, or if this is still too much, then a feast of a luncheon can herald in the new year.

HISTORY

Interestingly, January was named after the Roman god Janus. He held the title of protector of gates and doorways, which metaphorically translates as beginnings and endings. Janus is, in fact, depicted as having two faces, one looking into the past, the other with the ability to see into the future. And he is probably the 'influencer' of the new year's resolutions tradition. These intentions are well-meaning; for some, they are realised over the year. For others, the fitness drive or detox lasts merely a month, and then former routines and habits reinstate themselves!

NEW RESOLUTIONS

The first month of the year brings fresh hope, despite the darkness and tendency of harsh weather conditions, with little snowdrops appearing in the ground to symbolise this renewal of energy. This is utilised in the classroom, where setting new goals or resolutions is an activity that many teachers enjoy with their students. With only six months of the year to go, the realisation by older exam-focused students that time is short is an opportunity to galvanise them into taking action and striving forward on their academic journey.

With primary school children, new year resolutions need to be practical and achievable. However, what is easier to achieve is to focus on existing classroom guidelines, such as being respectful, acts of kindness, listening, or following instructions. In addition, many class teachers have motivational stickers or point systems that young students love.

January is also a great time to teach young children that under the blank of snow and despite the greyness, a lot of energy is being used in growth, which will emerge in Spring. A project to plant pea or bean seeds allows students to see how shoots emerge and slowly develop into plants. Many a keen gardener would support this line of thought as they plan their new garden.

CELEBRATIONS

There is always a time for celebration in school. For many in the Christian world, 6 January, the day of the Epiphany, is celebrat-

ed as it marks the arrival of three wise men or kings with their gifts. The day's teaching would focus on the incredible opportunities that are before young people and encourage them to find the courage and determination to seize and enjoy them.

Later in the month, another learning opportunity intertwining history, politics, global studies, and personal social development is on 17 January, when Martin Luther Day is observed. The day honours the principles of this Noble Prize and iconic civil rights leader and his teachings of change through nonviolent means.

BE GOOD TO YOURSELF

And the best way to live through the darkness of a Danish January is to indulge in healthy comfort foods such as delicious soups. Root vegetables are in season, so potatoes, peas, squash, carrots, and swede are excellent for making delicious soup bowls.

Along with delicious food, the other key ingredient is sleep. Plenty of sleep will keep sniffles and sickness at bay. Remember, Spring is around the corner! THE-INTL

Sources:

https://www.almanac.com/content/month-january-holidays-facts-folklore https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January https://publicholidays.dk/new-years-day/ https://therealschool.in/blog/new-year-resolutions-ideas-kids/ https://www.tasteofhome.com/collection/soup-recipes-to-make-this-winter/ https://www.google.com/search?q=foods+to+be+eaten+to+january&oq= foods+to+be+eaten+to+january&aqs=chrome..69i57j33i160j33i22i29i30. 14856j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

"January is also a great time to teach young children that under the blank of snow and despite the greyness, a lot of energy is being used in growth, which will emerge in Spring."

MONIKA PEDERSEN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

Monika comes from the London area of the UK, where she worked in the state system and the international school system, as an English teacher of 11-18 students and then a section leader. She has also worked in Germany and now in Denmark. She has an overview of the British, International, and American educational systems and is currently learning about the Danish system. She has been in education for 32 years and continues to enjoy the profession. She has relocated to Copenhagen as she is married to a Dane. She enjoys jogging, waterside walks, and cooking.

@monikapedersen

@monikapedersen

@monikapedersen

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ADVOCATING FOR EVERYONE

HER NAME IS LOUISE, BUT TO HER THOUSANDS OF FOLLOWERS, SHE IS @JUSTAWHEELCHAIRGIRL - THE YOUNG WOMAN BEHIND AN INSPIRING PROFILE ON INSTAGRAM, SHARING HER LIFE AND RAISING AWARENESS ABOUT DISABILITY.

LLOUISE FEELS THERE is a huge lack of representation in the media. “My goal with my Instagram profile has always been to show that it’s very possible to live a happy and fulfilling life with a disability. Of course, there are things that I can’t do - but there are so many more that I can,” says Louise.

As an infant, Louise was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy type 2 (SMA2), a progressive neuromuscular disease. As a result, she got her first electric wheelchair at two. “I don’t really think about my disability daily because I’ve never known anything else. But, having a disability like mine can be very time-consuming. Everyday tasks - getting up in the morning, taking a bath, getting in and out of the car, you name it - take longer because I need help.”

