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TEXTILE

VALUE CHAIN

www.textilevaluechain.com

August 2017

Volume 5

R&DINTECHNICALTEXTILE/FIBERS&YARNS      

Interview:Strata/KhoslaProďŹ l/OrientalWeaving SustainableFibre:Pineapple&Banana EU-CHINAUpdate TextileCommittee:DemandforTextiles MarketReport:RecycledPSF/Yarn/Cotton/Fabric/Surat BrandUpdate:Rieter/Spykar

Registered with Registrar of Newspapers under | RNI NO: MAHENG/2012/43707 Postal Registration No. MNE/346/2015-17 published on 5th of every month, TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN posted at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office,Pantnagar- 75, posting date 29/30 of month | Pages 68

Issue 8


Packtech Materials Private Limited We are a leading manufacturer, importer, exporter and supplier of a qualita ve range of Packaging Tapes and Bags. Our products are acknowledged for their high strength, excellent resistance proper es and durability. SUBLIMATION PAPER

PACKAGING PRODUCTS

TEXTILE CLOTH TAPES

PACKAGING BAGS

PACKAGING FILMS

OTHER PRODUCTS

Packtech Materials Private Limited Contact Person: Chirag Mehta PAP-A-206,207 MIDC Mahape,Navi Mumbai, Navi Mumbai - 400701, Maharashtra, India

M all anu co ki fa M nve nd o ctur FG r f er by ble non an KU s a w d D PS nd ove istr EN raw n ibu TE m to r RP a RI ter SE ia ls.

Sublimation Paper & cloth tape -Mob.9322271017 & packaging products - Mob.9320984727/9004669453 http://www.packtechmaterials.in

Cosset International

Since 2006 we are working on P.P. Spun Bond, Spun Less, SMS and Melt Blown Fabrics.

Our Products Non woven bags - D'cut bags, w'cut bags, Shopping bags, Promo onal bags, s tching Bags, Single color to Mul color Printed bags, Non woven industrial products- Packaging Materials, 20 Kg-30 Kg- 50 Kg Packaging bags, Laminated Packaging bags, Non woven Medical Disposable Products- Apron, Cap, Face Mask, shoe cover, bed sheets Non woven Agricultural products- Crop cover, U/V treated Ground cover, weed control Fabric, Root control b ag, Fleece covers, Plant cover, Fruit protec on cover

1 Sayaji Market, Opp. Royal Hotel, Near A.P.M.C Market, N.H-8 Vadodara-390019 ROHIT KUMAR (Marke ng) +91 9723014010, +91 9426553195. Email- interna onal.cosset@gmail.com | shahkaushalk@gmail.com


DN Associates represent in India the following Textile Machinery & Accessories manufacturers N.Schlumberger, France : Spinning preparatory machines for Spun and filament LONG fibres (Website:www.nsc-schlumberger.com) ANDRITZ Asselin Thibeau, France : Complete Nonwoven Lines : DrylaidNeedlepunched, Hydroentangled and others, Wetlaid, Spunlaid and special machines for chemical/hydro finishing (Website:www.andritz.com/nonwoven) Laroche SA, France: Opening and Blending Lines, Textile waste recycling Lines and “Airlay” Nonwoven Lines (Website: www.laroche.fr) LACOM GmbH, Germany : Hotmelt Laminating and Coating Systems – Multi Purpose, Multi Roller, Gravure Roller and Slot Die for complete range of Technical Textiles (Website:www.lacom-online.de) Schott & Meissner, Germany : Ovens, Dryers, Heat Recovery Systems, Heating/cooling calenders, Wet/Dry cooling systems, Cutters, accumulators, Winders, Palletisers and Bonding systems (Website: www.schott-meissner.de) Mariplast Spa, Italy : All type of Yarn Carriers for spun and filament yarns including dye tubes for filament/long fibre yarns (Website: www.mariplast.com) MORCHEM S.A.U., Spain : PUR Hotmelt Adhesives for Technical Textiles, Solvent Based, Water Based adhesives, cleaners and primers https://www.morchem.com/markets-and-solutions/textile-lamination/ Valvan Baling Systems, Belgium : Baling and Bump forming machines for spun fibres and textiles waste recycling lines (Website:www.valvan.com) C + L Textilmaschinen GmbH, Germany : Reeling (Yarn Hank Forming) Machines, steaming, Bulking and Banding Machines for yarns (for Western and Southern India) (Website:www.croon-lucke.com) Schmauser Precision GmbH, Germany : Pin Strips, Faller Bars, Disposable Faller Bars for Intersecting Gills and Chain Gills. Top Combs for Combing Machines in long fibre Spinning Preparatory Lines (website: www.schmauser.com) Groz-Beckert Carding Belgium NV, Belgium : Clothing for Cards and Cylinders used in processing of long fibres, nonwovens and waste recycling (website:www.grozbeckert.com ) Contact : DN Associates E-mail : info@dnassociates.co.in Website: www.dnassociates.co.in H.O.:   406, “Kaveri” Jagannath Mandir Marg, Opp. Holiday Inn, Near Sakinaka Metro Station, Mumbai–400 072 Contact Person : Mr. Hemant Dantkale Mobile : 98201 06018 Phone No.: 022-28516018 E-mail : hdantkale@dnassociates.co.in Regd.Office:  B-310, Universal Meadows, Plot No. 27, New Sneh Nagar, Wardha Road, Nagpur – 440 015 Contact Person : Mr. Yogesh Nawandar Mobile : 98901 53766 Phone No. :0712-2289662 E-mail : ynawandar@dnassociates.co.in    Branch Offices at : Coimbatore and Ludhiana  

OMF


“In combination with Microsoft HoloLens we are entering a new world of Customer Services solutions with highest benefit for our customers.� Marcel Bornheim Head of Customer Services Oerlikon Manmade Fibers Segment

The Future is Now Oerlikon Manmade Fibers Segment with its brands Oerlikon Barmag and Oerlikon Neumag again is setting the benchmark for the production of manmade fibers. The latest Oerlikon Industrie 4.0 solutions will give our customers the decisive competitive advantage.

For further information visit us at www.oerlikon.com/manmade-fibers

OMF Anzeige-Hololens-Textile Value Chain-210x297-EN-09_2017-170829.indd 1

Follow us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/OerlikonBarmag www.facebook.com/OerlikonNeumag

29.08.17 09:26


VMS INTERNATIONAL

Manufacturer of Polyester Staple Fibre For Non-woven And Tex le Grade In Any Colour, Cut Length And Denier As Per Customers Specifica on. Plot No 47c, Dss Ltd Industrial Estate,village Piparia, Silvassa, Ut Of Dadra And Nagar Haveli – 396 230 Email :Mail@vmsfibre.com Contact No. 93223 27799 / 9819011924


Hermann Bühler AG

Rieter

A Rieter Com4®ring, Com4®compact and Com4®jet yarn licensee in Switzerland

Com4® Yarns – Yarns of Choice

“Based on the novel yarn structure of the Com4®jet yarn my clients develop new designs and fabric properties.

Com4® yarns from Rieter spinning machines fulfill the most exacting requirements. Excellent properties ensure competitiveness in a dynamic market. The benefits are also visible in downstream processing and in the final product.

Their success is my success.” www.rieter.com

Mr. O. Baldischwieler, COO Hermann Bühler AG was founded in Switzerland by J. J. Bühler in 1812. An important step towards globalization of the company was made in 1996 with the launch of Bühler Quality Yarns Corp. in the USA. Today, 80 000 spindles produce more than 7 000 tons of yarn each year for customers in 43 countries. Bühler is the specialist for fine yarns manufactured from exclusive Supima® extra long staple cotton, high-quality organic

cotton, MicroModal® Edelweiss and Micro TENCEL® and blends. Alongside the ring, compact and Royal spun yarns, it is the trendsetting air-jet yarns that are brought to perfection at Bühler in close cooperation with Rieter in terms of quality and fabric feel. In addition, the company’s innovative strength is exhibited by the in-house development of the Rainbow Technology or the introduction of the revolutionary BeDry technology.

– ring-spun yarn

– compacted ring-spun yarn

– rotor-spun yarn

– air-jet-spun yarn

Hermann Bühler AG, Mülau 12, 8482 Sennhof (Winterthur), Switzerland T +41 (0)52 234 0404, F +41 (0)52 234 0494 info@buhleryarn.com, www.buhleryarn.com


SAG


CONTENT INTERVIEW 13- Strata Is Geared Up To Cater The Growing Demands 15- Khosla Profil Is a Brand And Believes In Delivering Its Best 16- It’s My Dream To Compete Globally In Parachute Manufacturing: Oriental Weaving

August 2017 ISSUE EDITORIAL TEAM Editor and Publisher Ms. Jigna Shah Consulting Editor Mr. Avinash Mayekar Graphic Designer Mr. Anant A. Jogale Sales Manager Mr. Md. Tanweer Editorial Assistant Mrs. Namsha T.

INDUSTRY

Mr. Devchand Chheda City Editor - Vyapar ( Janmabhumi Group) Mr. Manohar Samuel President, Birla Cellulose, Grasim Industries Dr. M. K. Talukdar VP, Kusumgar Corporates Mr. Shailendra Pandey VP (Head – Sales and Marketing), Indian Rayon Mr. Ajay Sharma GM RSWM (LNJ Bhilwara Group)

EDUCATION / RESEARCH

Mr. B.V. Doctor HOD knitting, SASMIRA Dr. Ela Dedhia Associate Professor, Nirmala Niketan College Dr. Mangesh D. Teli Professor, Dean ICT Dr. S.K. Chattopadhyay Principal Scientist and Head MPD Dr. Rajan Nachane Retired Scientist, CIRCOT

Delhi Representative office : Mr. Sudhir Verma Knit Experts 242, Pocket 3, Sector 23, Near Max Fort School, Rohini, New Delhi- 110085 Email : knitexperts@rediffmail.com Tel : +91-9818026572

August 2017

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COVER STORY 17- Technical Textile Today and Tomorrow by Mr. Sanjay Harane, Nagreeka Export 21- R&D carried in Technical Textile Fibres and Yarns By Mr. Avinash Mayekar, Suvin Advisors Pvt. Ltd. 23- Fire Fighter Suit by Dr. M.S. Parmar, NITRA 26- Growth And Development Of Agrotech - Role Of Standards by Mr. J.K.Gupta, BIS MARKET REPORT 29- Recycled PSF 30- Yarn Report 32- Cotton Report 37- Fabric Market Report 38- Surat Update 39- Textile Committee : Demand for Textiles 43- EU- CHINA UPDATE By Mr. Arvind Sinha SUSTAINABLE FIBRE 46- Clothing made from Pineapple fibre by Dr. N.N. Mahapatra, Colorant Ltd. 49- New Spinnable Banana Fibre by Khulna University of Engineering & Technology, Bangladesh BRAND UPDATE 52- Rieter 53- Spykar NEWS 25- Stretch for Power : Here’s high-tech yarn generates new energy 45- Wearit Group Century Yarn and Denim Textile Units 45- Aspen Fashion organised retail conference and fabric show in Mumbai 48- NITRA introduces smoothness tester for fabric and sheeting material 48- Vijay Textiles Ltd. Net profit jumps 245% in Q1 FY 2018 55- AEPC demands the refund of IGST paid on import of machinery for use by Apparel Manufacturer Exporters 55- Fabric Speakers Could Be Woven Into Walls, Clothes, And More 56- Government Of Telangana Signs Up For Techtextil India 2017 54- Event Update : Heimtextil & Ambiente India 57- SHOW CALENDAR

Advertiser Index Back Page : Raymond Back Inside : Prospor Group Front Inside : Raysil Page 3 : Siyaram Page 4: Cosset + Packtech Page 5: SGS Innovation Page 6: DN Associate Page 7: Oerlikon Page 8: Srivari + VMS Page 9: Rieter Page 10: ITMACH India Page 33: Strata

Page 34: Harish Textile Page 35: Ecocert Page 36: Garmek Page 59: RSWM Page 60: Sanjay Plastic Page 61: Bhatia Export + Wovlene Tec Fab Page 62: Deep Textile Page 63: Tuffplast Page 64: SKBS Page 65: ITSE Page 66: SAVIO

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EDITORIAL

Are We In For A Major Disruptive Growth? The recently news on Crypto currency crashing down might bring trouble to the world. Crypto curren currency is a digital or alternative or virtual currency designed to work as a medium of exchange using cryptography to secure the transactions and to control the creation of additional units of the currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank. The concept of private crypto currencies was born of mistrust of official money. China has banned crypto-currency fundraising schemes. In 2008, Satoshi Nakamoto – the mysterious creator of bitcoin, the first decentralised digital currency – described it as a “purely peer-to-peer version of electronic cash, which would allow online payments to be sent directly from one party to another without going through a financial institution.” Is this currency trying to kill any currency that may threaten government monopolies on printing money and earn seignior age income? (source : www.project-syndicate.org) Are 50% banks going to shutdown due to this? Recently BRICS meeting “Stronger Partnership for a Brighter Future” was held in China, each country presented the reforms executed in their respective countries. Issues discussed in the meet is Security situation in region, violence by terror groups, South korean nuclear missile tests etc. Our PM Spoke about the GST performance, Success of Digital India, Make In India, Start-Up India, which has lead to knowledge, skill support and technology driven society. The Gujarat textile policy which ended on 4th September, 2017 was extended for another one year after reviewing the last policy, which attracted many investments to the state as well as generated employment in the rural areas. Textile and fashion industry is going through major challenges, as at one end fashion industry is using more of organic and sustainable products. On the other end is going towards technical or unconventional textile using technical fabrics for most fashionable or functional fabric/garment. Usage of technical fabrics in the major industries leads to key innovation in the industry. Still India is far behind in this sector due to the lack of R&D, skilled labour and technology support. Wishing you a profitable and productive Festive Season..!!! Ms. Jigna Shah

Editor and Publisher All rights reserved Worldwide; Reproduction of any of the content from this issue is prohibited without explicit written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure and present factual and accurate information. The views expressed in the articles published in this magazine are that of the respective authors and not necessarily that of the publisher. Textile Value chain is not responsible for any unlikely errors that might occur or any steps taken based in the information provided herewith.

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Registered Office Innovative Media and Information Co. 189/5263, Sanmati, Pantnagar, Ghatkopar (East), Mumbai 400075. Maharashtra, INDIA. Tel : +91-22-21026386 Cell: +91-9769442239 Email: info@textilevaluechain.com tvcmedia2012@gmail.com Web: www.textilevaluechain.com

Owner, Publisher, Printer and Editor Ms. Jigna Shah Printed and Processed by her at, Impression Graphics, Gala no.13, Shivai Industrial Estate, Andheri Kurla Road, Sakinaka, Andheri (East), Mumbai 400072, Maharashtra, India.

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August 2017


INTERVIEW

Strata Is Geared Up To Cater The Growing Demands

Strata Geosystems is a leading provider of soil reinforcement technology and many geotechnical solutions in India for over a decade now. Customers count on strata geosystems for sustainable, eco-friendly and cost-effective geotechnical solutions. The company constantly endeavours to build trust and surpass customer expectations with high quality geosynthetic products for the infrastructure sector. In an exclusive interview with Textile Value Chain, Shahrokh Bagli, Chief Technology Officer of Strata Geosystems (India) Pvt. Ltd. spoke about the company’s recent achievements and future projects in the basket. He also spoke about their two products StrataGrid™ and StrataWeb® The official definition of a Geosynthetic is defined as a planar product manufactured from polymeric material used with soil, rock, or other geotechnical engineering related material as an integral; part of a human-made project, structure or system.”Geotextiles are a type of geosynthetic. Strata has recently completed the construction of the largest reinforced soil wall project in India. Could you share the facts on this? Reinforced Soil technology revolves around the reinforcing element. In ancient times these were vegetation slats and today it is generally polymer geogrid. It has proved to be technically superior and the structures comprising the geogrid proved to be economical. Reinforced soil structures are now increasingly adapted in cross-overs and grade separators along highways all over the world.

The National Highway Authority of India (NHAI) took a strategic decision to expand this stretch to six lanes. Having successfully completed several reinforced soil wall projects, Strata was awarded 46 structures on this project using proven StrataBlock™ technologywhich involves blocks and geogrids. In terms of area, the structures allotted were equivalent to a wall fascia of ~290,000 sqm(3 million sq. ft.).The enormous challenge, apart from the sheer size of the project, was to complete it within a stringent deadline while maintaining quality to international standards. What is scope of Geosynthetics in India and abroad? Since the 1970s, geosynthetics have been used internationally with varying degrees of success depending on the criticality of the application. Over the last two decades, engineers developed more confidence in geosynthetics after sustained effort by associations and manufacturers. Geosynthetics have been incorporated in various regulatory codes in construction across different sectors. This has boosted the popularity of geosynthetics in infrastructure globally. In India, geosynthetic products have been present since early 1990s. However, adoption to these products was slow. Due to the rising prices of natural resources, the elimination of regulatory hurdles, and consistent awareness efforts, the value proposition of geosyntheticshas improved. These products help provide a leaner yet safe structure design, reduce the capital and maintenance costs, speed up the construction time, and provide an environment-friendly finish.

StrataGeosystems is a market leader in geogridsin India with its manufacturing technology of StrataGrid™ geogrids and execution capabilities. Strata proved its point when it impeccably executed one of the largest projects of its kind in India. Located in the state of Gujarat in India, the congested stretch of NH-48 between Ahmedabad and Vadodara originally comprised of four lanes. This was rather demanding for a vital link of the ambitious Golden Quadrilateral and a major commercial corridor of the state.

August 2017

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INTERVIEW Geosynthetics are now being rapidly incorporated in specifications, codes of practice and guidelines of Bureau of Indian Standards, Indian Road Congress and the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways. Introducing geosynthetics into higher education and in several new sectors will help boost its usage. I s

Is Strata coming up with any new innovation in the next 2-3 years? At this juncture, all I can say is “Await the next announcement!” Strata works in many sectors. Which sector attracts strata the most and why? We have built a technical and strong reputation in the market. Developers and consultants in various sectors turn to Strata Geo-systems for its expertise and design prowess in geosynthetics to provide safe and cost effective solutions. Having proven the use of our products in many sectors, we are now looking to enter the industrial and real-estate space with retaining walls, access roads, embankments, and green roofs. Has GST impacted the technical textile in India? What’s your opinion?

Strata planning for any new big projects? Strata Geosystems now has a track record with highway projects across India. Strata provides a turn-key solution: supply of geosynthetics, technical designs, and construction. With its experience, Strata is in a position to take up projects which are very challenging and large scale. The focus for upcoming projects will be on highways and the use of StrataWeb® in container yards. Today, our factory in Daman has a capacity to manufacture 9 million square meters of StrataGrid™ geogrids. We are in the midst of finalizing a new state-of the-art manufacturing plant which will cater to the growing demand. It will be aimed to more than double the current capacity. You have two products strataGrid™, StrataWeb®,could you brief the product details and what’s their market share? StrataGrid™ is a geogrid used for soil reinforcement. These high performance geogrids are constructed of high molecular weight and high tenacity knitted polyester yarn with a proprietary coating. These geogrids are engineered to be mechanically and chemically durable during the harsh installation phase and aggressive soil environments. Our estimated market share is approximately 40%. Since we do turn-key solutions, we utilise a portion in our own projects itself.

