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THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

international

the

recipe to warm the heart

real stories from expats

happenings around denmark

insight into danish culture

JANUARY 2018 ISSUE 1

A TASTE OF AFRICA IN DENMARK

MATHEW'S WINE JOURNEY FROM CAPE TOWN TO COPENHAGEN


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

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FINDING YOUR

FEET IN DENMARK I'VE ALWAYS been a networker, according to my mother, my first report from kindergarden read, "Lyndsay communicates well with others in the sandpit." This has followed me into my adult life on my travels, and in experiencing new cultures. Ten years ago I moved to Denmark with my two boys and husband who is Danish. At the time I had been married for 10 years and thought that I understood the Danish culture and humour. I thought that with my great networking skills, adjusting socially in Denmark would be super easy - oh how wrong was I!

MEET THE TEAM MANAGING EDITOR & LAYOUT

LYNDSAY JENSEN has twenty years' experience in the advertising and publishing industry, and holds a degree in Business and a Desktop Publishing degree in print and repro. Born in the UK, and brought up in South Africa, she has the ability to understand different cultures, and is passionate about networking. She is a wife of twenty years and mother to two boys aged 20 and 13. She loves travel, photography and art. lyndsay@the-intl.com

STARTING FROM SCRATCH

is like getting used to a new pair of shoes. At first they pinch a little, but you like the way they look, so you carry on. The longer you have them, the more comfortable they become. Until one day without realizing it you reach a glorious plateau. Wearing those shoes is like wearing no shoes at all. The more scuffed they get, the more you love them and the more you can't imagine life without them.” - Tahir Shah

SUPPORT TOOLS As an expat living in Denmark for the last ten years, I've been through these experiences and watched Denmark change and develop over the years too. I've also had the great pleasure of working with various publications in which the expat, is the primary focus - constantly finding ways to help expats understand life in Denmark. The International gives my team and I the opportunity, along with other knowlegable expats, to give back the advice and support I only wished I had when I first moved to Denmark. Don't get me wrong, it's got a lot better from when I first moved here, but with this publication we hope to give you a more personalised, and real support tool to help in your adjustment.

SUB-EDITOR

DAVID NOTHLING-DEMMER is a print and digital writer, communicator and media production manager/ editor. He has several years’ experience in the media and publishing industry, and holds a Master’s degree in media and politics from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa). He is passionate about politics, publishing and people-empowerment. He is a husband of almost two years, and has a love affair with good food and wine. david@the-intl.com

KEY ACCOUNT MANAGER

MARK MILLEN is a business development and sales specialist from Northern Ireland. He has many years' experience in the media advertising industry in Denmark, and comes to us after founding and being the sales director at The Murmur. Mark is currently reading for his Master degree in Service Management at Copenhagen Business School. He lives with his Icelandic partner and their two beautiful girls. In his spare time (if he has any) Mark is generally found to be watching football or socialising with friends. mark@the-intl.com

MANAGING DIRECTOR

KENNETH MACALPINE is a Nordic Financial Manager in the Transport industry. His education is in Finance and he has a business degree obtained in the UK. Born in Norway he moved to Denmark at the age of 22. He is of Danish Scottish ancestry and lives in southern Denmark with his large multi-national family consisting of Danish, Irish and Brazilian heritage. He is always interested in new challenges and loves to live life to the fullest. kenneth@the-intl.com

EXPATS HELPING EXPATS The International will focus on the topics that are important to you. As we progress from issue to issue, we will explore issues that matter to expats, and bring you personal accounts and journeys of others who have come to call Denmark home. After holding focus groups we decided to include food, general relocation and education as starting points, as these were the three most important topics to our expat participants. We are priveldged to have two expats and one local Dane (who is married to an expat), who will be regular features in our monthly issue. So, all that's left to say is we hope you enjoy this first issue. Let us know how we're doing - we welcome feedback from you and look forward to giving you support in your journey ahead in Denmark. Welcome to The International network.

LYNDSAY JENSEN - MANAGING EDITOR

international

the

“Settling into a new country

As the saying goes, "Settling into a new country is like getting a new pair of shoes. At first they pinch a little, but you like the way they look, so you carry on." No amount of preparation before you leave your home country can ready you for what's to come upon your arrival to Denmark. No matter where you land in the country you go through the same feelings of excitement for your new adopted country, and sense of longing and loss for your homeland. The first few weeks or even months often feel like a romantic kind of holiday as you find your feet. Then reality hits! You are faced with the logistics of CPR cards, Nem ID, bank accounts and if you haven't found a permanent place yet, finding a home. If you have children the attention shifts to finding the right school, after school activities and eventually a job for yourself.

SALES AND DISTRIBUTION

HRISTO T. ALEKSANDROV is in the process of completing his Masters’ degree from CBS. Hristo has over 3 years' experience in the media business in Copenhagen, as a media consultant and distribution manager. When not engaged with his clients or his masters thesis, Hristo likes to try his hand in different sports, often with dubious success. Like a true Bulgarian, there is a special place in his heart for mountain hikes and nights by the fire under a starry sky. hristo@the-intl.com

SALES

For advertising sales, please contact: sales@the-intl.com

ADDRESS

The International ApS, Industrivej 14, 4683 Rønnede; +45 42407624

PRINT

Provins-Trykkeriet ApS, Vordingborg

COVER PICTURE

Jakob Kirk Von Lotzbeck (www.jakobkirk.com)

DISTRIBUTION

The International is available at a range of businesses, institutions, cafés and public libraries across Denmark

SUBSCRIPTIONS For home or corporate delivery of the printed edition please contact: distribution@the-intl.com The International is published 12 times a year. This issue was published on January 10, 2018

CVR:

39118181


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

[sumsum] English: Bzzz Japanese: Bún Turkish: Vzzz Korean: Boong German: Sum

It isn't that difficult.

Learn Danish at IA Language School

Free lessons IA Sprog / Vibevej 9-11 / 2400 Copenhagen NV Ph +45 3888 3233 / info@iasprog.dk / www.iasprog.dk

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WHAT’S ON

THIS WINTER? THE SUN MAY SET EARLY IN WINTER, BUT THIS DOESN’T HAVE TO PUT A DAMPER ON YOUR FUN. KEEP WARM AND STAY ACTIVE WITH A RANGE OF FESTIVE ACTIVITIES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY TAKING PLACE ACROSS DENMARK IN JANUARY AND FEBRUARY.

SKAGEN

NATIONWIDE

VINTER JAZZ FESTIVAL

SKAGEN TURISTBUREAU

COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER - JONAS SMITH

COPENHAGEN

12 JAN - 25 FEB

25 – 28 JAN

2 - 25 FEB

Every year over the festive season Frederiksberg Garden is turned into a winter wonderland with an ice rink at Frederiksberg Runddel as the star attraction. Admission to the ice rink is free, and the entire family is welcome. If you have your own skates, you can use the rink around the clock up until 25 February. During the day, you can rent a pair of skates for DKK 50 until an hour before closing time.

