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TEXTILE

VALUE CHAIN

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April 2016 | Volume 4 | Issue 4| Pages 44 Registered with Registrar of Newspapers under | RNI NO: MAHENG/2012/43707 Postal Registration No. MNE/346/2015-17 published on 5th of every month,TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN posted at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office,Pantnagar- 75, posting date 17/18 of month


EDITORIAL

The Indian Textile Industry had been sulking in the past 15-20 years or so. There was an impression in some quarters that the industry was not getting prompt attention of the authorities to maintain and accelerate its growth, despite its major contribution to the national economy. Some economic analysts were of the view that with the new stars rising on the horizon, a century-old industry was trapped in export quotas on the introduction of import restrictions by the traditional importing countries like the USA, the UK and other developed countries on the ground that import of cheap fabrics was causing loss of jobs in the importing countries, a fanciful argument without any support from the Principles of Economics. Obviously, obsolete or machines of earlier generation cannot compete with modern, sophisticated machines, where the cost of production is substantially lower because of super high-speeds and improved mechanism to ensure quality and faultless production. In the meantime, the textile industry underwent a radical change. It was no more a producer of just cloth and garments to meet a basic necessity of humanity, but it emerged as a fashion industry. The beauty queens started jostling on the ramps of fashion parades for displaying heart-warming colour combinations, exotic designs and good fitting of garments. Yet, the Indian Textile industry struggled to maintain and deepen its foothold in the international market against all odds. Fortunately, things have started improving for the textile industry. The recent decision of Central Government to give a solid push for development of rural sector will add millions of people as cloth buyers. Nearly 56% of the population in the country derives its subsistence from agriculture. The population in the country in 2010-11 was estimated at 1210 million. Thus 678 million people depend upon agriculture. This will augment domestic demand for textiles. Another benevolent decision in the pipeline is to streamline TUFS benefits to non-organised sector comprising micro, small and medium enterprises particularly in weaving and processing. This will increase demand for weaving and processing machinery and may lead to their production of the latest generation in the country. The success of spinning industry is lagely due to the availability of the most modern spinning frames in the country. If demand for weaving and processing machinery is of economic size, the production of such machinery in the country would be possible, which will give a shot in the arm for modernisation of those sectors. However, promotion of decentralized sectors in weaving and processing should not be at the cost of upgradation of the organised industry, whether in spinning or weaving or processing sector. All this will give new vigour, energy and scope to the Indian textile industry to recapture its pristine glory and win the international race for superiority.

Shri V.Y. Tamhane Editorial Advisor All rights reserved Worldwide; Reproduction of any of the content from this issue is prohibited without explicit written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure and present factual and accurate information. The views expressed in the articles published in this magazine are that of the respective authors and not necessarily that of the publisher. Textile Value chain is not responsible for any unlikely errors that might occur or any steps taken based in the information provided herewith.

April 2016

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NEWS AÉROPOSTALE LAUNCHES EXCLUSIVELY ON AMAZON. IN

Over 600 styles now available for an easy and reliable delivery across the country American youth brand, Aéropostale today announced its launch on Amazon.in, India’s largest online store. Through this partnership, Amazon.in is the first online store in India to offer Aéropostale’s products to customers across the country. Aéropostale’s latest Spring Summer 2016 collection on Amazon.in carries over 600 fun and trendy styles for both guys and girls from the iconic label. The collection includes stretchy jeans, denim shorts, floral jumpsuits, printed rompers, skater dresses for girls and heritage logo tees, distressed denims and quirky printed shirts for guys, offering the best from the brand to online customers. Speaking on this association Sumit Dhingra, COO – Gant, Nautica & Aéropostale said, “Having opened our first store in New Delhi in November 2015, we found customers coming in from across the country seeking our stylish collection. To meet this demand across the country rapidly, we chose to open our second store online, on Amazon.in to give us the geographical cover that we desired. We have chosen Amazon. in as our preferred partner in India because of its credibility and reach in the Indian market. Commenting on the launch of Aéropostale on Amazon.in, Puneet Gupta, Category Leader, Amazon Fashion, said, “In line with offering fashion for who you are, Amazon.in is extremely excited to further enhance its fashion leadership by launching the exciting Aéropostale brand. At Amazon. in, we are uniquely poised to leverage our easy, fast, convenient and reliable shopping experience by offering the best in premium brands to our fashion forward customers across the country“.

