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October 2016 Volume 4 Issue 10 Pages 48 Registered with Registrar of Newspapers under | RNI NO: MAHENG/2012/43707 Postal Registration No. MNE/346/2015-17 published on 5th of every month,TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN posted at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office,Pantnagar- 75, posting date 17/18 of month

Asian Countries : India need to Awake.!!! è Interview : Magus & Ken è Technical Article : Study of fabrics produced from modied Viscose & Bamboo Yarns è Report : Cotton/ Yarn/ Surat/ Vidharbha è Report : Events & AGM


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EDITORIAL

BRICS & Asian Countries BRICS is an acronym for an association of 5 major developing & fast growing national economies ie. Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa. The five nations have a combined nominal GDP of US$16.6 trillion, equivalent to approximately 22% of the gross world product, combined GDP (PPP) of around US$37 trillion and an estimated US$4 trillion in combined foreign reserves. Overall the BRICS are forecasted to expand 4.6% in 2016. The World Bank expects BRICS growth to pick up to 5.3% in 2017. Bilateral relations among BRICS nations have mainly been conducted on the basis of non-interference, equality and mutual benefit. BRICS group acts as a bridge between developed and developing countries. ( Reference : en.wikipedia.org) India being a hosting country for Summit 2016 , Indian PM Mr. Narendra Modi chosen climate change, infrastructure and sustainable development as the BRICS summit’s main goals. Each member country has their goal to discuss. yy Brazil is looking to boost business for its IT, pharmaceuticals, sanitation & farming sector. yy Russia is looking forward to expand nuclear tie with Syria and Afghanistan, improve ranking in global oil supply chain. yy India has $2.38 trillion economy & growing at 7.5 % annually, fastest of the five countries. But it also has the world’s highest number of people in poverty, with more than half of its 1.3 billion populations living on less than $3.10 a day. Indian government have set up three working groups at the summit focused on counter-terrorism, cyber-security and energy security. India also wants to launch a BRICS social services agreement, financial services framework and possibly a think tank. yy China’s economy is growing at its slowest pace in 25 years, but it is the world’s second largest after the U.S. at $11.4 trillion. President Xi Jinping is likely to be looking to expand access for Chinese goods to foreign markets. Chinese national priority now is “One Belt, One Road”. They are trying to seek Indian support for the trade route. yy South Africa : South Africa’s economy is troubled due to instability of currency. South Africa’s economy, by far the smallest among the BRICS.

Asian Countries BRICS have 2 common Asian countries, ie. India and China. But our neighbouring countries are not behind the race as far as Textile & Garment industry is concern. Bangladesh dominating by lowest garment manufacturing cost. Vietnam being cost competitive in labour. Cambodia, Srilanka, Indonesia, Pakistan, UAE & many others are on race. Being largest and ancient economy for textiles, India is still behind, due to lack of positive attitude, innovation & myopic view. In a global village any industry term as “Global industry” not country specific industry. Textile comes into manufacturing industry in overall economy, so no separate industry by government too. If we are manufacturing segment, why we are deviating from it? Imports, job working, dependence of countries? We need to gear up and plan the productive steps to reach at peak. Wishing you Very Happy Diwali and Productive New Year...!!!

Ms. Jigna Shah Editor & Publisher All rights reserved Worldwide; Reproduction of any of the content from this issue is prohibited without explicit written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure and present factual and accurate information. The views expressed in the articles published in this magazine are that of the respective authors and not necessarily that of the publisher. Textile Value chain is not responsible for any unlikely errors that might occur or any steps taken based in the information provided herewith.

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CONTENT NEWS

9- Birla + Rieter + Groz Beckert 10- Texpert 38- Kornit

October 2016 ISSUE EDITORIAL TEAM Editor & Publisher Ms. Jigna Shah Consulting Editor Mr. Avinash Mayekar Graphic Designer Mr. Anant A. Jogale

INDUSTRY

Mr. Devchand Chheda City Editor - Vyapar ( Janmabhumi Group) Mr. Manohar Samuel President, Birla Cellulose, Grasim Industries Dr. M. K. Talukdar VP, Kusumgar Corporates Mr. Shailendra Pandey VP (Head – Sales and Marketing), Indian Rayon Mr. Ajay Sharma GM RSWM (LNJ Bhilwara Group)

EDUCATION / RESEARCH

Mr. B.V. Doctor HOD knitting, SASMIRA Dr. Ela Dedhia Associate Professor, Nirmala Niketan College Dr. Mangesh D. Teli Professor, Dean ICT Dr. S.K. Chattopadhyay Principal Scientist & Head MPD Dr. Rajan Nachane Retired Scientist, CIRCOT

Delhi Representative office : Mr. Sudhir Verma Knit Experts 242, Pocket 3, Sector 23, Near Max Fort School, Rohini, New Delhi- 110085 Email : knitexperts@rediffmail.com Tel : +91-9818026572

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COVER STORY : Asian Countries: India Need to Awake...!!! 11- Overview of Asian Textile industry & competitors analysis by Mr. Avinash Mayekar 12- Co-branding: the Art of Collaboration by Mr. Rushin Vadhani 14- Customisation: Measuring up to challenges by Mr. Vishnu Govind INTERVIEWS 17- Mr. Mayur Suchak from Magus Consulting Pvt. Ltd. 18- Mr. Nikunj Bagadia from Ken Enterprise Pvt. Ltd. TECHNICAL ARTICLE 19- Studies on fabrics produced from modified Viscose/ Bamboo Yarns by DKTE Professors EVENT REPORT 16- Cotton USA Seminar 2016 22- World Textile Conference 24- Buyer Seller Meet : Bhiwandi 25- IAF Seminar 26- Shree Market Silk Merchant Association Directory/ Mobile App Launch meet 27- Texprocil Award Meet 28- ITTA AGM Meet 29- ITAMMA: chief guest & Guest of Honour speech 30- NITRA Convocation MARKET REPORT 31- Cotton Report 34- Yarn Report 36- Surat Report 37- Vidarbha Report 39- SHOW CALENDAR

Advertiser Index Back Page : Raymond Back Inside : LIVA Front Inside : Raysil Page 3 : Asmeeta Textile Park Page 4: Sanjay Plastic Page 5 : SGS Innovation

Page 7 : Colorjet Page 41 : ATE Page 42 : India ITME 2016 Page 43 : SKBS Page 44: YFA Page 45: INTEX Page 46: Amarjothi

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October 2016


NEWS LIVA collaborates with FDCI for Amazon India Fashion Week AW 2016as an Associate Sponsor

~Liva, from the Aditya Birla Group, offers exclusive service through kiosks for designers~ Brand Liva has collaborated with Fashion Design Council of India, apex body of Indian fashion industry,as an associate sponsor for the Amazon India Fashion Week (AIFW) Autumn Winter 2016.The brand will offer an exclusive fabric innovation service to the designers through kiosks across cities.The 28th edition of AIFW is being held from October 12th to 16th at the NSIC Grounds, New Delhi. LIVA received great response from fashion designers during theirlast edition at the fashion week.Speaking on the col-

Rieter receives compensation payment for damages from the patent decision in China

Rieter protects its innovations and products with patents and consistently takes action against patent infringements. This is also in accordance with the wishes of the Chinese government, which supports respect for intellectual property. Economic production in spinning mills can be ensured only with original products by Rieter. By using copied Rieter products, which generally demonstrate little wear resistance, the customer runs the risk of producing poor quality yarn. In addition, it

laboration, Mr. Manohar Samuel, President - Marketing & Business Development, Birla Cellulose said, “We are excited to collaborate with FDCI as an Associate Sponsor. At Amazon India Fashion Week, our objective is to interact and engage with the fashion designers and highlight LIVA’s fashion adaptability. LIVA fabric is innovative and natural, made of wood pulp, which delight consumers with its comfort & fluidity” Market research conducted by the Brand revealedthe biggest challenge faced by thefashion designers in expanding their market globally is the supply chain - availability of quality, innovative, natural and consumer friendly fabric in small and medium quantities. Addressing this challenge Birla Cellulose has come out with an exclusive solution. Mr. Samuel, added “Designers in India are exceptionallycreative with great consumer insight. In past few seasons, Liva fabrics have been sculpted into exquisite fashion apparelsappreciated by consumers across the globe. We intend to provide supportthrough a robust supply chain entirely created foroff-the-shelf requirements of LIVA fabrics through ‘Liva Fluid Center Kiosks’” Mr. Sunil Sethi, President, FDCIsaid, “We are happy to be associated with the Aditya Birla Group and the support they ofresults in unwanted downtime and outages of machines, and the success of the customer is vulnerable to becoming diminished. Rieter protects its products with patents and consistently takes action against copies. In 2012 Rieter discovered the first patent infringements of its Com4® compact spinning technology for compact spinning in China. The Chinese ring spinning machine manufacturer Tonghe installed components copied by Cixi Jingwei. In 2014 a Chinese court decided in the appeal process that the production and sale of copies by Cixi Jingwei and Tonghe must cease forthwith. Consequently, Cixi Jingwei was sentenced to pay compensation for damages and Tonghe may no longer use Com4® components. In a further process, the Jiangsu High Court established a clear

International textile con- tive exchange Albstadt/Germany: On Thursday, 22 Sepference in Albstadt: Groz- tember 2016, Groz-Beckert invited partners Beckert invited customers and customers to Albstadt for an event with many expert presentations from the textile and partners to an innova- industry. Around 160 international particiOctober 2016

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fer to the designers and the fashion community is appreciable. Fabrics are an important part of fashion garmentsand innovative& natural fabrics work best to get creativity in the silhouettes” At AIFW, launch of LIVA Protégé’s second edition was also announced. LIVA Protégé is a pan India fashion designer hunt and aims to reach hundreds of students through top fashion colleges across many cities in India. National Institute of Designing (NID), Ahmedabad continues to offer LIVA - ‘Natural Fibre Chair’ About LIVA LIVA is a natural fluid fashion fabric, from Birla Cellulose – a part of Aditya Birla Group. LIVA is created from natural cellulosic fibres and transforms the way you wear garments, giving them the most liquid and soft drape. LIVA is the preferred ingredient fabric brand for leading women’s brands including BIBA, Lifestyle, Shopper Stop, Van Heusen, Pantaloons, Allen Solly FBB, Fusion Beats, Maxx, Park Avenue, Wills Lifestyle and many more in over 140 cities and around 2000 stores. Currently more than 7 million garments carry LIVA tags. About 900 stores adorned the LIVA visual merchandise and training sessions conducted across India.

patent infringement in 2015. Based on this, Changzhou Intermediate Court this year obliged Tonghe to pay compensation for damages of RMB 230 000 to Rieter.

pants from highly innovative textile industry companies accepted the invitation. As part of the event, Groz-Beckert presented their new study of global textile production. The work combines analyses and market data from the areas of yarn production and textile manufacture, offering a

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NEWS

holistic and unique insight into the textile industry. As well as the presentation “The Fabric Year”, numerous exciting and informative expert talks awaited the international industry professionals in the audience. After the welcoming address by Eric Schöller, Member of the Executive Board of Groz-Beckert KG, the day started with a

talk by Andreas Engelhardt, who presented extracts from his publication “The Fiber Year”, whose data was the basis for “The Fabric Year”. He was followed by Dr. KarlMichael Schumann, Contarix GmbH, who gave a presentation about innovative products in the nonwoven industry. Then Jan Kettemann, Schlegel und Partner GmbH, spoke about the varied applications for textiles in cars. After a lunch break, the topic of textiles in the automotive industry was revisited by Omar Cividini, Brembo S.p.A. His presentation was devoted to the use of textile fibers in braking systems. Dr. Monica Segata

from Italcementi S.p.A. then highlighted another innovative application of textile: The construction industry. Then a presentation by formerly long-time Nike Manager Linda Keppinger, from MaterialsMove, gave unique insights into the innovation process of large brands. Finally, a talk by Andreas Engelhardt and Martin Weiler, market research at GrozBeckert KG, presented data and analyses from “The Fabric Year”. The analyses in the specialist publication combine a variety of data sources, such as textile machine quantities available in the market and production data of the fiber industry. The work therefore creates completely new and exclusive insights into the global textile industry. The day concluded with an evening buffet dinner, which offered the space for professional exchanges.

Texperts signs MoU with DKTE to stimulate and facilitate the research & development projects

sharing. During the course of the MoU, it will provide Texperts and DKTE a platform to share knowledge, resources, facilities & infrastructure for know-how transfer as well as to develop and commercialize new textile products.

Prof. (Dr.) P. V. Kadole, Principal, DKTE said that since inception, “DKTE has been serving the industry especially in the field of textiles through testing, training, product development, turnkey projects, incubation and R & D. The research environment of the institute will surely bring the success to the objective of the MoU with leading international sourcing and buying house, Texperts India Pvt. Ltd.” He further added that,“final year UG and PG students work hard to accomplish academic project requirements. DKTE is being updated with market through close industry interactions. The MoU with the Texperts will surely be helpful to the students to obtain international exposure through soft intervention for marketing, market trends, branding and corporate culture.Our institute has received an autonomous status from current academic year and R&D is being an important focus now, the institute will put significant efforts for the success of the MoU. DKTE is thankful to Texperts for the pro-active step.” The MOU recognizes the need for increased research and development projects in the field of textile and will serve as mutually beneficial programs to enhance the textile industry both domestically and internationally.

The scope of the MoU will include:

Texperts India Private Limited and DKTE Society’s Textile & Engineering Institute (DKTE) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to establish a collaboration in the field of textiles with the aim of innovating, developing & commercializing new or existing products with new applications. Talking about the MoU, Mr. Deipak Hamirwasia, Director - Texperts, said, with a vision to disrupt the Fashion & Textile Industry through Industy-Acedemia Collaboration, the purpose of the MoU is to stimulate and facilitate the research and development projects through knowledge & resources

Texperts shall undertake the following activities: • Share Ideas & concepts for new developments • Arranging raw materials as & when required • Organize internship programs for DKTE students • Visit DKTE to deliver guest lectures for DKTE students • Sponsor Mini projects DKTE will be undertaking the following activities: • Knowledge sharing & giving technical inputs • Sampling support • New Product developments • To organize & conduct training programs for Texperts employees • Product analysis & attending quality complaints • Industrial Seminars

you love a flower, don’t pick it up. Because if you pick it up it dies and it ceases to “beIfwhat you love.So if you love a flower, let it be. Love is not about possession.Love is about appreciation. ’’ -Osho

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October 2016


COVER STORY

Overview of Asian Textile Industry & Competitor Analysis Shri Avinash Mayekar

MD, Suvin Advisor Pvt. Ltd. Asian Textile Industry The global textile& apparel trade is increasing at a CAGR of 3% since last few years. Asia is the main hub for textile industry. China is the major exporter with total share of 37% in the global trade of textile & apparel sector followed by other countries like India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam & Cambodia. The textile industry is highly labor intensive industry. Hence, lower cost of production &cheap labor are the main reasons for growth of Textile industry in the Asian countries. USA, European Countries, UK & Japan are the major export market for Asian countries. China controls about 40 percent of global textile markets& India claims second position.

China

China has dominated the textile and garment industry for the past 30 years, and remains the single largest producer and exporter of textiles and clothing, thanks to its low production costs. It has well-established supply chains, as well as good infrastructure and expertise in textile and apparel products in much larger volumes. No single emerging country in South East Asia can yet hope to match China in all of these capabilities. Hence China will likely remain the leading textile and apparel sourcing country in the region over coming few years. With labour, land and regulatory costs on the rise, analysts predict that the industry is about to undergo a shift to South East Asia and beyond. Despite competition from cheaper South East Asian nations, China will remain the dominant player in the industry for some time to come — given the size of the domestic market, supply chain concentration and the scale benefits it has accumulated over the years. These things are hard to replicate. Emerging countries in South East Asia are increasingly challenging China’s dominance. Many international firms are adopting the “China plus one” strategy, whereby they retain a production base in China, yet open another facility in a low-cost Asian country. It’s a sound diversification strategy to reduce risk, most suited to larger businesses that can afford to scale up.