Are you brave enough? Winter swimmers, the "Icebreakers" sure are, as they prepare to take a dip in the North Sea. The yearly Skagen Winter Swimming Festival, which takes place from the 25 – 28 January is organised in cooperation with the local Tourist Board and encourages all ‘true Vikings’ to take part. The Festival guarantees an ice cold sea, hot drinks, close encounters with the unique nature of Skagen and much more. Each morning begins with a sea swim at Sønderstrand as participants put their courage to the test when they meet the ice cold wind and waves. The invigorating atmosphere is sure to get your blood flowing. After the swim hot soup is served by Jacob's Café.

In February, there'll be sounds of jazz all over the country when Vinterjazz (Winter Jazz) rolls out its nationwide music programme. During the three weeks of Vinterjazz, there will be more than 500 concerts to experience at more than 100 different venues all over Denmark. Both the country’s big cities and the outskirts can experience international stars on tour, new Danish award-winning projects and different concert themes. Vinterjazz kick-starts the season for the country’s jazz clubs and helps keep the music going all year. The Festival attempts to create curiosity towards the genre, especially towards Danish jazz, and the many dedicated venues, organisers and jazz associations all over the country. There are plenty of concerts to choose from, no matter if you want the full-blown orchestra at Copenhagen’s biggest venues, or an intimate concert at a cosy wine bar.

WINTER ON ICE

SWIMMING FESTIVAL

ADMISSION: FREE – DKK 50 DATES AND TIMES: MONDAY – FRIDAY (11:00 – 20:00) & SATURDAY AND SUNDAY (10:00 – 20:00)

THE SMOOTH SOUNDS OFJAZZ

FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT WWW.SKAGEN.DK

VINTER JAZZ FESTIVAL

FOTO COMMUNITY

COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER - CHRISTIAN ALSIN

THE FESTIVAL RUNS FROM 2 – 25 FEBRUARY WITH MORE INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE AT WWW.JAZZ.DK


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

AARHUS

NATIONWIDE

DISNEY ON ICE

SZYMON BRZÓSKA

GASTRO WEEK AARHUS

COPENHAGEN

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30 JAN - 2 FEB

8 – 18 FEB

7 - 18 FEB

The last week of January will see Copenhagen Fashion Week transform the city into a fashion Mecca. The festival is known for energising the city with fashion events including extraordinary exhibitions, cool street parties, mini concerts, competitions, trend shows and shopping events with cutting edge discounts that are open to everyone.

During Aarhus Gastro Week you can enjoy top-notch gourmet food at some of the best restaurants in town, all at a special price. The participating restaurants, some of the best in Aarhus, invite you to spend a wonderful evening out and enjoy first-rate gastronomy. Each restaurant prepares its own delicious three-course menu at a generously reduced Gastro Week price of DKK 250. This is the perfect opportunity for sampling new gourmet restaurants at a very favourable price.

Get close up for non-stop fun with four amazing Disney stories. From whining wheels to blue waves, ice-cold magic worlds come alive on the ice. Your family’s best Disney moments will be relived as Disney on Ice presents Enchanting Worlds. Be enthralled when McQueen, Bumle and the crew at Cars perform high-speed stunts and runs over the ice as you've never seen before! Dive into the adventures of the Little Mermaid's underwater kingdom, where Ariel, Prince Eric and the crab Sebastian share a story of love. The toys of Toy Story are back too! Experience Buzz Lightyear, Woody, Jessie and the rest of the gang as they attempt an escape from the unruly kids of Sunnyside Day Care in their most daring adventure yet! Last but not least, you can join the winter world in Arendal with sisters Anna and Elsa. Joined by friends Olaf and Kristoff from Frozen, they learn the meaning of true love. Be sure to dress warm!

COPENHAGEN FASHION WEEK AARHUS GASTRO WEEK

COPENHAGEN FASHION WEEK IS OPEN TO ALL AND TAKES PLACE FROM 30 JANUARY – 2 FEBRUARY. SEE THE FULL SCHEDULE AT WWW.COPENHAGENFASHIONWEEK.COM

DISNEY ON ICE

BE SURE TO BOOK A TABLE AND BUY YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE; WWW.NEMBILLET.DK/GASTROWEEKAARHUS. THE EVENT RUNS FROM 8 – 18 FEBRUARY.

TICKETS: DKK 230 – DKK 495 DATES: 17 – 18 FEBRUARY BOOK ONLINE AT WWW.MCH.DK Sources: http://www.visitcopenhagen.com, http://www.mch.dk,

DISNEY ON ICE

RESTAURANT MELLEMRUM

COPENHAGEN FASHION WEEK FACEBOOK PAGE

http://skagen.dk, http://copenhagenfashionweek.com/

H i g h Ac ad em i c S t an d ar d s C h ri st i an E t ho s C onv en i en t l y l o cat ed i n H el l er u p

rygaards.com


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NEW TO

DENMARK? YOUR SURVIVAL CHECKLIST

Relocating to another country is a daunting task. Aside from the many practical matters to attend to, there’s also the matter of fitting in. This survival checklist will not only make your move more manageable, but also help you adjust to life in Denmark. TEXT DAVID NOTHLING -DEMMER SOURCE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE COPENHAGEN

WITH THE HELP of International House Copenhagen, a onepoint entry to Greater Copenhagen with an International Citizen Service, we have come up with our own guide for settling newcomers into life in Denmark. Our nine-step process will have you calling Denmark home in no time!

#1 FIND A PLACE TO LIVE Depending on your place of work or personal preferences, deciding on an ideal home is important early on. Aside from your home being a base for your time in Denmark, it also serves its practical purposes. You cannot apply on the Danish Civil Registration System for a CPR or ‘ID’ number before you have found a place to live, and actually live at the address. A temporary address is also accepted if you need to apply for a CPR number (in that case you would need a signed housing confirmation or a receipt for a hotel/hostel/or the like). Both EU and non-EU expats may qualify for Housing Benefits (Boligstøtte). You can check this as soon as you have moved to Denmark and hold a NemID.

#2 DAY-CARE AND SCHOOLING If you have moved over with your family it’s always a good idea to get the kids settled as soon as possible. Start exploring the different options and get an understanding of how the education system works in Denmark. You cannot begin your child’s enrolment process before you have actually moved to Denmark. In addition to traditional Danish public and private schools, there are also several international schools across the country. The Ministry of Education website has the most comprehensive list of these schools to guide you further. See page 16 for more on day-care in Denmark.

#3 CHECK YOUR DRIVER’S LICENSE If you plan on driving in Denmark, you will in some cases need to exchange your foreign driving licence for a Danish driving licence. The website Life in Denmark offers a detailed list of countries and the various terms of conditions for driving in Denmark and the conversion of your driver’s license.