Cottage Launches – “First Home of India Handloom Brand Products in Mumbai” April 2016

Mumbai, 15 April’16: Shri Dayanand Shetty, Actor, in presence of Mr. R.M.Parmar, Dy. Director, Weavers Service Centre today inaugurated “The First Home of India Handloom Brand Products” at CCIC, D.N. Road, Fort, Mumbai. The first “India Handloom Brand” showroom was launched in Delhi in March’16. Cottage has joined hands with the Office of Development Commissioner (Handloom) in promoting and marketing the India Handloom Branded products by which customer will get authentic and good quality products drawn from some of the exotic locations of India, which will be on display and sale at its flagship showroom at CCIC, D.N. Road, Fort, Mumbai. The products range from Sarees: Mangalagiri, Venkatagiri, Balrampuram, Maheshwari, Kota Doria, Pochampalli, Banaras Tanchoi Silk, Banarasi Buti Silk; Fabrics: Banaras Tanchoi Silk, Banaras Cut-Work, Plain Tussar, Ikat, Pochampalli; Kullu Shawls and Po-

the sanctity of the traditional hand-woven textiles while molding the styles for a more contemporary look. Shri. Pramod Nagpal, Managing Director, Central Cottage Industries Corporation Of India Limited said “We are happy to be a part of India Handloom Brand products. The IHB logo will be an assurance to customer of quality and indigenousness. It is a great initiative by the Govt to display the handwoven strengths and sell the original and high quality products made by natural dyes. As the Govt is taking a number of initiatives to promote weavers, we are committed to provide original and high quality IHB logo

Mr. Dayanand Shetty (Actor, Populary Known as Daya in CID Tv Serial); Mr. Shoaib Shaikh, Branch Manager, Mumbai, Central Cottage Industries Corporation of India Ltd; Ms. Ashlesha Vaidya, Assistant Manager, Mumbai, Central Cottage Industries Corporation of India Ltd; Shri R.M.Parmar, Dy.Director ( Processing), Weavers Service Centre

champalli Bedspreads will be available on competitive price for public w.e.f 15th April 2016. Shri, Alok Kumar, Development Commissioner (Handloom) said, “The store is an excellent retail platform provided by CCIC, exclusive for India Handloom Brand high quality product. All the IHB products are on offer at an affordable price in Bengaluru after the recent launch of IHB store in the city. The government has been making efforts in popularising indigenous products and this provides an ideal platform to showcase and sell the wide array of products in the textile segment that our country has been producing. The Government has been focusing on encouraging Indian artisans and empowering them” The showcased collections are made using textiles from across India to create a unique identity and promote the rich Indian culture and heritage. This is part of a continued initiative by the IHB to promote Indian handloom. The main focus is to retain

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products to our customers”. Benefit for weavers: The presence of India Handloom Brand logo would differentiate their product(s) and assure the customer of its quality. The premium branding will enable the weavers to use good quality raw material and produce high quality product(s) and enh ance their sales and earnings through bulk marketing of these product(s) both within and outside India. Registered users of the India Handloom Brand will also be provided assistance for institutional finance, design development, technical assistance under the National Handloom Development Program’s as per the applicable guidelines.”

About ‘India Handloom’ Brand:

Launched by Hon’ble Prime Minister on 7th August, 2015, the first National Handloom Day, to endorse the quality of handloom products in terms of raw material, processing, embellishment, weaving, design and other parameters besides social

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NEWS and environment compliance. The main objective is to promote the production of quality products with new designs for winning the trust and confidence of customers by giving particular attention to the defect free, hand woven, authentic niche products with zero defect and zero impact on environment. The registration under the brand is given after stringent testing of samples in Govt. of India laboratory. By 31st March, 2016, 170 handloom producing agencies/ enterprises have been given registration under the Brand in 41product categories. Several e-commerce platforms and leading retail stores have been engaged for marketing of India Handloom branded products. Website: http://www.indiahandloombrand.gov.in/