The impact of GST on our area of technical textiles has been neutral. In some cases, our products are not classified explicitly and as a result we have fallen under the “others” category which ends up bearing a higher rate. Strata is committed to sustainability. What measures are taken to create a sustainable environment? We constantly ensure that our products are engineered and used in such a way that is environment friendly.By using our advancements in the geogrid and geocell technology, we are able to execute projects with significantly less concrete and steel in reinforced soil walls. This reduces harmful emissions, saves carbon foot-print, and lessens the burden on transportation considerably. In many of our construction projects, we use fly ash for casting blocks and pondash for reinforced soil back-fill. This is an innovative way of eliminating the remains of coal by using geosynthetics.We recently completed the first vertical landfill in India using geogrids and geocells! By building the landfill vertically with the use of geosynthetics, we have contained harmful wastes in less land and protected the surroundings by containing the waste effectively.

StrataWeb is a light-weight, yet strong cellular confinement system. It is made of HDPE and engineered intricately with texturing and perforations. It has been used to solve various civil engineering challenges in roads, railways, ports, canals, and more. Our estimated market share is approximately60%.

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August 2017


INTERVIEW

‘Khosla Profil Is a Brand And Believes In Delivering Its Best’ Do you find scope for nonwoven is India Yes, nonwoven has tremendous scope in India. CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of nonwoven is far higher than woven market. In nonwoven, medical, agriculture, hygiene, automobile, geo-textile etc has a very huge scope to grow. Mumbai based Khosla Profil Pvt. Ltd. was laid in the year 1979 by Pramod K. Khosla, the CEO of the company. The company is India’s only composite manufacturing plant having stateof-the-art manufacturing facilities right from fiber to made-ups. With an area of 1.5 Lac sq. meters, we are outfitted with highly advanced and modern machineries. In an exclusive Interview with Pramod K. Khosla, CEO of Khosla Profil Pvt. Ltd and Chairman of Indian Technical Textile Association (ITTA) spoke to Textile Value Chain, about the remarkable growth the company has gained in the last 40 years under his leadership and share his views on nonwoven market. So far how has the journey been for you and Khosla Profile? where do you see Khosla in next 5 to 10 years? So far my journey has been marvelous. I started by career with RSWM in 1977 with polypropylene yarn filtration. Thirty eight years back, I started Khosla Profile with woven filter fabrics. The company has now also started emerging in nonwoven by completing the filtration basket with woven to nonwovens. For nonwoven the demand is picking up and booming. After 2 years of planning we started our own nonwoven unit in 2016 with an investment of 200 crores and in the next two years we plan to open another two.

August 2017

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What’s your market share in nonwoven and any new applications in the area? In liquid filtration we are the market leaders while in dust collection we have just begun. So it’s less than 5%, it will become much more substantial in future. Indian market is much more competitive as Chinese companies are exporting raw material to India. We are in process to make a new fabric for swimming pools, Paint shops etc. it’s all under R and D. Could you elaborate on your product range, pricing and USP? We have many products in filtration both in liquid and dust collection. We do make all types of filtration fabrics for chemical, dyes, pharmaceuticals , cements etc. As far as pricing is concerned, it depends upon the quality of the product and characteristics. Our pricing are reasonable according to the product technology. Our USP is in liquid filtration, as we are the first ones in our country to apply certain advanced technology in this segment and that is our advantage. We offer products which are different in terms of dimensional, stability, coefficient variation percentage is lowest from others because finishing technology is very much new in the world. Could you tell us about dust collection application area? Dust collection bag is used to collect

dust mainly from chimneys, boilers, cement factory, power plant, chemical factories etc. In India, dust release in the air from these plants and factories is 40 milligram while china has brought it down to 10 milligram. Indian government has become very vigilant with the air pollution in the metropolitan cities like Mumbai, Delhi etc. If our government enforces rules on the -air pollution than the demand generation would be vice versa. How do you R and D for products and how much you invest in it? At Khosla Profil all R and D is done in house, we don’t hire any consultants nor have a joint venture. We don’t outsource any type of work whether it is for woven or nonwoven. All designs are done under our own supervision. Where investment is part of concerned, we don’t have any such percentage of investment done on R and D, as ‘we are like a laboratory which also manufactures’. We continuously innovate many new products throughout the year. What is your opinion on for CoE activities in nonwoven? There is definitely a huge scope for Centers of Excellence (CoE). In each area of nonwoven they are going to start some awareness through seminars. Industrialists were not taking as much advantage of DKTE, so CoE had to bring awareness among industries for their facilities and development. Usage of nonwoven such as geotextile, automotive, filter and hygiene are growing day by day as usage increase, demand will also increase. So, CoE needs to educate consumer as well as industry.

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INTERVIEW

‘It’s My Dream To Compete Globally In Parachute Manufacturing’ Oriental Weaving and Processing Mill Pvt. Ltd., started in 1975 at Mumbai first than moved to Umbergaon, Maharashtra. The mill manufacturer’s fabric, the processing units also included dyeing, coating etc. Textile Value Chain spoke to Smita Yeole, Managing Director of Oriental Weaving and Processing Mills Pvt. Ltd. Smita is also the member of the Parachute Association Industry in America. She spoke to TVC about her journey, inspiration and achievements. She also spoke about her vision and passion for parachute manufacturing and defence fabrics. Tell us about your journey with Oriental Mills?

ence? The experience was really good, learnt much more in the parachute technology. In the beginning we started with small automatic devices, cargo parachutes. First we made templates, and then the specification of range required, then plugged the parts together and stitched them. India is self sufficient for the dropping of 16 tons parachute after Russia and US and ADRDE has been awarded for this transformation. What all types of parachutes do you manufacturer and what other products fill your basket? We manufacture parachutes for defence target practicing, space recovery parachutes, aircrew parachute, cargo parachute, personnel parachutes, combat parachute , medical fabrics like gloves.

Our mill was started by my father in 1975, with the manufacturing of fabrics and trading yarn. When I joined him, we moved towards innovation like parachute manufacturing. After my marriage I join my husband’s firm which used to manufacturer and assemble aluminium casting. There I learnt assembling and drawing. At that point ADRDE (Aerial Delivery Research and Development Establishment) approached my father for an joint venture in parachute technology; it was like a dream come true. First we started with a project in Mumbai with but logistics and drawing and then we shifted our work station to Agra.

Defence fabric is an emerging segment in the technical textile world.

Who’s been your inspiration and list out your achievements?

In a month, we produce about 2.5 lakhs meter of fabrics. We produce them on imported machine because of the quality demand that can be fulfilled only by these imported machines.

My father has been my inspiration. He has motivated and supported me in all my endeavours. I got my first finished product in after a struggle of 10 years. I made various kinds of parachutes, but one of the parachutes, which I finished in 2013, it had the capacity to lift 16 tons tank dropped by an aircraft. It was very huge achievement for me. All parachutes were made India itself as the stitching and the fabrics were done in-house. You have worked with ADRDE, how was the experi-

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You have always focused in the domestic market why? Yes, I mostly concentrate in the domestic market because the requirement for our fabric is huge in India, if we give the world class fabrics to our client, then why would they import from aboard. In domestic market we are mainly in automobile sector, tank covers, tent, sleeping bags, jackets and all Military use product (Defence). What is your Production Capacity?

How do you modernise your products? How far is Centre of Excellence useful in your research? We have in house research and development (R and D) and designing team, but sometimes we do outsourcing for better innovation. Yes we also do take inspiration from the international market. Our R and D team is adequately strong in innovating and researching for new products. If we require we do take help of Centre of Excellence (CoE). CoE are well equipped with a good team. They are also in testing and developments of not only geo-textile but also in every segment of technical textile. Has GST affected your Business? No not at all. I am very happy with GST. Our company is much clear with the norms and taxes, so we have no problem with GST.

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August 2017


COVER STORY

Technical Textiles – Today And Tomorrow Technical textile covers a vast field in textile area and can be described in different manners but as general accepted definition can be as under ‘Textile materials and products manufactured primarily for their technical and performance properties rather than their aesthetic or decorative characteristics’.

Technical textiles are reported to be the fastest growing sector of the textile industrial sector. The speciality and challenge of technical textiles are in the need to understand and apply the principles of textile science and

of various fibres went on increasing and a concept of composite material started. Where by various areas like civil engineering, medical science etc. - started use of selected textile fibres and started getting benefits of improvements in products. The use of textiles at various segments of industry and are now popular as Technical textile with special names. Technical textiles include textiles for automotive applications, medical textiles (e.g., implants of organs), geotextiles (supports to reinforcement), agro-textiles (textiles for crop protection watering pipelines), and protective clothing or Personal Protecting Equipment’s (e.g., heat and radiation protection for fire fighter clothing, molten metal protection for welders, stab protection and bulletproof vests, and spacesuits). Over all, global growth rates of technical textiles are about 6.5% per year growth against clothing industry – the growth is quite low.In present market

light and resistance to toxic environment. All these properties help with the growth and harvesting of crops and other foodstuffs. There is a growing interest in using materials which gradually degrade (biodegradables). • Buildtech (Construction Textiles) Textiles used in construction – concrete reinforcement, interior construction, insulations, proofing materials, air conditioning, noise prevention, visual protection, protection against the sun, building safety. An interesting application is the use of textile membranes for roof construction. This area is also referred to as textile architecture. PVC coated high tenacity PES, Teflon coated glass fibre fabrics or silicone coated PES are used for their low creep properties. Splendid examples of such construction are found in football stadium, airports and hotels. • Clothtech (Clothing Textiles) Technical textiles for clothing applications especially in the finishing process where fabric is treated under pressure and high temperature the technical textile supports the fabric for smooth processing. • Geotech (Geo-textiles)

technology. It provides solutions, to technological problems but also often to engineering problems as well. With the emphasis on measurable textile performance in a particular field of application, this requires the technologist to have not only an in-depth knowledge of fibres / textile science and technology but also an understanding of the application. Since last two decades, use of textile material is increased in various fields due to its need and scientists have started different applications of textile material. As need increased, use

August 2017

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opportunities the importance of technical textile materials is increasing to accommodate the needs of requirement. Now a day the most widely technical textile materials are used in filter clothing, furniture, hygiene medicals, construction material and agriculture needs.

These are used in reinforcement of embankments or in constructional work. The fabrics in geo textiles are permeable fabrics and are used with soils having ability to separate, filter, protect or drain. The application areas include civil engineering - earth

• Agrotech (Agro-textiles) Textiles used in Agriculture are termed as agro textiles. They are used for crop protection, fertilisation. The essential properties required are strength, elongation, stiffness, and bio-degradation, resistance to sun-

and road construction, Dam engi-

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COVER STORY neering, soil sealing and in drainage systems. The fabric used in it must have good strength, durability, low moisture absorption and thickness. Mostly nonwoven and woven fabrics are used in it. Synthetic fibres like glass, Poly-propylene, and acrylic fibres are used to prevent cracking of the concrete, plastic and other building materials. Polypropylene and polyester are used in geo textiles and dry/liquid filtration due to their compatibility • Hometech (Domestic Textiles) Textiles used in a domestic environment – interior decoration and furniture, carpeting, protection against the sun, cushion materials, fireproofing, floor and wall coverings, textile reinforced structures/fittings. In the contract market such as for large area buildings, ships, caravans, busses, fire retardant materials are used. Fire retardant properties are obtained either through the use of inherent fire retardant fibres such as modacryl or through the application of a coating with fire retardant additives. • Indutech (Industrial Textiles) Textiles used for chemical and electrical applications and textiles related to mechanical engineering. Silk-screen printing, filtration, plasma screens, lifting/conveying equipment, soundproofing elements, melting processes, roller covers, grinding technology, insulations, seals, fuel cell etc…. • Mobiltech (Textiles used in transport) These textiles are used in the construction of automobiles, railways, ships, aircraft and spacecraft. Examples are Truck covers (PVC coated PES fabrics), car trunk coverings (often needle felts), seat covers (knitted materials), seat belts, non-woven for cabin air filtration (also covered in induct), airbags, parachutes, boats (inflatable), air balloons. • Ecotech (Environmentally-friendly textiles)

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New applications for textiles in environmental protection applications – floor sealing, erosion protection, air cleaning, prevention of water pollution, water cleaning, waste treatment/ recycling, depositing area construction, product extraction, domestic water sewerage plants. • Packtech (Packaging textiles) Packaging, silos, containers, bags, canvas covers, marquee tents etc….. • Protech (Protective textiles) Protection against heat and radiation for fire fighter clothing, against molten metals for welders, for bullet proof jackets etc, all these things are obtained by usage of technical textiles with high performance fibres. In bullet proof jackets, special fibre aramid are used which have high tenacity, high thermal resistance and low shrinkage. Glass fibre is also used in fire proof jackets due to its high strength, chemical and flame resistance. Protective clothing is also used by the astronauts when they go in space. It was used by the astronauts when they went on moon, their suits where covered with special chemicals including lead to protect them from suns heat, their suit not only made from special fibres but their airship was also lined with special fabric. • Sporttech (Sports textiles) Shoes, sports equipment, flying and sailing sports, climbing, angling, cycling, winter and summer sports, indoor sports wear, water sports clothing etc… Each segment has lots of inventions which lead to increase in consumption of textiles as a whole. In short, since morning - wakeup call to end of the day we use technical textile in our life Some figures for growth in Indian Market Below chart is analysed after collecting data from FICCI and I tried to analyse as under.

TECHNICAL TEXTILES (SWOT analysis)

INDUSTRY

How to address these challenges The main steps suggested are: 1) Change mentality from Cheap to quality products 2) Focused on volume, quality and commitments to on time delivery 3) Implementation of single taxation for various states (now GST) to ensure one market across the whole country without traditional barriers of trade between states. This will also control raw material availability and almost stability in rates. The producer can easily be focused on performance (Quality and On-time delivery) 4) Government to promote Entrepreneurs’ and focus more on new developments and innovations for Technical textiles. Developing a better and competitive infrastructure for ensuring easier, economical and faster movement of goods. Government Initiatives (As per source – FICCI) A) Support for business start-up Technical Textiles is a new area and entrepreneurs find it difficult to invest in this field due to lack of knowledge about technology, raw material, process etc. Therefore, support for ‘business start-up’ is being provided. The COE and other associations / institutes / independent reputed consultants are being empaneled by the MOT / Office of the Textile Commissioner who will Technical Textiles: Towards a Sm art Future of the projects. B) Providing fund support for organizing workshops Reputed National and International agencies including the Indian Diaspora settled abroad are being invited to conduct Seminars, Workshops and short term training programmes in whichknowhow about latest technology ,international practices ,market details ,global scenario etc. isbeing shared. C)

Social

compliance

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through

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COVER STORY standardisation, regulatory measures Consultants have been engaged to identify the needed regulatory changes required along withinternational best practices and also the strategy to facilitate such changes in the rules andregulations. 2 studies on developing measures for promoting usage of Agrotech and Geotechhad been have been approved and same have been placed in this Office Website

D) Market development Support for marketing support to bulk and institutional buyersetc. Under the intervention Buyers-sellers meet are being organized across the country wherein theindigenous manufacturers can showcase their products and institutional buyers are being invitedfor enhancing their mar7.00 AM 8.00 AM 9.00 AM 10.00 AM 1.00 PM

2.00PM 4.00 Pm 7.00 PM 9.00 PM 11.00 PM

keting competitiveness.

E) Market development Support for export sales There are many reputed technical textiles fairs organized abroad like TECHTEXTIL andIndustrial Fabrics Exhibition, Index etc., the participation in which will improve the exportpotential of the indigenous manufacturers. Some of the technical textiles units are alsoparticipating in the exhibition of application based fairs. The support includes participation inTechnical Textile fairs/Application based fairs by the Indian technical textiles manufacturers toexhibit their products.

material high-end convertedproducts are imported, there is strong need for indigenous development of products for whichR and D is of prime importance. Therefore, contract research will be covered under this head. Individual unit or two or more unit may come together for a Contract research proposal.

F) Contract Research and Development through IITs/TRAs/Textile InstitutesTechnical textiles is high technology area where most of the new

Medical textile – Retina , artifi- Use of - Various fibres Stain proof /Bathroom cur- cial body parts Cotton tains Electronic clothing Wool /Silk Seat covers of car, Mobile cov- Green house fabrics Linen / Bamboo / Sisal ers, Smart clothing Fishing nets Viscose Office furniture covers / CarPhoto sensitive textiles Hemp/Jute/Ramie pets Green house – sun protection Polyamide Fire proof dress, Industrial Jogging shoes

clothing ; Personal protective Smart Textiles -UV protection equipment’s clothing, Oil and water protection, Mosquito repellent, VitaStain proof table mats, Rain min E finish, Mineral feed finish coats … Theatre seats , Eco proof wall Medical Textile – absorbent cotcoatings ton, gauzes. Fishing nets, Absorbent cotModern Filtration techniques ton UF/Nano/RO filters Sailing boats with water rePackaging material and sistant textile covers Many more Mosquito Net

12.00 Night Home furnishing / carpets etc…

Nylon Polyester Acrylic Aramid Poly ethylene Spandex – stretch Melamine Treeline Acetate / Tri acetates Polyurethanes Poly olefins Polyurethane fibre PVC Rubber Many more

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COVER STORY

TECHNICAL TEXTILES INDUSTRY (SWOT analysis) Strength 1) Availability of educated technical officials 2) Huge Domestic market 3) India is one of the fastest growing economy 4) Self sufficiency of mostly all the fibres used in Technical Textiles 5) Substantial textile manufacturing network 6) Future growth in technical textile is expected at higher level. 7) Entrepreneur intelligence and mind set towards investment and growth

4) Lack of skilled work force. 5) Lack of knowledge/awareness/willingness Environmental issues

on

Threats 1) Absence of vision towards future requirements in Technical Textile (eg. Geotech, meditech, etc.) 2) Hesitancy in acceptance of sizable scales for new technology 3) Mind-set of investors is moving towards out-sourcing and selling rather than producing in India and selling.

Opportunity 1) One of the fastest growing economy 2) Massive developments in infrastructure and developments (Geo-tech) 3) Mega automobile manufacturing projects (Auto-tech) 4) Systematic way of agriculture production leads to use of Agro-Tech / Irrigation techniques 5) Educational institutes / sports authority is focused on sports activity – (Sport-Tech) 6) Real Estate - Building infrastructure is growing – (Build-Tech) 7) India growing as medical tourism – (Medi-tech Weakness 1) Fragmented / Limited production units. 2) Need to change existing infrastructure for more productivity 3) Poor RandD facility and also no/less research work in industry.