#4 REGISTER FOR YOUR CPR CARD If you plan on staying more than three months in Denmark, you need to apply for a CPR number. You use your CPR number in many situations: to get your salary, to transfer money, register for a doctor and so on. You can only apply for a CPR number if you: ✓ Stay in Denmark for more than three months. For EU citizens this is from the date you have a place to live and hold an EU registration certificate) ✓ Have a place to live ✓ Hold a residence permit (non-EU citizen) or hold an EU registration certificate (EU citizen)

ish tax card and a personal tax number. SKAT (the Danish tax authority) has guides on tax application as well as resources for you to check your preliminary income assessment. Visit www.skat.dk for more details on personal tax.

#7 OPEN A BANK ACCOUNT

#5 GET A NEMID

When you have a place to live and a CPR number, you are ready to choose a bank and open a bank account. This is a must if you are working, as your salary must be paid into your personal bank account. For payments, Danes usually use Dankort, the most common cash card, and Mobilepay, a smartphone app for credit card payments.

NemID is your digital signature. You can use this to do your online banking, get information from the public au-

#8 SIGN UP FOR DANISH LESSONS

OUR NINE-STEP PROCESS WILL HAVE YOU CALLING DENMARK HOME IN NO TIME!

thorities or engage with one of the many businesses that use NemID. Once you have your NemID, you can use Digital Post (e-boks) where you will receive e-mails from public authorities. Check out www.nemid.nu for more details on this service.

#6 GET TO KNOW SKAT If you work in Denmark, you have to apply for a Dan-

Some may argue that this should be the first step when arriving in Denmark, especially given that much of the above guide is made a little easier with some grasp of the Danish language. Nevertheless, the Danes are pretty decent with English and will more than likely accommodate you. Still, a good grasp of the language will help with your socialisation into Danish culture.

#9 GET A HOBBY For those in the greater Copenhagen region, there is a lot on offer when it comes to activities and cultural experiences that will help you adjust and fit in to your new surroundings – often free of charge. Many Danes are members of sports clubs or do volunteer work. It’s a good way to network after working hours – so get involved in your community – you may even make a friend or two! There are a whole host of websites that offer event guides and more information on ways to get out and explore your new home, including international.kk.dk; ihcph.dk; denmark.dk and visitcopenhagen.com. International House Copenhagen hosts many informative events every year on topics such as schooling, workplace culture, finding a home and many others. You can read about upcoming events on their website, www.ihcph.kk.dk. THE-INTL.


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

How many foxes do you need to make a fox cake?

Take a Danish course at Studieskolen and find out

Learn Danish for free. Sign up online today! Studieskolen’s courses are designed for everyone who wants to make fast progress with their Danish language skills. Beginners, non-beginners and everyone in between. Come to class up to four times a week in the heart of Copenhagen and you’ll no longer be treading in the spinach (as they say). Learn more at studieskolen.dk.

Follow us /studieskolen

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MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

THOMAS HØYRUP CHRISTENSEN

MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

TIVOLI - PETER NØRBY

WARMING UP TO DENMARK – MY JOURNEY AS AN EXPAT Expat Insider's The Best & Worst Places for Expats in 2017 sums up Denmark in a nutshell. Out of 65 countries, Denmark ranked: #1 for Work life Balance, #9 for Quality of Life, and #65 for Ease of Settling in. Canadian expat, and founder of Homestead Laura Wintemute, explains just how much of a culture shock Denmark can be. PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER & MARTIN GREGERS JENSEN

TEXT LAURA WINTEMUTE SOURCE WWW.INTERNATIONS.ORG

I

IF YOU TOLD me 12 years ago that I would end up ‘a soccer mom’ in Danish suburbia, I would have never believed it. I’ve spent the past 25 years travelling exotic countries and living abroad, and never thought that I would end up in a tiny, cold Scandinavian country, but I did. The decision to settle down on the other side of the world, far away from my family and friends was a difficult one. Being so far away from everything familiar, everything I knew and everyone I loved was the hardest part of being an expat. It was hard for me to accept that life at home didn’t pause in the lack of my presence. I was missing birthdays, weddings, births, school reunions and memorials of loved ones. My family has always supported my decision (they didn’t have much choice), but if I was happy they were happy. I was happy, and in love!

A CULTURE SHOCK Being Canadian, I feel that we have many similar cultural attributes to Danes. Like values for equality and community, respect for cultural differences and freedom of speech and most importantly we both believe that everyone deserves to be healthy and happy. Yet, with all these similarities, we are still so very different. Nothing prepared me for the culture shock I faced when I moved to Denmark. Canadians are extremely friendly and polite, almost to a fault. We smile and say hello to everyone who meets our eye. If we see a stranger in need, we ask what we can do to help, and if someone accidentally bumps into us on the street, we will apologise to them. We bring pie to all our new neighbours, we invite almost everyone we meet home for dinner and we try our best

ROBERT THOMASON

to make people feel welcome in their new surroundings. In comparison, Danish culture is best explained by its comparative lack of flashiness and disapproval of ostentation, snobbery or “show-off-ness”, putting society ahead of the individual, not boasting about individual accomplishments or being jealous of others. Danes enjoy a simple life with not much weight on possessions, job title, high income or how large their network is. This is almost the complete opposite of Canadians.

Knowing this, I did everything that I could to adapt and fit in to the Danish culture. Not because I needed the Danes’ approval or acceptance to be here, but because I knew that I was likely to spend the rest of my life here. For me, the most logical first step was to understand how Danes think; their humor, sarcasm and straight forwardness. Danish humor is often described as sarcastic and dry. They make fun of almost everything; politicians, gender, sex, even their own children. Danes are much more blunt and transgressive

than most people. But, to understand Danish humor, I soon realised that I needed a good grasp on the Danish language, otherwise things would get completely ‘lost in translation’.

TALK THE TALK, WALK THE WALK No matter how long you're planning on being here, learning Danish will make your time in Denmark that much easier. You don’t have to speak it fluently, just be able to understand it. One week after I arrived in Denmark


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LAURA WINTEMUTE OWNER, HOMESTEAD Laura was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. At a very young age she knew that she wanted to travel. At the age of 22, she packed her bags and moved to the tropical Cayman Islands. This launched her journey as an expat. MORTEN JERICHAU