When she was a child, they hired her first personal assistant. When she moved into her own place, she began needing assistants 24/7. “Some people prefer not to have a close relationship, but it wouldn’t feel right to me. We spend so much time together, so it’s important for me that we enjoy it.” When hiring an assistant, it’s not essential for her if they have experience - in a way, hiring one who has not tried this type of job before can be easier. She considers chemistry, the same sense of humour, shared values, and the same attitude towards life most important.

THE NEED FOR ALLIES

Louise spends a lot of her time advocating for herself - and for disabled people in general. But getting the help, she needs to live her independent life takes time, patience, and effort. “In Denmark, most disability-related things are paid for by the kommune (municipality), region, or government, but it isn’t just handed to you. You must apply for it - even the most basic things can take years.”

In general, she feels lucky to live in Denmark and get the opportunities she has. “We have some strong disability groups and advocates who have fought hard over the years to ensure the rights we have now.” Despite her disability, she attended the same elementary school as her friends. She attended university and now lives in her own house. This is not the case for many others in different countries.

However, even in Denmark, it’s getting more challenging to get proper help. One thing that needs to change is the lack of SMA treatment - one that would stop Louise’s disability from progressing and maybe give her some strength. “Denmark has some of the strictest rules in the world regarding treating SMA patients, only offering treatment to a limited number of children, even though so many other countries also offer it to adults.” She and many others are fighting very hard to raise awareness about this to change the rules. “We’re not there yet, but we’re doing everything we can to ensure that every SMA patient in Denmark gets access to this treatment that can be life-changing for so many of us.”

Some disabled people in Denmark also lose the help they need to continue living independently. “It’s a horrible development, and it’s quite scary to see one’s peers losing their help, knowing it might as well have been me. That’s one of the reasons why advocating for disability rights is so important. We must tell our stories so non-disabled people realise these things and hopefully become allies.”

EVERYONE’S INTEREST

To raise awareness and create a positive representation of people with disabilities was behind the decision to start her Instagram account. “You rarely see people in electric wheelchairs on TV or in magazines. As a child, I didn’t know what to expect from life when I grew up. I didn’t know anyone personally, and I didn’t see myself in books or movies.” Louise shares significant parts of her life on her profile. “But I’m also a very private person, so I choose not to share things. I didn’t create this profile to bring focus to me as Louise - the reason was to bring focus to me as a disabled person; on the challenges we experience. I do my best to show my life and what it can be like to have a disability.”

But fighting the system to get the help they need can be draining, so Louise understands why some people with disabilities don’t have the energy to do more advocacy. “I think we need nondisabled people to advocate for us, stand up, and help us fight the injustice we meet. It would be so amazing if people outside the disabled community would call out their local restaurant or store if their place isn’t wheelchair accessible. One thing that people often forget is that everyone can become disabled at any given time. So disability rights are, or should be, in everyone’s interest.”

Louise is grateful for the opportunity to show non-disabled people that her life isn’t much different than theirs. “I hope my profile will contribute to people behaving more naturally when talking with a disabled person. I don’t want people to treat me any differently. Just be polite and talk to me like you would talk to anyone else. One of my biggest pet peeves is when someone talks to me like a child. I’m a capable adult, and it frustrates me when I’m not being treated as one.”

She also appreciates the community she’s built with her profile which continues to grow. She loves receiving messages from fellow disabled people who tell her that her stories and experiences are relatable. Louise has collaborated with Zalando several times and received an incredible response. “So many people wrote to me saying how great it was to see a disabled person working with a big fashion brand. This shows how much our community longs for representation, and I feel proud to be a part of it. I also get messages from parents of children with disabilities saying they feel more reassured about their children’s future after seeing how I live my life.”

Knowing that her words and shared experiences are helping others is nothing short of an incredible feeling for Louise. “It’s both empowering and humbling. I’m so happy I’ve created a platform where that’s possible.” THE-INTL

MEDVEDOVÁ comes from Slovakia and moved to Denmark 3 years ago to study for her Master's degree. She says living in Odense is the perfect city for her because it's not too large to be intimidating, but still exciting!

She works at Umbraco as a Magical Copy Whisperer and started a podcast with her friends - @humans.of.sdu. She loves watching and talking about movies, Harry Potter, karaoke nights (even though she can't sing to save her life), and pub quizzes (winning them, to be specific).

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PHOTOGRAPHS LOUISE JUSTESEN TEXT MICHAELA MEDVEDOVÁ MICHAELA
"SO MANY PEOPLE WROTE TO ME SAYING HOW GREAT IT WAS TO SEE A DISABLED PERSON WORKING WITH A BIG FASHION BRAND."