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Sanjay Harane

Sr. Vice President Nagreeka Exports Ltd.

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August 2017


COVER STORY

R&D Carried In Technical Textile Fibres And Yarns It’s an era of advances and developments where concepts and proposed theories are converted to hardcore realities. Innovations and inventions are the gist of today’s living. All possibilities for bringing in extra comfort, ease and on the border prospects a greener future are thought, tested and executed. Today innovation is a driving force for each and every industry. We all know that today textiles have widened there horizon and are no longer providing just garments to the world but sourcing high performance delivery products from industrial filters, geotextiles, home textiles to sport textiles across all industries. Today textile products are mapping each and every necessity and providing products with value added features. For eg.: Stain resistant garments, fire retardant clothes, clothes that glow in dark and many more such features are all possible due to advanced dyes and chemicals furnished on the specialized fibres. Over the years researchers have mapped all the limitations of fabric and made developments in fibres and yarns to provide finished product with minimum limitations. Once upon a time walking into fire or using mere air bag to protect from high end collision was a rare magical incident but today it is very much a reality. In past, only natural fibres were produced but with developments in Science and the need of durable fibres led to the discovery of synthesised fibres named Rayon/Nylon. But today numerous fibers having fire retardant properties like Aramids, Carbon Fibres (Polyacroylonitrile and Pitch based), Carbon Precursor Fibres made from pyrolytic carbonisation of a modified acrylic fibre, glass fibre, Polybenzimidazole (PBI), Melamineare being used. Apart from the above, Poly-phenylene benzo-bisoxazole is also developed having exceptional

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ignition resistance, low heat release rate, and very less smoke emission. It’s high tensile strength and thermal properties are two times higher than that of aramid fibres. Fabrics made from these fibres exhibit good dimensional stability, and low shrinkage under high temperature treatments. Over the years there are many developments in textile fibres serving its purpose in various industries like Fashion, Construction, Sports and medical textiles. Advances in Biotechnology and nanotechnology have further facilitated the research and developments in Fibres. Some of which are polylactic acid, Basalt, Bionolles, Shape changing fibre, Vectran, Polyallylate, Chameleon fibre, polyketone fibre, Artirosa, Alginate, Super absorbent fibre, Hyaluranan and collagen and nanofiber. Of the many advances let us have a look at certain ice breaking inventions.

fibre comprises an outer layer encapsulating an intermediate sensor layer of thermochromic liquid crystalline material which is transparent, and the filamentary core which provides a contrast to see the change in colour of the thermochromic material when there is a change in temperature. The fibre itself may be woven or knitted into a loose textile product for incorporation into a wound like dressing. Thus it helps in monitoring the healing process and also in identifying infections at much earlier stages. Viscose fibres against marine pollution Viscose speciality fibres manufacturer Kelheim Fibres is introducing a new concept to help prevent marine litter. They have developed alterna-

Bandages that detect infection: Recently CISRO has developed a fibre with an intermediate sensor layer made from thermochromic liquid crystalline material. These crystals change their reflected colour based on temperature when illuminated by white light. When applied onto the human body in the form of a bandage, the fibre exhibits a change visibly in colour or colour gradient from a temperature change as small as 0.5 degrees Celsius within a range of 25

to 45 degrees Celsius. This means that healing problems such as infection can be quickly identified. The sensor

tive to conventional wet wipes having significant share of synthetic fibres by producing wet wipes from viscose speciality short cut fibre Viloft and cellulose or cotton. Both of which are plant-based and therefore completely bio-degradable. Trevira GmbH from Bobingen has made a new offering in biopolymer fibres (Ingeo™) called a siliconized PLA hollow fibre for use in fillings. With regard to the increased need for fibres with additional functionalities and the use of fresh combinations of raw materials, capacities in bico-fibres are being expanded. For both the polyester and the PLA programme, Trevira has also developed modified fibres

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COVER STORY for the hygiene sector (e.g. for wet wipes) having an advanced feature of soft handle. Efforts are being taken on finishes for fibres that must meet food industry standards, likewise on antimony-free polyester fibres to enhance product safety.

of Biosteel® fiber offers a wide range of capabilities. The most natural and intelligent ingredient for high-performance applications like sport apparels, active footwear, automotive textiles, Furniture’s, workwear and in medical textile.

Technical Absorbents Limited has developed Super Abrsorbent fibre. The Fibre that emerges from the production line is white and can absorb: up to 200 times its own weight of de-mineralised water. In addition, internally or with a toll manufacturer, the company makes woven and Hollow Fibres:

nonwoven fabrics, and yarns from SAF, a diversity of products that have applications in agriculture and horticulture, water-blocking tapes, filter materials, food packaging, geomembranes, wound dressings, garments for comfort and protection, and textiles for personal hygiene, including incontinence and feminine hygiene products. Lenzing group recently developed fibre named Tencel(Lyocellfibre) that is absorbent, pure, soft, strong and biodegradable used in nonwovens. The company has also developed grades specifically for use in dry and wetlaid fabrics, where short staple lengths, typically below 20 mm, are required. Biosteel® fibres: Developed by AMSILK are powerful, nature-designed, soft, smooth and high-performance fibers like no others having highest skin sensation, controlled moisture management and are 100% vegan and biodegradable. This intelligent fiber is superior due to its combination of strength and elasticity – and at the same time ultralight. The unique performance

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It is a high performance synthetic fibre that has been manufactured with a hollow core. The unique cross sectional shape determines the mechanical, thermal and optical properties of the fiber. They provide high loft with less weight properties that areessential in an insulated clothing (Rwei, 2000) they are small tube like filters approximately 200 microns in diameter. They can have properties such as anti- static, moisture management, chemical and Fire protection, thermal resistant and lightweight.They have applications in industries such as Carpet and upholstery, Sportswear and equipment. These fibres have multiple trade names some of which are thermolite® and Aerocapsule®. Conclusion: As long as one breathes and thinks there will be innovations and developments taking place across industries. The growth in one industry opens numerous applications and scope for advance in other sectors. A simple need of preventing damage caused by landslides in construction industry has led to advances and developments of geonets and geogrids that protect from landslides. With every new product launched the packaging industry grows and recent packtech advances have led to development of eco-friendly packaging materials. Innovation is not only

driven by the futureneeds but also the scarcity of resource that needs utmost attention for developingsubstitute products. Recently we have noticed a great amount of advances as developing sustainable products has become the main mantra in today’s world. As far as textile industry is concerned, there have been great developments in the entire value chain right from developments and research in fibres, yarns, advance finishes on fabric to the machineries. With age everything is improvised. Most of these advances are focused on increasing the performance of the product and adding high value features which is ultimately increasing the economy of product. Thus researches should keep in mind development of economical products. Though all these advances are very much a necessity but for masses these advances increase the selling price of products and thus economy of products becomes a greater question especially for highly engineered garments that after a span of time with changing fashion only remain in one’s wardrobes for several years without any wear and tear. All said and done we must also take into account the preference that natural fibres get over synthetic fibres when it comes to skin care and hygiene. This very feature of natural fibres is the reason why they are dominating the markets so the developments should also be focused on adding high performance delivery properties to natural fibres.

Avinash Mayekar

MD and CEO Suvin Advisors Pvt. Ltd.

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COVER STORY

Firefighter Suit: A Review Introduction: The role of firefighters is very extensive in our society. Firefighters not only play a pivotal role to rescue human lives during fire accident but also save properties for extensive damage by extinguishing hazardous fires. It is one of the most life threatening occupations that require intensive physical work in hazardous environment. For fighting fire accident more effectively and saving their precious life, it is needed to provide suitable personal protective equipment (PPE). The fire fighting suit is one of the important parts of PPE. Most of the body part of the fire-fighter is protected by this suit. Fire-fighter suit was first invented by Zachary Hansen in the 1600’s. Early fire-fighter suits were made-up of leather. This coat had felt or wool liners provided. Later we can also find the use of canvas and rubber in mid seventeenth century. Those previous interface of coat left a large gap of protection against fire. In the year of 1930 Aluminised suit was developed which was further modified/upgraded in the 1937. In the 1971 Smart Suit (having electrical sensors) was developed. In the year of 2003 Thermal imaging cameras was also provided with suit. The further up gradations were incorporated in the late years. Some of the International development on fire fighter suit is discussed below. US Firefighters are required to wear turnout ensemble (i.e., protective coat and pants), and other personal protective equipment (PPE) such as helmet, gloves, boots and a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) certified by NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) 1971 and 1981 standards. These items of firefighters’ protective system have been designed to provide protection against multiple hazards such as thermal threats (e.g. exposure to flame and

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excessive heat), toxic gas inhalation, and physical injuries (e.g. cuts, collisions, punctures, slips, falls etc.). So far, the focus of most studies on the firefighters, protective system has been on thermal protection, which combined with advances in material technology during the past decade, has greatly decreased burn injuries (Boorady et al. 2013). However, literature reports that the efforts to improve thermal protection have inevitably increased the weight and bulkiness of the firefighters’ protective system, hence, significantly compromising firefighters’ mobility and comfort (Adams and Keyserling 1993;

Functions and standards of firefighter suits: Keeping in mind various activities like extinguishing fire, rescuing humans, climbing stairs during operation etc, the fire-fighter suit is designed to performed several functions. It gives an individual a degree of protection from the thermal environment produced by a fire. It affords a limited degree of protection from thermal radiation, hot gas convection from a fire, and direct contact without surfaces. Burn injuries while wearing this protective clothing are directly related to the fire fighter’s thermal exposure, the actions of the fire fighter within the thermal, environment, the bio-

logical functions which regulate heat buildup within the human body and the performance of components that make up their protective clothing ensemble. Easy donning and doffing of fire fighter suit also play an important role. A good fire fighter suits must protect the firefighter from the following: ƒ Flash fire ƒ Conductive heat ƒ Radiant heat ƒ Absorbed heat ƒ Moisture vapours Beside above it should have following additional characteristics: ƒ Thermal insulation ƒ Water repellency ƒ Breathable ƒ Flexible ƒ Light weight ƒ Durability to several washes ƒ High impact, puncture and tear resistance According to NFPA 1971 as well as EN 469, all turnout clothing must have three components: y Outer shell: The outer shell resists ignition upon being exposed to thermal radiation or very short periods of direct flame contact. It also provides safety to the wearer from chemical hazards. y Inner Shell: The inner shell is generally composed of moisture barrier and a thermal barrier. y Moisture barrier: Moisture barriers may totally prevent the passage moisture, whether liquid or vapour. Now a day’s bicomponent ePTFE membrane being used for this purpose. y Thermal barrier: The thermal barrier is a layer of insulating material which retards heat flow through the garment. y Inner liner: It is light weight flame retardant fabric. International Scenario: In between these layers are pockets of air referred to as ´dead zones´. These layers of air along with the

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COVER STORY three protective layers help to further insulate the wearer from the extreme environments of fires. Usually turnout pants are outfitted with reinforced knees and leather cuffs. The materials used for the three layers in turnout trousers and coats may vary but will very often include a metaaramid/para-aramid combination of material. Globe, USA is one of the largest firefighter suit manufacturers in the world. Globe has introduced many of the materials, designs, and construction methods. Globe use DuPont NOMEX® inherently flame resistant materials, 3M SCOTCHLITE® reflective materials, and expanded PTFE technology including GORE-TEX® and CROSSTECH® moisture barriers. The Lübeck Fire and Rescue Service, Germany did not want to rely on a solution just because it was familiar to the firefighters so they undertook practical testing. The fire brigade tried two different protective suits from the clothing manufacturer Viking. One was made from an outer fabric with high para-aramid content and the other from UK manufacturer Hainsworth® Titan, a special fabric consisting of DuPont™ Nomex® and DuPont™ Kevlar® fibres. Both were put to the test in the field by professional firefighters. All key fire safety aspects were scrutinised in both garments in addition to the wash resistance of the outer fabrics. This proved a decisive factor as, whilst the material with a high para-aramid content had started to fade after five washes, the appearance of the material made from Hainsworth® Titan incorporating DuPont™ Nomex® fibres was almost unchanged. TITAN is a patented, dual layer, advanced woven fabric system for fire fighter. The two layers are woven together using a special weave pattern, which allows the innovative fabric system to work effectively. The VForce® protective suit is certified in diverse layer designs in accordance with EN 469:2005 – layer construction. The Structural firefighting clothing to Level 2 consists of: i) An outer

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layer to protect the wearer from flame injuries. ii) Moisture barrier to give protection from external water penetration and allow internal moisture vapour to escape. iii) Thermal barrier and inner layer/lining providing heat protection from proximity to flame. Indian scenario: Fire tragedies are not new in India. The country has witnessed several devastating fires that have claimed hundreds of innocent lives and damaged property worth billions. Fire also results in the loss of business, of goodwill and effects environment severely. Damages in industrial fires, for instance, are not limited to the industry where the fire occurs, but also effects other adjacent industries around it. In 2010-11, as many as 22,187 fire related calls were reported resulting in the death of 447 persons and injury to 2,613 persons across India. Building-fires are the most

(ULBs). Directorate of National Disaster Response Force and Civil Defence (NDRF and CD, Fire Cell), Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) renders technical advice to the States, UTs, and central ministries on fire protection, prevention, and legislation. Fire services in Maharashtra, Haryana, Gujarat, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh (excluding Indore), and Punjab are under the respective Municipal Corporations. In the remaining states, it is under the respective Home Department. At this moment there is no specification available on firefighter suit. BIS is working on this and circulated a draft specification based on EN 469. In India, there are a few manufacturers of fire fighter suits. Most of the cases they are doing assembling work. In many cases fire fighter suits or clothing used in fire fighter suits are imported. No remarkable work is done to develop indigenous fire fighter suit by changing chemistry of various layers used in the fire fighter suit. NITRA has started working on developing fire fighter suit clothing under Ministry of Textiles, Govt of India sponsored project. In this work, fire fighter suit clothing will be developed using various techniques to satisfy the requirement of fire fighters keeping in mind their safety, comfort and cost. Bibliography:

common among fire disasters. In the summer months from May-August of 2012, as many as 9 major incidents of fire had been reported including the fire at Maharashtra Secretariat building in Mumbai on 21 June in which three people lost their lives. Fire service is one of the most important emergency response services in the country, which comes under the 12th schedule of the constitution dealing with Municipal functions. At present, fire prevention and fire fighting services are organized by the concerned States and Union Territories (UTs), and Urban Local Bodies

1.http://www.fireengineering.com/articles/2008/06/the-history-of-firefighterpersonal-protective-equipment.html 2. Huiju Park, Juyeon Park Huiju Park ‘Assessment of Firefighters needs for personal protective equipment’ Fashion and Textiles, 2014. 3. Huiju Park, Seonyoung Kim, Kristen Morris, Melissa Moukperian, , Youngjin Moon , Jeffrey Stull, “Effect of firefighters’ personal protective equipment on gait” Applied Ergonomics, 48 (2015) 4248 4. Broorady, L. M., Barker, J., Lee, Y. A., Lin, S. H., Cho, E., Ashdown, S., “ Exploration of Firefighter Turnout Gear Part 1: Identifying Male Firefighter User Needs”, Journal of Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management, 8(1), 2013a, p1-13. 5. Broorady, L. M., Barker, J., Lee, Y. A., Lin, S. H., Cho, E., Ashdown, S. (2013b), “ Explo-

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COVER STORY ration of Firefighter Turnout Gear Part 2: Identifying Female Firefighter User Needs”, Journal of Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management, 8(2), 2013b, p 1-12 6. Boorady et al. 2013). Sobeih et al. (2006) and Dorman (2007) determined that wearing heavy and bulky turnout clothing caused restricted body. 7. Performance of protective clothing, 5th volume, James J Johnson and S.Z.Mansdorf, ASTM Publication, April 1996. 8. Tarek Sobeih et al, Postural Balance Changes in On-Duty Firefighters: Effect of Gear and Long Work Shifts, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 48(1):68-75 • February 2006 9. Paul S. (Paul Stuart) Adams and William Monroe Keyserling, Three methods for measuring range of motion while wearing protective clothing: A comparative study, International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 12(3):177-191 • October 1993 10. DORMAN, L.E. and HAVENITH, G., Examining the impact of protective cloth-

ing on range of movement, European Union project THERMPROTECT G6RDCT-2002-00846, Report 2007-7 11.http://link.springer.com/article/40691/ content/1/1/8 12.http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1183 and context=smhpapers 13.Richard Donarski, Developing Common International Standards For Firefighters Personal Protective Equipment, 6th Asia-Oceania Symposium On Fire and Technology

report, NFPA report, August 1998 18.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/ download?doi=10.1.1.515.2313 and rep=rep1 and type=pdf http://fire.nist. gov/bfrlpubs/fire96/PDF/f96072.pdf

19. David A. Torvi, and George V. HadjisophocleusResearch in Protective Clothing for Firefighters: State of the Art and Future Directions, Fire Technology, May 1999, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 111-130

14. www.ohmatex.dk 15. Thermal Capacity of Fire Fighter Protective Clothing , National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, The National Personnel Protective Technology Laboratory and National Institute of Standards and Technology and North Carolina State University, 2008 16. The protective work wear industry of india , TechTex india , Oct-Dec 2012,vol 6, Issue 4. 17.The International fire fighter protective clothing breathability research project

Prof (Dr) M.S.Parmar, NITRA drmsparmar@nitratextile.org

NEWS

Stretch For Power: Here’s How High-Tech Yarn Generates New Energy A new, high-tech yarn that generates electricity when stretched or twisted could use ocean waves and human motion to lower man’s dependency on fossil fuels, researchers said. An international team of scientists said in a study they had developed a stretchy yarn made of carbon nanotubes - tiny strands of carbon atoms up to 10,000 times smaller than a hair - that produces electricity from a host of natural sources. “The easiest way to think of twistron harvesters is, you have a piece of yarn, you stretch it, and out comes electricity,” said Carter Haines, a lead author of the study published in the journal Science. The device, which exploits the ability of nanotubes to transfer springlike motion into electrical energy, has numerous possible applications, according to the paper. In the lab, tests showed that a yarn weighing

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less than a housefly could light up a small LED light. When sewed into a t-shirt, it could power breathing sensors - like those used to monitor babies - using the stretch caused by the chest expanding at every inhalation. The innovation could be used to power internet-connected devices and smart clothing, said the study’s senior author Ray Baughman, a professor at The University of Texas at Dallas. “Electronic textiles are of major commercial interest, but how are you going to power them,” Baughman said in a statement. “Harvesting electrical energy from human motion is one strategy for eliminating the need for batteries,” he said. But the twistron’s most compelling feature was the ability to operate in sea water and potentially harvest vast amounts of energy from the ocean, he added.