In the Cayman Islands she learned how to interact with peo-

I started Danish lessons at Studieskolen. I met a fantastic have time in their busy lives for the friends they have. group of expats. It was so easy to just hang out with them After 10 years, I have more Danish friends than expat ones. (and speak English). However, we knew that this wouldn’t All it took was me making the first move, and the second and help us in the long run. We made a pact to speak Danish tothe third… but eventually I broke the code. It takes persegether and that helped immensely. We sounded ridiculous verance and patience to make Danish friends. But once you speaking in our broken-Danish, bad accents and incorrect have them, they’ll be friends for life. And so can you. tenses, but we didn’t care. Whatever your reasons for moving to Denmark, your time as The goal was to use an expat will be an exDanish as much as citing and frustrating “It’s been an adventure trying to adapt to a new culpossible in our everyexperience in equal day life. I spoke to evemeasure. Everything ture. Sometimes, things are tough. Danes tend not to ryone I met in Danis so different from be so welcoming and friendly to strangers, which is ish (well, I at least what we are used to. tried). Normally, after Normal everyday rousomething that is still difficult for me to relate to and hearing me say, “Hej” tines back home beunderstand. But, the work-life balance and famiDanes just automaticome daunting tasks. cally switched to EngJust get out there ly focus has helped me realise the importance of a lish. In the beginning and experience Danchild’s foundation and I’m grateful to be able to raise I thought it was rude ish life. Eat the pickkids here with this focus in mind.” of them, but I then reled herring with lard alised that they were on ryebread, drink a - Angelica Gandrup-Marino - American expat. just being polite. I Carlsberg Special and would kindly ask wash it down with a them to continue in Danish as I was trying to learn their lanRød Aalborg while snacking on fried pig skin (flæskesvær). guage. They would smile and repeat the sentence in Danish. Watch Danish TV series with subtitles. Read the metro exWhen it comes to the Danish working world, things are a press and Ekstra Bladet. Go to Bakken, Louisiana and Gagreat deal more relaxed. Danes have a high degree of flexibillopbanen… The sooner you get out of your comfort zone and ity at work, being able to choose when they start their workdive into your new life here in Denmark (be it temporary or ing day, and have the flexibility to work from home. This is long term) the sooner you can start enjoying your Danish especially important when you have kids. In this respect Denlife. THE-INTL. mark strikes a good work-life balance, prioritising career and ambition on the one hand, and life (health, pleasure, leisure, and family) on the other. Danish society is not created for the upper class. Just the opposite. Nearly all things are geared to the middle class creating a great deal of contentment, which is key. There is little of the mentality of ‘keeping up with the Joneses’. Everyone is on the same level, regardless of whether they are teachers, lawyers or the big boss.

GET OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE I find that most expats remain in their ‘expat bubble’ because it is difficult to make Danish friends. Danes take friendship very seriously and it’s all about trust. A friendship is also considered a lifetime commitment and they prioritise this in their social life. They feel that they don’t have time for more friends, they hardly

COLUMBUS LETH

ple from all walks of life, all nationalities and all cultures. She worked in the hotel concierge service, hotel management and, eventually, opened her own restaurants. In her eighth year of living in the Cayman’s, she met her Danish husband-to-be. Shortly thereafter, they moved to Whistler, Canada, where Laura managed a 5-star restaurant. One year later they settled in Denmark where she married and had a daughter. In 2012, she started working for a relocation company. It was a job that encapsulated both Laura’s experience as an expat and her love of helping people. She learned everything there was to know about relocation into Denmark and built a good network. After 6 years’ experience in relocation, she wanted to take her expertise to the next level and started Homestead – welcome international working expats and their families to Denmark.

www.homesteaddenmark.com


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A TASTE OF AFRICA

IN DENMARK

MATHEW'S WINE JOURNEY FROM CAPE TOWN TO COPENHAGEN

PHOTOGRAPHS LONNIE CASTLE; JAKOB KIRK VON LOTZBECK

W

WHEN YOU THINK wines of the world, Denmark probably wouldn’t make your top-10 list. So why then you ask would a South African viticulturist move more than 6000 miles from the world-renown wine producing region of Cape Town to cold Copenhagen and peruse a career in the wine industry? Love, he says! And not love for the grape, but a girl. Instead, Mathew Castle says that he came to Denmark as a refugee. “I’m a sexual refugee who was forced to come to Denmark by the allure of a gorgeous Danish woman,” he jokes over a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon on his farm in Humle-

bæk just outside of Copenhagen. Mathew explains that while it was his love for his now wife Lonnie Castle, that brought him to Denmark, he embarked on the business of wine importing and consultation as a way to keep himself in the industry. Mathew, who refers to himself as a viticulturist (a professional whose business is grapes), founded Mat’s Vineyard with Lonnie at his side in 2010. To pursue his dreams of establishing his own wine brand in Copenhagen, (and to satisfy his sexual urge, of course) Mathew left behind a long career as a viticulturist in Stellenbosch, Cape Town. He is now based in Copenha-

TEXT DAVID NOTHLING -DEMMER

gen where he imports great quality wine from a few selected wineries in South Africa that are very close to his heart. DOING IT IN DENMARK Denmark is not knowing for its great wine production, and according to Mathew the country only has around 60 Danish wine producers, with only a handful producing wine competitively. This unfortunately meant that none were large enough to employ a professional viticulturist. This realisation however did open a new door to Mathew in the niche markets of vineyard consulting and wine importing.

Naturally, Mathew turned to his love for South African wines which saw him introducing Danes to great quality South African wines. “Danes don’t really know South African wines, but luckily for me the wines sell themselves,” Mathew says of the wineproducing country consistently ranked in the top 10 of global producers. According to him, South African wines comprise only about five percent of sales in Denmark. “This makes the restaurant trade very difficult. We sell most of our wines through private and corporate arrangements,” Mathew explains. “There are over 1200 Danish wine im-


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THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

“I’M A SEXUAL REFUGEE WHO WAS FORCED TO COME TO DENMARK BY THE ALLURE OF A GORGEOUS DANISH WOMAN,” HE JOKES OVER A GLASS OF CABERNET SAUVIGNON ON HIS FARM IN HUMLEBÆK.

porters, so the competition is tough, and all of the big guys trade most of their wines on a discount basis. Our business model is based on honest value for money pricing, and we therefore trade more on the quality of our wines,” Mathew says. All of the wineries that Mathew imports from have a special story. Mathew has either had the pleasure of farming the vineyards, consulted to the farmer or is a personal friend. “This gives us the ability to choose wines that we know, love and can recommend from our hearts.” “I can’t promise you that you will like all of them, but I can promise you that I will be honest in my assessment and comments, and hopefully you will find your own little journey through our wines,” Mathew smiles. South African wines are probably, according to the legendary British master of wine, Jancis Robinson the best value for money wines today. “The industry in South Africa is bursting with young, enthusiastic and incredibly talented people,” Mathew says. It is this enthusiasm which he brings to his business in Denmark. AN ACQUIRED TASTE Establishing himself within the industry, and as a business entity in Denmark didn’t come without its challenges. “Back in 2010 I was one of the only self-employed non-European expats. The government didn’t really know how to categorise me in the labour market, but we found a way. I got a work permit on the strength that I was the only viticulturist in the country, and I had the support of a few of the top Danish producers,” explains Mathew. He says that without his experience and active involvement in vineyard consultancy, he would not be able to do business in Denmark. When it came to adjusting to life in Denmark, a far cry from the rolling mountains of the Cape, Mathew admits it wasn’t as easy as he thought it may be. The hardest part he says was adjusting socially, “I must admit I struggled living in Copenhagen. Neighbours in my apartment never greeted each other – it was like living amongst all these people but being alone.” He and Lonnie eventually bought a small farm in Humlebæk. “I needed the open space and physical challenge of farming. My beautiful wife compromised and commutes to the city for work. She loves having the best of both worlds. We have great