India

India is highest growing economy today on world’s map. With abundant raw material availability & stable government, strong industrial growth is forecasted in near future. Textile is one the most ancient industries. Today, textile sector is one of the largest contributors to India’s exports with approximately 11 per cent of total exports. The industry realised export earnings worth US$ 41.4 billion in 2014-15, a growth of 5.4 per cent, as per The Cotton Textiles Export Promotion Council (Texprocil). The Indian Textile Industry

October 2016

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contributes approximately 5 per cent to India’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and 14 per cent to overall Index of Industrial Production (IIP). The Indian textiles industry, currently estimated at around US$ 108 billion, is expected to reach US$ 223 billion by 2021. The industry is the second largest employer after agriculture, providing employment to over 45 million people directly and 60 million people indirectly.The Indian textiles industry is extremely varied, with the hand-spun and handwoven textiles sectors at one end of the spectrum, while the capital intensive sophisticated mills sector at the other end of the spectrum. The decentralised power looms/ hosiery and knitting sector form the largest component of the textiles sector. The close linkage of the textile industry to agriculture (for raw materials such as cotton) and the ancient culture and traditions of the country in terms of textiles make the Indian textiles sector unique in comparison to the industries of other countries. The Indian textile industry has the capacity to produce a wide variety of products suitable to different market segments, both within India and across the world.The future for the Indian textile industry looks promising, buoyed by both strong domestic consumption as well as export demand. With consumerism and disposable income on the rise, the retail sector has experienced a rapid growth in the past decade with the entry of several international players like Marks & Spencer, Guess and Next into the Indian market. The organised apparel segment is expected to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of more than 13 per cent over a 10-year period. Bangladesh While the rest of is Asia disappointed in terms of export revenue in 2015, there was one surprising anomaly to the pattern – Bangladesh. Bangladeshi export earnings rose to $31.5bn in 2015, thereby setting a new record for the South Asian country. This phenomenal success can be attributed to Bangladesh’s growing apparel industry, which accounted for over 83 percent of total exports. As global demand for cheap clothing rises rapidly, Bangladesh’s position as the second biggest exporter of garments in the world continues to hold strong, which is mainly due to its large population and low labour costs.In fact, according to the World Bank, the country’s GDP is expected to grow to 6.7 percent this year, which will make Bangladesh one of the fastest growing economies in the world. The textile and apparel industries provide the single source of economic growth in Bangladesh’s rapidly developing economy. Exports of textiles and apparels are the principal source of foreign exchange earnings. By 2013, about 4 million people, mostly women, worked in Bangladesh’s $19 billion-a-year industry, export-oriented ready-made garment (RMG) industry. Bangladesh is second only to China, the world’s second-largest apparel exporter of western brands. Sixty percent of the export contracts of western brands are with European buyers and about forty percent with American buyers. Only 5% of textile factories are owned by foreign investors, with most of the production being controlled by local investors. The Ready-Made Garments (RMG) industry occupies a unique position in the Bangladesh economy. It is the largest exporting industry

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COVER STORY in Bangladesh, which experienced phenomenal growth during the last 20 years. By taking advantage of an insulated market under the provision of Multi Fibre Agreement (MFA) of GATT, it attained a high profile in terms of foreign exchange earnings, exports, industrialization and contribution to GDP within a short span of time. Indonesia Robust economic growth and rising purchasing power make Indonesia – the world’s fourth most populated country – an attractive market for textiles and clothing. Both local and foreign companies are vying for market share. Rising costs are giving domestic producers a hard time as they try to fend off overseas competition, but technological modernization, improving labour skills, better infrastructure and not least the relatively low rupiah alter the picture in their favour.Local textile producers depend almost entirely on imported cotton, since domestic farmers are unable to satisfy even 1% of national demand. This makes yarn spinners vulnerable to the fluctuating global prices and has forced a number of small businesses to close up shops, though larger ones are in a stronger position, thanks to their greater stockpiling ability and better access to capital.The principle buyers of yarn from Indonesia are China and Japan, while textiles and textile products go mostly to the US, the EU and Japan. Vietnam Vietnam has a lower cost base than China and India, although higher than Bangladesh and Pakistan. The textiles and apparel industry is actively supported by the government, and relatively significant currency depreciation makes the country’s exports competitive. The local workforce is still largely of a low-end skill base, however, meaning that Vietnam’s best sourcing opportunities are still in basic designs and standard types such as woven garments and baby wear products. The total export turnover of the garment sector reached $24 billion in 2014 and $27.5 billion in 2015, and it is expected to reach $31 billion by late 2016. Plentiful competitively priced labor giving the country a distinct cost advantage; and supportive government policies, including incentives to attract foreign direct investment. Cambodia: The garment and textiles industry has thrived for about two

decades n o w . Growth skyrocke t e d when the normalized trade relationship went into effect with the United States and the European Union in 1996 and 1997. From humble beginnings with exports worth US$27 million in 1995, the sector grew 200-fold and by 2014 provided more than half a million jobs for young Cambodians. . The garment sector accounted for some 8.5 per cent of all employment in the country. Exports of the garment sector grew by a still substantial 8.3 per cent to $5.4 billion. The continued growth of garment exports is driven mainly by strong demand from European buyers Summary This very brief outline illustrates that China still holds the unique position in textile and apparel manufacturing however, it certainly is no longer the cheapest option available. It is still the dominant player, and will likely still account for the largest share of global textile and apparel sector, but other countries in South and South East Asia are now considered for certain product segments, and China’s position will be further assailed in the years to come by these emerging Asian countries.India is the most powerful competitor to China’s textile industry. It owns a huge and highly competitive textile industry and has become the world’s second largest cotton textile supplier. Today, Indian economy is in transition phase. Our Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi is taking good initiatives to attract foreign investments from Japan, China, USA and other developed countries. Many other foreign nations are eyeing on Indian economy for investments. Our Vision for textile & apparel sector should bring the right environment for investors by creating good infrastructure, skill development, Government policies & marketing platforms.

Co-Branding : The Art Of Collaboration Shri Rushin H.Vadhani AGM – Market Research & Product Development AYM Syntex Limited (Formely Welspun Syntex Ltd) Co-branding is an arrangement that associates a single product or service with more than one brand name or otherwise associates a product with someone other than the principal producer. The typical co-branding agreement involves two or more companies acting in collaboration to associate any of various logos, color schemes, or brand identifiers to a specific product that is contractually designated for this purpose. The object for this is to combine the strength of two brands, in order to increase the premium consumers are willing to pay, make the product or service more resistant to copying by private label manufacturers, or to combine the different perceived properties associated with these brands with a single product.

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When two or more companies are in a co-branded relationship, they are endorsing each other in an attempt to build a more successful brand than would have been built individually. Co-branding in its purest form has at its core the exchange of values or attributes (on a reputational level) between brands, to create a new reality whereby both brands are perceived to be better as a result of the initiative. These brand partnerships are common among consumer markets, especially between manufacturers & retail brands. Forms of Co-branding : There are many different sub-sections of co-branding. Com-

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October 2016


COVER STORY panies can work with other companies to combine resources and leverage individual core competencies, or they can use current resources within one company to promote multiple products at once. The forms of co-branding include: ingredient co-branding, samecompany co-branding, national to local co-branding, joint venture co-branding, and multiple sponsor co-branding. No matter which form a company chooses to use, the purpose is to respond to the changing marketplace, build one’s own core competencies, and work to increase product revenues.

• and rights to enforce combination marks are retained. Strategies for Successful Alliances Who owns the IP? Establishing who owns rights in a joint brand is essential to the success of a co-branding campaign. Who has the right to register the combined mark? Who has right to use it following termination of the relationship? IP is often developed around the alliance, such as taglines, websites, content, domain names and hashtags. Determining ownership of these assets at the outset of a relationship is critical. Continued use of a joint brand after termination of the contract can create confusion in the marketplace and dilute the value of the individual brands. Worse, an established brand can be tarnished and goodwill lost if the brand owner does not retain rights to monitor quality, control licensing and enforce the composite mark. Joint Ownership of Brands The Patent and Trademark Office will grant registration of a composite mark to owners of separate parts of the composite only in appropriate situations. Develop an Exit Strategy

One form of co-branding is ingredient co-branding. This involves creating brand equity for materials, components or parts that are contained within other products Co-branding is an important strategy for the transition of brands. For multinational companies with global brands, it raises the chances of success in local markets. For local firms with strong brands, it secures their future through foreign investment and access to technology while maintaining consumer franchise and loyalty. The decision about whether to co-brand is based on two conditions: the opportunities for creating a competitive advantage, and the operational benefits that will result. When these conditions are favorable, a firm must pick the right cobranding partner, using such criteria as (a) compatibility between brands, (b) market volatility, (c) investment requirements and arrangements, and (d) the prospective partner’s commitment to the agreement. The firm and its chosen partner then enter the phase of courtship and potential conflict, which involves planning, negotiation, and conflict avoidance and management. Finally, they must create an exit strategy, in case the co-branding arrangement fails to live up to its promise. The potential upside to such alliances is significant. Brand owners can expand their presence into new markets, take advantage of market research/data acquired by partners to leverage their brands and share marketing expenses of the co-branded product or service. Less obvious are the problems inherent in such arrangements. So many variables are beyond a company’s control when partnering with another brand. Special consideration needs to be taken to ensure that • ownership of Intellectual Property (IP) is clearly defined; • an exit strategy is in place if a partner’s brand is declining in popularity; • marketing strategies of the parties are aligned; • confidentiality provisions are in place to protect proprietary information; • quality control over the co-branded product or service is exercised;

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When partnering with another brand, many factors are outside the control of the brand owner. For example, a car company may recall a vehicle due to a manufacturing defect or a celebrity may be involved in a scandal during a co-branding campaign. It may become clear early on that the campaign is not gaining the traction that was hoped for. Planning for unanticipated events such as bankruptcy, dissolution of parties, a buy-out by a third party, or simply declining popularity of one brand is critical to preserving brand equity. Parties should consider stipulating in an agreement a relatively short trial co-branding period. If the campaign is successful, the parties can extend the agreement. If not, the contract can be terminated early without too much investment or damage to the brand. Other Considerations When partnering with another brand, making sure the parties’ marketing strategies are aligned is crucial. Developing a style guide for the combined brand—and agreeing on packaging and print advertising standards—will ensure that the marks are used in a consistent manner. Parties should also address how content will appear online and on social media platforms, what hashtags will be used and who will manage postings. Agreements should also address • the confidentiality of proprietary data exchanged during and after the relationship • the ability of the parties to exercise sufficient control over the quality of the co-branded product • and who will be responsible for enforcing the composite mark. Addressing these issues at the outset of a relationship will greatly increase the odds of a successful alliance. Some advantages to a co branding exercise include : • Shared resources • Reduced costs and hence higher margins • Branding boost especially if both the brands are renowned • Shared risk – All the risk is not borne by one brand • Better sales and better customer relations • Financing becomes easier as two brands are intertwined.

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COVER STORY

There are several disadvantages to a co branding exercise : • If anything goes wrong, both the brands are affected • Brand alliance might be positive or negative in consumers mind and might not achieve the desired effect. • If one brand enters too many co brand exercises, it dilutes itself, and hence the other brands it has associated itself with. • Consumers may prefer the bundling above the individual offering, thereby dropping the value when the co branding exercise ends. • Consumers may not focus on the individual brand altogether, thereby causing the co branding exercise to fail.

the marketing campaign informs consumers where they can purchase the stylish apparel made with the comfort and high-performance of LYCRA® fabrics. More than 92 percent of female consumers in the U.S. are aware of the LYCRA® brand and associate it with such positive attributes as high quality, modern, stylish and flexible. That perception translates into jeans that hold their shape and provide a custom-like fit. LYCRA® fiber first appeared in denim segment during the mid 1970s. After decades of LYCRA® fiber innovations for denim apparel, the brand evolved even further when INVISTA introduced XFIT LYCRA® fabric. The new technology allowed designers to develop denim that would stretch and recover in all directions, providing jeans with exceptional comfort and fit. LYCRA® dualFX™ fabric was added to INVISTA’s line of denim concepts, fulfilling consumer demand for jeans that could stretch 30 percent or more without compromising lasting fit and recovery. LYCRA® Style fiber entered the marketplace with the highest recovery levels versus three leading brands of spandex in denim tests. Conclusion : Strategic partnerships like that one can be a highly effective way to build a business, boost brand awareness, and break into new markets. The whole point is that the success of one brand will bring success to its partner brand, too. But for a partnership to truly work, it has to be a win-win for all players in the game. The value perceptions, target audiences, prices, and promotion channels need to match.

Example :

Key References : • www.knowledge.instead.edu • www.hbr.org • www.invista.com • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-branding • www.managementstudyguide.com/co-branding.htm • Book -Co-Branding: The Science of Alliance: Tom Blackett, Bob Boad

INVISTA, the manufacturer of LYCRA® fiber co-brands with leading fashion labels. In addition to showcasing the latest styles from these brands,

*Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author in his personal capacity of knowledge & perspectives on the mentioned subject .

Thus, keeping the above disadvantages in mind, Managers have to take the right decision whenever it comes to co branding exercises. The brands need to be aligned in the right manner to give a positive impact in the market. This can be done in the planning and tie up stage before the implementation of the co branding exercise.

CUSTOMIZATION: MEASURING UP TO THE CHALLENGES Mr.Vishnu Govind

Brand Consultant & Startup Mentor Founder-Add Valorem consulting Traditional Tailoring Some things in life are worth waiting for; like your dream home, or a business you are trying to establish; it could even be much smaller things like a cool gadgetthatyou have been saving up for, or even an appreciation from a person whom you consider your mentor. How about a perfectly tailored suit? Is it more valuable than a readymade piece which has comparable specifications? What makes a custom tailored suit different from one that can be picked off the shelves? Well, the obvious dffference is always there- like

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the measurements which are made specifically as per your bodyrequirements in the case of custom tailoring, in addition to the choice of buttons, linings and such details we call trims. These details which might have been just acceptable in the case of a readymade suit, will be your preference above many other choices you have. We all had our favorite tailors whom we relied on for our sartorial needs, let us leave out the millennials for a while here, for they are not from the pre-readymade era and might find the concept of neighbourhood tailor a bit too alien. Our tailors used to be the

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October 2016


COVER STORY world of authority on matters concerning trends, fabrics and what might suit us. They come with years of experience which customers continue to patronize them for, from one generation to the next. They do not use modern machinery and give a hand-crafted feel to the product which makes their work special, with many of them becoming brands in their own right. The advent of readymade garments indeed raised the bar in terms of giving a factory finish to the products. However, they are all assembly line products; each SKU that comes from a factory, will be available in standard size sets, like 39,40,42, 44 and production quantities will go into very high numbers in size ratios that work for the brand. These products are not uniquely made for you.Therefore, while custom tailoring scores in personalization and craftsmanship, readymade apparel is supposed to do better in finish and precison. Relevance of Tailoring Personalized suit-making nowadays has become a niche work, life has become fast-paced and instant gratification is the need of the hour. We hear about celebrities having personal tailors or even getting their suits crafted by Saville Row experts. While at the top end of the market where there is demand from users who need distinctiveness and leave a personal stamp on everything, the usage of custom tailoring has become restrictive while we look at the mass market price points. The consumption pattern largely revolves around special occasions that are planned well in advance, like a wedding in the family. Otherwise custom tailored garments are used when the consumer has difficulty in finding right fits in standard sized branded products; markets have clearly swayed the way of readymades. When times change, category trends also change, só do the preferences of customers. Therefore, for businesses to survive, they also need to change in line with the trends that we see around us. There are two major trends that become relevant here. First, is the matter of the time involved, with markets becoming more consumeristic the willingness to wait is reducing. Customers need the best products, right now! This works against the idea of custom tailoring; when weighed against the prospect of waiting for a week, the option of an acceptable compromise in the detailing of the garment wins hands down, to a large section of the market. The second change we are speaking about should intuitively be in favour of custom tailoring, because consumers these days want things their own way. We see this reflection even in mobile tariff plans. However, numbers indicate that readymades are gaining in India at the expense of custom tailoring. Therefore, all things considered, the negatives of custom tailoring are weighing heavily against it. Bespoke vs Made to Measure While we are on this subject, let me take the opportunity to draw small, yet important differences between the types of custom tailoring. One word that is frequently used in this context is ‘bespoke’. It means a garment that has ‘been spoken for’ – this indicates a suit that has been made from scratch by a tailor for one particular person only. The pattern is drafted directly on the person and requires multiple fittings. A bespoke suit is indeed a work of art and a prized possession for the owner and uses the most traditional way of making suits- something made popular by Saville Row craftsmen. Another term that is erroneously used synonymously with bespoke is ‘Made to Measure’. This process uses garments in pre-set patterns and sizes which are worn by the customer and then scaled up or down for different measurements. This process engages machines and lends better to mass production and scaling up by businesses. For like to like fabrics, bespoke suits are much

October 2016

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more expensive and are mostly hand sewn with high quality construction; on the contrary Made to Measure uses automated cutting and is somewhere in between a bespoke and an off the rack suit. ‘Custom Made’ is a term used relatively loosely and can normally refer to anything that has been tweaked to fit you better. If we imagine a continuum from art to science, we can imagine bespoke suit-making to be closer to the art side than where Made to Measure (MTM) is. While the former exudes the age old charm of precision tailoring where the element of human factor is celebrated, the latter, on the contrary, reduces this aspect. While bespoke suits are about care and craft, MTM suits are about precision and finish. Personalized tailoring of the kinds mastered by the experts at Saville Row are a lot about rare skills of specific people which get passed on from one person to the other; this commands a lot of premium because of the high levels of skills involved that are not easy to find. On the other hand, MTM comes across as a more scalable proposition because it is about machinery and processes. Hence we find established brands taking the MTM route to provide high levels of personalization, as against bespoke tailoring. Challenges in the Market If we look at the context of the Indian market, we are still to find brands achieving any significant scale in MTM business. Apparel brands that are into pure play readymade business may not get easily drawn to that space because, as we said earlier, the market is swinging towards ready to wear products. So it is the brands with a lineage in tailoring that will be interested in MTM because, for them this will be a good opportunity to strengthen their tailoring portfolio, thereby countering the onslaught of readymades. As a result, the MTM scene does not witness a clutter of competing brands in the market. One reason we are still to see brands scaling up significantly in this space in India is of course, the pricing. MTM products are priced higher than their readymade counterparts from the same brand; this detrimentally affects the traction in the market in a value- conscious country like ours. To add to this, the waiting time is also high, which restricts MTM to the space of special occasions. Awareness of the unique nature of MTM is also low in India; a large number of customers do not quite know clearly what distinguishes it from traditional custom tailoring, which enjoys lot more physical presence in high streets. The term Made to Measure, in its most fundemental level, refers to something that is customized as against something that is standardized. I have seen many customers not noticing the differences between MTM and traditional custom tailoring and referring to both the services interchangeably. Speed of delivery and price-value equation being two key barriers to a significant scaling up of MTM business, it will be crucial to address both these issues. Logically speaking, a service of higher quality can come at a higher price if the price differential is within reasonable limits. So the uniqueness of MTM needs to be communicated to customers. It needs to come across as a superior offering which justifies the slightly higher price points. The current lead time is a deterrent for continued business from customers for everyday wear. How about giving your measurements at a mall store, watching a movie and then collecting your shirt before leaving the mall? This, for the moment, comes across as inconceivable for us, but I hope I have made my point. A perfectly tailored garment, in factory finish, getting delivered in two working days will be a significant way forward. This calls for major ramp up of operations with multiple MTM factories in different cities. MTM is a service and we need to view it that way. Service standards in any category are improving every day with consumers getting more and more demanding. Online shopping for apparel is on

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COVER STORY the rise. Is there a scope for custom tailoring in the online space? Looks like there are inherent challenges here; it is possible to have your measurements taken yourself and have them shared online. There can be videos and other tutorial mechanisms to facilitate this; it is possible and many businesses have this model as well, but it is still a long way from being a process that is potentially game changing. Technology can be used to schedule stylist appointments; in fact if a customer’s measurements are already captured in the sys-

POST EVENT REPORT

COTTON USA Seminar in India: Growing the Passion and Spinning the Fashion

More than 60 delegates representing cotton textile leadership in India attended an invitation-only COTTON USA seminar in Mumbai to explore how, in these changing and challenging times, cotton can have an increased importance in the textile value chain. GTN Textiles Group Chairman B.K. Patodia, through his keynote address on “Growing the Passion and Spinning the Fashion,” highlighted that the cotton success story primarily comes from the strong linkages between passionate cotton farmers who have passed on a legacy and the spinning mills who have catered to the ever-changing needs of fashion through their innovative approach in spinning. More than 20 prominent textile mills attended, along with 12 COTTON USA licensees (Raymond, Vardhman, Welspun, Trident, GTN Textiles, Ambika, Morarjee, Brandix, SA Aanandaan, Pee Vee Textiles, Ramco Group Textiles and Arun Textiles). In addition, leading domestic apparel brands such as Madura Lifestyle and Raymond, and the international brand Ralph Lauren also participated. The COTTON USA seminar also had participants attend from within the sub-continent: Malek Spinning Mills Ltd (Bangladesh) and Brandix Textiles (Sri Lanka). Their participation and views shared as part of business forums brought new insights and perspective to present issues and encouraged more collaboration among textile value chain players. Cotton Council International (CCI) Executive Director Bruce Atherley offered an update on CCI’s promotion of U.S. cotton worldwide, and encouraged the multi-national cotton fraternity to think innovatively to bring cotton to the forefront. COTTON USA licensees shared their candid views on using U.S. cotton and other growths in terms of cotton quality and performance during the panel discussion title “What Delights Indian Spinners.” Supima President and CEO Marc Lewkowitz gave an update on Supima production and consumption. He also shared the experience of brands using Supima and how Supima is making stronger inroads within the premium clothing value chain. Additional speakers touched on agricultural and economic topics. Scott Sindelar (Minister Counsellor, USDA, FAS New Delhi) highlighted the importance of agriculture in the commercial economy and presented the audience with opportunities and challenges in Indo-U.S. trade discussion. HarminderSahni (Managing Director, Wazir Advisors) shared insights on global textile and clothing demand and its impact on fiber consumption. Ashish Jhalani (founding member of e-tailing India) gave insights on the e-commerce

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tem, it is possible for him to place a repeat order against the same measurements by just indicating the choice of fabrics and trims. On a wider perspective, we are in the era of customization and personalized services. MTM has the potential to replace regular custom tailoring and significant investments are required in creating infrastructure for the same, for a smarter, well dressed India.

business in India, with a special focus on fashion e-tailing and how it’s reshaping the fashion space. Sean Callanan (CCI Manager of Europe, South Asia and Africa), provided updates on U.S. cotton acreage, production and projected exports, as well as the latest information regarding the same data points for global cotton. COTTON USA’s seminar also offered an opportunity for textile manufacturers and retailer and brand sourcing experts to discuss the benefits of increased collaboration through the panel discussion on “Raw Material Planning in Today’s Dynamic Consumer Environment.”