“The grander dream is to make a real difference in the energy economy of nations,” Baughman told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone. A trial in South Korea showed that a small twistron attached between a buoy and a sinker on the seabed produced electricity every time a passing wave pulled the yarn. Baughman said that the technique could be scaled up in the future to create sea-power stations that can light entire cities, though harvesters are currently too expensive. Under the Paris accord reached in 2015, rich and poor countries committed to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases generated by burning fossil fuels that are blamed by scientists for warming the planet. Source: DNA India, Mumbai Edition

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COVER STORY

Growth And Development Of Agrotech - Role Of Standards Introduction Technical Textiles can be defined as textile materials and products manufactured primarily for their technical performance and functional properties rather than for aesthetics or decorative characteristics. The term Technical Textiles in common sense can be referred as Industrial textiles, Functional textiles, Performance textiles, High tech textiles, etc. Some of the major reasons for recent demand of technical textiles pertain to their cost effectiveness, durability, high strength, versatility, user friendliness, eco friendliness, logistic convenience, etc. Technical textiles constitute woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics made from natural fibres (cotton and wool), synthetic fibres (polyester, polyamide, polypropylene, polyethylene, acrylic, elastomeric, p-ararnid, m-aramid and other high performance synthetics), regenerated fibres (viscose rayon, acetate rayon) and inorganic fibres such as carbon, glass, ceramics and steel fibres. Based on the end-use applications, the technical textiles have been broadly classified in to 12 categories namely Agrotech, Buildtech, Clothtech, Geotech, Hometech, Indutech, Mobiletech, Medtech, Oekotech, Packtech, Protech and Sporttech. It is a known fact that India’s textile and apparel industry is one of the mainstays of the Indian national economy. It is also one of the largest contributing sectors of India’s exports worldwide. The Indian textile industry accounts for 14% of industrial production, which is 4% of GDP, employs 45 million people and accounts for nearly 11% share of the country’s total economy. Of late, Technical textiles has emerged one of the most innovative sectors with their ever-widening applications in view of growing industrialisation worldwide. Tech-

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nical Textile products derive their demand from development and industrialization in a country. In India Technical Textile sector has witnessed a growth of 12.4% over the last five years. As per the Baseline Survey of technical textiles industry-2015, this industry in India is estimated to be valued at Rs. 73,688 crore in 2013-14 and is projected to grow to Rs. 92,499 crore by 2015-16 and Rs. 1,16,217 crore by 2017-18. This sector provides new opportunity to the Indian textile industry to have long term sustainable future. Standardisation of technical textiles has been undertaken at National level through the specially constituted Technical Committees on Protective textiles, Agricultural Textiles, Industrial textiles, Geotextiles, Buildetech, Packtech and Medical textiles. The Textiles Division of BIS has published more than 1202 standards, out of which about 45 % are on the technical textiles and its test methods. Standardisation Of AgrotechAgrotech includes technical textile products used in agriculture, horticulture, fisheries, animal husbandry and forestry. The key products include shade nets, crop covers, vermibeds, mulches, Fishing nets, insect nets, anti hail nets and bird protection nets, lay flat tubes, gloves for tobacco harvesters etc. Agrotech is projected to grow to Rs. 1191 crore in 2015-16 at 12% CAGR and to Rs. 1614 crore by 2017-18 driven primarily by domestic market growth of Shade Nets and export market growth of fishing nets. The consumption of agrotech is driven by subsidy and incentives provided by NHM/NHB for promoting protective cultivation.

Committee, TXD 35 with mandate to formulate Indian Standards for terminology, testing and specifications for technical textiles for agrotech application such as horticulture, agriculture, forestry and animal husbandry, etc. The standards on fishing nets are formulated by Textile Materials for Marine/Fishing Purposes Sectional Committee, TXD 18. The synopsis of the important standards published by TXD 35 is detailed below: i) IS 15351:2015 Agro textiles- Laminated high density polyethylene woven geomembrane for water proof lining This standard prescribes requirements for high density polyethylene (HDPE) woven Geomembrane laminated with low density polyethylene (LDPE) or suitable combination of LDPE and LLDPE for use as lining for canal, pond and reservoir to control seepage and for proper disposal of industrial effluents, etc. This standard specifies four type of geomembranes of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 mm thickness. The primary function of geomembrane applied in ponds/reservoirs is to prevent loss of water due to seepage. The successful performance of geomembrane is based on a good quality material, installation and appropriate design of ponds/reservoirs. To improve the service lifetime of geomembrane, it is essential that the geomembrane are placed on the pond/reservoir surface according to

Standardization in the field of agrotech is handled by Technical textiles for Agrotech Applications Sectional

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August 2017


COVER STORY the dimensions and contours of the pond/reservoir ensuring full contact with the sub grade. To achieve this onsite laying, joining and fixing is imperative.

Shading %age is determined on the basis of amount of light transmitted through the sample and the same is measured with the help of PAR sensor.

ii) IS 15907:2010 Agro textiles High density polyethylene (HPDE) woven beds for vermiculture

The shade nets are mostly used for agriculture and horticulture applications particularly in countries like India where the scorching heat of the sun plays a major role in damaging the crops by sun burning and thus causing severe financial losses. The varying climatic conditions throughout the year, together with the slow but constant rising temperature in the summer months prove the need for shade nets to maximize growth and crop yields. The shade nets helps in controlling the temperature by accumulating the day heat to withstand the low temperatures of night thus help in off season ripening of fruits and vegetables. It also acts as a wind shield and prevents damage to young plants from damage.

This standard prescribes constructional and other requirements for high density polyethylene (HDPE)

woven beds for vermiculture used in producing compost for agricultural purposes made from 340 GSM, 7 layer laminated fabric. It can produce about 800 to 1000 kgs of vermicompost in one cycle of about 45 days and has the provision of collecting vermiwash. These vermibeds enjoy greater advantages over the traditional concrete ones in terms of space, durability, ease of handling, yield of compost, cost, etc. iii) IS 16008 (Part 1):2016 Agro textiles - Shade nets for agriculture and horticulture purposes Part 1 Shade nets made from tape yarns This standard prescribes constructional and other requirements for Agro shade nets manufactured from tape yarns for agriculture and horticulture purposes in protecting/ increasing crop yield by providing controlled climatic conditions for the intended crops. This standard specify three type of shade nets based on the shading factor of 50, 75 and 90%.

iv) IS 16008 (Part 2):2016 Agro textiles - Shade nets for agriculture and horticulture purposes Part 2 Shade nets made from mono filament yarns This standard prescribes constructional and other requirements for Agro shade nets manufactured from mono filament yarns for agriculture and horticulture purposes in protecting/ increasing crop yield by providing controlled climatic conditions for the intended crops. This standard specify four type of shade nets based on the shading factor of 35, 50, 75 and 90%. v) IS 16202 : 2014 Agro textiles – Woven ground covers for horticulture application This standard prescribes constructional and other requirements for 100 GSM woven ground covers made from UV stabilised polypropylene tape yarns for applications in horticulture. The ground covers are used to meet diverse needs of crops in the horticulture sector like suppression of weed growth around

August 2017

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the plant, water conservation, soil temperature moderation, increase in yield etc. by blocking extreme climatic conditions of sunlight or cold. vi) IS 16190:2014 Agro textiles – High density polyethylene (HDPE) laminated woven fabric lay flat tubes for irrigation purpose This standard prescribes constructional and other requirements for high density polyethylene (HDPE) laminated woven lay flat tube of internal diameter 50, 63, 75, 90, 110, 125, 150, 175 and 200 mm for irrigation purpose. These lay flat tubes are used at the delivery lines of the agriculture pump sets, which may be exposed to atmosphere and sunlight. These lay flat tubes are manufactured from 260 GSM, HDPE 5 layer laminated fabric and can sustain bursting pressure of 2.6 Kg/cm2. Transportation of the water from ponds, canal or borewell to the various part of the field for agriculture is of paramount importance. High density polyethylene laminated woven lay flat tube has been developed to easily transport water in the agriculture field and have an advantage of lighter in weight. These lay flat tubes do not require fixed installation and can transport water at the place of choice easily. Farmers are expected to incur less fixed expenditure to irrigate their field at considerably lower running cost as compare to the existing piping systems. These lay flat tubes can sustain the actual field conditions like uneven field surface, extreme climatic conditions, resistance to puncture etc. vii) IS 16187:2014 Agro textiles — High density polyethylene (HDPE) / polypropylene (PP) leno woven

27


COVER STORY sacks for packaging and storage of fruits and vegetables This standard prescribes the re-

quirements of high density polyethylene (HDPE)/polypropylene (PP) leno woven sacks for packaging and storage of fruits and vegetables. The fabric used in the manufacture of leno sacks shall be woven on circular or flat looms. This standard covers leno bags of 25 and 50 kg capacity. viii) IS 16390:2015 AgrotextilesNylon knitted seamless gloves for tobacco harvesters

This standard prescribes the constructional details and performance requirements of knitted seamless gloves, white, made from nylon yarn for tobacco harvesters. This standard specifies five sizes of gloves from Size 0 to Size 4. Tobacco farming presents several hazards to those who cultivate and harvest the plant. Although some of these hazards, such as pesticide exposure and musculoskeletal trauma are faced by workers in other types of agricultural production, tobacco production presents some unique hazards, most notably acute nicotine poisoning, a condition also known as green tobacco sickness. Green tobacco sickness is an occupational poisoning that can affect workers who cultivate and harvest

28

tobacco. It occurs when workers absorb nicotine through the skin as they come into contact with leaves of the mature tobacco plant. Use of the knitted seamless nylon gloves by the workers, while cultivating and harvesting the tobacco plants, can significantly reduce the above hazards. ix) IS 16513:2016 Agrotextiles – Insect nets for agriculture and horticulture purposes

TECH: y Agro textiles - High density polyethylene (HDPE) laminated woven lay flat tube for use in mains and submains of drip irrigation system y Textiles - Polypropylene spun bonded non-woven crop cover fabric for agricultural and horticultural applications IMPORTANT STANDARDS UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNDER TXD 35: y Agro textiles – Specification for bird protection nets y Agro textiles- Specification for hail protection nets y Agro textiles – PP non woven bunch covers y Jute agro-textiles for growth of plants and suppression of weeds CONCLUSION-

This standard prescribes constructional and other requirements for insect nets for agriculture and horticulture purposes in protecting crop from insects such as aphids, whitefly, carrot fly, cabbage root fly and caterpillars etc. This standard specifies three types of insect nets based on their mesh size (30, 40 and 50 mesh). x) IS 16089:2013 Jute Agro-Textile — Sapling bags for growth of Seedling/Sapling — Specification This standard specifies requirements of jute sapling bag made from hessian cloth to use for growth of sapling in nursery. JAT is a natural fabric, made of jute fibre, that helps retain soil humidity at a conducive level, arrest desiccation of soil and attenuates extremes of temperature due to the intrinsic characteristics of jute and capacity to absorb water/ moisture up to about 5 times of its dry weight. On bio-degradation, jute coalesces with soil, increasing its permeability and supplementing its nutrient level. JAT provides all these advantages without affecting ecoambience adversely IMPORTANT STANDARDS FINALIZED FOR PUBLICATION ON AGRO-

Standardization in the field of agrotextiles has been carried out by BIS taking into consideration the latest technological advancement in the field through consultative process of all the stakeholder. Role of standards is vital for growth and development of this sunrise sector of economy. Standards can play a pivotal role in enhancing the quality and productivity of agriculture keeping in pace with government priority to help farmers to double their income in next five years.

J K Gupta

Scientist-D (Textiles) Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi

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August 2017


MARKET REPORT

Recycled PSF Will Be Costly As China Will Stop Waste Import Crude up on Weak US$ and signs of supply tightness Crude oil prices declined early in August, pressured by rising OPEC exports and strong US output, but the fall was limited by strong US jobs report which bolstered hopes for growing demand. Prices continued to sober later but bounced back sharply in third week, rallied by a fall in US dollar and drillers cutting down rigs. Signs of supply tightness started surfacing in US. While prices continued to remain supported by weak US dollar the markets were adversely impacted by Hurricane Harvey bracing the USG coast. Harvey, a powerful Category 3 storm, forced shutting down of refineries, terminals, onshore and offshore production facilities and other infrastructure. Benchmark US crude averaged US$ 48.12 a barrel while European Brent averaged US$ 51.93 a barrel, both up 3% and 6% on the month, respectively. MEG prices rise on cost support, but PTA sobers Ethylene prices in Asia surged 25% on the month hitting a 3 month high on tight supply and strong downstream demand while European spot surged 9% as supply tightened following fire at Pernis refinery. In US ethylene prices climbed 30% on anticipated startup of several derivative projects, following decline in July contract prices. Strong demand from SM and positive production margins continued to spurethylene markets. Paraxylene prices in Asia moved up 4% in Asia while European paraxylene moved in tandem with Asian numbers but remained mute. MEG prices hit a 6-month high in Asia and margins flipped into a positive zone as rising ethylene cost continued to provide healthy cost support. SABIC raised its September contact price for Asia in view of healthy demand. In Europe and US, MEG prices declined amid stable demand. PTA markets weakened slightly in Asia as petrochemical cost kept fluctuating across the region. Prices edged down 1% during August In Europe, August contract prices were hiked in line with paraxylene movements while in US, August PTA contract settled up following movement in the contract for paraxylene, which settled higher. Polyester chip markets were directionless in Asia as raw material cost fluctuated sidewaysin weakness PSF prices were seen rising 2% month on month in China, India and Pakistan although raw materials cost eased. In

August 2017

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China, PSF market was dominated by sidelined stance as overall polyester market was stable to firm. In Pakistan, PSF prices inched up on firm raw material cost while import offers were stable. In India, PSF prices rolled over in August after the last revision in late July. Recycled PSF can become dearer in the short run In mid-July, China notified the WTO that it intends to ban 24 types of solid waste products by the end of 2017. The notification is under the WTO Committee on Technical Barriers to Trade. In the notice in circulation the last date for comments is given as 20 July and the proposed date for entry into force as September 2017. The rationale behind the notification is that large amounts of dirty and hazardous waste is mixed in the solid waste. This has led to serious pollution of the Chinese environment and people’s health. In China, 1.4/1.5D recycled PSF prices are up 300 Yuan a ton (US cents 4 a kg) in July mainly due to cost push from the prices for recycled flakes, imitation virgin staple grade, hot water washed, which were up 200-300 Yuan a ton (US cents 3-4 a kg) up on the month. The potential ban on imports of solid waste is causing some concern in the industry since the trade code for bottle bricks and flake (unwashed) is mentioned in the notification to the WTO. China produces around 5 million ton of recycled PSF. Around 50% of the raw material is imported while the rest is sourced domestically. In 2016 China imported around 2.7 million ton of waste and scrap of Polyethylene Glycol Terephthalate under one of the targeted HS codes, 39159010. This included bottle bricks and unwashed flake. At this point of time it is believed washed flake is not included since official confirmation of specific products to be included in the ban is still pending. Since the announcement of mid-July, recycled flake prices are up, continuing to rise despite virgin chip prices retreating by 50 Yuan a ton (US cent 1 a kg). Polyester yarn prices moved up 2-3% in China in line with PSF cost. Sales volume was moderate and overall transactions were limited. In Pakistan, polyester yarn prices also gained about 1% in August given the firmness in PSF markets. In India, polyester yarn prices moved up, for four weeks in a row, to reflect hike in PSF price.

29


YARN REPORT

China Tops In Indian Yarn Exports, But Volume Still Down Spun yarn exports aggregated 83 million kgs in June 2017, down 22% and 11% in value terms at US$ 260 million. However, they were 11% more than May shipment. Shipment in June

was also adversely impacted by the production cuts just before the rolling in of the Goods and Service Tax regime from 1 July. Producers and trader refrained from accumulating inventory and were busy offloading surplus stock. Unit value realisation averaged US$ 3.14 per kg, down US cents 3 from previous month but up US cents 39 as compared to June 2016

Cotton yarn was exported to 71 markets worth US$ 214 million (INR 1,360 crore) and volumes at 66 million kg. The aver-age unit price realisation was at US$ 3.23 a kg, down US cents 7 from previous month and up US cents 46 from the same month a year ago. China reemerged as the largest importer of cotton yarn from India in June, followed by Bangladesh and Turkey. Fifteen countries did not import cotton yarn from India this June as they did last year. However, they were replaced by 12 countries which imported yarn worth US$ 1.6 million in June 2017. Brazil, Turkey and United Arab Emirates were among the fastest growing markets for cotton yarn, and accounted for 10% of total value of cotton yarn exported in June. 100% man-made fibre yarns export was at 6 million kg in June, comprising 3 million kg of polyester yarn, 1.9 million kg of viscose yarn and 1.1 million kg of acrylic yarn. Polyester yarn exports were down 0.4% in value while viscose yarn exports value plunged 47% during the month. Acrylic yarn

exports were down 18% in June. Polyester spun yarns were exported to 43 countries in June aggregating US$ 7 million with unit price realization averaging US$ 2.34 a kg. Turkey was the largest importer of polyester yarn, followed by Iran and UAE. Viscose yarn worth US$ 6 million or INR39 crore was exported in June with shipment at 1.9 million kg, implying average unit price realisation of US$ 3.25 per kg. Iran was the top importer worth US$ 1.3 million, followed by Belgium with imports worth US$ 1.1 million. Blended spun yarns worth US$ 30 million were exported in June, down 23% YoY while volumes down 27% at 10.3 million kg. During the month, 6 million kg of PC yarns was exported worth US$ 16 million. Another 3 million kg of PV yarns valued at US$ 9 million were exported. Egypt and Brazil were the largest importers of PC yarn from India in June followed by Bangladesh. In June, Turkey was the largest importer of PV yarns from India followed by Iran with total volume at 2.2 million kg worth at US$ 6.2 million. In June, all filament yarns export totaled 48 million kg, down 50% YoY while value declined 44% at US$ 77 million. Filament yarns include polyester, nylon, polypropylene and viscose filament yarns and were exported to 80 countries during the month

Nitin Madkaikar

Textile Beacon

30

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August 2017


YARN REPORT

August 2017

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31


COTTON REPORT Cotton Sowing Heavily Depends On the Weather Condition, While The Exports Move Slow. 40 million bales. In July end, when there were reports of floods in parts of Gujarat, Punjab and Rajasthan, and draught in parts of Karnataka and Maharashtra, the cotton crop figure was revised to 38 to 39 million bales. In first fortnight of August, there were reports of deficient rainfall in many parts of North India, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, M.P. and Karnataka. Apart from these, there were reports of pest attacks in Punjab and Haryana (white fly) and Maharashtra and Telangana (Pink balworm) compelling the ‘ analysts and buyer lobbies’ to revise their crop estimates to “ not less than 36.5 to 37 million bales”. Meanwhile many seller lobbies continued to project a glum picture of Indian crop.