“BACK IN 2010 I WAS neighbours, and the local community greet each other (and strangers)! All of a sudden people just pop in for a chat and glass of wine, which is unheard of in the city. After almost a decade in Denmark, Mathew is well adjusted to Danish life and culture, and has a special place in his heart for the tradition of hygge. “I love Danish hygge. Danes are very similar to South African’s in their approach to eating, drinking and partying at home. I just need to teach them to braai (barbeque) properly,” he laughs. Mathew also enjoys the feeling of personal safety. “Kids can be kids. The roads are safer than back in South Africa and the driving less aggressive,” he observes. Mathew hopes that he can introduce more Danes (and the many expats living in Denmark) to the taste of South Africa through its wines. He encourages anyone interested to pop over for a glass of wine. “We are always open for sales and a chat. Our farm is very close to Louisiana and Årstiderne ved Krogerup, so why not make it a cultural day out,” he says.

ONE OF THE ONLY SELF-EMPLOYED NONEUROPEAN EXPATS. THE GOVERNMENT DIDN’T REALLY KNOW HOW TO CATEGORISE ME IN THE LABOUR MARKET, BUT WE FOUND A WAY.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MAT’S VINEYARD OR TO GET IN CONTACT FOR A PRIVATE OR CORPORATE WINE TASTING, VISIT MATSVINEYARD.COM OR FOLLOW THE VINEYARD ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM, @MATSVINEYARD.


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

BUILDING YOUR OWN BUSINESS

Advice for expats wanting to start their own business. Mathew made mention of the difficulties he experienced in setting up and running his own business as an expat living in Denmark. Fortunately, with the help of Lonnie, he was able to register a company, but still has had to jump through many hoops to ensure that he complies with government regulation when it comes to running his own business. In Denmark innovation and entrepreneurship are highly encouraged. This means that many people start their own businesses. However, as is evident in Mathew’s experience, this process can be somewhat challenging for expats unaware of the regulation requirements put in place by government. For instance, Nordic or EU/EEA citizens can more easily start their own business in Denmark, however those expats from outside the Nordic, EU/EEA and Switzerland regions have to apply for a residence and work permit in order to be self-employed and/or operate an independent company in Denmark. Mathew attested to this saying that it was much easier for him to get his business up and running once he and Lonnie were married. UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS According to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, in its Step-by-Step Guide to Opening a Business in Denmark, there are several steps involved in the process. Below is a basic guide that will assist you in getting started:

#STEP 1 Decide on the legal entity that fits your business operations. There are several types of company structures in Denmark. It is recommend that foreigners use an “Anpartsselskab” (ApS – meaning a private limited liability company).

#STEP 2 Registering your company. All companies must be registered with the Danish Commerce and Companies Agency. For more information on the agency or to register your own company, visit www.virk.dk. This is where those Danish lessons will pay off, as the site is mostly in Danish. Once you have registered your business you will get a Central Business Registration Number (CVR number). The CVR-number is your business’ identification number which you must use when you correspond with public authorities and private entities, i.e. when issuing invoices etc.

#STEP 3 Register with the tax authorities. On completion of the registration process, your company information is sent to the Danish tax authorities (SKAT), as the company must be VAT registered.

#STEP 4 Put in place employment contracts. This is a labour-related matter should you be employing others.

Taster Days January 16th & 18th, 2018

13

www.cis.dk

Our High School students

go to Harvard, Oxford and Outer Space Are you looking for a High School that opens the doors to some of the world’s best universities and most interesting opportunities? We are one of the original IB schools and our graduates have been accepted at Harvard, Cambridge, Princeton, Oxford, MIT and the International Space Station. To experience and learn more about our High School program we invite you to a Taster Day on January 16th or 18th. To sign up please visit www.cis.dk or call +45 3946 3315

#STEP 5 Get your paperwork approved. If you require any permits for the running of your business, such as a liquor license etc., be sure that these are in place before you start trading. If you want to start a business in Denmark, you will need to follow all the Danish rules. It is important that you seek expert advice and do things by the book. Online resources such as Business in Denmark, a public service organisation providing information to foreign service providers from other EU and EEA countries, is a great place to get started. They will guide you on which rules apply to you and your business free of charge. Start-up Denmark is another great resource, and has in place is a start-up visa scheme for talented entrepreneurs who want to grow high-impact start-ups in Denmark. Accepted applicants get a residence and work permit for Denmark valid for two years plus the possibility of extension. Expats from outside the Nordic, EU and EEA regions can apply for resident and work permits through such schemes as a stepping stone to staring their own business. You can find more information on the different visa schemes and rules at www.newtodenmark.dk. THE-INTL. Sources: https://www.workindenmark.dk, http://www.investindk.com, https://danishbusinessauthority. dk/, http://www.startupdenmark.info

A limited number of financial scholarships are available. See website for details.


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

14

BREAKING BORDERS WITH FOOD Adjusting to life in a foreign country is often difficult. For many, fitting in to a new culture, learning the language, even changing ones taste in food causes much anxiety. For Erin Eberhardt Chapman this experience was all too real after she made the move to Denmark from the USA. However, 20 years on, she shares how her love-affair with food helped her discover a new love for Denmark. PHOTOGRAPHS THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY

I

I WAS BORN and raised in the farmlands of Illinois and the northwoods of Wisconsin, USA. Some of my fondest memories are of my parents seamlessly working together in the kitchen creating lovely dinners each night. I think this was where my love for food began. Home-style cooking was the mantra of my slightly food-obsessed family. A mantra I have carried with me half way across the globe. I first visited Denmark in 1993, and then for a semester of school during my university years. I travelled quite a bit between Denmark and the USA during this time, before taking up a job as an art director. Back then, I was “the American” in the ad agency. Just 24 at the time, I was one of the few Americans who had decided to call Denmark home.