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October 2016


INTERVIEW Mr. Mayur Suchak,

Managing Director MD of Magus Consulting Pvt. Ltd.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN (TVC) had interacted with Mr. Mayur Suchak ( MS), of Magus consulting Pvt. Ltd. , an authorized Project Consultant by Textile Ministry. Currently Magus Consulting is working on Asmeeta Textile Park which is located at Bhiwandi. TVC : What is the USP ( Unique Selling Proposition) Magus Consulting as Project Consultant? MS : Magus being a Concept to Commissioning (C2C) consultant has focus to observe the project from holistic perspective. It also brings variety of skill sets under one room i.e. Project Designing, Engineering, Approvals, Financial closures, & Project Marketing. We also further facilitate services for various end users occupying the space by way of extending various Government benefits to make it more sustainable for them to operate on long run. Also the extensive knowledge bank & experience of handling various categories of industrial infrastructure projects from small scale to large scale helps to make the project most viable proposition for all the stakeholders. Asmeeta TEXPA is the first and the only approved Integrated Textile Park in MMR under the Scheme for Integrated Textile Parks (SITP) by Ministry of Textiles. It is located in MIDC – Seravali in Bhiwandi, District Thane. The TEXPA is not only designed as Eco-Textile Park, but also adheres to the principles of Vastu-Shastra for prosperity. The Asmeeta TEXPA is located in Octroi Free/Stamp duty exemption Zone offering build to suit plots with factory buildings of global standards and industrial galas with plug and play facilities at affordable rates. TVC : Which Textile Projects you are working on? MS : Magus, as one of the empanelled Project Management Consultant under Ministry of Textiles, GoI, has been instrumental in facilitating the development of Textile Park on Pan India basis. We have successfully completed textile parks in Surat, Gujarat; Dhule, Maharashtra and currently developing projects in Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra apart from the Asmeeta Textile Park at Kalyan-Bhiwandi, Maharashtra. TVC: What is the Vision & Objective of Asmeeta Project? MS: Asmeeta has been conceptualized to create the cluster of Garment & Apprarel Zone offering all category of spaces for large, medium and small scale manufacturer as well as processors to improve their production & productivity. It is designed to suit the market requirement to improve their business performance in domestic and international market. It delivers the best in class infrastructure to support the manufacturing processes and create a Hub to become a landmark in Industrial space.

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TVC : Brief about “Asmeeta” Textile Park Project. MS : There are much more than one can explain about the project, but few important pointers are as follows : • Self contained & self sustained project where everything from industrial units to support centres are located within the same premises • 24 hr power supply no load shedding – express power feeder installed • Separate water lined laid by MIDC exclusively for Asmeeta texpa • Project promoted under SPV • Vaastu compliant • 60 acres of exclusive textile park • 100 % legal and clear titled project • 2 exclusive common facility centres TVC : What Segments of clients you are targeting for the park. MS : We are Focusing on Garment & Apparel manufacturers operating on domestic & international market. TVC : What are the benefits of Textile Park to the Garment Manufacture or Exporter ? MS : Benefits for being the part of Park are as follows : • One and only Gated Integrated facility in MMR region • Offers world class infrastructure designed and implemented to suit the operating requirements of the manufacturers • Unit holders can avail various government benefits from the project developer office itself – a single window solution • Excellent connectivity with entire MMR and surrounding centers within state as well as neighboring states • Availability of skilled & unskilled manpower including women employment • One of the rarest legal parks for the hassle free operations. TVC : Any Special incentives offered to being a part of Asmeeta park by Textile Ministry ? MS : Yes, certainly, there are many fruitful benefits are provided by Textile Ministry, GOI. • Unit holders at the Asmeeta TEXPA, can avail various central and state government benefits. • Central Govt. Benefits -6% Interest Reimbursement and 15% Capital subsidy or 30% Margin money (MMS) on brand new shuttleless loom for powerloom sector . 15% margin money subsidy for SSI textile and jute sector. 5% Interest Reimbursement plus 10% Capital Subsidy for specified Processing machinery, Garmenting Units & Technical Textile. • State Govt. benefits -For New Units will be exempted from payment of Electricity duty for 15 years. All new Micro, Small and Medium manufacturing Enterprises in areas other than Group A will be eligible for interest subsidy @ 5% of effective Rate of Interest. • Micro, small and medium manufacturing enterprises can avail additional benefits like 5% subsidy on equipment, 75% subsidy on quality certification expenses, 25% subsidy on cleaner production measures and 75% subsidy on patent registration expenses. • Affordable and Value for Money property base

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INTERVIEW Mr.Nikuj Bagadia

MD. Ken Enterprise Pvt.Ltd.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN has been fortunate to interact with Young Entrepreneur Mr. Nikunj Bagadia, MD of Ken Enterprises Pvt.Ltd. based at Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra, India. Being Young, motivated, dynamic and passionate about his business made him industry leader in a segment. Recently awarded by TEXPROCIL. Let’s hear what he wants to say about his success. TVC: What Is the Vision & Objective of the KEN ENTERPRISE? NB: Our immediate Vision at Ken is to become an integrated fabric producer catering to the top brands of the world. To build an organization & infrastructure capable of adapting to the fast changing consumer demands. Our aim is to be ‘first in mind’ of the customer whenever he think of fabrics. Our Objective is to create an enterprise based on values of integrity, responsibility towards all stakeholders, society & environment and be the leading player in our field. TVC : What is your company USP ? NB : At Ken we are working at becoming an indispensable part of the customer’s supply chain by offering them expertise in product development & innovation, product & cost rationalization along with offering a very wide range of fabrics from a single window. Our USP is our ability to understand the customer needs and offer them complete solution from design to delivery. TVC : What motivated you to running fabric mill, as today so decentralised Power loom sector / cluster dominate the industry ? NB: In fact it is the other way round. We have only the weaving division in-house while the yarn is outsourced and we offer grey fabrics to our customers. Having said that, we can vouch for the fact that our weaving facility is amongst the best with the latest state-of-the-art European Airjet machines. In spite of being part of the decentralized weaving industry we have done well for ourselves in terms of building a culture of excellence and ‘can do’ attitude within the very young organization. This has helped us grow exponentially in a very short span of 2-3 years into a leading exporter of fabrics to over 12 countries. TVC: You cater to both Domestic / International Market? if yes, what is the marketing strategy for both the market. NB: Yes, we cater to both Domestic & International markets and exports constitute almost 65% of our sales. We are very bullish on the international market for Indian fabrics and see our export growth at 30-40% CAGR for at least the next 3-4 years. In the domestic market we are dealing with the top Mills & RMG Exporters like Birla Century, Arvind Mills, Raymond, Shahi Exports & others. All our Domestic as well as International customers are repeat customers whereby once the relationship has been established; we look for continuously increasing volumes with them. Our marketing strategy is to first evaluate the customer needs in detail and juxtapose our strengths against the same. Further we only work with customers with whom we share common values & ethics. Though

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we have a very wide product portfolio, we are still into very few segments where we feel we have a competitive manufacturing strength based out of India. TVC: Winning reputed & respective TEXPROCIL award for Highest Exports for “Grey Fabrics” Grade 1 is a great honour. Share your Strategies & Vision. NB: We feel very proud that within a very short span of 2 years of starting exports we have been able to bag this Prestigious Award. The entire credit is due to our young and inexperienced team at Ken. More so because we are the first company from Ichalkaranji to do so. Ichalkaranji has a very rich and historical textile manufacturing tradition dating back to 1904. However, with the modernisation of the industry and the installation of state-of-the-art technology we have become capable of competing with the rest of the world. Our major concern is the lack of scale. We are still installing very small capacities considering the global potential. Having said that, we are still looking forward to a period of sustained growth. Our future strategy is to create efficient manufacturing facilities using the best in class technologies and go global in sales and accordingly create an organization and team that is geared towards international business. TVC : What is the Next Opportunity & Challenge for Ken Enterprises ? NB: The opportunities are endless. The immediate opportunity is to scale up the manufacturing facilities in line with the market potential and add new product segments. Tying up with an existing European company for sharing of technology and marketing would be on the cards. The challenges are typically the ones faced by the industry as a whole and decentralized sector in particular – that of cheaper credit & almost non-existence of equity markets & growth capital for the textile sector. TVC: Share your Success / Winning Formula. NB: Our company name KEN means Knowledge and the 3 alphabets stand for Knowledge, Excellence & Network. We apply these 3 simple attributes to our daily business practises. First is to apply Knowledge to every task, deal or transaction that is carried out. Second create, build Excellence in everything you do. Finally spread your Network – of relationships. This is our simple business formula and I believe this is what is leading us to success. We ourselves have been motivated by the leading lights of the industry like Welspun, Indocount, Loyal & others. They have set the stage for Indian textiles to go Global and it is for us to draw inspiration and learning from them and follow their path. Most important is to be committed to the goal and not get disappointed by short term failures. TVC : Countries Exported . NB: USA, Korea, China Mexico, Bangladesh, Croatia, Slovenia, Thailand, Turkey, Oman, Sri Lanka ,Mangolia

“ Winner of the Gold Plaque for the highest export of fabric

( Grey) in Categroy. Export performance between Rs.10 Cr. - Rs. 50 Cr. ) for Exports of Rs. 49.97 Cr. during the year 20152016 By TEXPROCIL.”

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October 2016


TECHNICAL ARTICLE

STUDIES ON FABRICS PRODUCED FROM MODIFIED VISCOSE/BAMBOO YARNS Prof. (Dr). P.V. Kadole, Prof. S.S. Lavate, Mr. Sonal Ukey*, Mr. Ashish Hulle

Department of Textiles D.K.T.E. Society’s Textile and Engineering Institute, “Rajwada”, Ichalkaranji-416115 Maharashtra, India Email*: sonalukey@rocketmail.com

Abstract In this research work an attempt has been made to study the physical, mechanical and comfort related properties of fabrics made from yarns along with 100 % regular viscose, modified viscose i.e. modal, tencel, excel and bamboo yarns. All above spun yarns were having the same count of 40S Ne (14.76 Tex). Using all these yarns five different plain woven fabrics were manufactured with same yarn in warp as well as in weft. From the study it was found that Tencel fabric is having better characteristics in terms of tensile, thermal, water vapour and air management, surface and dimensional properties whereas viscose is at lower side. Keywords: viscose, modal, tencel, excel, bamboo 1 Introduction The rayon is the generic term for all regenerated cellulosic fibers. These fibers generally perform well in producing breathable textiles having softer feel and are comfortable to skin than synthetics which is more important for the fabric to be chosen for clothing. The viscose rayon is the first regenerated cellulosic fiber produced in filament form has a serrated cross section and having low dry strength. To overcome this problem high wet modulus and high tenacity rayons were developed. These fibres were manufactured by dry jet wet spinning process. Due to the changes in the manufacturing process the fiber obtained are having different characteristics and has smoother surface than that of regular viscose rayon. To fulfill the demand for today’s global world, the modern textiles proposed biodegradable, environment-friendly, and costeffective fibres like modified cellulosic rayon’s and bamboo fibres. Popular modified variants of viscose rayon are Modal, Tencel, and Excel. Where Modal is 2nd generation, Tencel, Excel and Bamboo are the 3rd generation fibers and viscose rayon is the 1st generation fibre. All are called regenerated cellulosic fibers, since the natural material that makes up the fiber is cellulose. Viscose rayon originated by the wood pulp from a number of different trees like pine, spruce, or hemlock trees and cotton linters, bamboo originating from bamboo tree, modal originating from beech tree, tencel fiber originating from eucalyptus tree are made of cellulose wood. Bamboo fiber has unique properties such as natural antibacterial and antifungal properties, making clothes made from bamboo fibers hygienic, providing smoothness and bamboo fabrics to be nonirritating for sensitive skin. Modified viscose fibers has good hydrophilicity, permeability and its wearing comfort is much better than polyester, its feel, gloss, drape is all good and also has advantages such as dimensional stability and it can be blended with other natural fiber and synthetic fiber. The modified regenerated cellulosic fibers that have promising future are considered for research and development to suit various textile applications. Modified viscose fibers are included in the group of high comfort fibers. 2 Materials and Methods In this study, commercially available of 100 % viscose, modified

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viscose i.e. modal, tencel, excel and bamboo spun yarns having same count of 40S Ne (14.76 Tex) were used for fabric manufacturing. By using all these five yarns plain woven fabric with 83 EPI and 68 PPI was manufactured with same yarn in warp and weft. 100 % viscose, modal, tencel, excel and bamboo fabric samples were manufactured on sample weaving machine with single head rigid rapier weft insertion system. After manufacturing of fabric, all the fabric samples were characterized for different properties and results were analyzed by using statistical tools.

3 Results and Discussions 3.1 Yarn characteristics

Before going for actual fabric manufacturing all the yarns were tested for different properties which are as shown in table 3.1. Table No. 3.1: Yarn characteristics U (%)

Imperfections

Hairiness (S3)

Yarn Shrinkage (%)

54.20

10.39

68.80

496.20

1.67

80.70

8.92

37.60

139.60

0.67

Material

Tenacity (gf/ tex)

Elongation (%)

Lea Strength (lbs)

Viscose

12.69

36.89

Modal

19.14

41.12

Tencel

23.36

41.00

98.10

9.61

38.00

280.80

0.61

Excel

20.11

35.32

86.50

11.12

102.80

264.00

0.84

Bamboo

13.84

55.07

56.00

9.99

37.40

307.80

2.02

3.2 Fabric Characteristics 3.2.1 Areal Density Areal density of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.1. It can be seen form figure 3.1 that the viscose fabric having lower weight per unit area as compared to all other fabrics. This is due to the fact that pick density of viscose fabric is lower as compare to other fabric samples. Also this may be due to viscose fabric shows lower cover factor of all other fabric samples. Statistical analysis shows there is significant difference between GSM of all the fabric samples. 3.2.2 Thickness Thickness of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.2. From figure 3.2 it can be clearly seen that the all the fabric samples have approximately same thickness value. There are two reasons behind this, first one is all fabrics produced with same count i.e. 40s as well as with similar thread density. Also it was found that the yarn diameter for all yarns is nearly same. Statistical analysis shows

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TECHNICAL ARTICLE that there is no significant difference between the thickness values of all the fabric samples.

more durable during abrasion test, also the modified viscose fibres having better frictional characteristics as compared to viscose and bamboo fibres, which may be attributed due to the smooth surface of the modified viscose fibres [11]. Tencel fabric has excellent resistance to abrasion because of higher tensile strength and smooth fibre surface as compare to others. Statistical analysis shows significant difference between all plain woven fabric samples for abrasion resistance 3.2.5 Total Crease Recovery Angle

3.2.3 Strength and Elongation Breaking load and elongation at break of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.3 and fig. 3.4 respectively. From the above fig. 3.3 it can be seen that the modified viscose fabrics i.e. modal, tencel and excel are having higher fabric strength in both warp & weft way direction as compare to viscose and bamboo fabrics. This is because of the modified viscose fibers having more crystallinity percentage and also higher degree of polymerization than viscose and bamboo fibres. From the above graph it can also be seen that the tencel fabric gives higher fabric strength in warp as well as in weft direction this is due to tencel fiber has more crystallinity percentage, higher degree of polymerization and a higher molecular orientation than others. When the tencel fibre structure is subjected to mechanical action, the outer crystalline region can break and peel away from the main fibre but remains attached like banana peel. The ratio of crystalline to amorphous area is approximately 9:1, while the values for regular viscose fibre is 6:1 [4].