FORGET ABOUT RESOLUTIONS – JUST BE YOU!

CCAN YOU BELIEVE it’s 2023 already? How did this happen? I know - it is unbelievable how fast time flew by right in a blink of an eye. But, if anything that has been reaffirmed in the past few years, particularly during Covid times, it is that nothing in life ever goes as planned. So, for this January 2023, let’s not give a f*ck about resolutions and just go with the flow.

THE ART OF NOT GIVING A F*CK

I know there are books out there explaining the art of not giving a f*ck - truth be told, I have never read them, but somehow, I have become quite a Master of it since a young age. I know that having a plan, resolution, and goal sets little milestones for success. However, it works for many, and it is very motivational. But let’s rewind to January 2020 - what was your plan? What was your resolution? Did any of that happen and fall into place when March arrived? My guess is that half of the people were unwillingly forced to put all their plans on hold.

TRUST THE PROCESS AND GO WITH THE FLOW

Cliché? Yes. But what can you do when life works in mysterious ways? The art of not giving a f*ck is to let go of control of how things should be. It’s normal to want certainty, clarity, and security because who likes uninvited changes and disruptions? It’s not about doing nothing at allyou can still plan, set goals and work hard but leave some room and flexibility to let things work out their way. Allow space to be chaotic. Sometimes from where we are to where we want to be is not always a straight line - there might be some detours, pauses and redirection. But, eventually, we still get there, just not within the timeline we had carefully planned and plotted. As long as we set the goal, have the clarity of what we truly want, let go and let the rest fall into place at its own divine timing. The tighter we hold onto how and when, and where we want things to happen, the bigger the resistance we’re creating for things to happen. We need to learn to trust the process and that everything will work out for the best, even if it

doesn’t seem to be at that point, and just go with the flow. The ebb and flow of life are where we find gold. We might accidentally discover something new and stumble upon a new opportunity - who knows? This might be the exact stepping stone we need towards the next step.

It is difficult to fully trust life and hold on to faith. We are human beings, and we all want a sense of security. It feels safe to foresee and control the unfolding of things. Going with the flow is easier said than done - it is the continuity of being present.

While many might disagree, some things in life require specific planning and careful steps, but trusting the process and not giving a f*ck is accepting whatever it may be - it will eventually work out. It is the detachment of the results of things and the details you’ve planned thoroughly.

If anyone has ever tried creating a ceramic piece, you will know that many times, the result of what you had in mind when you set out to create can be different. It might take a couple of rounds or more to create the perfect result, and each round leads you to a slightly different shape and form. Even the masters won’t be able to create two exact same pieces with their meticulous skills. The journey mattersthe excitement, fun, ups and downs are all part of the process, and we learn, grow, and mould from it.

So if we are to make a resolution for 2023, allow yourself to not give a f*ck and just be you. When you commit to living mindfully, you’re present in the moment. Your experience and your instinct will guide you towards the next step. So give it a go for a year and see how much you’ve transformed. THE-INTL

Like her hometown Hong Kong, Ophelia has a diverse background and upbringing. She moved to Copenhagen in 2019 after 10 years of living in London. Her fashion and journalism career began in 2007 at ELLE Hong Kong magazine, and later on as an online stylist at Net-A-Porter.com in the UK; she has worked with all sorts of creatives, brands and celebrities globally.

She now works on everything fashion and communicationrelated. With her love of travelling and places her work brought her to, people she met from all walks of life inspired her to start her own business

M for Minimal: a place to raise the awareness of going back to basics through conscious consumption and mindfulness with a touch of spirituality - something she has been practising since her teenage years.

@mforminimal.com

@mforminimal.mfm

@opheliawu

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"WHILE MANY MIGHT DISAGREE, SOME THINGS IN LIFE REQUIRE SPECIFIC PLANNING AND CAREFUL STEPS, BUT TRUSTING THE PROCESS AND NOT GIVING A F*CK IS ACCEPTING WHATEVER IT MAY BE - IT WILL EVENTUALLY WORK OUT."
PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH TEXT OPHELIA WU

ENERGY SECTOR CHALLENGES

TTHE ENERGY SECTOR is the basis of any society. Without access to energy, we would be unable to supply the world with electricity, gas, water and food, which are integral to economic growth and survival globally.

Non-renewable energy has powered the world for centuries. From petroleum products, oil, natural gas and nuclear, approximately 80% of the world's energy each year comes from non-renewable sources. Although these sources are energy-rich and cheap to process, they are nevertheless finite resources.