Cotton Sowing 17/08/2017

Report

as

on

Indian cotton crop continues to depend heavily on weather conditions. Although amount of sowing is a significant factor in estimation of cotton crop, it is the ‘yield’ which is the key factor for determining the final crop. The below mentioned historical data of last 7 years corroborates this fact. It is too early to determine the crop estimate of India. Beginning of July, inspired by high sowing estimates of about 120 lakh hectares, many trade analysts and buyer lobbies declared that Indian crop will not be less than

32

Since last week, monsoon has revived in most cotton growing centres of India (except Karnataka) enticing many analysts to again post a rosy picture of Indian cotton crop. The best time to estimate the Indian crop will be at the September, although final estimate can be derived only by Nov, sometimes even later like in 2013-14. During 2013-14 season, due to better prices in cotton compared to other agro- commodities and some rains in Nov, Dec and Jan, farmers did not remove the cotton plants from their fields. As a result, we had about 3 to 4 million additional bales of average quality cotton in India which was not considered in early estimates.

New crop prices have seen a significant fall in futures following reports of excellent sowing and a favourable monsoon. Old crop prices continue to hold its fort following a shortfall in current physical cotton stock, especially of good quality cotton. Spinning mills are in a dilemma as the yarn prices are not supportive both in domestic and export market and fabric demand is yet to pick up post GST. September will be a crucial month to determine who wins this war. Prices of most Indian cotton varieties remained stable during the last fortnight. Both buying and selling is limited. News season (2017-18) seed cotton arrivals have started in parts of Punjab and Haryana and are expected to pick up by 1st week of Sep. Arrivals in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Telangana are expected to start by early October but ginners are of the opinion that good quality cotton will be available only after the Indian festival of Diwali i.e.by Oct end. Export-Import Export activity continues to be slow since quite some time following higher prices and lower availability of Indian cotton. Good crop estimates in the new season and availability of Indian cotton at a reasonably low price in the futures have prompted some Indian exporters to sell the new crop.

The situation in Karnataka continues to be serious especially in the Extra long staple (ELS) belt of Hubli to Chitradurga. Soil moisture is low throughout the state and immediate rains are the need of the hour for this rain-starved state to prevent a draught-like situation. Domestic Market Summary:

Manish Daga

There is a vigorous price war between the old crop and new crop cotton.

MD, COTTON GURU cottongurutm@gmail.com

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August 2017


FABRIC UPDATE

Fabric Market Report known for its art silk, polyester, georgette etc., but now they are into 1005 cotton printing.

down to 13 paisa per peak.

Situation of Market is Slake due to GST. In textile only 10-15% work is process rest of all is not on the board. In market grey fabric is ample in stock, no buyers are available. Dyeing and Printing projects is very few. Ahmadabad process house shut 2-3 days in a week due to no demands.

South is known for its spinning but now Maharashtra and Gujarat (Saurashtra) also started spinning Mills in state. Spinning and Weaving looms are emerging in Gujarat; So Gujarat is in peek of its development. Now Yarn is also available in Gujarat, so manufacturer doesn’t depend on south for yarn. In south labor is cheap comparatively Gujarat, but then to delivery is on time and quick.

While in Maharashtra processing house has little improvement in dyeing program and at the same time Ichalkaranji market is worst. Earlier weaving labors use to get 20 paisa per peak and now their wages lower

Hosiery mainly manufacture in Ludhiana and Tirupur, now Surat put its feet in hosiery. GST is yet not settles down in textile because traders and manufacturer doesn’t earn their bread n butter, hence processing mill unable to pay their loans which are already 2 months overdue. If this continue then textiles small industry will suffer a lot or may be close down.

Processing in Ahmadabad and Surat is running successfully. Surat mainly

Kirti Shah

Textile World textileworld@airtelmail.in

SULZER - RUNNING QUALITIES - SEPTEMBER 2017 S.NO

QUALITY

HSN CODE

WT L.MTR

WT GSM

YARN TYPE

WEAVE

STD

PRICE EX.MILL

1

07X07/68X38 - 63

5209

625

390

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

88.00

2

10X06/76X28 - 63

5209

510

325

OE X OE

DUCK

DYEING

73.00

3

10X10/68X38 - 63

5209

440

275

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

66.00

4

10X10/40X36 - 63

5208

310

195

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

48.00

5

16X08/84X28 - 47

5209

265

225

OE X OE

DUCK

DYEING

43.00

6

16X08/84X28 - 63

5209

360

225

OE X OE

DUCK

DYEING

57.00

7

16X12/84X26 - 47

5208

230

193

OE X OE

DUCK

DYEING

39.00

8

16X12/84X26 - 63

5208

310

193

OE X OE

DUCK

DYEING

51.00

9

16X12/96X48 - 63

5209

415

260

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

69.00

10

16X12/108X56 - 63

5209

470

295

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

78.00

11

16X16/60X56 - 63

5208

300

187

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

52.00

12

2/20X10/40X36 - 48

5208

235

193

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

42.00

13

2/20X10/40X36 - 63

5208

310

193

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

54.00

14

20X20/60X50 - 63

5208

225

140

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

42.00

15

20X20/60X60 - 50

5208

200

155

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

38.00

16

20X20/60X60 - 63

5208

245

155

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

46.00

17

20X20/60X60 - 67

5208

255

155

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

48.00

18

20X20/60X60 - 72

5208

275

155

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

52.00

19

20X20/60X60 - 78

5208

300

155

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

57.00

20

20X20/60X56 - 131

5208

480

150

OE X OE

PLAIN

DYEING

91.00

21

20X16/108X56 - 63

5209

345

216

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

64.00

22

20X20/108X56 - 63

5209

327

205

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

60.00

23

20X20/108X56 - 67

5209

345

205

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

64.00

24

20X20/108X56 - 72

5209

370

205

OE X OE

DRILL

DYEING

69.00

25

30X30/76X68 - 65

5208

195

112

CARDED

PLAIN

DYEING

51.00

26

30X30/68X64 - 63

5208

175

110

CARDED

PLAIN

S.DYEING

44.00

27

30X30/124X64 - 63

5208

260

165

CARDED

2/1 TWILL

DYEING

67.00

28

40X40/92X88 - 67

5208

200

118

COMBED

PLAIN

DYEING

65.00

29

40X40/92X88 - 72

5208

215

118

COMBED

PLAIN

DYEING

69.00

30

40X40/100X96 - 65

5208

205

125

COMBED

PLAIN

DYEING

69.00

31

40X40/100X96 - 72

5208

230

125

COMBED

PLAIN

DYEING

75.00

SLUB Fabrics - (Warp - Normal yarn + Weft Ringspun Carded Slub yarn)

August 2017

1

10X10/40X36 - 63

5208

315

195

OE X RS

PLAIN

DYEING

62.00

2

16X08/84X28 - 63

5209

370

225

OE X RS

DUCK

DYEING

72.00

3

2/20X10/40X36 - 48

5208

240

195

OE X RS

PLAIN

DYEING

54.00

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37


SURAT UPDATE Heavy Demand Of Fancy

: Payment Crisis

Jacquard Fabrics

Though the yarn manufacturers has given repeat sale in September first week, access stock is a big concern for them. Weavers are purchasing yarn as per the requirement only. Since fortnight, dealers are waiting for new big order. There is a pressure for clearing yarn stock, some second line spinners are offering under table rate discount (RD) upto Rs. 1-3 per Kg.

Ahead of Navratri, Durga puja and Diwali festival, the demand of finished fabrics has increased in the local textile market here. Shining fancy printed fabrics and designer jacquard fabrics are in heavy demand. As the demand rise, plain grey fabric producer, wevears are now also turning into jacquard grey fabrics manufacturing form plain fabrics. After two months long period of GST implemention, daily business turnover of finished synthetic saree, dress and home textile fabrics is increasing in country’s largest man-made fabric (MMF) wholesale market. Textile trading industry sources said the traders had booked huge orders for the upcoming festivals like Durga Puja and Diwali. The retailors from all across the country, are giving orders for new creative quality and worked fabrics. Specialy, the pallu, butta and top-dyed jacquard fancy fabrics are in heavy demand. Among of 6.5 lakh powerloom machines in the city, only few hundreds are making jacquard fabrics and that is why quality fabrics manufacturers are in win win situation. The wholesale traders have received huge orders of ultra-satin, jari broket, rubber-print, velvet worked and fancy sequence fabrics from the retailors and small traders from Bihar, Asam and kolkata. The wholesale price of these fabrics are in the range of Rs. 30 to 200 per metre. The prices of various quality of raw grey fabrics has also incresed upto 20% because of rise in demand. PC Rangoli, polyester by polyester Rangoli, marble are few qualties of grey fabrics, which are in high demand in wholesale textile market. Finished fabrics goods dispatching also incresed from local transport companies.

Rate Discount(RD) Offer To Clear Yarn Stock

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The prices of basic raw materials PTA and MEG are steady. Synthetic yarn prices were also unchanged since week in the local market. Powerloom sources said, they have already stock yarn earlier when the prices was at high level now they are waiting for some correction for new orders. In September first sale, spinners have not changed the prices but they are worried for stock clearance and offering under table discount. The prices of 80 crimp yarn were remain at Rs. 112/kg. and 80/72 semidle roto at Rs. 115-117/kg. Nylon yarn prices are at high here in the local market. In the last fortnight, nylon yarn prices rose upto Rs. 5-7 per kg. Yarn price moved up on the back of short supply and strong demand from weavers. According to market sourses, supply from local yarn manfactures are not sufficient to meet industry’s demand. The demand of imported yarn is increasing. Call it a Goods and Services Tax (GST) effect, payment delay is a big concern for entire textile industry in the city. The industry is facing a huge payment defaults. The normal payment cycle, which was used to be between 30 and 60 days, has now extended upto six months, leading to a payment crisis in the local textile industry. In some extreme cases, the buyers even disappeared without making payments. Post-GST, the association of yarn manufacturers, weavers, processors and traders have made a new Rules and Regulations for payment, but in fact this exercise has failed to erase the payment dilemma.

Post-GST, Imported Polyester Fabrics Cost Down Upto 20% : Weavers Urges For Safeguard Duty “The dumping of cheap fabrics from China and Vietnam has become a serious concern for local weaving industries. After implemention of GST regime, the tax on imported polyester decresed upto 20% and import of chaper fabrics is increasing. In order to protect textile powerloom small and medium enterprises (SMEs), the government should impose heavy anti-dumping duty on import of polyester fabrics.” Various textiles and powerloom industries members have organised a meeting with high authority of central government here and made above represntation. They provided data comparison of the benefit in import duty pre-GST and post-GST to fabrics imported from China and Vietnem. The imported fabrics is become cheaper upto 20% post-GST. In the pre-GST era, tax on fabrics imported from china was 29% and now post-GST it is 10%. The increasing import of cheaper fabrics will severly damage Surat powerloom weaving industries. Earlier, SGCCI has raised apprehensions about the heavily under-invoiced fabrics import from China and said that the import has climbed to more than Rs. 10,000 crore in the last couple of years. The Government of China provides heavy subsidy to its textiles industry. This further reduces the production cost per unit in China. The sourses stated that after implemention of GST, the prices of imported polyester knitted fabrics, tafeta and georgette fabric has come down by Rs. 4-8 per metre. The under valued fabrics import has left no competition for fabrics manufactured by local weavers. It has become difficult for the powerloom weavers to survive here. The textile indusries members have urged the authority to

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SPECIAL REPORT impose heavy duty on imported polyester fabrics to safeguard the domestics weaving sector.

SGCCI To Organise “Textile Week” From 6-12 September

The Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce and Industry SGCCI and GFRRC will organises ‘Textile Week’ in surat from 6 to 12 September at Samruddhi Building. The seminar and talk programmes on textile export marketing, fashion trend forecasting, developments in polyester fibre

fabrics, processing of knitted fabrics, new developments in nylon fabrics, natural fibre fabrics and new trends in Textiles will be onganised during the week. Eminent speaker and industries experts will represnt their views in the programme.

Textile Committee: Demand for Textiles The Textiles Committee, a statutory organisation under the Ministry of Textiles, Government of India has been conducting a survey to quantify the domestic demand of textiles in the household sectors of the country since 1969. The demand of textiles is derived on the basis of textile purchase data collected bi-monthly from selected panel household across the country. The latest annual report “Market for Textiles and Clothing: National Household Survey 2015” is prepared on the basis of bi-monthly textile purchase data for the calendar year 2014. The latest annual report has tried to capture the demand for most of the popular products purchased by the household sector during 2014. The estimation on demand pattern includes the per capita consumption of textiles, fibre and sector-wise demand; region–wise demand of textiles etc. for the reference and use of the industry and Government. Aggregate and Per Capita Demand of Textiles The aggregate purchased of textiles was 36086 million metres in 2014 as compared to 31636 million metres in 2012 and have experienced a positive growth rate of 14.07%. In value terms, the aggregate purchase of textiles is Rs. 4363466 million in 2014 while in 2012 it was Rs. 3493287 million. The aggregate value of the textiles purchased by the urban households has recorded a growth of 18.59% in 2014. On the other hand, growth in demand of textiles in the rural area is 30.78 % during this period. It indicates that the rural population is purchasing more textile and textile articles as compared to the urban population during 2014. The per capita purchase of textile during the period is estimated to be Rs. 3470.77 in 2014 as against Rs. 2862.87 in 2012. The per capita value of the textiles purchased during 2014 has recorded a growth of 12.08% in the urban area over the year 2012. On the other hand, from per capita purchase in the rural area has increased 28.50% in 2014 as against the previous year. Similarly, the per capita purchase of textile in terms of quantity has increased from 28.70 metres in 2014 as against 25.93 metres in year 2012. Hence the per capita purchase has ex-

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perienced a positive growth of 10.68% during the period. The purchase trend indicates that an average person’s consumption of textile has increased by 2.77 metres in 2014 as compared to the previous year. Area-wise Demand of Textiles

In urban area the aggregate consumption of textiles is 13509 million metres in 2014 as against 11863 million metres in 2012, which accounts for 37.44 % of the total demand of textiles. The aggregate consumption in rural area is estimated at 22577 million metres in 2014 as against 19773 million metres in 2012, which accounts for 62.57% of the total consumption. Similarly the per capita purchase of textile in urban area is 33.58 metres in 2014 as compared to 31.20 metres in 2012. In rural area, the per capita consumption is 26.41 metres in 2014 and 23.54 metres in 2012. The aggregate consumption of textiles in metro, big cites, small cities are 3432 million metres, 1480 million metres, 8816 million metres respectively in 2014. The per capita consumption of textiles in metro, big cites, small cities are 36.78 metres, 32.97 metres and 33.38 metres respectively. Hence, the purchase of the textiles in metro cities is highest among all segments of consumers in the country. Gender wise Demand of Textiles The per capita purchase of all textiles by male is estimated at 22.29 metres in 2014 as against 21.44 metres in 2012, hence recorded a positive growth of 3.96% during 2014. It indicates that an average Indian male has increased has textile purchase by 0.85 metres in 2014 as compared to

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SPECIAL REPORT and branded products in their wardrobe. Fibre wise Demand of Textiles Fibre is the basic raw material used for manufacturing different textiles items. The broad process in making of fabric involves conversion of raw fibre into yarn and then yarn to fabrics.

previous year. In value terms, the per capita purchases of male have increased to Rs 3089.00 in 2014 as against Rs. 2344.59 in 2012, a positive growth of 31.75%. Hence, an average Indian male is reportedly spending Rs.744.41 more for purchase of textiles in 2014 than the previous year. On the other hand, the per capita purchase of textiles by female is estimated at 35.64 metres in 2014 as compared to 30.42 metres in 2012, thus increased by of 5.22 metres with a growth of 17.16%. In value terms, the per capita purchases have increased to Rs 3882.15 in 2014 as against Rs. 3381.17 in 2012, with a positive growth of 14.82%. It means, an average Indian female is reportedly spending Rs.500.98 more for purchases of textiles in 2014 compared to previous year. The per capita purchases of male in value terms have recorded a growth of 31.75% in 2014 compared to the year 2012 whereas the same for the female the growth is only 14.82%, clearly indicate that there is a tendency of male to opt for more value added

The aggregate purchase of cotton fibre based product is 15521 million metres in 2014 as compared to 13289 million metres in 2012. The aggregate consumption of manmade fibre is 20162 million metres in 2014 as against 18034 million metres in 2012. Similarly, the demand for pure silk and woollen fibre based product is 261 and 142 million metres respectively in 2014 as against 221 and 92 million metres in 2012, showing a positive growth of 18 percent and 54 percent respectively. The survey reveals that out of the total aggregate consumption of 36086 million metres (per capita 28.70 metres) of textiles in the year 2014, manmade and blended/mixed textiles together have the largest share of 55.87 percent followed by cotton textiles with 43.01 percent, pure silk textiles with 0.72 percent and woollen textiles with 0.40 percent.

Region wise Demand of Textiles In order to ensure a better estimation of the data with accuracy, the country have been segregated into four division i.e. North, East, West and South region. The region wise estimates indicate that the North region has recorded the highest purchase of textiles with Rs.1197732 million followed by the Eastern region with Rs.1196778 million. The contribution of Western region is Rs.1010914 million and South region is Rs.958042 million. However, in terms of quantity, the East region has contributed highest with 10635 million metres of purchase followed by 9564 million metres by North, 8076 million metres by West and 7811 million metres by South region. The highest purchase of textiles in quantity terms is recorded in East region, but it ranked second in value terms. Similarly, the North region ranked first in case of value but stood second in case of quantity. But the estimated average price

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SPECIAL REPORT of the textiles shows that the household in the Northern region purchases the textiles higher valued products amongst the four regions with an average price per metre of Rs.125.23 followed by West region with Rs.125.18 and South with Rs.122.65 and East with Rs.112.57.

made Garments” is increased from 7397 million metres in 2012 to 11168 million metres in 2014. The aggregate purchase of “Garment in piece length” during 2014 is 14321 million metres as compared to 12672 million metres in 2014, which is 45.08 percent of the total all India house hold textiles purchases. The aggregate purchase of “Woven household Varieties” during 2014 at the all India level is 2683 million metres. As compared to 2012 the purchases of home textiles were 2204 million metres. The share of the household varieties is 8.44 percent among the total demand of woven textiles.

Region Wise Per Capita Demand In term of per capita purchase of textiles in 2014, the East region recorded the highest with 33.05 metres, followed by 30.34 metres in the South, 29.06 metres in the West and 25.48 metres in the North region. However, the per capita purchase in value terms is highest in South region with Rs.3691.13 followed by the Eastern region with Rs.3689.41 and Western region with Rs.3607.85 and North region by Rs.3164.89.