Fig. 3.4 it can be observed that the elongation percentage at break of bamboo fabric is higher than other fabrics in both warp and weft directions. This may be attributed by higher elongation percentage of bamboo yarn than others. Statistical analysis shows there is significant difference in strength and elongation properties of fabric samples for both warp & weft directions. 3.2.4 Abrasion Resistance Abrasion resistance of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.5. From above figure it is found that the regular viscose rayon fabric has higher weight loss% due to abrasion as compared to modified viscose rayon and bamboo fabrics. Whereas modified viscose rayon fabrics having lower weight loss% due to abrasion than regular viscose and bamboo fabrics. However, tencel fabric has minimum weight loss% due to abrasion as compared to modal and excel fabrics. Investigation shows that it would be due to the highest tensile strength of modified viscose fibres against viscose and bamboo fibres which makes it to be

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Crease recovery angle of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.6. From fig.3.6 shows total crease recovery angles of fabrics for both warp and weft directions. From above fig. it can be observed that the viscose and bamboo fabrics existed more total crease recovery angle than modified viscose fabrics. However, tencel fabric having lower total CRA this is due to the tencel fabric having smooth surface due to the structure of tencel fibre has a smooth uniform surface and a circular cross section than other fibers. E. R. Kaswell [9] had examined that this is because of fiber cross sectional shape, modified viscose fibers having circular fiber cross section whereas viscose and bamboo have serrated fiber cross sections. Figure 3.6: Total Crease Recovery Angle The actual shape of fiber cross section is an uncertain factor, although from a mechanical view point it is probable that a fiber with a circular cross section will resist wrinkle formation better than flat or ribbon like fiber shape. The flat or serrated cross section fiber is more easily bent than circular cross section fiber but once a creased is formed in circular or smooth cross section fiber greater strains are probably developed. Statistical analysis shows significant difference between all samples of crease recovery angle for both warp & weft way. 3.2.6 Bending Modulus and Drape Coefficient Bending modulus and drape coefficient at break of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.7 and fig. 3.8 respectively. From above figure 3.7 it can be clearly seen that the modified viscose fabrics have higher bending modulus as compare to viscose & bamboo. This is due to higher stiffness of modified viscose fibers than others. Tencel fabric is stiffer than others. Also modified viscose fibers have a smoother and suppler surface than viscose and bamboo fibers [9].

There is significant difference between bending modulus of all the fabric samples. Fig. 3.8 shows that the modified viscose fabrics having higher drape coefficient than viscose & bamboo. This is due to modified viscose fabrics having higher bending modulus as

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TECHNICAL ARTICLE shown in fig. 3.7 compared to viscose & bamboo. So we can clearly say that the high value of tencel for drape coefficient means that fabric is stiffer than others. Statistical analysis shows significant difference between drape coefficient values of all the fabric samples. 3.2.7 Dimensional Stability Dimensional stability of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.9. Fig. 3.9 shows that the modified viscose fabrics have excellent dimensional stability in both directions i.e. warp and weft than viscose and bamboo fabrics. This is due to the fact that the modified viscose fibres falls under the category of high wet modulus fibers and this leads to a very low shrinkage in water. These fibers have low linear swelling in water, absorb less moisture, more stiffness. Of all fabric samples, tencel has excellent stability than others which is expected, this is because of tencel is stiffer than others. The high elongation

value of bamboo fibre can result in high fabric shrinkage [10]. Statistical analysis

shows there is significant difference in dimensional stability of all fabric samples both warp & weft way. 3.2.8 Air Permeability

From fig.3.10 it can be observed that the viscose fabric has higher air permeability value compared to others. The reason behind this is the lower pick density as discussed earlier. The ppi of viscose fabric is lower as compared to other fabrics. This would be the pick density effects on air permeability. The pick density decreases, air permeability of fabric will increase. This is due to the air gaps between the constituent yarns after interlacement will increase which ultimately increasing air permeability of fabric [5, 8, 9]. Statistical analysis shows that there is significant difference between air permeability values of all fabric samples. 3.2.9 Thermal Conductivity The fig.3.11 shows that the tencel fabric having higher thermal conductivity compared to others. This is because of tencel fabric having smooth surface due to the structure of tencel fibre has a smooth uniform surface and a circular cross- section than other regenerated cellulose fibers. The uniform fabric surface of tencel fabric has high emissivity which produce high heat transfer from fabric to fabric which ultimately increases the air gaps in the fabric structure thereby increasing thermal conductivity [3, 4, 9]. Statistical analysis shows significant difference in thermal conductivity of

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all the samples. 3.2.10 Water Vapor Transmission Rate The above fig. 3.12 shows the water vapor permeability is considerably same for all plain woven fabrics. This is because of all fabric samples have approximately same thickness. There are two reasons behind this, first one is all fabrics produced from using same yarn count i.e. 40s. Second one, it is also found that the yarn diameter for all yarns are nearly same. Statistical analysis shows that there is no significant difference in water vapor permeability of all fabric samples.

3.2.11 Wicking Height

Wickability of fabrics woven from different yarns is as shown in fig. 3.13. From figure 3.13 it can be seen that the modified viscose fabrics have higher wickability than viscose and bamboo fabrics in both warp and weft way as well as all for all time intervals. However, tencel fabric has maximum wicking behaviour in both warp and weft direction. Figure 3.15: Wicking Height

Fiber moisture absorption has influence on wicking. Viscose and bamboo fibers has high amorphous area which absorbs more moisture, results in swelling of fibers reduces the gap between the fibers. Also the cellulose crystals of tencel fiber are highly parallel in longitudinal direction of fibre which consists of countless and very hydrophilic crystalline nano-fibrills, which are arranged in a very regular manner and uniformly distributed. These fibrils do not absorb water. The water absorption takes place in the capillaries between the fibrils. The space between these micro fibrils acts like capillaries giving rise to enhanced capillary effect [2, 3]. Statistical analysis shows that wickability of all the fabric samples differ significantly from each other. There is significant effect of time interval on wickability of all the fabric samples. Conclusions Tencel fabric is having better characteristics in terms of tensile, thermal, air management, surface and dimensional properties whereas viscose is at lower side. Fibre type has no significant effect on water vapour transmission.

References 1. Nazan Erdumlu et al., Investigation of regenerated bamboo fibre and yarn characteristics, Fibres and Textiles in Eastern Europe, vol. 16, 2008, P. 43- 47. 2. K. Parveen Banu et al., Wicking behaviour of viscose staple yarns differing in linear densities, J. Environ. Nanotechnology, Vol.2, 2013, P. 01-05. 3. Heinrich Firgo et al., The functional properties of tencel, Lenzinger Berichte, 2006, P. 22 30. 4. R. B. Chavan et al., Development and processing of lyocell, Indian Journal of Fibre & Textile Research, Vol. 29, December 2004, P. 483-492. B.K. Behera., Comfort and handle behaviour of linen-blended fabrics, AUTEX Research Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1, March 2007. 5. Tatjana Kreze et al., The sorption behaviour of cellulose fibers, P. 28-33. 6. Karin Stana Kleinschek et al., Correlation of regenerated cellulose fibres morphology and surface free energy components, Lenzinger Berichte, Vol. 82, 2003, P. 83-95 7. R. Tugrul Ogulata, Air permeability of woven fabrics, JTATM, Vol. 5, 2006, P. 1-10. 8. E. R. Kaswell, textile fibers, yarns and fabrics, Reinhold publishing corporation, Jan 1953. 9. Calvin Woodings, regenerated cellulose fibers, Woodhead publishing limited, 2001. 10. Alaa Arafa Badr et al., “Comfort and protection properties of tencel/cotton blends�, Beltwide cotton conferences, New Orleans, LA, January 2014, P. 1009-1020.

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POST EVENT REPORT WORLD TEXTILE CONFERENCE -2 “World Textiles – Growth & Great Opportunities” September 16 & 17, 2016 At Sahara Sapphire, Hotel Sahara Star, Mumbai, India The grand success of the First World Textile Conference held in the city of Mumbai in the year 2011 and excellent response thereafter from the technocrats, industrialists, manufacturers, traders, educationist from the participating countries as well as local Govt. dignitaries prompted the Textile Association (India) to take up the challenge of organizing the World Textile Conference-2. DAY-1, September 16, 2016 World Textile Conference-2 was organized at Mumbai, India by the Textile Association (India) (TAI) on 16th& 17th September, 2016 at Sahara Sapphire, Mumbai with the help of Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT) as Knowledge Partner to deliberate upon the global theme “World Textiles – Growth & Great Opportunities” under the dynamic leadership of National President TAI , Mr.Arvind Sinha. This Conference was enthusiastically attended by luminaries from textile and allied sectors from about twenty countries making it truly a World Textile Conference. Also, members of TAI, faculty and students from ICT, members of TITOBA, leading technocrats, industrialists, manufacturers, traders and businessmen turned out in great numbers for the WTC-2 with great expectation of being exposed to see of technological advancements and knowledge in multifarious exponents of textiles from galaxy of speakers. The tone was appropriately set by the Chief Guest Dr. (Mrs.) Kavita Gupta, IAS, Textile Commissioner of India, who spoke very high of the cohesive efforts of the textile technocrats from TAI and ICT to organize such a mega event in the country and to nurture a sincere thirst for global knowledge in textiles in pursuit of attaining excellence in the world market. She expressed her satisfaction that there has been a progressive trends in Textiles in respect of global competitiveness level from 2% in 2002 to 5% in 2015 and was optimistic that the upward trend will continue. While saying so, she encouraged the participants, particularly the institutions and the industry leaders to invest in basic research, innovations and sophistication to meet global challenges in keeping with Government support to the extent of 60% in such endeavours. Mr.Ujjawal N. Uke, IAS, Principal Secretary (Textiles), Govt. of Maharashtra stressed the need of identifying the strengths of the Textile Industry and channelizes available talents and resources to optimize growth in the industry with ultimate aim of grabbing great global opportunities. PadmashreeDr. G. D. Jadhav was felicitated by the National President, TAI, Mr.Arvind Sinha for being conferred with the Honour recently by the President of India. Speaking on the occasion, Dr.Jadhav spoke of his allegiance to ICT Mumbai and encourage the audience to be determined in achieving excellence in Textile Industry. Dr.Chandan Chatterjee, Representative, Govt. of Gujarat, also spoke of his rich experience with Gujarat Textile Industry and focused on the great opportunities open to the technocrats, industrialised and investors in Gujarat Textile Industry. Plenary Session –I The Session was chaired by Prof. (Dr.) M. D. Teli, Chairman, Conference Paper Committee, WTC-2 from ICT, Mumbai. This Session

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included penal discussion on the theme “Make in India and Gujarat Textile Industry” in which eminent experts from the Govt. and Industry participated. Dr.Teli introduced the panellists, gave his opening remarks and set the ball rolling for meaningful discussions. Mr.Prashant Agrawal, Moderator, the panellists Dr.Chandan Chatterjee, Mr. Mohan Kavrie, Mr. Rajiv Gopal, Mr. B.B. Sharma and Mr. R.K. Kalia deliberated upon various aspects of the theme. They deliberated as to encourage and motivate the industry stalwarts and Businessmen to invest in ‘Make in India’ slogan of the Hon. Prime Minister. Summing up the penal discussion, Mr.Prashant Agrawal, Moderator emphasized the significance of adopting export oriented and quality conscious approach to make indelible impression in the Global Market. This Session also witnessed excellent presentations by speakers from India and abroad. They included Mr. Rajiv Gopal, Chief Marketing Officer, Grasin Industries Ltd. speaking on ‘How to Make Commodity in BrandLIVA Success Story’, Prof.(Dr.) (Mrs.) Jin-lian Hu from the Hongkong Polytechnic. University speaking on ‘New Paradigm for Textile Materials: From Functionality to Intelligence ’and Mr.Arvind Sinha, Chief Advisor and CEO, Business Advisors Group speaking on ‘Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) ’. All the speakers made valuable contributions towards the theme of the WTC-2 Conference and aroused noticeable response from the audience. Dr.Teli summed up the Session bringing out the salient aspects of all the presentations. Techno Commercial Session –I The session was chaired by Dr. J. Arthur Prem, Former IRS Officer, who gave a befitting and elaborate introduction of the subject to be deliberated upon in Penal Discussion: II, as well as of permanent speakers Mr. R.D. Udeshi (Moderator),Mr.Sanjeev Saran, and Mrs.ChandrimaChaterjee. While speaking on the subject ‘How to Improve Textile Product Basket of India and its volumes’, Mr.Udeshi, representing Reliance Industries Ltd., blended his vast knowledge of techno-commercials of Textile Industry in India with his experience of several decades and stressed the overall aspiration to reach greater heights in improving textile product basket for the global market. He informed that at present Indian Share happens to be around 10% and that we do have the potential to enhance it further. Mr.Sanjeev Saran, Ex-SREPTC, advocated the case of speciality fibre products to be included in the textile basket to attract global customers, while stressing the significance of maintaining optimum level of quality versus large volume. For encouraging such a thrust for the market, he suggested institutional support for global players. He also touched upon important issue of striking joint ventures with world leaders in common areas of interest in textile, whether it may be apparels or yarn or fabric with the view to improve quality consciousness and acceptability in the world. Mrs.ChandrimaChaterjee(AEPC) drew the attention of the technocrats and businessmen towards the textile package announced recently by the government of India so as to strive to

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POST EVENT REPORT achieve excellence in all the areas of textiles. She advised that global players present for the conference should gear up to take advantage of China’s recent trade decline in textiles as this trend has opened up plethora of opportunities. She also short listed certain products which, in her opinion, will enhance the scope of improving textile products in the basket. Mr. R.D. Udeshi, Moderator, complimented the panellist for their wonderful and valuable contribution while enlightening the audience with significant data which should prompt us to move forward for excellence. Thereafter Dr. J. Arthur Prem introduced Mr. B.B Sharma, CEO/ED, Sintex Industries Ltd., who made his presentation on the subject ‘Vision of installing one Million Spindles in Spinning’; Mr.Faruque Hassan from Bangladesh Garment Manufactures & Exporters Association who spoke on the subject ‘Bangladesh Emerging as Global Textile Hub’ and H.E. SautSiringoringo, Consul General of the Republic of Indonesia in India who presented a paper on ‘Current Status of Indonesian Textile Industry in Global Scenario’. All the eminent speakers spoke of vast opportunities available for global cooperation in spinning, apparel designing and manufacturing, machinery etc. Dr.J. Arthur Prem summed up the entire techno commercial session with following salient remarks:1. Echoing the advice of the Chief Guest Mrs.Kavita Gupta, IAS the session successfully reiterated the need for increasing global trade share of India form 5.8% to a realistic target to be chalked out by a Core Committee to be formed soon. 2. Determined industrialists, technocrats, businessmen and investors have to rise to the occasion to take advantage of textile package of 6000 crores recently announced by the Hon. Prime Minister of India. 3. Coordinated efforts have to be pursued to retain experts in various departments of textiles migrating to other nations by providing institutional support and advanced facilities for research and development. 4. There is a large gap between the first and the second in the global arena as far as textile trade is concerned. Since China is experiencing negative growth in apparels and allied sectors, Indian businessmen have great opportunity open to them. 5. Open invitation from countries like Bangladesh & Indonesia announced during the session has to be accepted on its face value. A realistic plan has to be framed soon to strike it when it is read hot. The session ended with Dr.J. Arthur Prem thanking the speakers of the sessions for their incredible suggestions and proposals for all out efforts to achieve the pinnacle in the global textile market. Technical Session –II The session was chaired by Dr. Kim Gandhi, who is a Faculty member for last few decades in various UK Universities and he is a very well-known authority for Textile Education & Research. Dr. Francois Boussu from France who presented the paper on 3-D Warp Interlock Fabric: From General Definition to Various Transportation Applications and Dr. Sanjay Muthal, RFG Management Search spoke on Challenges for Human Resource Management in Global Business Strategy and after that Mr. Rajeev Pandey presented a paper on Sportswear a Great Opportunity which was a eye opening presentation and covered the topic very well and he concluded that India has great opportunity in sportswear. The session ended with Dr. Kim Gandhi thanking the speakers. DAY-2, September 17, 2016 Day-2 started with panel discussions “Africa Emerging New

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Textile and Apparel Hub” moderated by Mr.Prashant Agarwal of Wazir Advisors, Mr. Ashish Agarwal from Arvind Ltd. All the panellists expressed their satisfaction in spite of many odds in Africa. Most of these units are in Ethiopia. They were substantial detailing and it was concluded various tax incentives and marketing incentives it is good to focus on Africa which is also emerging as big consumer market. GST implications in Textile Industry by Mr.Arvind Bhansali, Sr. Executive Vice President, Reliance Industries Ltd. Mr.Bhansali gave overall picture of GST, how GST will benefit Textile Industry he also expressed there are many clarifications required from Government of India and the process is going very fast. He also expressed serious concerns, application of GST on Job work, return on goods, discount offered by various consumer companies including telecoms, this was extraordinary presentations and audience liked it. Mr.ShishirMankad, Forex and Its management in imports and exports. Brilliant presentation and Shishir could clarified so many doubts which people had regarding Forex. He also expressed various modalities which are applicable to cover Forex. Over all presentation was very nice. Dr.Anagha V. Soocheta, Sustainable Fashion: Design, Research and Innovation. Dr.Anagha spoke brilliantly and explained very well Fashion and connectivity between design research and of course innovation. She has expressed innovation is a continuous process and without this survival is very difficult. She gave many examples in new trade and new work created in Textile Industry. Panel discussion - IV has focused on Future of Indian Cotton & Global Scenario moderated by Shri Suresh Kotak attended by Shri M.L. Jhunjunwala, Shri Manish Dagga, Shri Sundaramoorthy C. and Shri HemantSonare. All the panellists discussed on various situation changing for cotton and how it is impacting in Industry. Mr.HemantSonare highlighted the situation in Vidarbha region and how the farmers are getting disturbed. Today Cotton Industry is in a very bad shape and mills are losing money very heavily. There have been lot of discussions in deliberations and session ended with the remarks of Shri Suresh Kotak.

Dr.GordanaColovic - Importance of Mapping for Development of the Fashion Company Business Strategy.