ISA opposes anti-dumping measures on import of VSF topromote fair competition. Indian Spinners Association (ISA) lamented that continuation of anti-dumping duties (ADD) on viscose staple fiber (VSF) will have a deleterious effect on the textile sector in India, which is reeling under high cost of production and sagging export demand. The firm stand of the spinners’ body, which is a major segment of the Indian textile chain, assumes importance in the backdrop of Directorate General of AntiDumping & Allied Duties (DGAD) initiating a sunset review investigation for assessing the need for continuation of anti-dumping duties on viscose staple fiber excluding bamboo fiber from Indonesia & China. VSF is one of the major inputs for manufacturing of man - made fiber yarn in Indiaand is mostly used for the manufacture of fabrics made of poly-viscose (PV yarn) and 100% viscose yarn. Aggrieved by the unwarranted tariffs and undue protection to the sole producer of VSF in India - Grasim Industries-the spinners havemade representations to the Ministries of Textiles, Commerce & Industry and Central Board of Excise and Customs for removal of ADD to ensure fair competition and to make available the viscose at international prices in India. Industry leaders, in their interfaces with the concerned officials had focused on the deteriorating health of the Indian textile

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industry characterized by widespread sickness, uncompetitive and predatory VSF pricing policy of the Grasim, absence of “injury” factor for the domestic manufacturer, a necessary condition for imposing ADD, impact of the unwarranted duty on input cost escalation, exports of yarn, fabrics, made ups etc. Mr. S.K.Khandelia, President ISA said that “the petitioner and the sole producer of VSF in India - M/S Grasim Industries - using its oligopolistic position,has been charging the Indian consumers a higher price as compared to the international prices of viscose, consistently for the past six years,under the cover of ADD.The domestic prices are artificially kept higher by Grasimto the tune of 20% of international prices, which is higher than the alleged under-cutting margin. While Grasim exports at prevailing international prices, it leveraged its monopoly and anti-dumping coverage to charge higher prices from domestic customers, leading to dual pricing system in India.” While Grasim has been charging a premium on sale of VSF from the domestic spinning industry, the user industry (spinning industry) has not derived any benefit during the period of “ injury”.Therefore, ADD has led to extending unwarranted protection and subsequent enrichment of the manufacturer at the cost of the entire textile sector (user industry), which is the highest employment provider in India.“The decline in the volume of yarn sales and employment in the textile sector isattributable to increasing imports of viscose yarn and fabrics from other countries, likeChina, Vietnam and other ASEAN countries, leading to large outgo of precious foreign exchange,” Mr. Khandelia added. Echoing these views, Mr.M.L.Jhunjhunwala, Vice President ISA, saidthat the imposition of ADD is being used by the domestic VSF manufacturing industry as a shield to cover its inefficiencies and inadequacies in a competitive environment.The Competition Commission has already found Grasim guilty of controlling prices and pursuing differential pricing. Discontinuance of ADD will force Grasimto become more efficient, price competitive and achieve economies of scale.It will also boost export of viscose yarn,blended yarns and fabrics manufactured in India,” he said,

adding that these steps will give a critical push to “Make in India” mission of the Government of India.The spinning industry, being the largest industrial employer in the country, will boost multi fold development across the country if it is able to source raw materials in a more competitive manner, he pointed out. Mr. Sunil Bhargava, Founding PartnerS. Bhargava Associatesand advisorto ISAon ADD matters, saidthat Grasim being the sole manufacturer of VSF in India is claiming to be injured by the imports at alleged lower prices, whereas their balance sheet shows losses due to mounting debt servicing cost on expansions and higher fixed overheads in Nagda unit. Water shortage is another cause of production Slippages. As per the anti-dumping rules in India, there needs to be a clear causal relationship between the injury caused to the domestic industry and the dumped imports, if any. Therefore, before reaching a conclusion, the DGAD must objectively examine all factors establishing a causal relationship before arriving at an informed decision. Oncethe ADDon VSF arelifted , the VSF prices being charged by Grasim from the domestic consumers will be aligned to the international prices. This will reduce the cost of manufacturing of the Indian textiles,

leading to higheremployment generationand increase inexport of value added textile products. “I am sure all concerned ministries, particularly the finance ministry will be vigilant of the larger public interest in developing the textile sector, employing over 100 million people directly or indirectly, achieving its competitive edge to realize higher exports realization through value addition and ensuring a healthy growth to the industry to further gainfully absorb millions of people. In the entire discourse, discontinuation of ADD on viscose fiber is a major policy initiative that the textile industry is looking forward to,” he said.