As non-renewable energy supplies deplete, the negative environmental impact caused by the extraction, production and combustion of these sources has resulted in a societal backlash and governmental regulations to curb usage to avert the worst effects of climate change. Yet, as energy demand grows, our dependence on non-renewable energy continues.

Despite the calls to replace non-renewable energy with renewable green energy, we will only see a peak in oil within the next five years and natural gas will remain the most-resilient non-renewable energy source.

Renewable energy stems from natural sources such as the wind, sun and sea as well as biofuels such as ethanol. This type of energy is easily replenishable, reducing dependence upon non-renewable energy and lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, implementation remains a challenge. High initial costs, storage concerns and its intermittent nature are some of the issues the sub-sector must overcome.

The scope of digitalisation is entering the energy sector to improve the safety, production and sustainability of energy systems globally. For the EU, digitalisation is at the centre of its future. To achieve its digital ambitions by 2030, the European Commission emphasises the importance of digital technologies to deliver flexible energy generation and consumption to increase renewable energy usage.

The European Commission proposed the Digitalisation of Energy Action Plan in 2022. The Action Plan seeks to build a competitive digital energy service and infrastructure market. One that is cyber-secure, efficient and sustainable, thus promoting cooperation between the energy and digital sectors. Besides enhancing the uptake of digital technologies in the energy sector to mobilise research and innovation, the European Commission ensures interoperability of energy data, platforms and services.

Digitalising the energy sector has massive potential to steer the world towards a more secure, sustainable and smarter energy future.

The influx of Internet of Things (IoT) appliances supports the Energy sector's adaptation to a digital world through improved connectivity and efficiency. IoT devices use the Internet to provide connectivity between devices and users. For example, home sensors allow for real-time room temperature monitoring and control over energy consumption patterns. Moreover, IoT devices support consumers in managing their energy use through everyday objects and businesses to find innovative ways to improve productivity and decision-making.

For businesses, real-time applications and intelligent process monitoring can supply data that allows for faster decision-making, improves quality and reduces waste. For example, IoT devices in energy management can deliver real-time insight, support maintenance forecasting and address performance issues through

system metrics. Therefore, IoT devices can support the reduction in system downtime – parallel to managing energy consumption patterns and resources to promote positive energy conservation practices. Furthermore, the automation of specific tasks helps to minimise human effort and save costs through modernisation. The effective targeting of IoT applications at specific issues within the energy sector could usher in a lower cost, higher efficiency industry capable of meeting the challenges of the 21st century.

Digital technology is driving the application of intelligent IoTbased solutions across city life. In a smart city, the connection of buildings, urban infrastructure, energy networks and utilities to intelligent sensors allows for monitoring every aspect of life.

To improve a city's efficiency and sustainability, data relating to energy consumption, with the application of cognitive learning and context awareness, informs decision-makers regarding energy demand and delivers cost savings. The rise of smart cities is crucial to dealing with the challenges of pollution, environmental concerns, energy access and demand.

Global electric, gas, oil and utility providers are embracing new technologies to improve their efficiency whilst reducing operational costs.

Energy companies must show flexibility in compliance plans, analyse potential risks on a case-by-case basis, track performance and effectiveness, and ensure high standards of compliance evidence management to handle multiple regulatory bodies and requirements. THE-INTL

MARIANO ANTHONY DAVIES

Mariano has over 40 years global experience as a bus ness executive. He spent ten years with KPMG, so far thirty years with British Chambers of Commerce (while also running Oxford Business Services ApS). He is a British citizen, who grew up in Kent, went to boarding school in Sussex and has a British university education. He has been married to a Dane for over 45 years and has held over 150 official anti-Brexit speeches since 2016. He both speaks and writes Danish without difficulty.

oxford-business.com

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THE RACE TO GREEN!
PHOTOGRAPHS UNSPLASH TEXT MARIANO ANTHONY DAVIES
"GLOBAL ELECTRIC, GAS, OIL AND UTILITY PROVIDERS ARE EMBRACING NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE THEIR EFFICIENCY WHILST REDUCING OPERATIONAL COSTS."
25 JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM Good advice Good habits 22.09.2022 1. Stay at home – If you are ill 2. Wash hands frequently – Or use hand sanitiser 3. Clean regularly – Especially surfaces that are touched by many people 4. Ventilate your home 5. Cough or sneeze into your elbow sst.dk/en
JANUARY 2023 - WWW.THE-INTL.COM
# S T A N D W I T H U K R A I N E # P E A C E F O R U K R A I N E