She mentioned in her presentation that Rapid change of fashion trends, new fabrics and more demanding customers impose the need for flexible production. Mapping is a tool that helps fashion companies in the process of strategic planning to define existing condition or the new strategy and strategic goals. Most. Setara Begum - Surface Modification of Polyamide 6.6 Fabric with an Alkaline Protease - Subtilisin. She spoke about Subtilisin treatment is feasible in benign conditions, and grants a clean and dynamic approach for Polyamide 6,6 (PA 6,6) modification. In this study, the Water Contact Angle (WCA) method Capillary Height and Moisture Regain were applied for measuring hydrophilicity. For characterizing the modification, the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Amino Groups determination, X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS) were applied. The physio-mechanical properties were studied through Bursting strength and Fabric Hand Properties. Braz Costa - Conductive Fibres for Sensing and Energetic Applications. He mentioned that the number of final consumer products based on technical textiles and garments having electronic functionalities are still very limited given the difficulty of such technical applications in combining added functionality, design, comfort and affordable and viable production costs.Therefore, theintegration

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POST EVENT REPORT of electronic components and interactive functionalities onto and into textile structures has been widely researched and developed in the last years. Mr.Ishtiaq Ali, - Knowledge of Law in our Business Life Eliminating Risk. Mr.Ishtiaq Ali, Senior Partner of Orbit Law done a remarkable presentation narrating details in our business life and how to take various pre-cautions while conducting business so that your losses are minimized. Panel discussion - V Design Sustainability for Future Growth Sharad Kale - The Prospects of 3-D Textiles in Indian Composite Industry. He spoke about the composites with laminated textile reinforcement have become basic ingredient in aeronautics and space sector. It is because of the high strength to weight ratio of the composites. In spite of the drawbacks of laminations, the aviation industry is using laminated composites to the tune of 60% to 70 % of the total weight. The new concept of 3- d weaving has added a

new dimension to composite industry. In addition of scores of advantages, it eliminates the problem of delamination which can be catastrophic in aviation. Ms. Dimple Trivedi Rajani - Process of FDI coming into India and related laws. Foreign Investment in an Indian Company can be in two forms – A] Share capital (equity and compulsorily convertible instruments) - Foreign Direct Investment B] Commercial loans and bonds (optionally and partially convertible into equity) - External Commercial Borrowings Foreign Investment Promotion Board (FIPB) is a regulator of all FDI into India Automatic approval is available for investment in most sectors - certain sectors require prior approval of FIPB whereas FDI is completely prohibited in certain other sectors. The sectorspecific policy for foreign investment is promulgated under Foreign Exchange Management (Transfer or Issue of Security by a Person Resident outside India) Regulations, 2000. Presentation was very informative.

Buyer Seller Meet : Bhiwandi Govt. of India, Ministry of Textiles, Regional Office of the Textile Commissioner, Navi Mumbai is organizing a Buyer Seller Meet at Shree KachhKadavaPatidarSamaj Hall, Bhiwandi from 22.09.2016 to 24.09.2016 Shri. Naresh Kumar, Director, Regional Office of the Textile Commissioner, NaviMumbai, Government of India, Ministry of Textiles has inaugurated the Buyer Seller meet at Shree KachhKadavaPatidarSamaj Hall, Bhiwandion 22.09.2016. In his inaugural address, Shri. Naresh Kumar stated that Govt. of India is giving Marketing support to the Powerloom fabric manufacturers in the country under Integrated Scheme for Powerloom Sector Development. Several Buyer seller meets are conducted frequently in various parts of the country to promote the Powerloom manufacturers in the decentralized sector. He has seen all the stalls in the hall and seen

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the various types of fabrics. He requested the Buyers to purchase the fabric at manufacturing cost, since the powerloom products are selling directly from the manufacturers. At the outset,Shri.D.Ravikumar, Deputy Director, Regional office of the Textile Commissioner, Navi Mumbai has given the Welcome address. Shri.PurshotamVanga, Vice-President, PDEXCIL, Mumbai, Shri B. D. Chatterjee, Co-ordinator, SASMIRAPowerloom Service Centre-Bhiwandi, Shri M.Y. Momin, President BhiwandiPowerloom Weavers Association, Shri Vinod V. Chothani, Director, Sudha Mills gave Special address on the occassion.Shri M.Y. A. Sheikh, Assistant Director has given the Vote of thanks. The Buyer Seller Meet will be held from 11.00 am to 6.00 pm at atShree KachhKadavapatidarSamaj Hall, Bhiwandi

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POST EVENT REPORT

International Apparel Federation (IAF)’s twoday seminar focuses on the growth of India’s apparel sector CMAI signs MoU with China Chamber of Commerce for cooperation in apparel sector between two countries

International Apparel Federation (IAF), the global representative body of apparel manufacturers, organized for the first time in Asia a two-day seminar in Mumbai on September 27and 28, 2016. The first day on Tuesday, the session started with a welcome address by the IAF president Mr Rahul Mehta who is also the president of the Clothing Manufacturers’ Association of India (CMAI). In his welcome address, Mr Rahul Mehta highlighted the great potential India has to increase the market share in global apparel trade. He said China has started gradually reducing its focus on labour intensive industry which includes textiles and apparel which poses a great potential for India to take this as an opportunity and grab the place vacated by China. Taking the existing relationship to the next level, India’s The Clothing Manufacturers’ Association of India (CMAI) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with China Chamber of Commerce for import and Export of Textiles (CCCT) for extending co-operation to each other in terms of new business opportunities and exchange of trade and data related co-operation for mutual benefit. The MoU was signed by Mr Rahul Mehta, President IAF and CMAI and Mr Jiang Hui representing India and China respectively. “This MoU will benefit both countries when we explore opportunities. While organizing trade fairs, both of us would co-operate in associating new clients, visitors and associated supply chain participants to the forum for the benefit of the apparel trade,” said Mr Mehta. “The MoU will benefit both countries’ apparel sectors in long run, said The session was followed by the detailed presentation on India’s textiles industry the potential lies ahead by Wazir Advisors. In his keynote address on “India – EU Trade Relations : Future Perspectives” Mr Francesco Marchi, Director General, EURATEX, said, “The Indian government should start negotiations for the Free Trade Agreement with the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK) for the benefit of the Indian apparel sector. It is hard to imagine the success of the FTA without UK, post Brexit. UK continues to be textiles manufacturing hub contributing 29 percent of the entire apparel trade in the EU. 22 per cent of India’s exports to the EU goes through UK.” Experts however have forecast India’s textiles industry to double in five years from $110 billion ($68 billion of domestic and $42 billion of exports) now to $220 billion by 2021. Speaking on the occasion, AniruddhaDeshmukh, Managing Director and CEO of Mafatlal Industries Ltd, said, “E-retailing is going to be the next growth opportunities in the Indian textiles and apparel sector in the next few years. Metro cities are overcrowded with retailers with higher overheads. Thus, there are more retail business opportunities in tier 2 & tier 3 cities. Companies have better opportunity of expansion though franchise route.” Mr. Ashok G. Rajani, Chairman –Apparel Export Promotion Council (AEPC) stated that “India has to reach a target of US$ 30 billion of apparel export turnover over the next 3 years and we en-

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visage an investment of US$ 11 billion over the next 3 years”.

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India’s Denim Fabric Sector to grow at 15% per annum in 5 years With huge population base and the world’s fastest growing economy, India’s apparel segment poses huge potential for future growth

The Rs 30,000 crore India’s denim industry has been growing at a CAGR of 15% over the last five years and would continue to growth at the same speed in the next five years to achieve 54,600 crore by 2023, stated experts at the 32nd IAF World Fashion Convention said. This was stated during the session “New Opportunities in Denim” on 28th September 2016 in Mumbai. Organised jointly by the International Apparel Fashion (IAF) and the Clothing Manufacturers’ Association of India (CMAI), the Convention was supported by the Union Ministry of Textiles and Union Ministry of Commerce. The Convention witnessed participation from all leading brands in apparel and denim sectors with over 500 participants from all across the world. For the first time, India was chosen for this two day event between September 27 and 28, 2016 being the fastest growing economy in the world. With growing disposable of the average middle class, India is endowed with humungous potential not only for denim but also for the entire textile value chain. “In my personal opinion, Indians have a British colonial hangover of foreign brands. But, Indians should create their own brands as they understand Indian consumers better than foreign brands. Foreign brands are luxury ones which are limited to metro cities only. Indian brands feel ownership pride as well. In fact, India is gradually moving towards branding from labeling earlier. But, the average Indian business will have to shift from FoB based pricing for profit making to brand building for long term profits in apparel sector,” said Rahul Mehta, President, IAF and CMAI. Mr Han Bekke of the Netherlands was elected as the president of International Apparel Federation as Mr Rahul Mehta retired as President of IAF. The 33rd IAF convention is scheduled to take place in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, between October 17 and 18, 2017.Mr. Rahul Mehta was recently re-elected as President of CMAI. “Denim revolution started in India in 80s and 90s from simplicity which gradually shifted to lifestyle and moreso fashion of late.

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POST EVENT REPORT With 7.4% of India’s GDP growth and $1362 per capita income, India continues to be one of the largest producers of denim in the world. Indians possessing 2-3 pairs of jeans in a year as against 7 pairs in US with 96% of Americans wearing jeans in the US,” said Deval Shah, Business Head – Diesel & GAS, Reliance Brands. With the emergence of denim demand from Bangladesh to which India exports huge quantity, Indian businesses have doubled installed capacity denim to 1.3 billion meters per annum over the last five years with an estimated investment of Rs 60 crore per million meters. Number of denim manufacturers has almost doubled to 42 now from 25 five years ago. But around 30% of this capacity remained idle due to excess production capacity. Subir Mukherjee, Business Head (Denim), Bhaskar Industries, said, “India is selling cheapest pair of jeans which nowhere in the world is available. If we bring down the price of jeans to $10 apiece as is currently prevailing in the US, India’s denim demand would increase resulting into this sector’s growth at 20% per annum.” The online retailer Myntra has been selling the most value segment jeans at the price range between Rs 999 and Rs 1299 apiece. AnuragAsthana, Vice President, (Product Development & Sourcing), Myntra Designs, said, “E-commerce today is similar to the internet before Google. We are getting most traction from consumers for the value segment. There is a myth in the market that we are competing with the brick and mortar retailers. But, we complement to them (brick and mortar retailers). So, denim business will grow both online and offline.” The online retailers do not require to incur cost on retail but a massive cost they incur on technology and last mile delivery. In

fact, at Myntra 60% of manpower is involved in the technology while the rest on other aspects of entire business. Asthana said that the online labels created by Myntra will soon be seen in brick and mortar stores as well. Speaking on the occasion, Sanjay Vakharia, Director and COO, Spykar, feels that lower segment of denim is growing rapidly. But, there is a need to bring cheaper segment of denim for the consumers in the bottom of the pyramid. “Brands are getting disturbed due to rapid change in fashion and technology,” said ManjulaTiwari, CEO, Future Style Lab, while speaking on the significance of brands in denim and other lifestyle segments.

Shree Market Silk Merchant Association launched Textile Directory & Mobile Application Association launched textile directory and Mobile App on 8th October, 2016 at IMC chamber’s Walchand Hirachand hall. Launch is graced by Chief Guest Dr. Kavita Gupta, Textile Commissioner of India/Ministry of Textiles. Dr. Kavita appreciated directory project and every year new edition should be launch in taking consideration of “Global Textile Directory”. Association invited Mr. Vinesh Mehta, President of FAM & Mr. Kundan Vyas, CEO of Janmabhumi Group as guests of honour. FAM President Mr. Vinesh Mehta spoken about GST Rules and Regulation where as Mr. Kundan Vyas highlighted necessity, importance use of directory & mobile app in this techno savvy world. Mrs. Smirti Irani sent her good wishes for the occassion. Warm welcome given to all by association President Mr. Dinesh Mehta with brief speech on association activities. Association started in 1948 for the trader’s benefits. Activities involved are arbitration facility, guidance of laws, education fund to labour workers children & family floater medi-claim facility, financial help during natural calamities. Textile directory conveyer Mr. Narendra Mehta informed that directory is in English language and Priced at Rs. 500 / Copy. Complementary copies will be given to all members, advertisers, traders. Idea of Directory given by Mr. Sharad Mehta, Office secretary. Directory Cover page has been designed by Mrs. Isra Domadia , daughter of Mr. Narendra Mehta. Printing done by Mr. Nachiket Shah, Shree Printers; Mobile application has been developed by Mr. Ashish Pokhale. In this occasion, Life time achievement award given to Mr. Bal-

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mukund Kapadia for his dedication and service given to association. Special honours given to Mr. Narendra Mehta for fund raising; Mr. Haresh Kapadia for increasing membership; Mr. Ashwin Malkan for dedicated time /services given to association. Vote of thanks given by Mr. Ashwin Malkan. Event has been sponsored by Reliance industries; hosted by Ex- NMIMS Professor and Great orator Mr. Ashwin Mehta. Few guests made their gracious presence like Mr. Surendra Savai, President of Mahajan association; Mr. Trayambak Shah, President Swadeshi Market Association; Mr. Paresh Chothani, VP of Garden Silk Mills; Mr. Gurucharan Singh, MD of GM Mills; Mr. Rajnikant ( Babulal ) Chewali, President of Surat Bombay Market; Mr. C.B. Modi, many more eminent dignitaries are present to grace the occasion.

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October 2016


POST EVENT REPORT

‘TEXPROCIL’ CELEBRATES ACHIEVEMENT OF ITS MEMBER EXPORTERS WITH ANNUAL AWARDS PRESENTATION y

MADE UPS & HOME TEXTILE SECTOR MAY BE COVERED UNDER ANOTHER SPECIAL PACKAGE: UNION TEXTILE MINISTER

Smt. Smriti Irani, Union Textile Minister brightened the TEXPROCIL Export Award Function by stating that another special package for Made-ups and Home Textile Sector, similar to Rs. 6000 crore special package announced for garment sector, was under active consideration of the Ministry. Thus, the Textile Industry may be celebrating one more Diwali, after the current Diwali, stated the Union Textile Minister. The Minister further stated that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has a vision of doubling the income of farmers by 2022. “We are happy the farm yield has already increased and the country hopes to become a leading producer of cotton”. The event was inaugurated with lighting of traditional lamp by Smt. Smriti Irani, Hon’ble Minister of Textiles who was also the Chief Guest at the event. Also present at the function was Dr Kavita Gupta, Textiles Commissioner. Smt. Smriti Irani, Hon’ble Minister of Textiles later distributed the awards for excellence in exports of yarns, fabrics and home textiles. Leading textile companies like Welspun Global Brands Ltd, Vardhman Textiles, Trident Ltd., Alok Industries, Arvind Ltd, Loyal Textiles, GTN Textiles, Premier Mills, Paramount Textiles, SEL Group, Lahoti Overseas among others were some of the recipients of the awards. Shri R K Dalmia, Chairman, Texprocil in his opening remarks congratulated all the award winners for facing the challenges of a slow global demand and intense price pressures to emerge leaders in their respective line of businesses during the year 2015-16. He said that as per a recent WTO forecast, the global trade volumes would rise only by 1.7% this year. This would be the slowest increase since the 2008 financial crisis and the first time in 15 years that global trade has grown more slowly than world GDP, he added. Shri R K Dalmia complimented the government on the announcement of the special package of ` 6000 Cr. for the apparel sector which he said was bearing fruit as the September export figures for apparel showed a growth of 12% compared to a downward trend for most other sectors. The Chairman stressed that this special package also needed to be extended to the Made-ups and Home Textile sector as that sector is equally, if not more labor intensive in comparison to the apparel sector. He also said that it will act as a pull factor for increased consumption of fiber, yarns and fabric produced domestically. Another critical area where the Government needs to move with vigor is to expedite the negotiation of Free Trade Agreements with EU, Australia and Canada, he said. In countries like Turkey and China, high discriminatory tariff was posing a challenge in terms of market access into those countries. The Chairman pointed out that cotton textiles of HS Chapter 52 was the single largest contributor accounting for almost 20% of our exports to China and if duties were reduced they had the potential to reduce India’s trade deficit with that country. Besides complimenting the Government on the likely introduction of GST from April 2017, Shri R K Dalmia also highlighted the oft

October 2016

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repeated request of the industry that raw materials especially cotton should be available at international prices or lower. Finally, Shri R K Dalmia mentioned that the spinning sector was going through rough times and the sector is looking up to the government for help and support. Inclusion of cotton yarn in the MEIS and extending the interest equalization scheme to merchant exporters will go a long way in reducing the stress levels in the Spinning sector as well as increase in exports. As part of the international promotion campaign for Indian cotton textiles, the Hon’ble Minister released Texprocil’s newly designed corporate promotional literature including corporate brochures and pamphlets.

TEXPROCIL AWARD FUNCTION TEXPROCIL, the first Export Promotion Council set up in India in the year 1954, and responsible for promoting exports of cotton textile celebrated the achievements of its member exporters at the Annual Awards function held here today. The Council is the international face of Indian textiles, a one point stop for those who wish to source textiles from India. It has 3000 members who are engaged in the exports of cotton textiles including yarns, fabrics and home textiles including made ups. TEXPROCIL promotes exports through buyer seller meets, participation in trade fairs, in depth market studies and by leading delegations to explore potential of global markets. TEXPROCIL also assists the Ministry in formulating policies to promote textile exports. Every year the Council recognizes the role played by exporters by giving out awards in different categories. This year the Council is distributing seventy three awards in thirty two different categories, including the coveted Gold trophy for the highest global exports. TEXPROCIL’s awards are recognized world over by textile importers and hence exporters attach high importance to these awards. For the period 2015-16, the Council members exported US$ 10.95 billion worth of cotton textiles and the Council has targeted US$14 billion worth of exports for the current financial year i.e. 2016-17. Shri Ujwal Lahoti, Vice Chairman of Texprocil then proposed a Vote of Thanks and invited the guests for dinner.