FINDING MY FEET WITH FOOD I quickly immersed myself into the Danish way of life, but struggled with the language. At first the only words that would stick in my brain were the names of food items I’d find in the grocery store. I couldn’t speak complete sentences, but quiz me about items on the grocery shelves, and I’d nail it. It wasn’t until my second year of life in Denmark that the natural pangs of homesickness began to kick in. I was young and independent, but still very close with my family back in the USA. I needed to find a way to cope with it. Naturally, I turned to food. I began to embrace all the foods that I had grown up with, digging into old family cookbooks, baking traditional favourites, and filling my little Copenhagen apartment with familiar scents of ‘home’. It worked. I would make dinner for my Dan-

ish friends, bake treats for my colleagues, and when I met my Danish husband-to-be, I suddenly had someone I could cook for on a daily basis. My homesickness began to fade and my life evolved. Denmark became a part of me, but my wariness of the Danish winters grew more and more intense (as I imagine it does for many). I would say: ‘it’s not the cold – it’s the damp and grey!’ As the years went on, my husband and I finally thought we’d had enough of the ‘damp and grey’. We packed up and moved to Southern California, where every day was a warm and sunny 25 degrees. I thought that I would love it. I thought that it was going to be the answer to where I belonged: sunshine and being back in my home country. In the short time that we were there, I went crazy with the abundance of produce at the colourful farmers markets, sipped California wines a-plenty, and soaked up inspiration from all my new foodie friends. But it wasn’t really home. And the seasons didn’t change. I found myself suddenly missing a cool, rainy day in October, candlelit afternoons in December, and snowfall in January. Most of all, I missed making the foods that would go hand-in-hand with the changing seasons.

A NEW FOOD JOURNEY My husband, daughter and I moved back to Denmark permanently nearly three years ago after a realisation that this was where we were meant to be. Making the most of our move back, I had the opportunity to merge my love of baking and nostalgia, and create a ‘Home away from Home’ with the

TEXT ERIN CHAPMAN

launch of The American Pie Company. The shift from long Scandinavian summer nights to damp and grey winter days became a positive rather than a negative. It was at this moment where I learned to truly embrace the Danish winter weather in the foods that I prepared. Hearty stews, slow-cooked fare, roots, herbs, baked goodies and hearty weekend breakfasts reign supreme during these cold

months. And just because it’s grey outside, doesn’t mean that the food has to be grey! My sunny days in California instilled a constant reminder to add colour and use seasonal fruits and veggies to their fullest. So whether you’re a sunshine-deprived Dane or a homesick expat, remember to explore food as a way to nourish your soul during the Danish winters. THE-INTL.


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

RUSTIC SWEET POTATO & BEET GALETTE

15

ERIN CHAPMAN CO-OWNER, THE AMERICAN PIE COMPANY With over 20 years’ experience in the advertising industry, working both in Denmark and USA, Erin has specialised in brand building and image development for lifestyle, food and fashion clientele on both national and international levels. Erin attended DIS, Denmark’s Study Abroad programme in 1996 and made a connection with Copenhagen. She moved to Denmark permanently in 1998 with two suitcases and a pocket-

JUST AS FLAVOURFUL AS IT IS COLOURFUL, THIS HEARTY SAVOURY GALETTE IS A PERFECT WINTER SIDE DISH TO ROASTED MEATS, OR A STAND-ALONE AS THE MAIN COURSE. THE DOUGH IS SIMPLE AND CAN BE EASILY MADE AHEAD OF TIME AND REFRIGERATED FOR UP TO 3 DAYS. SERVES 2-4

ful of change. Working in the advertising industry she worked her way up as a senior creative, as well as a voiceover artist, and then began her own brand and

ple times in the processor) just un-

30-40cm in diameter and approx.

175g flour

til mixture comes together, do not

½cm thick. Transfer the dough to

125g butter, cold and cut into cubes

over-blend.

the baking sheet (the easiest way

INGREDIENTS:

1/

4

to do this is to fold the dough in

tsp salt Bring the dough together with your

half and then in half again, move

hands and form a ball. If it feels a

it to the sheet and open it back up

1 large sweet potato, peeled and

little too sticky, sprinkle with flour.

again).

sliced thin

Wrap with plastic wrap and press

1 large beet, peeled and sliced thin

into a round disk shape. Refrigerate

Leaving about 10cm of dough on

1 small onion, peeled and sliced

for 30 minutes (or up to 3 days if mak-

the edges, layer the prepared po-

into thin rings

ing on advance).

tato, beet and onion in the centre

6-7tbsp cold water

1 clove garlic, smashed and diced

of the dough and out toward the

design business in 2006. Merging her love for food and art direction, she began food styling and cookbook design for other authors, and then proceeded to continue with recipe development, publishing two cookbooks in Denmark. While living in Los Angeles, Erin worked with several US brands on image and recipe development and upon returning to Denmark,

2tbsp olive oil

TO ASSEMBLE THE GALETTE:

edge. Sprinkle with goat cheese

she partnered with Dorte Prip in

Salt and pepper

Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees

and fold the edges in over the beets

2015 to introduce The American

5-4 sprigs of fresh thyme

and line a baking sheet with parch-

and potatoes.

Pie Company in Copenhagen.

150g goat cheese (or fresh

ment paper.

mozzarella for a milder taste),

Erin is happily married to her Brush the folded over dough with a

Danish husband and is the moth-

cut into small pieces

In a mixing bowl, add the sliced

beaten egg or milk. Sprinkle with the

er of a sassy 5-year old daughter

Egg or milk for brushing crust

sweet potato, beet, onion, gar-

remaining thyme sprigs and sea salt.

who speaks fluent “Danglish”.

lic, olive oil and salt and pepper to

Bake for 40-45 minutes or until the

taste. Add thyme leaves from 2-3 of

crust is golden brown and the beets

In a mixing bowl, add the flour, but-

the stems and gently toss the ingre-

and potatoes are cooked through.

ter and ½tsp salt. Using a fork or

dients until the potato and beet is

pastry blender, (or pulse in a food

coated well.

TO MAKE THE DOUGH:

processor) press the cubed butter pieces until you have a crumbly mix-

On a clean surface, sprinkle a good

ture, and the butter is in pea-sized

amount of flour and roll out the

chunks. Gradually add the cold wa-

dough into a circular shape, (using

ter, and press into the mixture with

plenty of flour if needed to avoid

a rubber scraper (or pulse a cou-

sticking) so that it’s approximately

NOTE: IF CRUST IS BROWNING TOO FAST, COVER WITH FOIL AND CONTINUE TO BAKE UNTIL FILLING IS DONE.

www.theamericanpieco.com


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

16

SO, WHY SHOULD YOU LEARN DANISH? THE INTERNATIONAL TAKES TO THE STREETS OF COPENHAGEN TO DISCOVER WHAT MOTIVATES EXPATS TO LEARN DANISH, AND HOW THEY WENT ABOUT IT. THIS IS WHAT YOU HAD TO SAY… TEXT DAVID NOTHLING -DEMMER SOURCES WWW.SPROGCENTERHELLERUP.DK; WWW.DEDANSKESPROGCENTRE.DK

There are long courses that run during the academic year, short courses and summer courses. Depending on your needs, time, interests and prior learning levels, these options below are available to you: ➜ Courses at Danish higher education institutions ➜ Programmes and courses offered by the local council (kommune) ➜ Courses in Danish at adult learning centres (VUCs) ➜ Private language schools or classes offered by private language teachers ➜ Courses at Folk High Schools (Folkehøjskoler)