Demand of Woven Varieties The aggregate purchase of woven varies i.e. woven textile in piece length, garment in piece length, readymade garments and woven household varieties is given below. The study indicates that the aggregate purchase of “woven textiles in piece length” is 3596 million metres, which is 11.32 percent of the total all India textiles purchases during 2014 as against 5594 million metres in 2012. Further, this segment of the woven textiles has been experiencing a negative growth during the past few years due to change in preference pattern of the consumer. The year 2014 is also not an exception to the trend. During the year, the demand for the woven textiles in piece length has declined by 35.72 as compared to previous year. On the other hand, the aggregate purchase of “Woven Ready-

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Demand of Major Varieties The report has estimated the domestic demand of most of the varieties of the Textiles and Clothing product purchased by the households during the reference period. However, there are some varieties which are highly demanded in the household sectors and the lists of such varieties are also experiencing change due to change in preference pattern. For presenting the demand estimates in a more user-friendly manner on the basis of the varieties, the demand is further segregated into (i) personal clothing and (ii) home textiles. Among the personal clothing’s, the products like shirt, trousers, frock, skirt midi, jeans (male and female), sweater, saree, kurta,pyjam, constitutes the major varieties in the reference period. Similarly, the inner wear products like Banian, underwear, briefs, petticoat, panties, brassiere, are also a major chunk of demand in the personal clothing categories. The report indicates that the market size of personal clothing items is 33404 million metres during 2014 as against 29432 million metres in 2012. Hence, the personal clothing varieties have experienced a growth of 13.50 percent during the reference period as against previous year. In the home textiles segments, the major contributors to the domestic demand are chaddar, bedsheets, towel and terry towels. In addition, the products like mosquito net, pillow cover or cushion cover, furnishing materials, blankets are equally important products in this segment. The aggregate demand of these products is about 866 million pieces during 2014.

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SPECIAL REPORT The domestic demand of some the varieties are given below:

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EU-CHINA UPDATE

EU-China Powerful Equations

CHINA’S EMERGING NEW POWERFUL EQUATIONS Throughout his campaign and from the start of his presidency, Donald Trump’s blatant disdain for NATO and his open support for Brexit and populist, Euroskeptic parties across the continent have riled European leaders. At the NATO and G7 summits in Brussels and Italy last week, Trump further poisoned transatlantic relations by refusing to support NATO’s doctrine of collective defense and then signaling that he would withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, which he did on June 1. As German Chancellor Angela Merkel balefully declared, “The times in which we could rely fully on others— they are somewhat over.” She did not specifically mention the United States, but her message was clear. As Trump alienates his Western allies, and the United Kingdom begins its departure from the EU, China has been quietly reaching out to Western nations. Both Beijing and Brussels hope to move ahead with economic globalisation, and during the annual EU-China Summit held in Brussels on June 1–2, the two sides forged a new green alliance to combat global warming, a clear nose thumbing at Trump. With the EU and the United States increasingly divided, this moment may mark the beginning of a new China-EU axis in global politics. A MONETARY AXIS? One of the areas in which China and the EU have developed strong ties is in the monetary field. Beijing has traditionally supported the euro, which is the only serious alternative to the dollar, and has diversified its foreign

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exchange reserves—the world’s largest—so that it now holds over onethird in euros and just slightly more than half in dollars, a decrease of around 30% since 1999, when the European common currency came into circulation. What this means is that in the last several years, Beijing has swapped dollars for euros, a trend that is likely to continue in future. China’s diversification of its foreign reserves has accelerated since August 2011, after Standard and Poor’s downgraded the credit ratings of the U.S. federal government from AAA (outstanding) to AA+ (excellent). Sino-European financial and monetary links deepened as a result, because China began divesting away from dollar-denominated assets and purchased growing quantities of eurozone bonds, in particular German Bunds, which were perceived to be safer than U.S. Treasuries. This has come at the expense of the United States, which has had to raise the yields on its securities to attract investors. Moreover, China’s diversification strategy signals that the dollar is no longer the world’s only reserve currency, and this is important to Beijing, which is trying to internationalize its currency as it weans itself off of its dependency on the United States’ economic cycle and monetary policy. The reserve status of the dollar means that the world needs greenbacks for making payments, and this has allowed the U.S. government as well as Americans to borrow at lower costs. The fact that China supports the European common currency at the expense of the dollar has thus major geostrategic implications. Europe has, in turn, supported many of China’s monetary ambitions. The Europeans unanimously backed the decision by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in December 2015 to include the renminbi in the basket of currencies making up the Special

Drawing Right (SDR), an international reserve currency that includes the U.S. dollar, the euro, the British pound, and the Japanese yen. The decision was clearly political. The EU wanted to send a friendly message to China, the world’s second-largest economy, as well as to recognize what Beijing had done to support the euro during the euro crisis of 2009– 11, when the European common currency became the target of speculative attacks mainly stemming from Wall Street–based banks and hedge funds. At the time, Chinese leaders intervened on various occasions to reassure the financial markets by buying eurozone bonds. Europe’s decision to support the renminbi’s inclusion in the IMF’s currency basket was also taken in defiance of Washington, which had argued for years that the Chinese currency should be included in the SDR only if China opened its capital account, meaning it would allow companies, individuals, and banks to move money without overbearing rules and government approvals; let its currency float freely; and loosened government control over its central bank. None of this has happened. But Europe believed that including the renminbi would encourage China to liberalize its capital account further. Today, the old continent is home to the largest number of renminbi bank clearings or offshore hubs where the Chinese currency can be traded. The fact that offshore renminbi hubs have also emerged in Budapest, Frankfurt, Luxembourg City, Madrid, Milan, Paris, and Prague indicates Europe’s willingness to promote the use of the Chinese currency. In the same vein, most of Europe’s central banks have accepted—or are considering accepting—China’s currency as a viable reserve. Although London is currently the most important offshore market for renminbi trading, once the

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EU-CHINA UPDATE United Kingdom leaves EU, significant shares of renminbi trading in London will most likely move to the continent, in places such as Paris, Frankfurt, and Luxembourg, thus strengthening the China-EU monetary axis even more. TRADE AND THE PROBLEM WITH RECIPROCITY When it comes to trade, relations between China and the EU have been more rocky, although Trump’s derision of global trade certainly provides an opening. Between 2002 and 2016, total EU-China trade has risen dramatically, from 125 billion euros to roughly 515 billion euros. Today, China and the EU trade more than 1.5 billion euros in goods each day, and total bilateral trade in 2016 was 514.6 billion euros according to the European Commission—nearly equivalent to what China exchanges with the United States. In fact, the EU is now China’s most important trading partner, although China ranks number two for the EU, after the United States. In addition to buoyant commercial relations, Beijing is trying to charm Europe through investments. Europe is now the top destination for Chinese foreign investments, surpassing the United States. According to the China Global Investment Tracker, a joint project of the American Enterprise Institute and the Heritage Foundation, China invested nearly $164 billion in Europe between 2005 and 2016. During that same period, it invested $103 billion in the United States. That said, the European Parliament and a number of EU member states have increased their criticisms of China’s lack of reciprocity. China restricts foreign investment in its domestic market for almost all sectors, with limited openings in banking and finance. European businesses consistently face difficulties in entering the market, while Chinese companies often receive help from the government, through subsidies or simpler procedures, for example. Big government contracts are routinely awarded to Chinese companies. Foreign companies, meanwhile, particularly those

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with recognised brands and technologically advanced products, are required to share their expertise before they are allowed into the market at all. This has triggered a debate about the growing imbalances between Europe and China. In February, France, Germany, and Italy asked the European Commission to rethink the rules on foreign investment in the European Union. It was a message to Beijing about opening up access to its markets, at the time when the two sides are negotiating a bilateral investment treaty, which is meant to address the question of reciprocity. Progress on the treaty has stalled, however, owing to China’s reluctance to remove nontariff barriers in a range of sectors that are of interest to European businesses. Furthermore, the EU is unwilling to grant market economy status to China. Should they reach an agreement on these issues, however, there would be a significant boost to Sino-European trade and investment at the expense of other important players, most notably the United States, which would likely receive less inbound investments from China. At the EU-China Summit, leaders of the two sides failed to deliver a final joint communiqué because of a disagreement over reducing global steel production. China’s annual steel output is almost double the EU’s, and the European Commission maintains that Chinese steel exports are damaging Europe’s steel sector by putting tens of thousands of jobs at risk. Consequently, the EU denied China’s request to be granted market economy status, which also strained relations at the summit. INCREASED TION

SECURITY

COOPERA-

Still, as the summit revealed, there are a number of issues on which China and the EU agreed. Both pledged to continue efforts to reduce pollution and combat rising sea levels even without the United States. Donald Tusk, the president of the European Council, made clear that “the

decision by the United States to leave the Paris agreement is a big mistake,” adding that “the fight against climate change, and all the research, innovation, and technological progress it will bring, will continue.” China and the EU agreed to cut back on fossil fuels, develop more green technology, and raise funds to help poorer countries, particularly in Africa, cut their emissions. The two sides also discussed the problem of a belligerent North Korea, advocating for a peaceful resolution through increased dialogue at the multilateral level. The statement was in direct contrast to Trump, who has responded to Pyongyang’s recent missile launches with belligerence, an attitude that both Brussels and Beijing saw as troubling for regional peace. Shared opposition to Trump’s diplomatic style first surfaced at the last China-EU Strategic Dialogue, which was held in Beijing on April 19, when the two sides agreed on a common vision of international affairs and global governance, with the United Nations at the center. It is clear that the relations between the EU and China will continue to strengthen as their concerns with Trump’s unilateral attitude toward global issues grow. Under such circumstances, it is likely that the EU and China will foster ties on security and defense as well. The EU and China already work together on conflict prevention, crisis management, and postconflict stabilization. EU NAVFOR, the EU-led antipiracy operation off the coast of Somalia, has already tested naval cooperation between some EU member states and China. Peacekeepers from both China and EU member states operate under the UN flag in Lebanon as well as in other UN-EU operations, such as Congo, Mali, and South Sudan. Future China-EU security cooperation might involve China’s participation in the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy or peacekeeping missions, particularly in African territories and seas, as well as targeted joint military activities, such as counter-

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EU-CHINA UPDATE piracy drills and humanitarian rescue exercises and operations. Moreover, Brexit will facilitate the establishment of a structured dialogue mechanism between the EU Military Committee and the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, including the appointment of a defense and security adviser to the EU Delegation in Beijing. London consistently opposed the creation of such a position for fear that this move would send the wrong message to Washington and undermine their special relationship. That is because the United Kingdom has always wanted the EU to remain a trading bloc and has traditionally refused to give EU institutions the powers and capabilities necessary to transform the union into a global power. For decades, the United Kingdom rallied for Europe to stay firmly embedded within the Western alliance, a task made easy by Wash-

ington’s commitment to its European partners. Today, this configuration is fading away, with London leaving the EU and Trump alienating his Western allies. This will make it easier for Brussels to further ties with China on a whole range of issues that have the potential to challenge the United States’ global primacy. Make no mistake, however. A ChinaEU alliance would be more a marriage of convenience than a solid partnership—one that is facilitated by Brexit and that revolves around a shared antagonism for Trump. We must wait and see whether the new dynamics within both the United Kingdom and the United States transform this axis into a more permanent one as new possibilities for China-EU relations open up, unthinkable only a few months ago.

Arvind Sinha - CEO

Business Advisors Group, Mumbai arpsinha09@gmail.com lionasinha@gmail.com

NEWS Wearit Group Acquires Century Yarn And Denim Textile Units Wearit Group buys Birla Century Yarn and Century Denim Textile units at a paltry sum of just Rs 2.51 crores ($0.3million). In a disclosure under regulations 30 of Securities and Exchange Board of India, Century Yarn and Century Denim units of textile business segment, under B K Birla Group of Companies, the board of directors approved the sale with a lump sum consideration of Rs 2.51

crores. The company had a turnover of Rs 253 crores ($38.92 million) in the financial year ending March 31, 2017. The net worth of these companies was disclosed at 25.52 crores ($3.92million). The rationale for the sale as disclosed was, since operations of Century Yarn and Century Denim were not viable due to their small sizes, it

was considered appropriate to sell the units. Sources close to the directors revealed the unit had an asset base of over Rs 300 crores in Madhya Pradesh, including land and machinery but were making losses to the tune of Rs 3 crores ($4 .6million) every month.

Aspen Fashion Organises Retailers Conference And Fabric Show In Mumbai Aspen Fashion organised a retailer’s conference and fabric show on July10-12 at Westin Hotel in Mumbai. Dealers and retailers from Mumbai and the other parts of Maharashtra participated in the conference. The whole innovative range newly developed fabrics according to the requirement of the coming winter season was displayed

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in the conference. T R, velvet, print and zakard were the main fabrics that were displayed. They received a good response and heavy bookings were recorded. Aspen fashion is quite advanced on ethnic level in the fashion industry. They deal in suiting fabrics of high quality from India and China. Their fabrics are sold in almost 300 high profile retail shops in the country.

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SUSTAINABLE FIBRES

Clothing Made From Pinapple Fibre Many health conscious people love to have Pineapple as their favorite dessert because of many health benefits of the delicious fruit. It protects from a simple flu as well as fights off free radicals that cause cancer. It cleans the internal system to keep our body healthy through fibers that help in proper digestion. That’s not all, it’s not the only kind of fiber that a pineapple carries. Pineapple leaves are used to obtain Piña, a textile fiber that is used to make fabrics. As such, we are able not only to keep our internal system clean but also to achieve an outer elegant appearance. Piña is a pineapple fiber made from the leaves of a pineapple plant and is commonly used in the Philippines. It is sometimes combined with silk or polyester to create a textile fabric. Piña’s name comes from the Spanish word piña which literally means pineapple Pineapple is mainly grown in subtropic countries including Philippines, Taiwan, Brazil, Hawaii, India, Indonesia and the West Indies. However the credit for making textile fibers from pineapple leaves go to the Philippines. Pina weaving is an age old tradition dating back to Hispanic times. Pina clothes were said to have reached Greece and African countries many centuries ago. During 19th century, pina fabric was much in demand, not only in Philippines but worldwide. However, when the much cheaper cotton fabrics became popular, its production ceased and Pina fabric almost disappeared. Till the mid eighties of 20th century, pina fiber was nearly impossible to find with only a handful of aging, part time weavers working for its survival. In fact, Pina has been revived in the recent past two decades only. Great efforts were made for the reviv-

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al of this age old tradition and for reestablishing the pina trade. It started with marketing of pina barong [embroidered traditional garment of Philippines] locally which eventually got popular with the elite. Traditional pina weaving has survived in spite of all odds and production has since begun to flourish. Now once again, pina fiber is globally popular and Pina cloth from the Philippines are being exported to various parts of the world, particularly to North America and Europe. Kalibo, Aklan is the main and the oldest manufacturer/weaver of Piña cloth in the Philippines which are being exported to various parts of the world most particularly North America, and Europe. Piña weaving is an age-old tradition which was recently revived in the past 20 years. History records suggest that Kalibo’s Piña cloth was traded during the PreHispanic times and reached as far as Greece and Egypt during its heyday. Kalibo is also known for other native products such as handbags made of buri leaves which is a favorite for Caucasian females visiting the town. Pineapple silk is considered the queen of Philippine fabrics and is considered the fabric of choice of the Philippine elite. During the 1996 edition of APEC in the Philippines, world leaders donned a Pineapple silk Barong Tagalog from Kalibo during the traditional group photo. PRODUCTION OF PINAPPLE FIBRE Since piña is from a leaf, the leaf has be cut first from the plant. Then the fiber is pulled or split away from the leaf. Most leaf fibers are long and somewhat stiff. Each strand of the Piña fiber is hand scraped and is knotted one by one to form a continuous

filament to be handwoven and then made into a Piña cloth. Fibre from Pineapple leaves for long has been used by Philippine handicraft artisans to produce cloth. Pineapple fibre is considered to be more delicate in texture than any other vegetal fibre. A kilo of leaves may provide up to 15-18 pieces of white, creamy and lustrous as silk fibre about 60 cm long and it easily retains dyes. It is a painstaking process and involves up to 30 people from the beginning to the end of the process. Fibres of the leaf are scrapped by means of a broken plate or coconut shell and a fast scraper can extract fibre from over 500 leaves per day after which the fibres are washed and dried in the open air. After which they are waxed to remove the entanglements and then the fibres are knotted and bind into yarns for the next process of weaving it in to fabric. Pineapple fabrics are mainly used for creating Barong Tagalog and other formal wear. It is also used for other products where a lightweight, but stiff and sheer fabric is needed. It is sometimes combined with silk or polyester to create a textile fabric. The end fabric is lightweight, easy to care for and has an elegant appearance similar to linen. Pineapple silk is considered the queen of Philippine fabrics and is considered the fabric of choice of the Philippine elite Piña weaving is an age-old tradition which was recently revived in the past two decades and has a lineage going to Hispanic times. Piña cloth was said to have reached Greece and African countries many centuries ago. The pina fibers are extracted from the pineapple leaves by hand scraping,

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SUSTAINABLE FIBRES decortication or retting. While hand scraping, leaves are stripped by pulling or scraping the fiber away with tools such as porcelain plate, coconut shell, plastic comb and seashells. It is a tedious, time consuming and labor intensive process. The more refined processes include decortication that uses a motorized machine with blades to scrape off the pulp in order to separate the fiber. In retting, the pineapple leaves are immersed in water for some time to soften the plant gums. After extraction and subsequent drying in the open air, the fibers are waxed to remove any entanglements and then they are knotted and bind into yarns for weaving into fabric. The fibers are hand spun into ivory-white colored and naturally glossy fabric. As the fiber is fine and breaks easily, working with piña is really slow and tedious. One can see the workers constantly knotting the broken threads. However, all these efforts go to produce lightweight, soft, shinning, transparent and somewhat stiff fabric that can be termed as a royal exotic fabric. Sometimes, pina is used to make blended fabrics by combining it with silk fiber or polyester fiber. The resultant fabric is lightweight, easy to care for and has an elegant appearance similar to linen fabrics. Pineapple silk is, in fact, considered the queen of Philippine fabrics. PROPERTIES OF PINAPPLE FIBRE The piña fiber is softer, and has a high luster, and is usually white or ivory in color. The end fabric is lightweight, easy to care for and has an elegant appearance similar to linen. Pineapple fibers are an ivory-white color and naturally glossy. This delicate and dreamy cloth is translucent, soft and fine with a high luster. Pineapple fibre is obtained from the large leaves of the pineapple plant grown in tropical countries . This natural fibre is white and especially soft and lustrous . It is woven into pine cloth in phillipines islands which is soft, durable and resistant to moisture. This is also used in making