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AGM MEET REPORT

Annual General Meeting of Indian Technical Textile Association- FY 2015-16

The 6th Annual General Meeting of ITTA was held on 2th September 2016 at 2.30 PM at Mumbai Cricket Association, BKC, Mumbai. Dr Kavita Gupta IAS, Textile Commissioner, MOT was the Chief Guest of the meeting. Business session was followed by Knowledge sharing Session wherein three eminent Industry experts presented different topics of interest to the members. Dr. Anup Rakshit, Executive Director, ITTA, welcomed the Chief Guest, ITTA Members and invitees in the meeting. In his brief welcome address, he stated that our Textile Commissioner (TXC) is very instrumental in promoting technical textiles in India and personally monitors progress of various Ministry schemes on technical textiles. She gives importance & value to the various industry issues presented by ITTA to Ministry time to time. We can visualize its effect looking at the growth of the industry. Dr. Rakshit also informed that in knowledge sharing session this year three eminent Industry experts will present three different topics of interest to the members. The topics are- “Total Solutions: From Melt to Yarn, Fibers and Nonwovens“, “Indian diapers market – current scenario & emerging trends” and “High Performance Fibres & Yarns used in Technical Textiles”. He also enlightened the audience by showing an audio-visual presentation which represents the journey of ITTA during the last year. Shri. Pramod Khosla, Chairman, ITTA, addressed the members and expressed his happiness on the large number of members present in the AGM. With an extremely eventful and fruitful year at ITTA. He thanked TXC for the tremendous support and encouragement that we have been receiving from TXC Office and Government for ITTA. ITTA is associated with Govt. in its various programs/ schemes like ATUFS, base line survey of technical textiles industry, formulation of textile policy, TMTT implementation, etc. He wished that the endeavor of the association is to become the EPC for technical textiles and establishing a separate identity for Technical Textile products and articles. He highlighted what Technical Textile Industry and ITTA have achieved during last year i.e. increased capital subsidy from 10 to 15% for all technical textile under ATUFS, reduction in import duties on eight speciality fibres into India, movement on HSN code issue, improved focus of armed forces towards Indian manufacturing companies of Technical textiles, etc. With the advent of various programs initiated by the Govt. of India (like Make In India, Agrotextiles and Geotextiles promotion in NER States, etc) it is expected to have an impetus on growth of Technical Textile Industry. He is also confident of larger contribution of ITTA to the growth of the industry. Shri. K. S. Sundararaman, Vice Chairman, has stated that working with ITTA has fulfilled his desire for working with a different segment of the textile industry which is directly reflected to the growing membership numbers. He appreciated the support and encouragements given to ITTA by the TXC Office, Ministry of Textiles. The Chief Guest Dr. Kavita Gupta, IAS, Textile Commissioner, expressed her view stating that although India has lot of potential to take lead in Technical Textiles, but our current growth rate is only 9-10% and we are still very far away from the other developed

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countries. For example, in Germany the market share of Technical Textiles in total textile sector is around 60-70% whereas in India it is only about 10%. She said that private entrepreneurs should bring in Joint Ventures and investment to India. She highlighted that Center of Excellences and Textile Research Associations should work together with technical textile industry on R&D, product development, standardization, testing, etc. Work is in progress on creation of HS codes of technical textiles products. She highlighted that ATUFS with higher capital subsidy on technical textile sector and other steps taken by Government of India for the growth of Technical Textiles in India. Abstract of the three presentations in Knowledge Sharing Session ‘‘Total Solutions: From Melt to Yarn, Fibers and Nonwovens” was presented by Shri. Atul Vaidya, Oerlikon India. He highlighted about the drive systems of man-made fibres from Melt to Yarn, Fibers and Nonwovens. He emphasized about the solutions and different technologies used in PET Polycondensation Plant, Monofilament extrusion lines, Spunbond lines. He briefed about the application of Industrial Yarn (IDY) such as Tire cord, Geotextiles, V-belts, Hoses, Sewing threads, etc. and the working principle of Industrial Yarn spinning. The global nonwoven consumption represents 43% for Hygiene applications and 57% for technical applications and nonwoven has a higher growth rates in technical applications. He also spoke on production capacity of high performance nonwoven applications like Bitumen roofing substrate, Underlayment roofing membrane, Geotextile nonwoven, etc. and PET geotextiles is a benchmark which has improved strength and higher growth rate. Shri. Kamal Kumar Johari, Managing Director of Nobel Hygiene presented an interesting topic know as “Indian Diaper Market- Current Scenario and the emerging trend”. Nobel Hygiene is a market leader in the adult diaper segment and also enlightened the audience with the other products the company offers such as baby diapers know as “Teddyy”. He also spoke the unspoken stating that this industry has a blooming edge since the market is growing by 25% year-on-year basis. He expressed his view stating that he majorly faced a big challenge since the diapers are imported to India from

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October 2016


AGM MEET REPORT the nearby countries are priced much less than the ones produced in India leading to unhealthy competition, so seeks help from the Government on India to protect domestic industry. Dr. Anjan K. Mukhopadhyay, Director, BTRA presented the topic on “High Performance Fibres and Yarns used in Technical textiles”. He briefed about the High performance fibres which are used in Technical Textiles. He explained the importance, properties and application of different high performance fibres such as aramid, carbon, chemically resistant & thermally resistant fibres. He

also talked about the speciality fibres like PVDF, PVF, FEP, PEEK and Polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibres. The problems faced by the industries during the import of these speciality fibres like customs duty, import duty, etc. Shri. Amit Agarwal, Hon’ Secretary, ITTA, proposed a vote of thanks. Mr. Agarwal thanked all the Directors, members and invitees who were present. He specially thanked the resource persons for making the presentations.

ITAMMA

Chief Guest Speech Mr. Ujjwal Narayan Uke, Principle of Textiles, Government of Maharashtra delivered Chief Guest address at 73rd AGM on 30th September, 2016 He started the speech by giving a warm welcome to all the dignitaries on the dais. He stated that how boring are the AGM’s and we have to return back home with empty bags. He emphasized more on the mindset of the people and the continuous changing mood swings. Events are effective as it gives happiness, opportunity to meet new people and it gets registered in your life. Hoping to create a positive impact on you through this event. In 1970’s we had Mr. Tofler, author of Future Shock, he said that the future is here and the changes are happening so rapidly that the phase of change itself states that the second derivative is also going very high. 2016, I look back and say Tofler was right. Mr. Uke, expressed his love for photography and how he used to develop his own films and photographs sitting in his college dark room for hours and suddenly one day, Kodak was not there and that trend is gone. It is a selfie phase now. Looking that, it feels that the internal composition engines will also be things of past. After 5 years there won’t be petrol and diesel cars and that is called phase of change. There will be more of solar cars, more conventional energies and fossil fuels may get fossilised. We must be prepare for the change, that differentiate a losser from a winner. His expressed his aim of converting a people from loser to winners, people are hopes of the country, captains of the industry. Textile Industry depends on the machines made by the Textile stalwarts. When they work it directly create or generate employment for people and those people are his citizens and once they get employment they buy clothes for which the machinery of Textile Stalwarts are prepared, it is a beautiful phase of life. Success depends a lot on 2 things Somatic part and Visarlic part. We tend to work more on somatic part like how do we work, skill upgradation, how do we make person more efficient, factory, shopfloor, etc. The other side that is the visarlic part is like how good we are mentally, mental capacity, mental willingness that is what makes you. Physical ability comes later. Lot depends on your values and beliefs also. Sometimes we have to put our value system upside down and then we tend to come out loser. We most of the time depends on our fortune, that we are here only because of our fortune and we have to continue to be here and suffer in silence. We see movies, mythology, literature all these glorify sorrow. Let us not be like that, let us not be too humble, that is not expected from a fighter, if we want to be winners we have to give up the thinking of sad is good. It is a time to have a killer instinct. That’s

October 2016

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what business needs, that’s what country needs and that’s the call of the time. We feel that there is no escape and we are here to pay for our sins. Most of the time people look into their past or future not only this but also their previous and next life. We have to change this thinking and remember that things are happening right here. Association is a group of great industrialists and all are competing with each other, and who also get along with each other for the betterment of the Association. Association needs to built a good road map, develop a strategy and then tactical. Government is there for you, you create government we are not on the opposite side. This nation was created with lots of hopes and ambitions and we had several false start. It’s time to understand that we need to change and grow very fast, we need escape velocity. Maharashtra government is looking seriously into garments and apparel sector and inviting more investors to come in, and for this machinery could be required and so you people can look in to it. Business needs killer instinct. Look into your own strengths, your strengths will give you the key to success. He appreciated the youngsters receiving the ITAMMA awards and stated that these are the hopes for our country. Recent developments in country says “Guss ke Maaro”. This is the mantra for business and welcome the change. Open your windows and doors and new ideas will come in from anybody. Quoting the Buddha, “Acceptance of change not statiscope reducing sorrow” What UKE says, “Willingness to change increases happiness” “SO BE READY FOR CHANGE”.

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ITAMMA

Guest of Honour Speech

Mr. M.L. Jhunjhunwala, President, RSMW Limited delivered Guest of Honour address at 73rd AGM on 30th September, 2016 He started with a note congratulating all the Awards Winners and the welcoming the Chief Guest and Textile Stalwarts in the hall. Life time achievement award to Mr. G.T. Dembla of Precision Rubber Industries reminded him his early days when he was the Purchase manager and used to purchase the cots and aprons of Precision Rubber Industries. He mentioned that Textile Industry is growing and we are lucky to be the part of it in this Era. Government of India is taking various initiatives for the betterment of Textile Industry by supporting and enhancing the domestic market which is further helping to produce value added products. Recent initiative taken by Government is by announcing 6000 crores package for Textile Industry so that new reforms can be introduced. Textile industry is the largest employment provider in India after Agriculture. Growing domestic market, increase in disposable income, rise in working population of wom-

POST EVENT REPORT

Eminent Industrialists Grace NITRA’s 13th Convocation

NITRA’s 13th Convocation Ceremony was held on Friday, 23rd Sept.’16 at NITRA, Ghaziabad. Sh. Sanjay Jain, newly elected Chairman NITRA and MD, TT Ltd., Sh. R. K. Jain, Immediate Past Chairman NITRA and CMD, Pasupati Spinning & Weaving Mills, Sh. R. L. Nolkha, CMD, Nitin Spinners Ltd and Past Chairman NITRA along with other eminent industrialists were also present on the occasion in addition to Director General NITRA Dr. Arindam Basu, Officiating Director NITRA Sh. Abhijit Pal and other faculty members. A total of 175 students from all regular, distance learning and PG Diploma programs were awarded certificates and medals in this year’s convocation. Dr. Arindam Basu, while welcoming the guests, mentioned that today NITRA is offering many industry oriented programs on regular, part-time and distance learning modes, covering the areas such as textile/garment manufacturing, designing, merchandising, and quality assurance. He informed that at present NITRA has more than 2400 pass out who are working in more than 100 renowned apparel and textiles exports companies. Sh. R. L. Nolkha opined that the availability of skilled manpower for textile industry is quite inadequate hence the training programs offered by NITRA are very useful for the industry. He expressed happiness over NITRA’s excellent placement record.

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an, home textiles demands, helped in the development of Textile industry. Involvement of young population who are spending on lifestyle and fashion has given an opportunity for increase in retail segment and further demand in domestic market only. He gave example of his company where in early days 50% was exported and 50% was consumed in domestic market but now with growing era 35% is exported and 65% is consumed in domestic market. He with pleasure mentioned the initiative of Indian Textile Machinery Manufacturers who have done good job under leader as LMW who are making Textile Machines available to us for spinning segment but still we have to depend on imports of machines for manufacturing of Denim fabrics. He mentioned that if we are able to manufacture machines indigenously for these requirements then this will also create a huge scope for the manufacturing of Spare parts and components for these machines and will also further create more employment thus further help to achieve the government mission of Make In India.

Sh. Sanjay Jain advised the young students to become hardworking and quick learner. He opined that if someone works extra for the company, it is not only the company that benefits alone but the employee himself benefits in the long run. He mentioned that the benefit of the company is temporary in this case whilst the value added to the employee’s skill remains forever. Sh. Jain also encouraged the students to think out of the box and do things in innovatively different ways. He wished every success for the passout students while they work in industry. At present NITRA conducts two 1year-full-time job oriented certificate programs Apparel Manufacturing and Merchandising (AMM) and Apparel Design and Quality Control (ADQC). Both the programs are approved by Apparel, Made-ups and Home Furnishing Sector Skill Council, Govt. of India. In addition to that, NITRA also conducts three 1year-distance learning certificate programs Textile Technology and Management (TTM-DLP), Apparel Manufacturing and Merchandising (AMM-DLP) and Quality Evaluation of Textiles and Garments (QETG-DLP). Full day contact classes are held on 2nd and 4th Sundays of every month for the DLPs. Sh. Abhijit Pal proposed the formal vote of thanks.

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October 2016


COTTON REPORT

INDIA Arrivals: (as on 18-10-2016) Mr. Manish Daga MD, COTTON GURU cottongurutm@gmail.com State Wise

2015-16 (Bales)

Haryana

5000

Punjab

8500

Rajasthan

8500

Gujarat

25000

Maharashtra

12000

Madhya Pradesh

8000

Karnataka

4500

Andhra Pradesh

3500

Telangana

7000

Total

82000

Total Arrivals as on 18-10-2016: 1037700 (1.38 million) bales Indian Cotton Arrivals (Oct-Sep) 2015-16

Source – Trading Economic

Cotton Imports by India in the last 3 years: Cotton exports from India have been steady since the last 3 years but have dramatically risen in 2016 because of various reasons like y Low crop due to deficient monsoon. Cotton crop in 2014-15 was ----- million bales while that of 2015-16 was revised down to 33.7 million bales (of 170 kg each). y Significant increase in cotton consumption due to new spinning mills in Gujarat and other states. y Dipping stock of physical cotton and sudden spurt of about 40% in prices of Indian cotton compelled Indian spinners to import cotton.

Domestic Market Summary: Oct to Sep (2015-16)

Cotton prices v/s Yarn prices:

Cotton Exports by India in the last 3 years: Cotton exports from India have been gradually receding since the last 3 years because of various reasons like y Stagnant or lower cotton crop. y Increasing consumption within India. y No demand from China, the leading importer of Indian cotton.

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Prices of Indian cotton started increasing immediately after the feared atom bomb of sale of Chinese reserve stock was diffused when the auction started in the 1st week of May. It was like a spring release for cotton prices after being suppressed for a long time. COTTONGURUTM has been continuously reporting since the beginning of 2016 that the Indian cotton prices were scheduled to increase due to various fundamental and technical reasons: y Following a weak monsoon and diseases like whitefly (N.India) and pink ball- worm (Gujarat), the cotton crop in India was bound to fall. But this was reported very late (July 2016) by the Indian and International Agencies due to which the spinning mills were taken off-guard. y The cotton stock will both spinners and sellers was historically

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COTTON REPORT y

low leading to a mad rush to buy cotton. The well-planned and executed Chinese auction of reserve cotton and unexpected demand from Chinese mills triggered the increase in the cotton prices in India and worldwide.

Last year, COTTONGURUTM had reported of the dynamic increase of spinning capacity in the cotton-rich province of Xinjiang, China. Slowing demand in domestic market enticed the Indian spinners to explore the export market for selling yarn. Stiff competition from Vietnam and Pakistan compelled them to sell yarn at very competitive rates, sometimes even with negative margins. On the other end, soaring domestic cotton market deepened the gap between cotton and yarn prices squeezing the margins of the spinners and pushing them to the brink of heavy losses.

International Market Summary: 2015-2016 World Cotton Scenario during the last 3 years

Reports: USDA: World 2016/17 cotton output to increase by 7%. Driven by increases in Australia and Mali, partially offset by declines in Brazil and the United States, global cotton production in 2016/17 is forecast at 102.7 million bales. This figure revealed by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in its October report is slightly above the September USDA projection and nearly 7 %higher than 2015/16. The October report forecasts world harvested area at 29.4 million hectares in 2016/17, 3 per cent below the prior season and the lowest since 1986/87. The global cotton yield is projected at 760 kg per hectare, which is equal to the 5 year average. Cotton production is expected to rise in three of the four top producing countries, with China being the exception, with its cotton production projected to decrease 1 million bales to 21.0 million. Output in India is projected at 26.5 million bales; up marginally from 2015/16 from a rebound in yield, which is expected to be offset from a 10 % reduction in cotton area. The report estimates an US production increase to 16 million bales in 2016/17, while Pakistan’s cotton crop is estimated to expand to nearly 8.3 million bales. A cotton crop of 4 million bales is forecast for Australia in 2016/17, up from 2.6 million bales last season and that of Brazil at 6.5 million bales, 10 % above a season earlier, despite slightly lower acreage.

ICAC:

Cotton production in top 5 cotton growing countries

Cotton Acreage and Price Linkage

Highlights: • Increased Production in the USA, Pakistan and Brazil Will Offset Losses in China In 2016/17, • 2016/17 is expected to increase by 7% to 22.6 million tons. • The average yield is projected to improve by 9% to 753 kg/ha, and world production in Cotton area in India contracted by 8%, • The world cotton area is forecast to fall by 1% to 30 million hectares. • World cotton consumption is forecast to remain unchanged from 2015/16 at 23.8 million tons, but is projected to exceed production by 1.3 million tons. • Beneficial weather during the growing season is expected to lead to a 5% improvement in the average yield to 899 kg/ha • Although domestic cotton prices have fallen since China implemented its direct production subsidy policy • World stocks are projected to decline by 7% to 18.1 million tons. INDIA: Area: 11.2 million hectares (- 6%). Avg. Yield: 526 kg/h (+9%). Production: 5.8 million tons (+2%). Mill Use: 5.2 Million Tons (Stable) Export: 820,000 tons (-35%). CHINA: Area: 2.8 million hectares (- 7%). Avg. Yield: 1,600kg/ha (+3%). Production: 4.6 million tons (- 4%). Mill Use: 7.2 Million Tons (-2%) Import: 980,000 tons

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October 2016


COTTON REPORT USA: Area: 3.9 million hectares (+20%). Avg. Yield: 929 kg/ha (+8%). Production: 3.5 million tons (+25%). Export: 2.5 million tons( 26 %).