LEARN FOR WORK OR PLEASURE As an expat living in Denmark, and depending on your residential status, the following is available in the form of Danish language schooling: ➜ Labour market-oriented Danish – a 250-hour course for beginners ➜ Danish 1, 2 or 3 – programmes divided into six modules Labour market-oriented Danish is a beginners’ course for foreign workers, spouses, students and au pairs. The course is made up of 250 hours of instruction over a maximum period of 18 months, and is divided into five 50-hour courses. Upon completion of the course, students then have a right to enrol in a Danish programme concluding with a Danish exam. Danish 1, 2 and 3 are courses aimed at expats with varying levels of education. Each course is made up of several modules and concludes with an exam. For Boualem Marir, an Algerian expat, learning Danish was all about its practicality and ease of getting things done – be it personally or at work. Boualem didn’t want to have to rely on asking for a translation every time she needed to get something done official done. “All correspondence from Danish authorities (municipality, DONG, SKAT...) is in Danish, which meant continuous asking for help from Danish people,” she explained.

“LESSONS ARE FREE FOR THE FIRST THREE YEARS OF LIVING HERE. WHO WOULDN’T WANT TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS CHANCE TO MASTER A FOREIGN LANGUAGE EVEN IF LESS THAN 0.08% OF THE WORLD UNDERSTANDS IT,” LAURA WINTEMUTE, AMERICAN EXPAT.

WHEN EXPATS ARRIVE in Denmark learning Danish is an important part of the process of settling in. Surveys have shown that learning Danish benefits you both professionally and socially, and will offer greater insight into Danish cultural and social norms. This is important for successful communication and networking, whether on a personal or a business level.

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS Ganesh, a medical doctor from Madurai who attended Danish language lessons at Hellerup Sprogcenter said

that his reason for taking up the language was about expanding his horizons. There are plenty of opportunities for learning Danish in Denmark, and many types of courses available for free if you have a CPR number or a work contract. There are several private and public organisations that offer lessons in Danish at various levels. “Lessons are free for the first three years of living here. Who wouldn’t want to take advantage of this chance to master a foreign language even if less than 0.08% of the world understands it,” laughs American Laura Wintemute.

Laura went on to tell us that she started Danish Lessons at Studieskolen just one week after arriving in the country, with a goal to use the language as much as possible in everyday life. “No matter how long you’re planning on being here, learning Danish just makes your time here that much easier. You don’t have to speak it fluently, just be able to understand it,” she said when asked why she would encourage others to learn the language. No matter your reasoning for wanting to learn Danish – most agree that it has helped make their adjustment to life in Denmark that much easier. THE-INTL.


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

CHRISTIAN LINDGREN

17

CHRISTIAN LINDGREN

BJARKE ŸRSTED_LOUISIANA MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

THE ABC’S OF CHILD-CARE IN DENMARK Choosing the best kindergarten for your child can be a daunting task. This is especially true if you are new to the Danish education system. However, upper Secondary school teacher, Jeppe Jensen says that it needn’t be a worrisome task, as he offers up advice on schooling for your young child. PHOTOGRAPHS COPENHAGEN MEDIA CENTER TEXT JEPPE JENSEN

I

IN MY EXPERIENCE, expats have come to perceive the Danish kindergarten as being more lenient than those in their home countries. Excursions, forest treks and napping outside – activities foreign to many expats when considering a kindergarten. My wife is an expat, and like her, I know that this is often a cause of many sleepless nights, tossing and turning over the best kindergarten to send your child to. As a teacher, my knowledge of the Danish education system did assist in our decision making. But, it wasn’t until I visited a few kindergartens and discovered first-hand the ins and outs of this pre-school institution, that I was sure of our decision.

WHAT IS A DANISH KINDERGARTEN? In Denmark, a kindergarten is a preschool environment for the care and development of children aged three to six years.

The facilities are manned with professionals who are trained “pædagoger” (teachers) and have years of experience taking care of other people’s children. Kindergartens are usually divided into rooms with smaller groups of children (a healthy mix of boys and girls). Danish education law stipulates that each room must have at least two adults to care for the children, including ‘helpers’.

THERE ARE FOUR MAIN TYPES OF KINDERGARTENS IN DENMARK. THE FIRST is an ‘integrated institution’, meaning that the schooling facility is both a day nursery and kindergarten in one. Although, children are cared for separately according to age. These schools tend to be bigger than the other kinds, meaning more children, but also more public funds and more help if such is needed. THE SECOND type is just ‘kindergarten’, meaning no toddlers, fewer children, more focus on the skills your child needs to grow and develop. THE THIRD and increasingly popular type is ‘Forest Kindergarten’. Here the kindergartens pledge to take children into the forest every day (some do less, I know), allowing free-roam in a forest they are familiar with. Children usually carry out most of their daily activities in the forest.

TUALA HJARNØ

A FOURTH type, similar to

the other three but fewer in numbers, is the ‘Rudolf Steiner’ kindergartens. They are often praised for their educational approach, focusing on creativity, organic awareness and non-materialistic approach.

ENROLLING YOUR CHILD IN A KINDERGARTEN The first thing that my wife and I did when choosing a kindergarten was to visit a few that we had shortlisted. This was a good starting point and gave us a first-had look into the daily goings on at a kindergarten. The teachers are often more than willing to show you around and, like most Danes, many speak fine English. Once you’ve taken a look and decided on a list of the most suitable kindergartens, you apply online via your local municipality (kommune). Simply type in your info, make a prioritised list of kindergartens and press send. Unfortunately, and this may be a drawback, there is no guarantee that your child will end up in the kindergarten you wished for, as there are limits to how many kids each can take. In my personal opinion, most plac es are great and they will work through any language barrier without hesitation. They will talk to you about your kid every day if they have time for it. They will post pictures online, take them on day tours to camp grounds, forests, performances, seeing Santa, visiting castles and so much more. So, after looking at the different facilities, signing up and being assigned a spot, all you have to do is leave your child in the capable care of a group of complete strangers. And that folks, is the hardest task of all! THE-INTL.

JEPPE G. JENSEN TEACHER AND FATHER Jeppe is an Upper Secondary Teacher, teaching both English and Film. He married an expat from the USA and is father to two kids, aged seven and four. He currently lives in Roskilde, but has lived in both Copenhagen and Elsinore. Jeppe has always travelled extensively. First with his parents, seeing almost every European country, then as a student, spending eight months attending Glasgow University. Jeppe and his family often travel on holiday to visit family in the United States. Education is something Jeppe values highly and wishes for everyone.


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

18

A HEALTHIER YOU IN 2018

INSIDE AND OUT

So you’ve made the brave decision to embark on a journey to better health in 2018 – good on you! But what exactly is a healthier you, and how do you go about measuring better health? We investigate...