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April 2016


NEWS

Quality with a winning style The USTER®TESTER 6triumphs in Red Dot Design Award 2016 Uster, Switzerland, April 14, 2016 – Success at the first attempt in a prestigious international design competition was rooted in USTER’s commitment to both innovative technology and elegant styling in its quality testing and monitoring instruments. The new USTER®TESTER 6 earned the Red Dot Design Award 2016 for its ideal blend of impressive functionality with distinctive looks – now taking its place alongside other outstanding products in the Red Dot Design Yearbook. For yarn testing instruments, function comes first. And USTER®TESTER 6 fulfills this priority in every way, through comprehensive, precise and fast measurement capabilities. But then – perhaps akin to an individual looking to buy a new car –factors such as shape, color and brand image can also come into play for the textile mill customer.

Unique instrument, unique look

The USTER®TESTER 6 is the pulse of a new generation in yarn testing.The high accuracy and reliability of its measurements are crucial in assuring the commercial value of spinners’ products. This sixth generation of the USTER®TESTERincorporates the USTER®QUALITY EXPERT, an essential tool for quality management, creating the brandnew Total Testing Center. Accurate laboratory test results from the USTER®TESTER 6 are the starting point for Total Testing. This data is combined with real-time information from yarn clearers monitoring 100% of mill production. The underlying principles of precision and reliability in its operation are also reflected in the quality materials and high standards of manufacturing applied in its construction.An important element of USTER’s product development strategy focuses on creating a unique and distinctive style. Specifically, this means instruments and components are deliberately designed to incorporate special shapes and profiles that are unique. This policy has been in place since at least 1987, when the USTER®TESTER 3 became the first instrument to feature a distinct ‘rounded’ appearance. It continued with the curved front section of the USTER®TESTER 5, establishing a clearly-recognizable look which sets the USTER® evenness testers apart from others.

April 2016

“Functionality, reliability, accuracy and user-friendliness have always been the top priorities in USTER product development, and this approach continues now and in future. However, we also admit that it’s our ambition to manufacture the best-looking instruments too,” says Gabriela Peters, Product Manager Yarn Testing within Uster Technologies. What customers want Just as with a new car, mill managements are proud of their purchases in yarn testing instruments: there is always an emotional element in the choices they make. Laboratories worldwide feel the satisfaction that USTER®TESTER 6 confirms their status in the industry, as a major player for whom quality is paramount. In fact, elegant design has been integrated into USTER product developments for decades. The brief is to combine aesthetics with user-friendly ergonomics, so that creations – however stylized – will never detract from the primary needs of functionality and usability. Now, that style commitment has been formally acknowledged with the Red Dot Award 2016 for industrial design. But USTER customers will already recognize the same style concepts in products such as the USTER®QUANTUM yarn clearer.

Excellence has its reward

Only products which stand out strongly for their design excellence can earn the sought-after quality seal from the international Red Dot jury, inaugurated in 1955.For the 2016 awards a total of 5,214 products and innovations entered from 57 countries. Professor Dr. Peter Zec, founder and president of the Red Dot Award, says: “With their performances, the Red Dot winners not only demonstrated an extraordinary design quality, but they also showed that design is an integral part of innovative product solutions.” The Red Dot product design competition this year saw 41 experts from all over the globe gathering in Germany at the end of February. The jury members included ICE and Transrapid designer Alexander Neumeister, fashion icon Jimmy Choo and automotive design legend Chris Bangle. During the jury session all entries were examined on site. Products were registered in 31 categories: from consumer electronics, furniture, jewelry or watches to interior decorations and lab technology. Global brands such as Google, Apple, Sony, LG, Philips, Kartell or Artemide regularly submitentries, but 2016 was the first time that USTER has put forward a product for consideration.