Introduction of GST

PAKISTAN: Area: 2.5 million hectares (- 12%). Avg. Yield: 756 kg/ha (+43%). Production: 1.9 million tons (+26%). Mill Use: 2.3 Million Tons (+1%) Brazil: Production: 1.4 million tons (+ 7%) BANGLADESH: Mill Use: 1.2 Million Tons (+10%) Imports: 1.2 million tons (No.1 importer) VIETNAM: Mill Use: 1.1 million tons (+15%) Imports: 1.1 million tons (No.2 importer) WORLD COTTON SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 Million Tons Production Consumption Imports Exports Ending Stocks Cotlook A Index

Garment sectors are set to benefit tremendously with this scheme. According to the government, this scheme will result in social transformation by uplifting women in rural areas as 70% of the workforce in the garment sector is women. COTTONGURUTM strongly feels that India’s cotton production will determine it’s chances of success in achieving the target of increasing textile exports by $30 billion over the next 3 years.

26.20 24.20 7.57 7.73 22.31 71

21.10 23.78 7.23 7.49 19.37 70

22.54 23.81 7.41 7.41 18.10 73*

Changes from previous month Million Tons 0.01 -0.08 0.09 0.00 -0.07 0.00 0.00 0.02 -0.08 0.01 0.13 -0.08 0.00 -0.13 -0.04

The price projection for 2016/17 is based on the ending stocks/ consumption ratio in the world-less-China in 2014/15 (estimate), in 2015/16 (estimate) and in 2016/17 (projection), on the ratio of Chinese net imports to world imports in 2015/16 (estimate) and 2016/17 (projection). The price projection is the mid-point of the 95% confidence interval: 62 cts/lb to 88 cts/lb.

Government Reports: Textile policy 2016: Government of India recently announced a scheme targeting at its garment export to reach US$30 billion in 3 years. Prime Minister Modi’s government recently unveiled a scheme with an annual outlay of about US$890 million (Rs.6000 crores) that will enable the country to reach US$30 billion in garment export in three years. The scheme is labour friendly and empowers women and underprivileged working in the garment and allied sectors. In 3 years, the initiative is expected to attract additional investments worth US$11 billion and will provide 10 million new jobs. An important aspect is that the garment exporting units will enjoy 5% additional duty drawback which will boost the competitiveness of Indian exports in foreign markets. This initiative will cost the government about US$800 (INR 5500 crores) annually. As a first of its kind, units will be able to obtain refund for state levies that were not included in the computation before.

October 2016

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The Goods and Services Tax Bill or GST Bill, officially known as The Constitution (One Hundred and twenty second Amendment) Bill, 2014, proposes a national Value added Tax to be implemented in India from 1 April 2017. “Goods and Services Tax” would be a comprehensive indirect tax on manufacture, sale and consumption of goods and services throughout India, to replace taxes levied by the central and state governments. The introduction of Goods and Services Tax (GST) would be a significant step in the reform of indirect taxation in India. Amalgamating several Central and State taxes into a single tax would mitigate cascading or double taxation, facilitating a common national market. The simplicity of the tax should lead to easier administration and enforcement. From the consumer point of view, the biggest advantage would be in terms of a reduction in the overall tax burden on goods, which is currently estimated at 25%-30%, free movement of goods from one state to another without stopping at state borders for hours for payment of state tax or entry tax and reduction in paperwork to a large extent. Minimum Support Price (MSP) of Cotton for 2016-17 The MSP of seed cotton in India has been increased by a mere INR 60/quintal. The revised MSP chart is as under: The revised MSP chart is as under: Staple Specifications Length (mm) Micronaire Medium staple 24.5-25.5 4.3-5.1 Long Staple 29.5-30.5 3.5-4.3

MSP (INR/quin) 3860 4160

Technical Reports: 1)

ICE Cotton:

Noted in last update “can retest 68-66 areas. However this corrective decline would be opportunity to go long in Cotton”, ICE Cotton Futures has bounced smartly from 66 areas! After a vertical rally upwards, there was equally swift correction as well, the support areas held and ICE Cotton technically looks sound & bullish on all time frames. All long bets are off if & only 65 areas break on closing weekly basis. All dips for short to medium would be opportunity to go long. Cotton likely to make higher highs in months to come.Key Supports 67.80-66.47-65.22, Key Resistances 72.18-74.50-77.80

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YARN REPORT

YnFx Export Watch Report SEPTEMBER 2016 India’s overall export shrinks in AUGUST

India’s merchandise export in August 2016 was valued at US$21.52 billion (INR144,045 crore), down 0.3 per cent (2.6 per cent higher in INR terms) compared to the levels in August 2015. Total exports for the period April-August 2016-17 was down 2.98 per cent at US$108.52 billion (INR726,776 crore, up 1.82 per cent) over the same period last year. Imports in August 2016 were valued at US$29.2 billion (INR195,415 crore) and were 14.1 per cent lower (11.6 per cent lower in INR terms) over the level of imports in August 2015. Cumulative imports for the period April-August 2016-17 was at US$143.19 billion, down 15.9 per cent (INR1,086,515 crore, down 11.7 per cent) over the same period last year. Crude oil imports declined 8.5 per cent in August 2016 and 22.1 per cent drop during April-August 2016-17. In similar comparison, non-oil imports were 15.7 per cent lower in August 2016 and 13.9 per cent lower in April-August 2016-17. As a result, trade deficit for April-August, 2016-17 was at US$34.67 billion, which was lower than the deficit of US$58.38 billion in April-August, 2015-16. India, Chile signs bilateral preferential trade agreement India and Chile has agreed for expansion of their bilateral preferential trade agreement (PTA). The trade pact was signed in a meeting between Commerce Secretary Rita Teaotia and the South American country’s Ambassador to India Andres Barbe Gonzalez on 6th September 2016, an official statement said. Under the expanded PTA, both sides are offering to lower or eliminate tariffs on a number of items traded with each other. Chile has offered concessions to India on 1,798 tariff lines with margin of preference (MoP) ranging from 30 percent to 100 percent and India has offered concessions to Chile on 1,031 tariff lines at 8-digit level with MoP ranging from 10 percent to 100 percent, said a Commerce Ministry statement.

Indian exporters to get greater market access under APTA

The exchange of tariff concessions under the Asia Pacific Trade Agreement (APTA), gets the Cabinet’s approval on 12th September 2016, Commerce and Industry Minister Nirmala Sitharaman told media after the cabinet meeting. The APTA will enable Indian exporters to get greater market access in sectors, including textiles and pharma, in countries such as China and Korea. For its part, India is offering import duty concessions for 28.01 percent of tariff lines (products) for other APTA members. The duties applicable on these items will be lower by an average of 33.45 percent than the MFN rates applicable for imports from other countries outside the APTA bloc. Bangladesh tops in india’s yarn Export Spun yarn exports in August 2016 declined 36.9 per cent in volume terms while it was down 31.9 per cent in value terms. Spun yarn (all kinds) shipments were at 80 million kg worth US$246 million or INR1,627 crore, implying per unit realisation of US$3.07 per kg which was up US cents 16 from previous month and up US cents 22 as compared to August 2015. Indian exporters were still suffering from a sharp fall of sales to China in August. The sales to China had further plunged, due to competitive pressure from Vietnam, whereas exports were rising to Pakistan and Bangladesh. However, the surge of 18% in shipments to Bangladesh from year earlier and a rise of 25.3% of exports to Pakistan have not offset the fall of China’s market.

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A. Spun Yarn Exports - By Port ‘000 Kgs

Rs crore

Mln US$

Aug-15

Aug-16

Aug-15

Aug-16

Aug-15

Aug-16

Mundra

15,438

20,452

277.2

392.6

43.48

59.39

Tuticorin Sea

17,348

13,546

355.3

306.8

55.80

46.40

JNPT

19,180

10,881

339.8

213.9

53.28

32.36

Ludhiana ICD

19,200

9,175

336.9

186.1

52.88

28.14

9,620

6,516

168.2

126.4

26.37

19.11

Madras Sea

23,222

5,797

392.7

115.8

61.58

17.51

Mandideep

2,695

2,951

51.2

60.6

8.04

9.17

Cochin Sea

3,609

1,758

84.4

50.0

13.24

7.56

Petrapole Road

899

1,665

21.6

41.4

3.39

6.26

Marripalam ICD

3,168

1,888

50.3

32.7

7.88

4.95

Kattupalli

1,744

1,023

27.8

21.0

4.36

3.17

800

983

12.4

18.6

1.94

2.82

Vizag Sea

1,366

930

20.8

14.2

3.26

2.15

Nagpur

Pipavav

Krishnapatanam

1,137

821

19.8

13.3

3.10

2.01

Tuticorin ICD

485

383

13.7

10.3

2.15

1.56

Hyderabad ICD

745

371

14.4

6.9

2.27

1.05

4,521

435

85.0

4.3

13.36

0.65

Delhi TKD ICD Ahmedabad ICD

884

224

15.7

4.1

2.48

0.62

Calcutta Sea

33

56

2.2

3.9

0.35

0.60

Delhi Air

20

38

0.7

1.6

0.11

0.24

Pithampur ICD

38

118

0.8

1.5

0.12

0.22

Bombay Air

10

25

0.3

0.7

0.05

0.11

Madras Air

12

9

0.5

0.3

0.08

0.05

Ahmedabad Air

0

0.0

0.00

Tondiarpet ICD

720

10.8

1.71

Ankleshwar

45.5

0.71

Grand Total

126,942

80,047

2,303.3

0.11 1,627.1

361.39

246.11

Vietnam’s share of total Chinese imports rose from 20.5% to 34.4% in a single year, in volume terms. India is the main loser with its share falling from 30.6% to 20.2% whereas Pakistan has resisted, thanks to its specific products. In August 2016, 82 countries imported spun yarn from India, with Bangladesh at the top accounting for 18.5 per cent of the total value with imports rising 12.9 per cent in terms of volume YoY and climbing 18 per cent in value YoY. China was the second largest importer of spun yarns in August and accounted for around 16.2 per cent of all spun yarn exported from India. Export to China plunged 77.5 per cent in volumes and 76.4 per cent lower in value. Portugal was the third largest importer of spun yarns, which saw volume surging 12.8 per cent while rose 10.7 per cent in value. These three top importers together accounted for around 42 per cent of all spun yarns exported from India in August. Cotton yarn export was at 60.7 million kg in August with 71 countries importing yarn worth US$191.4 million (INR1,266 crore). The average unit price realization was at US$3.15 a kg, up US cents 20 from previous month and up US cents 30 from the same month a year ago. Bangladesh was the largest importer of cotton yarn from In-

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October 2016


YARN REPORT dia in August, followed by China and South Korea. The top three together accounted for more than 47 per cent of cotton yarn with combined volume at 29.8 million kg worth US$90.1 million. Peru, Turkey, Tunisia, Brazil and Greece were among the fastest growing markets for cotton yarn, and accounted for 9.1 per cent of total cotton yarn export value. Ten new destinations were added for cotton yarn export, of which, Bulgaria, Syria, Cote D’Ivoire and Honduras were the major ones. Five countries did not import any cotton yarn from India, including Lithuania, Syria and El Salvador. They had imported yarns worth US$0.5 million in August 2015. In August 2016, significant deceleration was seen in export to Jordan, Romania, Cambodia, United Arab Emirates and Honduras. Combed cotton yarn accounted for 65.5 per cent of cotton yarn exported in August with volumes at 39.7 million kg worth US$133.9 million. Carded yarn export was at 14.5 million kg. Their respective unit value realization was US$3.37 per kg and US$2.81 per kg. Open ended yarn export was at 3.7 million kg at an average price of US$1.74 a kg.

Manmade fibre yarns export cont inues upward trend B. Fibre Exports - By Port ‘000 Kgs

Rs crore

Mln US$

Aug-15

Aug-16

Aug-15

Aug16

Mundra

14,071

7,020

145.0

90.1

22.70

13.64

JNPT

25,764

8,970

241.6

84.3

37.79

12.76

Petrapole Road

14,572

4,746

149.6

61.1

23.39

9.24

702

1,383

7.7

15.9

1.19

2.40

Ankleshwar Nagpur

Aug15

Aug16

927

1,642

6.6

11.2

1.03

1.69

Ludhiana ICD

1,787

508

20.1

4.4

3.17

0.66

Tuticorin Sea

38

117

1.2

1.9

0.19

0.29

Calcutta Sea

57

0.3

Viscose yarn export was valued at US$11 million or INR72.7 crore and volume at 3.66 million kg, implying average unit price realization of US$3.01 per kg. They were exported to 27 countries with Belgium at the top worth US$2.59 million. It was followed by Iran with imports worth US$2.38 million. Both these markets accounted for 35.6 per cent of all viscose yarn exported in August. Brazil, Iran, Morocco and Portugal were the fastest growing markets for viscose yarns while Turkmenistan, China, Australia, and United Arab Emirates were the new major markets. Pakistan, Peru and Canada were the major ones among the 7 countries that did not import any viscose yarns during the month. Blended yarns export dips in August Blended spun yarns export was worth US$34.47 million in August, down 1.6 per cent YoY while volumes edged down 0.9 per cent at 11.85 million kg. During the month, 5.8 million kg of PC yarns was exported worth US$16.1 million. Another 4.4 million kg of PV yarns valued at US$11.5 million were exported. Acrylic/cotton yarn prices were down 22.4 per cent YoY. In August, 1.2 million kg of other blend of yarns were exported worth US$ 5.88 million. Bangladesh and Colombia were the largest importers of PC yarn from India in August followed by Brazil. Guatemala, Latvia, South Africa, Poland and Sri Lanka were the fastest growing markets for PC yarns while Portugal significantly reduced its import of PC yarns from India. Mexico, South Korea, Canada, United Arab Emirates and Bulgaria were among the 15 countries that did not import any PC yarns from India during August. Honduras was the major destination among the 6 new markets found in August. In August, US$11.45 million worth of PV yarns were exported from India with volumes at 4.44 million kgs. Turkey continued to be largest importer of PV yarns from India followed by Iran with total volume at 2.54 million kg worth at US$6.43 million. Honduras and South Korea were the new major markets for PV yarn while 3 countries did not import any PV yarn during the month, including the major ones like Sudan and Uganda.

Filament yarns export value declines C. Filament Exports - By Port

‘000 Kgs

0.05

Bombay Air

7

2

0.0

0.0

0.01

0.00

Delhi Air

1

1

0.0

0.0

0.00

0.00

Rs crore

Mln US$

Aug-15

Aug-16

Aug-15

Aug-16

Aug15

Aug16

27,677

28,931

301.5

285.4

47.30

43.17

3,139

2,346

27.6

19.3

4.31

2.91

441

460

18.6

18.6

2.92

2.82

Vizag Sea

688

6.8

1.07

Madras Sea

581

5.9

0.91

Nagpur

Krishnapatanam

124

0.5

0.08

Tuticorin ICD

Pipavav

2,115

22.3

3.52

Mundra

422

403

8.7

9.3

1.37

1.41

Kattupalli

1,000

10.0

1.54

Pipavav

178

195

4.9

5.0

0.77

0.75

18

0.4

0.06

Tuticorin ICD Grand Total

62,396

24,446

617.6

269.2

96.64

JNPT

Ahmedabad ICD

40.73

100% man-made fibre yarns export was at 7.50 million kg in August, comprising 3.01 million kg of polyester yarn, 3.66 million kg of viscose yarn and 0.83 million kg of acrylic yarn. Polyester yarn exports were up 22.3 per cent in value while viscose yarn exports value surged 63.6 per cent during the month. Acrylic yarn exports declined 6.2 per cent in August. Unit price realization was down US cents 12 a kg for polyester from a year ago and that of viscose yarn was up US cents 6 a kg. Acrylic yarn unit price realization was down US cents 3 a kg year on year basis. Polyester spun yarns were exported to 45 countries in August aggregating US$6.72 million with unit price realization averaging US$2.23 a kg. A total of 3.01 million kg was exported, of which, 17.6 per cent was shipped by Turkey alone. Eleven new destinations were found for polyester yarn this August, of which, Dominican Republic, Djibouti, Tunisia, Nigeria and Mozambique were the major ones.

October 2016

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191

1.1

3.7

0.18

0.56

136

111

3.1

2.8

0.48

0.43

Madras Sea

53

111

1.9

2.0

0.29

0.31

Bombay Air

59

89

2.0

2.0

0.31

0.30

Tuticorin Sea

Ludhiana ICD

27

21

0.9

0.8

0.14

0.12

Delhi TKD ICD

18

30

0.5

0.6

0.07

0.09

Kattupalli Petrapole Road

29

0.5

0.08

11

20

0.3

0.4

0.05

0.07

Madras Air

2

6

0.0

0.2

0.01

0.03

Ahmedabad Air

2

3

0.1

0.2

0.02

0.03

Ankleshwar Delhi Air Calcutta Sea

15

0.2

3

0.1

13

Cochin Sea

13

Grand Total

32,246

0.4

371.8

0.01 0.06

0.2 32,963

0.03

0.03 350.9

58.32

53.09

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YARN REPORT In August, all types of filament yarns export aggregated 32.96 million kg, up 2.2 per cent YoY while value declined 9 per cent to US$53.1 million. Filament yarns include polyester, nylon, polypropylene and viscose filament yarns and were exported to 77 countries during the month. More than 89 per cent of filament yarns were of polyester, of which, DTYs were the largest at 75.3 per cent. During the month, 31.6 million kg of polyester filament yarns were exported worth US$47.4 million. Brazil and Turkey continued to be the major importers of polyester filament yarns, followed by Bangladesh. The three together accounted for 50.7 per cent of polyester filament yarn exports. Brazil was also major importer of polyester DTYs and Bangladesh was major importer of PFYs. USA was the major importer of nylon filament yarn in August with volumes at 45,000 kg worth US$0.25 million. In value terms, Sri Lanka and Oman were the other largest markets for nylon filament in August, worth US$0.27 million. Polypropylene filament yarns were exported to 17 countries in August with volumes at 181,000 kg worth US$0.36 million. Djibouti was the major importer of PP yarns. Paraguay and Bangladesh were the other major importers of PP filament yarns in August. Around 1,044,000 kg of viscose filament yarns were exported in August to 24 countries from India valued at US$4.3 million. During the month, 224,000 kg of VFYs were exported to Japan. It was followed by Germany and Morocco.