TEXT WEIGH-LESS MAGAZINE SOURCES DANISH HEALTH AUTHORITY; LIFE IN DENMARK

H

HOW DOES ONE measure a healthy you, is it in the amount of weight lost, pant size dropped, increased fitness level or even better blood cholesterol? While the scale may give you an indication of your dropping numbers after a week of healthy eating, and you can now go an extra 10 minutes on the treadmill, are you truly healthier because of your efforts at the gym and on the plate? Your body’s health has a significant effect on your life, wellness and even your family’s future. Leading a healthier life by being more physically active and following a healthy, balanced diet has an even greater impact on your overall health – not just on the outside. Key health indicators such as Blood Sugar (glucose), Blood Pressure and Blood Cholesterol are important

checks to get done on a regular basis, and numbers to monitor for better indication into your overall health.

WHY SHOULD I GET MY NUMBERS CHECKED? Health screening helps you find out if you have a particular disease or condition even if you do not exhibit any symptoms or signs of disease. Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar, and Cholesterol are known as the silent killers, often going unnoticed until too late. In Denmark, disease prevention is an important part of the health-care system. The Danish Health Authority for example is responsible for national action plans in particular, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other chronic disease prevention.

Early detection, followed by treatment and good control of the condition, can result in better outcomes and lowers the risk of serious complications. It’s therefore important to get yourself screened by your local general practitioner (GP) even if you feel perfectly healthy. It’s recommended that you screen blood glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure levels as early as the age of 20. This is particularly relevant for people at risk of lifestyle diseases and who are overweight, have a family history of disease, have had previous abnormal cholesterol/ blood sugar/ blood pressure readings and those who are smokers. People within the normal range should be re-screened every five years, until the age of 35. Screening should then be done more routinely (every one to two years).


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

ARE YOU AT RISK? AND HOW DO YOU KNOW? Thankfully, there is a system of “numbers” we can use to tell us how we compare to a healthy state. By knowing your numbers, you can take action in making positive lifestyle changes that will help prevent and manage chronic health conditions that contribute to heart disease, diabetes and strokes.

Fasting blood sugar

> 5.5

HbA1c

> 6.5

6.1 – 6.4

Total

>7

5-7

LDL

>5

3-5

HDL

<1

1 – 1.5

Triglycerides

>2.2

1.8 – 2.2

< 1.8

Systolic

>140

120 – 139

< 120

Diastolic

>90

80 - 89

Determine whether the results of your tests fall within the ideal range, moderate risk or high risk categories.

HIGH RISK

Cholesterol (mmol/L)

Blood Pressure

HOW CAN MY NUMBERS BE MONITORED? In Denmark your GP would normally perform these tests – in fact, they should be part of most routine check-ups. If you are new to the Danish health-care system, choosing a GP only requires that you are registered in the Civil Registration System. Once you are, you are entitled to choose a GP you can contact if you fall ill or require prescriptions, vaccinations, and certain types of contracepIDEAL tion etc. Your GP will also assist you RANGE with regard to disease prevention and < 5.5 of course getting these all-important health indicators checked. < 6.0 The citizen services of your munic<5 ipality will give you a list of doctors you can choose between. You can reg<3 ister with a new GP whenever you want to. It only costs a small fee. > 1.5

YOUR HEALTH INDICATORS

Blood sugar (mmol/L)

Fortunately, these are all things you can change and manage.

MODERATE RISK

WHAT CAN I DO TO IMPROVE MY NUMBERS? Although you do inherit some risk of these diseases from your family, the lifestyle you lead particularly increases your risk of chronic diseases – specifically linked to smoking, following a poor diet, being overweight and leading a sedentary lifestyle.

H OW O F T E N D O I N E E D TO CHECK MY NUMBERS?

Anyone whose numbers are above the recommended range should monitor change every six months. Even if your numbers are in the recommended range, it is still important to monitor them every six months as an increased age is a very high risk factor. Based on your individual risk profiles, your GP will advise you on how often and when these tests should take place. It is also important to monitor change when follow-

< 80

19

ing a healthy diet as even modest weight loss (5-10 percent) can have a significant effect on your numbers. Seeing these health improvements can become a crucial reminder as to why it is essential to follow a longterm healthy lifestyle. Your individual circumstances and your numbers will dictate how often you should get tested, so speak to your GP.

ARE YOUR NUMBERS HIGH? If your numbers are out of the recommended zones in the table, it may be a good idea to consider some of these remedies before your health takes a nose-dive:

#1 EXERCISE Regular physical activity is an important part of a healthy body. The Danish Health Authority advocates a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise every day for adults aged 18-65. Regular exercise will assist in lowering your numbers, and risk profile. Find an exercise that you enjoy, this will ensure you do not get bored or despondent and give up.

#2 STICK TO A HEALTHY, BALANCED DIET Obesity may increase your risk of higher numbers in all the mentioned areas, which may result in disease such as Diabetes.

#3 MONITOR Pay close attention to your numbers and comply with the frequent testing set out by your medical practitioner. This ensures that you remain aware of any negative trends that may develop so you can take quick action. Know your numbers and make 2018 your healthiest year yet. THE-INTL.

herlufsholm.dk INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

AT HERLUFSHOLM SKOLE, NÆSTVED Give your child the best of Denmark wrapped in an international education.

Herlufsholm is a boarding school located in beautiful surroundings south of Copenhagen. We offer the IB Diploma as well as a preparatory IB class, opening doors to university home and abroad. Our students are ambitious. They combine their studies here with international exchange, service work, The Duke of Edinburgh International Award, sports, arts, Model United Nations, etc. We set the framework for world citizens but it is our students who aspire to see the world. we aim to inspire and engage students small classes - student-teacher ratio is 7:1 study hall and after school tutoring to students in need of a helping hand assigned mentor who guides students and helps them set goals for personal and academic development 25 years experience with international boarders and how to make them feel at home strong alumni network with group meetings all over the world

A DANISH INTERNATIONAL

EDUCATION

Have a taste of our everyday life on Facebook: Herlufsholm Skole og Gods #myherluf @herlufsholm_skole

Summer School - in July every year for children aged 13-15 with intensive Danish Language Course or Media Project


THE INTERNATIONAL - JANUARY 2018

20

“Opening a Danish textbook could be your next big career move”

Alejandro, engineer from Co´rdoba.

Sign up for intensive Danish courses in Hellerup and Lyngby sprogcenterhellerup.dk

1605_SH_annonce_Murmur_255x345mm_01.indd 1

23/10/17 09.46

Profile for The International Denmark

The International - January 2018 - Issue 1  

Welcome to the first issue of The International. We have loved creating the first issue packed with solid helpful articles, personable stori...

The International - January 2018 - Issue 1  

Welcome to the first issue of The International. We have loved creating the first issue packed with solid helpful articles, personable stori...

Profile for the-intl