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Night of honors A glamorousaward ceremony and aftershow party will be held on July 4, 2016, with 1,200 guests expected to see the winners receive their certificates. Their products will also be exhibited in the Red Dot Design Museum in Essen (Germany). Winners of the Red Dot Design Award 2016 will also be set down for posterity in the Red Dot Design Yearbook 2016/2017. In this publication, the USTER®TESTER 6 is described as follows: “Gloss and matt chrome finishes together with black components reflect the technical dimensions of the tester.” Says Peters: “We are proud to be a winner of the Red Dot Design Award 2016 but it will always make us even more proud when customers report how the USTER®TESTER 6has helped to sustain their business success thanks to the Total Testing Center and other innovative features. Positive feedback of this kind is the best award USTER could ever receive.”

About the Red Dot Design Award:

In order to cover the wide scope of design in a professional manner, the Red Dot Design Award is broken down into three distinct disciplines: the Red Dot Award, Product Design; Red Dot Award, Communication Design; and Red Dot Award, Design Concept. The Red Dot Award is organised by the Design Zentrum Nordrhein Westfalen in Essen, Germany. With more than 17,000 entries in 2015 alone, it is one of the largest competitions in the world. It was in 1955 that a jury convened for the first time to assess the best designs of the day. The name and branding of the awards were developed in the 1990s by Red Dot CEO, Professor Dr. Peter Zec. Since then the soughtafter “Red Dot” is the revered international seal of outstanding design quality.

www.red-dot.org.

About Uster Technologies Ltd. The Uster Group is the leading hightechnology instrument manufacturer of products for quality measurement and certification for the textile industry. The Group provides testing and monitoring instruments, systems and services that allow optimization of quality through each individual stage of textile production. This includes raw textile fibers, such as cotton or wool, all staple fiber and filament yarns, as well as downstream services to the final finished fabric. The Uster Group provides benchmarks that are a basis for the trading of textile products at assured levels of quality across global markets. The Group’s aim is to forward know-how on quality, productivity and cost to the textile industry.

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COVER STORY

Insight On Technical Textile

Introduction

Shri Saurabh Agarwal Voice: 91-22-22829696 / 22829797 Mobile: +919892337579 email: saurabh@netitb.in Web: www.thetalentmart.com

Technical textiles are defined as textile materials and products used mainly for their technical performance and functional properties rather than their aesthetic or decorative characteristics. Other terms used for defining technical textiles include industrial textiles, functional textiles, performance textiles, engineering textiles, smart textiles and hi-tech textiles.

The world market for technical textiles was estimated to be around 19.68 million tonnes with a value of approx. (US$107billion) during 2005. • The drivers for future growth of this industry are expected to be Asian countries like India, China etc. With increase in indigenous production, there is excellent potential for export of technical textiles particularly in the SAARC countries, where this industry is not well developed and depends on import to meet their domestic demand.

Technical textiles sector is a knowledge based research oriented industry and has been slowly but steadily gaining ground due to functional requirements such as health and safety, cost effectiveness, durability, high strength, light weight, versatility, customization, user friendliness, eco friendliness, logistical convenience etc. Review Though the market size of technical textile is growing at a rapid pace, there is a lot of shortfall with regards to technically skilled professionals for this sector. As per the research done by Himanshu Gupta from Bhiwani there is lot of scope in technical textile industry. There are very few institutes in India which enable development of skills. Any candidate wishes to develop skills in technical textile industry, has to explore European Institutes for skill development, hence making it an expensive affair. Once the candidate has acquired skills of technical textiles, opportunities for him increase due to shortfall in manpower supply in the industry; hence they demand higher salary package as compared to their peers who are working in the traditional textile Industry. At present the Industry is opting to decrease the gap between the demand and supply of technical skills, whichthey are investing in fresh candidates who have acquired knowledge in technical textile, but do not possess real time experience. Then the companies hire technical textile experts and trains the fresh candidates so that demand versus supply gap decreases. The Indian Technical Textile Association (ITTA) is the only association of the technical textile industry in the country. ITTA focuses on skill development for technical textile in India by enrolling technical schools to introduce courses on technical textiles. It also develops more and more candidates in technical textiles so that supply vs demand gap decreases and industry can get quality skilled manpower for the industry in India. I searched on Naukri.com for “technical textile” and I got only 2,000 resumes which were active for last six months and 5,200 resumes total in whole database. I think this is a really scary figure. There are 18 companies which are registered with IITA. This does not mean that all of them are technical textile skilled professionals. There might be few who have just worked for a few months in technical textile company at some other technical position. Hence we assume that out of 5,200 resumes,realistically only 1,200 would be having experience in technical textile which is quite low even to serve 18 companies registered with IITA. Hence there is a burning need for technical textile professional in India