Cotton fibre export was at 11.8 million kg or 69,713 bale s (of 170 kg each) in August which declined 75.1 per cent YoY and was valued at US$23.2 million, down 68.5 per cent. Bangladesh and Malaysia were the largest importers of cotton with combined volumes at 65,110 bales amongst the 16 countries that imported cotton from India. Exports of manmade fibre were at 12.6 million kg, worth US$17.5 million. These included ASF, PSF, VSF and PPSF. USA and Bangladesh were the largest importers of PSF during August while Iran and China were the major importers of VSF, in similar comparison. Vietnam was the dominant buyer of ASF. Similar report on Fabric is under preparation While this report is dedicated to fibres, filaments and spun yarns, we are in the process of preparing a separate report covering all kinds of fabric exported from India. Like this report, it will provide in-depth analysis and statistics of fabric exported from 33 ports in India accounting for 90% of total volume and value of export. We shall be glad to offer early bird discount for this report. To know more call us on 022-66291104, 66291141.

Cotton export plunge again

D. Exports by Mode of Shipment ‘000 Kgs

Rs crore

Mln US$

Aug-15

Aug-16

Aug-15

Aug-16 Aug-15 Aug-16

Spun yarn

126,942

80,047

2,303.3

1,627.1

361.39

246.11

Sea

126,001

78,310

2,280.1

1,583.0

357.76

239.45

Road

899

1,665

21.6

41.4

3.39

6.26

Air

42

72

1.5

2.7

0.24

0.40

Filament

32,246

32,963

371.8

350.9

58.32

53.09

Sea

32,173

32,842

369.3

348.1

57.93

52.66 0.36

Air

62

101

2.2

2.4

0.34

Road

11

20

0.3

0.4

0.05

0.07

Fibre

62,396

24,446

617.6

269.2

96.64

40.73

Sea

47,816

19,698

467.9

208.1

73.24

31.48

Road

14,572

4,746

149.6

61.1

23.39

9.24

Air

8

3

0.07

0.03

0.01

0.01

Contact Vidya Vadgaonkar Email : Vidya@ynfx.com Tel : +91 22 66291122 Mobile : +91 9619 293725

SURAT REPORT Synthetic yarn prices are steady, manufacturers in pressure Surat : The prices of various deniers of synthetic yarn stick to upper level in surat market. After a month purchase and stock, the manufacturers of raw grey fabrics are now in cautious mode. As Diwali vacation is likely to start from 25th October, weavers has stopped new orders. Crude oil, PTA & MEG prices remain same as was in last month. But, because of less number of orders, the Yarn manufacturers are now in pressure to clear their stock. Market sources said, the second line spinners are now offering Rs. 1/2 discount in Crimp and Roto based Yarn quality. The Roto 80/72 denier prices has come down to Rs. 100/kg in the local yarn market. Sourc-

36

es said that, if crude oil prices increases, it will effect the prices of yarn. Two weeks of Diwali vacation in textile manufacturing units Surat : The Diwali vacation in Surat textile industries will remain atleast for two weeks this year. The manufacturing in weaving, processing mill, embroidery and other job work units will remain slow. The production and trading will likely to regularise in mid of November. After a month long good sale of finished synthetic fabrics, the graph of daily turnover has come down. The wholesellers

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October 2016


MARKET REPORT are clearing their inventories and reducing new orders of raw grey fabrics and because of that various grey fabrics prices are now decreasing. Due to decline in demand, the powerloom sector is witnessing slowdown. This has forced many powerloom weavers to reduce the grey fabrics production. The workers of Bihar, UP, Rajasthan, Orissa and other parts of contry are going to their native for Diwali celebration and are likely to return by second week of November. The Diwali vacation for the weavers and in other manufacturing segments of textile remains for atleast two weeks. Sources said that the weaving units in various industrial area are expected to close shops from October 25 and reopen in the first week of November. The trading in textile market will gearup after second week of November. Amended-TUF scheme losses shine due to decreased subsidy in Surat Surat : The textile indusries is not happy with the decreased subsidy in Amended Technogy upgradation scheme(A-TUF). Surat based Faderation of Indian Art Silk Weaving Industries(FIASWI) has made a representation in the meeting of Inter minisrial stearing committte, that the govt. has decreased the subsidy to 10% in ATUF scheme. Earlier, under R-TUF and RR-TUF the subsidy rate was 30%. Less numbers of new application in A-TUF scheme shows that the scheme has lost it’s shine in Surat. The office bearers of FIASWI, CITI and other organisations demanded to increased the Subsidy rate as was in RR-TUF scheme. The meeting was held in New Delhi under the leadrship of Textile Minister Smriti Irani on 5th October. The Textile Commissioner was instructed to clear the pending cases

of subsidy of 1445 crores. The govt. has added new 24 banks in TUF list. The stearing committe has accepted the list of advises to rectify the mistakes in R-TUF and RR-TUF which was given by technical advisory cum monitering commitee(TAMC). CAIT organises conference on GST for textile and small traders in Surat Surat : To empower the non corporate sector with technology and awareness campaign about compliance of proposed Goods & Service Tax(GST), the Confederation of All India Tarders(CAIT) has organised a conference for textile and small traders in Surat on 12th October. CAIT National President Mr. B.C. Bhartia & Secretary General Mr. Praveen Kandelwal while addressing a Traders Conference said that the GST is a technology based taxation system. The entire production chain of textile and all other industries will cover under GST. As per the esimate, about 70% of non corporate sector including traders are still away from computerisation. At a time when the Government is moving towards e governance, the businesses can not remain aloof from the technology. CAIT has decided to empower and equip the non corporate sector about importance and acceptance of digital technologies which is expected to drive course of small & medium sized businesses in India. CAIT Gujarat chapter President Mr. Pramod Bhagat informed that in the first phase, the team CAIT Gujarat will hold GST awareness Conferences in all Districts of the state and has a target to train 500 traders with procedurs & compliance formalities of GST. Team CAIT will also rope in Tax Practioners, Chartered Accountants and Tax Consultants in this drive.

Dr.Hemant Sonare at World Textile Conference

Dr.Hemant Sonare, A leading educationist, a reputed textile & garment technologist, agriculturist ,eminent speaker and a well known social scientist spoke about Growth Model of Vidarbha at the World Textile Conference recently held at Hotel Sahara Star, Mumbai During the World Textile Conference based on theme World Textile-Growth & Great Opportunities, Dr.Hemant Sonare expressed his views in the panel discussion on Future of Indian Cotton in Global Scenario While talking about his efforts in creation of Vidarbha as a Growth Model from last two years, He Said, Unfortunately Vidarbha has been in the news because of farmer’s suicides distress .Vidarbha is a land where maximum number of suicides happened in last few years. He Said, When anybody Google word Vidarbha they

October 2016

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VIDARBHA REPORT

get maximum links which is showcasing stories related to suicides of cotton growing farmers of Vidarbha. This has created negative image of Vidarbha in the eyes of entire world. Inspite of being cotton rich area farmers from this region is shifting from cotton to other crops. He said, this is a wakeup call for industry which is based on calling for immediate attention from the industry. To address these societal & industrial issues, we have to adopt value added manufacturing & retail led growth dynamics in textile and clothing industry for employment generation, economic development and prosperity of this region. He said only the unbridled actions of people, entrepreneurs, dreamers, visionaries,risk takers, job creators ,wealth creators can lift Vidarbha at an altogether new level of prosperity and wellbeing. On the contrary the fact & figures related to cotton productivity and cotton quality of Vidarbha shows encouraging picture. Vidarbha is one of the highest cotton producing regions of India.Vidarbha have strength & immense potential like strategic location, quality land, irrigation facilities, connectivity, availability of skilled resources . The region has tremendous potential for all round value added growth.MIHAN (Multimodal international Hub Airport) at Nagpur will increase as a logistic hub on global map. Nagpur being centre of India offers logistical advantage & most economically viable location because of its connectivity. Being cotton rich region there is a huge investment potential within the region through appropriate value addition at each level. Organic cotton & technical textiles can provide new growth area in the region. Apparel manufacturing has

37


MARKET REPORT huge potential in the region which is still untapped. He talked about forward and backward integration, how it can be the key for success to address farmer’s distress of the region. He said, maximum output of quality cotton is going out of Vidarbha. Laboratory report given good rank & remark regarding cotton strength & staple length of cotton produced at Vidarbha. He said,Textile Association of India-Vidarbha has created successful impact by organizing 12th International & 70th all India Textile Conference at Nagpur. The conference created positive momentum in mindset of people who are working in Vidarbha’s textile sector. Government of Maharashtra has taken various decisions in the interest of Vidarbha.He talked about encouragement, communication gap, mobalization of resources & applicable research. He talked about how to develop next generation of Entrepreneurship .He said Textile association in coming future will involve themselves for prosperity & growth of all sectors from Fibre to Fashion.He talked about creation of brand value Made in Vidarbha with quality & productivity.Vidarbha falls in assured rainfall region. Climatic condition of Vidarbha is suitable for quality cotton crop production. Talking about survival of cotton & farming sector of Vidarbha, He said skill development of involved manpower is need of an hour for industry to progress & grow. He said various new projects can be started through value addition in cotton Industry as cottage industry at village level .He given emphasis on involvement & productivity of people for the growth of textile industry sector in Vidarbha. He said, Vidarbha is a potential land for development of all sectors from farm to fashion because of ample availability of cotton. He said, Textile association of India is covering all sectors from Fibre to Fashion and hav-

ing knowledge base of almost 28,000 qualified members all across India. He Said, cotton sector of Vidarbha is a promising sector of growth, everyone should work hand in hand. He said, entire cotton value chain have to stop working in isolation if we want to grow & prosper. He said for the survival of cotton farming sector of Vidarbha, ecosystem needs urgent reformative, remedial actions to survive, rive & thrive by relooking at the cotton textiles value chain and working out reforms to remedy and needed necessary immediate corrective actions. He said TAI-Vidarbha is creating new frontier of knowledge in all allied textile sector & developing entrepreneurial skill in manufacturing, marketing & technical services. If we will able to give professional inputs at every level we will able to improve productivity & quality at every level. He said, Cotton cultivation, productivity & quality will go hand in hand. He said changes could not be seen in textile sector if we will not give importance from cultivation to marketing. He said for inclusive growth consultative approach from everyone involved in the industry adopts best practices in technical, managerial & administration. He said, we in Vidarbha trying to create model of growth based on Cotton. He said, In Vidarbha, Handloom industry needs immediate attention. Handloom weavers are shifting to other businesses. ; Famous Navwari saree of Vidarbha needs design and marketing support He said, existing and budding entrepreneurs from Vidarbha will act as change agents and develop integrated framework to make Vidarbha as future Textile & Garment Hub of the country. He said, He can foresee a desired development at every stage from fibre to fashion and translate the thought process into action to achieve value added growth.

NEWS Kornit Digital ProvidesOn-Demand Fashion Production Technology for Project Runway

One-step, super-fast textile printing solution enables overnight turnaround for a complete collection of swimwear designs Kornit Digital, (NASDAQ: KRNT), a worldwide market leader in textile printingtechnology, has announced that its digital roll-to-roll printing system, the Kornit Allegro,will play a critical role in the next episode of Lifetime’s Emmy®-nominated Project Runway. In this American reality competition show, fashion designers compete to create the best fashion pieces with a limited amount of time and resources. The episode, called Sink or Swim, will air on October 6. Project Runway, which has been called “a lesson in fashion” by the Washington Post, is now running its fifteenth season. Judges include Heidi Klum, Marie Claire’s creative director Nina Garcia, creative director for Brooks Brother Women, fashion designer Zac Posen and mentor Tim Gunn, who once again will have the power to “save” one designer from elimination. In theSink or Swim episode, previewed

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at http://kornit.info/2dhn5vk, the challenge is to create a swimsuit and cover-up design. The candidatesare told that they can create a custom design which would be printed and returned to them the following morning. Heidi Klum also announces that the winning design would be shown as part of her swimwear line. The technology partners enabling the super-fast turnaroundareKornit Digital and Kornit userPapilio Prints in New Jersey. The production technology used is called Kornit Allegro. With its print width of 1.8m, it is the world’s onlysingle-step digital textile printing system designed for highspeed end-to-end production, using Kornit’s patented NeoPigmentTM printing process. The system features an integrated pretreatment technology and works on a variety of fabrics, both natural and man-made fibers and blends. It is the only industrial textile printer available today that integrates all production steps in a single, integrated production line, removing the need for complicated pre- and post-treatments such as steaming and washing. In fact, it is the fastest way from digital designs to the finished fabric. Relying on Kornit’s proprietary process, textile companies and brands can

shorten their turnaround times, cut intermediators and eliminate inventory cost. Because of its resource-efficient technology, saving energy and water, the Allegro is also a top choice for environmental protection, can be located practically anywhere and is especially suitable for local production requirements, a growing trend fueled by the internet. Captions: [Project Runway Tim Gunn and Heidi Klum.jpg] Tim Gunn, mentor of Project Runway, with the show’s host Heidi Klum [kornit allegro.jpg] With its print width of 1.8m, the Kornit Allegro is the world’s only single-step digital textile printing system

www.textilevaluechain.com

October 2016


SHOW CALENDAR

9-11

November 2016 8-9

International Apparel, Textile & Footwear Import Trade Exhibition 2016 Place : Cap Town/ South Africa, info: http://atfexpo.co.za/

10-12

ICTN 2016 Place : Delhi, India, info : www.textileconferenceiitd.com

15-17

Non Wovens Intermediate Course Place : France info: www.edana.org

14-15

ITF Place : Dubai, info: http://www.internationalapparelandtextilefair.com/

` 15-16

Fashion SVP 2016 Place : London/ UK, Info: http://www.fashionsvp.com/

16-18

INTEX SOUTH ASIA 2016 Place : Colombo/Srilanka, info: www.intexfair.com

16-17

Performance Days Place : Munich /Germany, info: www.performancedays.com

17-19

Fashion Mega Trade Fair 2016 Place: Kolkatta, info : http://tradeshows.tradeindia.com/fashion-mega-tradefair/

January 2017 4-6

Beltwide Cotton Corporation Place: Dallas/ Texas, info: www.cotton.org/beltwide/

30-31

NGF by CMAI Place: Mumbai/ India, info: www.cmai.in

February 2017 16-18

India Textile Sourcing Exhibition Place: Ahmadabad/ Gujarat, info : www.itsexhibition.com

21-24

TEXSTYLES INDIA 2017 Place : New Delhi/ India, info: www.texstylesindia.in

March 2017 7-9

ITMF Place: Jaipur/ India, info: www.itmf.org

Outlook Plus Latin America 2017 Place : Brazil, info: www.edana.org

7-8

23rd

GOTS NATIONAL SEMINAR Place : Bangladesh, info : gupta@global-standard.org

NHPA Place : Prague/ Czech Republic, info: www.intnews.com/NHPA

12-17

23-26

YFA Place: New Delhi/ India, info: www.yfatradeshow.com International Textile Conference Place : Dresden/ Germany, info: http://www.aachen-dresden-denkendorf.de/en/itc/

Geotechnical Frontiers Conference Place : Orlando/ Florida , info: www.geotechnicalfrontiers.com

24-25

23-25

Textech Indonesia 2016 Place : Jakarta/ Indonesia, i info: http://textechonline.org/textechindo/

April 2017 2-5

Textyle Expo 2017 Place : Oran/ Algeria, info: www.textyle-expo.com

4-7

INDEX 17 Place : Geneva/ Europe, info: www.edana.org

6-8

Fibers & Yarns 2017 Place : Mumbai/ India, info: www.fibersnyarns.com

12-14

Technotex 2017 Place : Mumbai/ India, info: www.technotexindia.in

December 2016 1-2

Make in India Conference Place: Mumbai/ India, info: www.textileassociationindia.com

3-8

10th INDIA ITME 2016 Place: Mumbai/ India, info: www.india-itme.com

6-7

Spunbond Advance courses Place : France, info: www.edana.org

8-11

FESPA Eurasia 2016 Place : Istanbul/ Turkey, info: http://eurasia.fespa.com/en/

October 2016

www.textilevaluechain.com

June 2017 8-10

Non Woven Tech 2017 Place : Mumbai/ India, info: www.nonwoventechasia.com

September 2017 13-15

TechTexil India 2017 Place : Mumbai/ India, info: http://techtextil-india.in.messefrankfurt.com/

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A.T.E. Pumping solutions, drum filters, spring filters for ETP, air filters for minimising dust

B-Tex Inspection, packing, & accessories CEIA Metal detectors

Corino Beating, brushing & dust removal systems, digital printing inlets Dunline Rubber blankets & felts for shrinking range, comfits and compactors

Integrated and CrossNet Products Special lubricants & maintenance products from Dupont, Setral, and Ultrachem

Josts material handling systems Platform truck, hand & electric pallet truck, batching tow truck, manual & electrical stackers, dock levelers, reach truck, electric fork lift, scissor lift, racking system KCMT VDR, inlet & outlet combinations, box trolleys, batch rotating stations, and padders Luwa Heat recovery solutions and lab humidification MAG Laboratory testing equipment Mahlo Weft straighteners, process control systems & retrofits Monforts Stenter/pad dryer/chamber extensions, ecoapplicators, and heat recovery systems

Montimac Stitching automation & fabric preparation for digital printing Osthoff Senge Online hairiness tester for controlling hairiness and gas saving

Softech Customised automation and upgrade of old continuous and batch process machines Softex Assists textile and apparel industries in optimising profits through improvement in industry specific activities Technijet Rotovac online dust and lint removal system for printing, screen & drum washing, ready for printing fabric preparation for digital printing Valence Antistatic, static solutions for fabric and flocking Aug 2016

Advance Cooling Panel air conditioners, chillers, and air drier


7

Hari Santharam


SKBS

Advt.

SHREE BALAJI SYNFABS

Contact: Suresh Saraf+91 9322 50 4449 / +91 9322 10 4449 | Nayan Saraf - +91 7498 88 1400 Office Landline - 91-22-6002 0119 / 9699 25 8834 Email : sureshsaraf2000@yahoo.co.in | info@shreebalajisynfabs.com sureshsaraf@shreebalajisynfabs.com | Website : www.shreebalajisynfabs.com Address: Room No.-17, Ground Floor, 342 Kalbadevi Road, Mumbai- 400002


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OCTOBER 2016  

ASIAN MARKET & BRICS

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