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coarse grass cloth and for mats, bags and clothing. The leaves need retting ,which is controlled rolling by soaking in water and allowing bacteria to attack the leaves . The fibres are then separated mechanically by scutching ( beating ).The fibres are bundles of many overlapping cellulosic cells and are much , stiffer and longer than cotton. The cells adhere by means of lignin cements. As the pineapple leaf fiber fabric or the pina fabric is lightweight but stiff, this sheer fabric can be used in any creative design. These fabrics, apart from environmental friendly, have many other qualities. • They have beautiful elegant appearance with natural shine, similar to that of linen. • They are lightweight. • They blend very efficiently with other fibers. • They are very soft, even softer than hemp. • They have better texture than silk. • They can be washed and don’t need to be dry cleaned. As the making process of piña fabric is tedious, time consuming and labor intensive, it becomes quiet expensive. However, when worn, one can feel the luxury of this exotic fabric and then its price becomes immaterial. In fact, a garment of piña fabric is categorised as an heirloom garment. Pineapple ,being a leaf fibre and due to its long length it was used in worsted spinning . pineapple fibre was brought from south India . It was blended with polyester tops in the ratio of polyester/pineapple 80/20. Please note that the yarn was made then fabric was also made for suiting purposes.The feel and look was very good. Pina fiber is often blended with cotton, abaca, and silk to create wonderful light, breezy fabrics. When woven with silk, it’s called piña seda or piña-silk. Piña jusi is blended with jusi (abaca or silk) for strength and sheerness and is less expensive than 100% piña . Raw pineapple leaf fibres are coarse and harsh, and are normally used for preparation of

fancy articles, such as mats, handbags, brushes etc. A study was conducted to develop yarns and fabrics from cotton-pineapple fibre blends for textile applications. Pineapple leaf fiber (PALF) which is rich in cellulose, relatively inexpensive, and abundantly available has the potential for polymer reinforcement. Bleaching of pineapple fibre is done by Hydrogen peroxide at boil . As per requirement pineapple fibre is dyed using ME dyes at 60 deg c or HE dyes at 80 deg c. Where high fastness is required in that case vat dyes are used. Spinning of pineapple fibres on worsted system. It was carried out as follows. 1. Blender 2. Carding. 3. Combing. 4. Mixing With Polyester Tops/Wool Tops./Viscose Tops. 5. Recombing. 6. Gilling 7. Roving. 8. Ring Frame With this idea the synthetic p/v spinning mills R and D dept should start working on using pineapple fibres in synthetc / cotton spinning system. It will become a value added item . It will have good export potential. USES OF PINEAPPLE FIBRES – Pineapple fibers, primarily used in hand weaving are divided into two groups- the linuan or fine fibers and bastos or coarse fibers. Red Spanish or native variety of piña is mainly used for hand weaving to make valuable items such as traditional Barong Tagalog, wedding attire for men, and blouses for women , kimonos, panuelos, handkerchiefs, table linen, mats, fans, gowns, and other clothing. The smooth Cayenne or Formosa varieties are primarily used in development of Philippine Tropical Fabrics. A major use for piña fabric is in the creation of the Barong Tagalog and other formal wear that is common

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SUSTAINABLE FIBRES in the Philippines. It is also used for other table linens, bags, mats and other clothing items, or anytime that a lightweight, but stiff and sheer fabric is needed. The pina fabric is decorated by a traditional style of hand embroidery called calado. An embroidered piña garment is known as piña calado. These handwoven fabrics are dyed with vegetable dyes obtained from leaves and bark of various trees. Pina fiber is often blended with cotton,

abaca, and silk to make amazing light and breezy fabrics. When woven with silk, it is known as pina seda or pinasilk. Pina jusi is a blend of abaca or silk for strength and sheerness and is less expensive than 100% pina. NOTE – The author is the first person to bleach and dye pineapple fibres using vat dyes in three shades like black ,coffee, and navy. Then it was blended with polyester fibre in 80/20 ratio .Safari suit fabric was made at Jayashree Textiles ,Rishra ,Hooghly.

Dr N.N.Mahapatra

President COLORANT LTD

NEWS

NITRA Introduces Smoothness Tester For Fabric And Sheeting Materials (Patent application no. 2053/DEL/2015 dated 07.07.2015)

• NITRA has invented innovative instrument to accurately measure smoothness property of all types of fabrics and sheeting materials – long standing demand of the Textile Industry • With this instrument the smoothness properties can be quantified/ graded which otherwise was carried out by subjective evaluation. • The instrument will help finishers to modify their finishing process as per the smoothness requirement of the buyers. • It will help the industry to precisely evaluate different kind of finishes,

which they use in their day-to-day operations to alter fabric surface. • Fabric evaluation form an important consumer perspective i.e. fabric feel can be now objectively evaluated

evaluation system and FTT fabric touch tester, which are very expensive.

Two versions of instruments are developed as per the need of customers. ƒ The first version is available for those customers who are having RH and temperature controlling facility in their laboratory. ƒ In the second version, facility of controlling temperature and RH inside the chamber is provided. ƒ The alternative for measuring smoothness is using Kawabata

Vijay Textiles Limited Net Profit Jumps 245% In Q1FY 2018 Result Highlights – Q1FY2018: ƒ Net Profit (PAT) jumps 245% to Rs. 1.72 Cr in Q1FY18 as against Rs. 0.49 crore in Q1FY17 ƒ Total Revenue rose by 66.54% amounting to Rs 40.94 crore in Q1FY18 compared to Rs.24.58 crore in Q1FY17 Vijay Textiles Limited, a leading fabric manufacturing company reported a jump of 245 % in Net Profit to Rs 1.72 crore as against Rs 0.49 crore in Q1FY17. Total Revenue for Q1FY18 rose by 66.54 % to Rs 40.94 crore as against Rs 24.58 crore in the same period of last year.

and Managing Director of the company said: “We are seeing an enhanced demand across segments and geographies. We expect the momentum to continue on account of new product launches and better orders for organised players like us on account of GST implementation”

Commenting on the result, Vijay Kumar Gupta, Chairman

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August 2017


SUSTAINABLE FIBRES

New Spinnable Banana Fiber Abstract

source in textile process.

Banana plant not only gives the delicious fruit but it also provides textile fiber, the banana fiber. It grows easily as it sets out young shoots and is most commonly found in hot tropical climates. All varieties of banana plants have fibers in abundance. These fibers are obtained after the fruit is harvested and fall in the group of bast fibers. In banana plantations, after the fruits are harvested, the trunks or stems will be wasted. Billion tons of stems and leaves are thrown away annually. Such waste provides obtainable sources of fibers, which leads to the reduction of other natural and synthetic fibers’ production that requires extra energy, fertilizer, and chemical. The properties of banana fiber are good absorbent, highly breathable, quickly dry with high tensile strength. This research is to develop banana fiber from the plant that is available locally throughout the country of Bangladesh but rarely used as fiber source in textile industry. The focus of the study is to optimize the fiber producing processes of in an environmental friendly manner and decrease chemicals and toxic agents incurred. The findings were 25-30% yield for fiber collection and the mechanical process (fresh method) is an appropriate method of fiber extraction. The yarn spinning and knitting were experimented but the results have not been satisfied, yet. Further study should be developed. As banana fiber can provide a wide variety of uses in textile and paper industry, the study, the application of this locally and widely grown plant species for the sustainable development would be beneficial.

Information about Banana

Introduction

to neglect traditional fiber harvesting process and turn to synthetic fibers and chemicals to achieve production capability, including expensive imported fibers and yarns purchased from foreign traders, whereas the local cheap material available in their hometown is ignored. The significances of this study is using left-over banana trunk as raw material in environmental-friendly manner to optimize natural fiber processes and decrease chemical and toxic agents in the process. As the material is available locally, villagers are not necessary to purchase or grow new plant and using extra chemicals, fertilizers, or pesticides. Utilizing banana fibers will promote sustainable development in the community, since villagers will be able to produce this fiber in their household.

After the industrial revolution, synthetic component and chemistry have been developed to increase efficiency to fulfill the needs in textile production. It became one of many industries highly affecting on the environment, especially water and soil pollution. Textile production processes release some chemicals that contaminate water and soils resources, including fume emission. Cultivation of natural fiber, including fibers from plants and animals, requires the use of hazardous pesticide and chemical fertilizers to control and increase the quality. Textile production processes are now shaping toward the concept of environmental-friendly and sustainable development. These ideas are not very new in textile industry. The progresses have been improving ranges of natural and environmental (eco)-friendly textile processes. Many efforts have been made in sciences and technology to develop environmental-friendly process to sustain relationship with the ecosystem. However, alternative materials should be considered. This research proposes an option of natural fiber, byproduct from banana fruit cultivation, by suggesting a use of left over banana trunk as fiber

August 2017

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Banana is a tropical herbaceous plant consisting of an underground corm and a trunk (pseudo stem) comprised of concentric layers of leaf sheaths. At 10 to 15 months after the emergence of a new plant, its true stem rapidly grows up through the center and emerges as a terminal inflorescence which bears fruit. After banana fruits are harvested, their trunk will be wasted. Three trillion banana trees were thrown away every year. Hence, it will be highly advantageous to investigate the potential of this locally grown plant as fiber source. Textile production has been developing to increase efficiency to serve consumer’s needs. As the convenience increases, villagers tend

Development of Using Banana Fiber and Other Natural Fibers The research and development in utilizing banana fiber have not been generally conducted. Currently, there are only a few developments trying to fully utilize natural fibers, including banana fibers and its parts. In Australia, the researcher has developed paper technology

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SUSTAINABLE FIBRES by using banana trunk as raw material and cross-plying technique (papyrus paper technique) to produce banana paper. Banana paper is much stronger than regular paper. They use it for cement bags (25 kilograms weight) and other heavy duty bags. Since the tenacity of banana fiber is very high, therefore some automobile companies use it to reinforce the body of the vehicle. The European Union’s legislation forced producers to increase their products’ recyclability and bio degradability. Efforts have been made in the environmental conscious to avoid high disposable cost according to the legislation. Since natural fibers such as coconut, banana, is 100% biodegradable, there is no significant energy costs associated with processing waste and recycling because the waste fibers are wither fed back into the processing cycle. Coconut fiber is employed for headrest and car seat. Consequently, using natural fiber products provides value in projecting a positive public image. Scholars have explored banana fibers in composite material. Cellulosic fibers, such as banana fiber, are used to decrease cost as filler in plastic industry (composite material). The composite with high tensile strength can be obtained using banana combined with glass fiber in the fabric form. The strength impact of the composites increases with the number of layers and fiber volume fraction. Table 1 Banana fiber properties Fiber Properties

Value

Tenacity

29.98 g/denier

Fineness

17.15 Denier

Moisture Regain

13.00 %

Elongation

6.54

Alco-ben Extractives

1.70 %

Total Cellulose

81.80 %

Alpha Cellulose

61.50 %

Residual Gum

41.90 %

Lignin 15.0% The data is compiled of information from: (1) Fiber Properties. Philippines Textile Research Institute (2005), (2) Thailand Textile Institute (2008), and this research experiment. Banana Fiber Collection Process In banana plantations, after the fruits are harvested, the trunks or stems will be discarded. These wastes provide obtainable sources of fibers, which leads to the reduction of other natural and synthetic fibers’ production that requires extra energy, fertilizer, and chemical. The properties of banana fiber are good absorbent, highly breathable, quickly dry with high tensile strength.

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Table 2. Banana fiber yield test. Fiber collection

Yield (%)

Fibers (used for spun yarn).

25-30

Short-length fibers (used for ba- 25-30 nana paper pulp). Sap (used for banana sap print- 35-40 ing. Unused waste for mulch and 10-15 fertilizer. Comparison of Fiber Collection Methods Natural fiber extraction processes could be employed in different procedures, including mechanical (extracting when the trunk is green and fresh), biological (extracting after banana trunk was fermented), and chemical methods. Different techniques offered advantages and difficulties according to the quality and amount of fibers obtained. The research explored only mechanical and biological methods. The chemical extraction method was not experimented because the ultimate goal of the whole research is to eliminate the unnecessary use of chemical in the process. Although both mechanical and biological methods provided similar yields, the results showed that fibers collected from biological method are darker than mechanical methods. The darker color is more difficult during dyeing and finishing process. In this research, the mechanical was employed because of the fiber’s quality achieved. Yarn Spinning Development After fiber is collected, the process goes to yarn spinning. The researcher investigated the traditional process, which use the filament yarns in weaving banana fabric. The finding showed that the convention process was very time-consuming, thus not appropriate for today’s use. Therefore, this research explored open-ended spinning process for yarn development. The fiber was cut in to 3-centimeter length for spinning process. CONCLUSIONS The findings from this research presented 25-30% yield from mechanical process. For a comparison of fiber extraction, the mechanical extraction should be employed. The mechanical process was appropriate for fiber collection since the color of fibers is lighter than biological process. The yarn spinning and knitting were experimented. The results were not satisfied, yet. The improvement of fabric hand feel and yarn quality should be developed. The research presents sustainable use of alternative materials, banana fibers, and suggests applications that reflect concerns for the environment. The environmental benefits of utilizing left-over products have offered options instead of using new fibers, where it could increase the demand of new natural material and high energy consumption. It also promotes awareness of environmental

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August 2017


SUSTAINABLE FIBRES issue on excessive chemical in textile industry from using synthetic and petroleum-based fibers. As the environment changes rapidly, textile industry has also investigated alternatives that express cares for the natural resources and the future of the environment with less effect on ecosystem. Therefore, the awareness of environmental issues through the use of eco-friendly material that is locally available and easily renewable, is one of necessary responses to the development in textile processes. REFERENCES [1] Japan Echo Inc. 2005. Banana Stem Become Denim-like Cloth. Domestic Japanese News Source. 1-6. DOI= http://web-japan. org/trends/science/sci040105.html

[9] Saleeby, Murab M. Abaca (Manila Hemp) in the Philippines (Musa Textilis). Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1919. 1-15. [10] Silayoy, B. 2008. Banana. Thai Encyclopedia for Youth. Dansutha: Bangkok. [11] Anonymous. The Many Uses of Musa. 2003. International Network for the Improvement of Banana and Plantain. INIBAP. October.

A.K.M Nayab-Ul-Hossain Lecturer, Department of Textile Engineering Khulna University of Engineering and Technology

[2] Lu, P., Woo, K.C., Liu, Z.T. 2002. Estimation of Whole- Plant Transpiration of Bananas Using Sap Flow Measurements. Journal of Experimental Botany. 53:375, 1771-1779. [3] Anonymous. 2007. Kijoka Banana Fiber Cloth. Kijoka Banana Fiber Cloth Association. Cooperative. Union. 1-7. [4] Johnston, T. 2003. Banana Paper. The Buzz. Transform Australia. 1-4 DOI=http://ingentaconnection.com/content/oup/ exbotj/2002/00000053/00000375/art01771Banana Paper [5] K. Jankeaw, U. Bupachat, V. Simachaya, Environment Issues in Pollution, Thailand Ministry of Education:Bangkok, 35-36, 1992.

Salma Katun Sela Asst. Manager, Wet Processing Laboratory Thermax Woven Dyeing Limited. Thermax Group.

[6] P. Rodphothong, U. Paradee (Pitimaneeyakul), Dyes and Environment. Proceedings of the Environmental Engineering Association of Thailand, Pitsanulok, Thailand, March 7-9, 2007. [7] K. Morimoto, Natural Dyes, Appropriate Technology Association: Bangkok, 2-11, 1985. [8] PTRI. 2005. Banana. Development of the Technology on Processing Banana Fibers as and Investment Opportunity. Indigenous Fibers for Textile Application. Textile Development. 4 (2005). Philippines Textile Research Institute.

Pro.Dr. Md. AbdusShahid

Department of Textile Engineering Dhaka University of Engineering and Technology

Advt.

August 2017

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BRAND UPDATE

Influence Of The Mechanical Harvesting Method On Ring And Rotor Yarn Up To The End Product also to be expected. Also decisive here is, however, how great the influence is of the two yarn structures, ring and rotor (Fig.3).

In a joint cooperation between the Cotton Institute of South Africa and Rieter, the two commonly used methods of mechanical cotton harvesting were compared with each other. The comprehensive test and its results are available in a special print. Here are a few interesting extracts from the project. Cotton is still the dominant staple fibre. In Africa 1.4 million tons of cotton were produced 2013. That corresponds to about 5 % of global production. In South Africa, approx. 9 000 tons of cotton are harvested annually. Test conditions Two different methods of cotton harvesting were each examined at two different farmers. The comparison was carried out through to the knitted fabric, whereby carded ring and rotor yarns with various counts were spun. Not only the yarns and knitted fabrics were tested but also interim products, to be able to better interpret the effects on the yarn and the knits. Mechanical harvesting methods Today there are two common mechanical methods for harvesting cotton – the spindle method and the stripper method.

Yarn quality The quality criteria of the ring yarn shows that the spindle method gives somewhat better yarn results than the stripper method. With rotor yarn, no evident differences between the two harvesting methods are detectable. Knitted Fabric Comparisons The knitted fabrics made of rotor yarn have a far better evenness than those made of ring yarn. This means that the influence of the end spinning system on the knitted fabric quality is far higher than the influence of the harvesting method. Nevertheless, the positive influence of the spindle method, at least with one farmer, is recognisable even in knitted fabric made of rotor yarn. Comprehensive information in the special print The special print includes the complete, comprehensive data and detailed explanations and background information. It can be ordered under rieter-link@rieter.com. Electronically, the special print can be downloaded with the given QR code.

They differ in productivity and quality. The stripper method has many advantages – lower investment costs, lower fuel consumption and higher harvest yields, which, however, can increase the proportion of immature fibres. Also known is that the cotton harvested with the stripper picker exhibits a higher seed coat content. Fibre length The fibre length, in particular short fibre ratio and mean fibre length, have a strong influence on the yarn unevenness. Across the process line, a mean staple 1 to 2 mm longer is seen with the spindle method compared to the stripper method. Thus, as far as evenness is concerned, a positive result in the yarn and in the knitted fabric is

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August 2017


BRAND UPDATE

Spykar Captures The Young And Restless Festive Spirit With Panache – #Fastmeetsfestive The brand’s latest digital film shows us how the young and restless festive spirit is best embodied through what the youth believe in, what they do, and what they stand for Spykar India’s leading denim wear brand hit the young and restless market in Kolkata for the upcoming festive season, with a refreshing new ad film. At the onset of Kolkata’s biggest festival of the year, Durga Puja – Spykar announced its brand campaign named #FASTMEETSFESTIVE specially targeting the millennial of the city. With a 25 year legacy in denim, Spykar truly defines the rules of thegame. The montage film by Brand movers India the digital agency for Spykar brings together four talented and influential faces in Kolkata - Suyasha Sengupta, a singer and musician, Chitrangada Chakraborty an actor and

August 2017

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photographer, Sambit Chatterjee a drummer and musician, and Ayushman Mitra, an artist and entrepreneur doing what they do best in their own spheres. Underlined by an edgy soundtrack, the film follows the path of these four youngsters in various corners of Kolkata as they play their music, paint their canvas, and capture poignant moments. Filled with colours, the film goes to the very core of the festive restlessness that they create by being entirely themselves. They wear their hearts on their sleeves and the trendy Autumn-Winter collection by Spykar with panache. The collection fills a void for outdoor enthusiasts and

speaks loud and clear that freedom is bold and adventurous just as the millennial of the country. Sharing his views on the film, Mr. Sanjay Vakharia, COO of Spykar, said“We see our brand as truly young and restless which is why we wanted to associate with these four young influencers and make them our brand ambassadors. They are not only talented but also fierce, edgy, fun and of course constantly restless and hungry to create something unique with their vision. Our clothes symbolise the same spirit and they look great in them!” Suvajyoti Ghosh, Co-Founder and Managing Director at Brandmovers India, said “Spykar is an exuberant and youthful brand and we wanted to create a film for the festive season that would stand out. These four faces are unique and fresh and doing really well for themselves - we tried to capture them in their real habitats and bring out the essence of the young and restless brand”

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EVENT UPDATE

4th Edition Of Heimtextil India And Ambiente India Show Strong Trade Potential

Even as Delhi witnessed unexpected rains this June, it was raining orders inside Pragati Maidan as Heimtextil India and Ambiente India marked the start of the pre-festive retail season in India. Highly regarded for its trade potential, India’s leading home fashion trade fair duo closed its doors welcoming 198 exhibitors and attracting 7,457 visitors. Business comes first – be it for new brands or well-established industry players both of whom managed to acquire new leads. Ajay Arora, Managing Director, D’decor shared, “Increased customer walk-ins and over 130 new inquires – for D’decor, this edition has been even better. We truly believe in the business effectiveness of the platform and will continue to support it.” Surenthar Kumar, Dy. General Manager-Sales and Marketing, Shri Laxmi Cotsyn Ltd said, “This show strongly caters to the domestic market but also provides an international connect. We have received a great response from international buyers from countries such as Kenya, South Africa and Japan. The enquiries and the communication between us and the buyers have been very clear, which is important for us.”Ambiente India Exhibitor, Ahmad Arsalan, Director, Ahmad Gift Exports who was also very happy with the quality and internationality of the visitors said, “This has been our first time at Ambiente India and we are overwhelmed with the kind of visitor response we have received. We have got a lot of enquiries from different industries such as hotels, designers as well as international buyers from Thailand, Germany among others.”

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Buyer-Seller Meets: Setting the tone of business One-on-one buyer-seller meetings set the tone of business networking at Heimtextil India and Ambiente India 2017 right from day one. A dedicated day for Hospitality and Retail procurement brought together purchase managers and retailers from across the country and together with the business match-making programme, many exhibitors confirmed to have closed orders through the pre-arranged buyer-seller meet format. As part of the match-making programme, Dinesh Keshwani, Purchase Manager at Krishna Décor said: “As a platform Heimtextil India and Ambiente India 2017 proved to be beneficial to me for having meetings and discussing my requirements directly with manufacturers. We will be placing orders for the season with two of the exhibitors I met, KC Fabrics and Styler. I also visited the ‘Exploration Zone’ where designers have displayed their innovative concepts and the experience was quite different, nothing of which I have ever come across. I am definitely looking forward to the next edition.” Buyers, mainly from the hospitality and retail segments were satisfied that some of their immediate requirements got catered to through the direct interactions with exhibitors. Among the delegation was also Ms Dipti Pandey, Deputy Merchandiser-Home Stop, Shoppers Stop who shared: “We managed to meet new vendors which we were trying to search and couldn’t get connected and we finally found them here. It is

a great platform for networking and building contacts. Overall it was a good experience and we look forward to visit the fair next year.” Not limited to product sourcing, Heimtextil India and Ambiente India also hosted several features inspiring new design visions. Cushion Kari: Depicting the Indian textile story India’s designs and thread work reflect a piece of its history - be it the fabric, or the crafts used. CushionKari captured this story of the Fabrics and Embroideries of India. Unveiled at the hands of Hon’ble Minister of Textiles Smriti Irani, it was a one-timeopportunity for visitors in the history of home décor and textiles industry. The record-breaking installation was designed by Kanika Bawa and curated with fabrics from D’decor with a rare combination of fabrics, textiles and embroideries used. Sharing her thoughts on the the conceptualisation and making of this record-breaking installation, Limca record holder Kanika Bawa said, “CushionKari was conceptualised taking inspiration from the rich wealth of Indian mythology, heritage and finesse in craft as well as Indian stories passed on from the Vedic period woven into fabrics. Handcrafted using natural and renewable materials, it is completely eco-friendly in nature. We came across many hurdles in the process of assembling the Cushion Kari due to its massive size and uniqueness in design, however we finally managed to tailor it to perfection and achieved the impossible of creating a magnificent art piece which weighing approximately one tonne.”

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August 2017


NEWS AEPC Demands The Refund Of Igst Paid On Import Of Machinery For Use By Apparel Manufacturer Exporters AEPC has asked the Ministry of Finance for the refund of IGST paid on import of machinery used by the apparel manufacturer exporters. In a letter written to Ministry of finance, AEPC has stated that after the implementation of GST from 1st July 2017, apparel exporters are required to pay IGST up to 18% on assessable value plus BCD while clearing shipments of capital goods under EPCG. The incidence of a very high IGST without any corresponding relaxation for export obligation has rendered the EPCG scheme unattractive. In a letter written to Shri G K Pillai, Chairman of the Drawback Committee of Ministry of Finance, AEPC Chairman, Mr. Ashok G Rajanihas highlighted the anomalous situation which has emerged after the implementation of GST. The letter states that the only way for apparel exporters to claim IGST refund is through

input tax credit but apparel exporters who import capital goods normally export 100% of their products and doesn’t sell their products in the domestic market. Hence, for them the issue of utilisation of input tax credit doesn’t arise. On the contrary, domestic players who are importing capital goods are better placed as they have various opportunities to utilize input tax credit. Talking about the issue, Mr. Ashok G Rajani, Chairman Apparel Export Promotion Council said, “During pre-GST regime apparel exporters were availing benefit of EPCG scheme where exporters were allowed to import capital goods without paying any import duty. The scheme was very popular amongst apparel exporters and encouraged many of them to invest in new units or go for expansion. But after the implementation of GST, there has been no clarity on the re-

fund proceeds of IGST. The working capital requirement of the exporters have gone up drastically due to the high rate of IGST which has not only added to the cost of production but have created a glaring anomaly by making domestic operations attractive compared to exports. Therefore, we have requested the ministry to resolve the matter by taking up the matter with GST council to allow refund of IGST to exporters.” AEPC has informed the ministry that refund mechanism of input tax credit on account of IGST has become a matter of serious concern as there is no clarity on the refund process and therefore for creating a positive eco system of investment, expansion, employment and export, it is important that Government intervenes in this matter and provide assistance to the exporters.

These Fabric Speakers Could Be Woven Into Walls, Clothes And More What if the curtains in your house doubled as speakers, and sound were part of–not separate from–the interior architecture of your home? What if music itself became something tactile, another texture to add to the living room? A new project called Soft Sound from the Hungary-based art studio EJTechpromises a future where speakers are no longer hulking hardware, but are instead woven into textiles and soft fabrics. EJTech, which is made up of the Mexican artist-researcher Esteban de la Torre and the Hungarian artist-researcher Judit Eszter Kárpáti, created prototype speakers that require only a piece of fabric to play sound.

August 2017

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For each speaker they designed, the duo heat-pressed coils of conductive materials into different types of textile, effectively melding them togeth-

er. These coils act like the ones you’ll find inside more traditional speakers, vibrating on certain frequencies when a current runs through them to create sound. But the sounds the soft speakers conjure have a tactile element as

well–the fabric vibrates and shudders as the coils buzz, giving sound waves a physical manifestation. While the speaker is experimental right now–the textiles are hooked up to an amplifier that provides the current, so they can’t quite play music yet. EJTech is talking with an interior design studio that is interested in turning the soft speakers into roomdividing curtains. Music could be played through the fabric, creating a more holistic listening experience in both residential or commercial spaces. Just imagine if the walls of your cubicle could play white noise. There are also applications in wearables and in gaming devices; for instance, the textile speakers could be integrated into a vest you’d wear for virtual reality

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NEWS gaming, producing thumping and vibrations against your chest when you’re hit in the virtual world. However, EJTech isn’t concerned with any of these commercial applications for now–De la Torre and Kárpáti want to continue working out some of the challenges of the speakers. The biggest issue? They aren’t very loud yet. While they would work well in an immersive environment like an art installation, the speakers aren’t power-

ful enough for a concert. Their next big project is to build a textile synthesizer, putting multiple coils on the same piece of fabric so they can manipulate the sound waves. Perhaps soft speakers will spell the end of the chunky speakers of old, integrating more gracefully into our interior spaces and our lives. Source : www.fastcodesign.com

Government Of Telangana Signs Up For Techtextil India 2017 To Further Attracttextile Investments In To The State

Over 160 companies from 9 countries to present solutions across key applications for the Indian market With the aim to woo investors to the mega textile park in the state, Department of Handlooms and Textiles, Government of Telangana has signed up for the International Trade Fair for Technical Textiles and Nonwovens ― Techtextil India2017. Government of Telangana will be promoting textile policies and highlighting investment prospects at this trade fair in a bid to attract companies and investors to the state. Hon’ble Minister for Handloom and Textiles,Shri K.T. Rama Rao shared:“Telangana aims to strengthen the textile and apparel industries in the state.With this in mind, we have recently launched an aggressive set of incentives which are easily the best support offered by any state. Technical textile is the sunrise sector within this industry with huge opportunities of growth considering its application and demand in various segments. In order to attract this sector, the state offers additional incentives in areas such as capital support, power tariff and land price rebate over and above what is being offered to conventional textiles.” On announcing a close co-operation with Messe Frankfurt, he further added “The state is also developing Kakatiya Integrated Mega Textile Park in Warangal over an area of 1200 acres with full complement of high quality trunk infrastructure. Through this partnership with Techtextil India and Messe Frankfurt India, we want to reach out to this niche sector and invite them to explore the immense growth opportunities that Telangana has to offer. We look forward to interacting with leading brands and partnering with them to create a roadmap for technical textiles in Telangana.”Hon’ble Minister Shri K.T. Rama Rao is also expected to visit the fair and address the opportunities in

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store to the textile industry players. Scheduled next month, from 13 – 15 September 2017 at the Bombay Exhibition Centre in Mumbai, the trade fair is known to attract key buyers who are looking for solutions across multiple technical textile applications in agriculture, automotive, building, clothing and protective clothing, environmental protection, geo-technology, housing and home, medical science,packaging and sports.Top textile players including Reliance Industries, Welspun, Garware Wall Ropes, GrozBeckert, Khosla Profil, Luwa India, Lenzing AG, Archroma, and CHT India will be showcasing their latest solutions for these key application areas. Overall, more than 160 companies from 9 countries including Austria, Belarus, China, France, Germany, Italy, Korea, Spain and Switzerlandwill be participating at this premium industry platform. The fair will also launch an exclusive pavilion of Texprocess, the leading international trade fair for processing textile and flexible materials.In this area, some of the largest machinery importers including IIGMPvt Ltd& E. H.Turel and Mehala will have live demonstrationsof their new technologies to all buyers.Held alongside the pavilion is the Texprocess Seminar on day one with a series of product sessions. State representatives are also expected to join this seminar to network with the industry at large. Additionally, the Techtextil India Symposium will focus on prime business topicsthat cover the most demanding application areas to disruptive technical textiles that will drive innovation forward. Backed by knowledge partner – Gherzi, the symposium will present a global outlook on technical textile trends, future forecast on sustainability, and digitalisation which is the current industry debate.

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August 2017


SHOW CALENDAR

September 2017 8-16

Paris Design Week Paris / France www.parisdesignweek.fr

13-15 11th Central Asian International extile Machinery Exhibitions Tashkent/ Uzbekistan www.caitme.uz 13-15 Techtexil India 2017 Mumbai/ India www. techtextil-india.in.messefrankfurt.com 16 2017

SDC EC’s 12th International Conference Mumbai / India www.sdc.org.in

15-17 Colombo International Yarn & Fabric Show 2017 Colombo/ Sri Lanka www.cems-yarnandfabric.com 19-21 Premiere Vision Paris / France www.premierevision.com 21-23 Yarnex / Texindia Tirupur/ India www.yarnex.in / www.texindiafair.com October 2017

17-18 TexNovation Mumbai/ India www.catnewtech.com 17-20 Texfair 2017 Coimbatore / India www.simamills.org/texfair/ 24-27 YFA Show 2017 /ATME 2017 Delhi/ India www.yfatradeshow.com www.atmeindia.com 27-30 Shanghaitex 2017 Shanghai/ China www.shanghaitex.cn December 2017 5-7

China Machinex India/ China Homelife India Mumbai/ Maharashtra www.chlmx.com

7-10

ITMACH India/ ITSE Exhibition Gandhinagar / Gujarat www.ITMACH.com / www.ITSexhibition.com

January 2018 9-12

Heimtextil Frankfurt/Germany www.heimtextil.messefrankfurt.com/ frankfurt/en.html

07-09 Garmek Panipat/ Haryana https://10times.com/garmek

15-18 TEHRANTEX Tehran/ Iran www.tehrantex.com

13-17 IHGF Delhi Fair Autumn 2017 Delhi/India www.ihgfdelhifair.epch.in

19-22 UDYOG 2017 Surat / India www.sgcci.in

29-31 Screen Print East Africa Nairobi/ Kenya www.screenprinteastafrica.com

March 2018

November 2017

13-15 FILTECH Cologne/ Germany www.filtech.de

1-3

April 2018

3-5

International Textile & Apparel Show Dubai/ UAE www.internationalapparelandtextilefair.com Garknit X Science City/ Kolkata

15-17 INTEX South Asia Colombo/ Sri lanka www.intexfair.com 16

14-17 ITM 2018 / HIGHTEX 2018 Istanbul/ Turkey www.itmexhibition.com www.hightex2018.com 19-21 TPF Digital Printing Shanghai/ China http://2016.cstpf.com/en-us/index

Digital Textile Symposium Mumbai/ India http://catnewtech.com/DTS2017/

August 2017

www.textilevaluechain.com

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August 2017


YEARS

India's Leading Manufacturer & Exporter of

Torrey Twister

GRIPPERS Picanol/Dornier/Vamatex/Sulzer/Somet

TEMPLE RINGS/ROLLERS

RAPIER TAPES Picanol/Dornier/Vamatex/Sulzer/Somet

TEMPLES


BHATIA EXPORTS Manufacturer of all types of yarn dyed woven fabrics in 100% Coton & PV Rayon, Melange & specialised of dobby & Fancy yarns.

Mr. Rajesh Bha a

Address : 389, Trichy Main road, Gugai, Salem : 6, Tamilnadu, India. Landline : +91-427-2465479 / +91-427-2465489 Mobile No : +91-98946-46789 Email : bha aexports@gmail.com

Wovlene Tec Fab India Mr. Rakesh Tikawala Mr. Pravin Khambhati

Wovlene Tec Fab India is a well-known Manufacturer, Supplier and Exporter of a wide range of Non Woven products. The Company established in 2011 Wovlene Tec Fab India known for its Non Woven: Bags, Covers, Fabric, Home Furnishings, Hygiene Products and Surgical Disposables, etc. The company has established a wide network for its products in the market. Our range of products is high on demand among clients based in India, Bangladesh, UK, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Europe & USA, etc.

Oï¬&#x192;ce Address : A-42/5 ICCHAPORE GIDC,ONGC ROAD BEHIND GEB SUBSTATION,HAJIRA,SURAT 394510 Mobile : +91-9909961177 / +91-9374501713 Web Site : h p://www.wovlene.com / Email : wovlene@hotmail.com


Tuff Timer Pulley® Gears & Planetary Gear Box Gear Pumps for Food & Chemicals

Salient Features of Tuff Timer Pulley®

Beware of Duplicate products made from inappropriate plastic material


SKBS

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SHREE BALAJI SYNFABS SHR

Contact: Suresh Saraf+91 9322 50 4449 / +91 9322 10 4449 | Nayan Saraf - +91 7498 88 1400 Office Landline - 91-22-6002 0119 / 9699 25 8834 Email : sureshsaraf2000@yahoo.co.in | info@shreebalajisynfabs.com sureshsaraf@shreebalajisynfabs.com | Website : www.shreebalajisynfabs.com Address: Room No.-17, Ground Floor, 342 Kalbadevi Road, Mumbai- 400002


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ORGANIZERS

SAG


Sustainable Solution

ECO PULSARS: A STEP FORWARD TO ECO-SYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABILITY Use of energy, production of waste/dust and noise are the key environmental aspects of the spinning production process. EcoPulsarS, with its innovative platform, can save up to 30% power bill, reduce yarn waste, air conditioning costs & noise inside the spinning room.

SAVIO MACCHINE TESSILI S.P.A. 33170 PORDENONE (Italy) Via Udine, 105 www.saviospa.com

SAVIO INDIA LTD Nallattipalayam, Tamaraikulam Post Pollachi, Coimbatore 642109 Tamil Nadu, India Phone : +91 4259 304555 Fax : +91 4259 304567 www.savioindia.com


PROSPER

IT'S ONLY ONE...

Prosper Group is specialized in designing and developing a wide range of machines at reasonable prices such as Non-woven disposable bags, Baby/Adult Diaper, Fabric Plant, Sanitary Napkins and also Surgical Disposal Machinery. Serving our customers with the best products and services, we are reckoned as leading Non-woven Bag Making Machine Manufacturer and Exporter. Qualitatively engineered, longer function-life and easy to use, our machines include different kinds of plants such as woven, nonwoven, knit fabric making plant, oil processing plant, rice milling plant, fiber plant, etc. Our high performing products-- such as environmental machinery / agriculture safety product/ eco-environment friendly vehicle and fruit, vegetable and animal protecting products have earned us remarkable accolades in the industry. Besides, on time dispatch and market leading prices has made our products the foremost choice of our clients

Sales and service office :INDIA - CHINA -BANGLADESH -HONG-KONG Www.prospergroupmilan@hotmail.com Www.prospergroup.co.in Whatsapp :-9716126049 and 8800648793

ZHEJIANG PROSPER CO. LIMITED NINGBO SAMADE IMPORT & EXPORT CO.,LTD Factory Address: Songjadai Economic Developement Zone, Feiyun Town, Ruian, Zhejiang China Key Personnal: Mr. Milan Mobile :+8613567843786, +919716126049 Email: info@prospergroup.co.in, prospergroupmilan7864@gmail.com Skype: milan466

Prosper Choice Import Export (India Customer Care) Tel + Fax : 011 25062056 Delhi MT- 0091 8802715772, 0091 8800648793 Bangladesh MT - 008801955942434 * China MT- 0086 13567843786 / 13777083484*, Hong Kong MT-00852 -64937649 * www.prosper-non-woven.com, www.prospergroup.co.in,

"Our aim is to satisfy our customers and to establish our brand all around the world"


August 2017 issue  

Technical Textile / Fibre & Yarns

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