Source: http://www.slideshare.net/himanshugupta3139/introduction-totechnical-textiles3

Market Size Indian Technical Textile

Conclusion After understanding the scope of technical textile and the increasing size of market in India, there are lot of opportunities for recruitment consultant to service technical textile industry. But hiring for technical textile industry would not be a cakewalk. The recruitment consultant should have experience or knowledge in technical industry for better understanding of requirement and enabling them deliver quality skilled professionals.

Source: http://www.slideshare.net/himanshugupta3139/introduction-totechnical-textiles3

Global Market

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April 2016


COVER STORY

DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVE SPORTS WEAR FOR BASKET BALL PLAYERS Dr.P.Senthilkumar

Assistant Professor (Sr.Gr), Department of Textile Technology, E-mail: senthiltxt11@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

In active sports, because of metabolism the body temperature rises. The pre-requisites of sportswear are rapid transport of perspiration away from the body and then its rapid evaporation to keep the fabric dry. This can be achieved through bi-layer fabric construction in which the inner layer is made of polypropylene yarn which is hydrophobic and having good wicking rate. The outer layer is made up of nature fiber such as cotton which has more absorption character and rapid evaporation. The purpose of this sportswear is to help the sports person in his/her effort and not to give additional physical and heat stress. In this study, designing and developing bi –layer knitted fabric for active sportswear for basket ball players with polypropylene and cotton yarns has been carried out. 40’s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene, 20’s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene and 20’s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene fabrics were developed and the comfort properties have been evaluated objectively by testing the properties of wetting, wicking, water absorbency, dryness, moisture vapour transfer, thermal conductivity and air permeability. Also subjective evaluation has been analysed for the sportswear for basket ball players. Results of the study showed that 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene sportswear shows better performance in both subjective and objective evaluation and it is recommended for basket ball players. Key words: wetting, wicking, water absorbency, dryness, moisture vapour transfer, thermal conductivity, air permeability, wear study

INTRODUCTION

Over the past fifteen years there has been an increase in participation in active sportswear all over the world. More healthy life styles are leading to greater sports participation. This has been accompanied by the development of appropriate performance sportswear which can meet the requirements of various sports. The human body strives to keep its core temperature at 370C. During physical activity, extra body heat is produced causing the nervous system to react by sweating. Sweat glands pump perspiration through pores, body heat is transferred to the sweat, causing it to evaporate and cool the body. If a garment cannot ‘breathe’, i.e. transport moisture from the skin to the surrounding area, perspiration, in the form of water vapour, and excess heat from the body cannot escape. The wearer will experience clamminess as water vapour condenses on the inside of the fabric and body heat may be lost as wet fabric clings to the skin. This may cause discomfort and, in cold weather, chilling. Using fabrics with better moisture transport means less energy is wasted trying to cool the body and the heart rate remains lower. This leaves more energy available for increased performance and endurance. This is an important consideration for all layers of clothing.

April 2016

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The 1980s was a period of highly fruitful innovation in sportswear garments. Some reasonably simple microfibers and coated fabrics were developed; variants of which have met the needs of many sports garments. The innovation of new materials and garments was so successful that in many sports the fundamental performance requirements have been identified and largely satisfied. Nowadays, from very simple microfibers to much more complex fabrics are effectively used in active sportswear. The latest textile materials are much more functioning specific for fulfilling specific needs in different sports activities. Fibers and fabrics are used presently for satisfying different functional properties such as sweat absorption and fast drying properties. The comfort perfections of clothing are influenced by the wetness or dryness of the fabric and thermal feeling resulting from the inter action of fabric moisture and heat transfer related properties. MATERIALS & METHODS The process flow to produce active sportswear is shown in FigYarn Sourcing ure 1. Knitting by using Interlock Jacquard Dyeing Compacting Fabric Testing Garment Making Figure 1 Process flowchart

Materials Used 20s -100% Cotton Combed Yarn 40s - 100% Cotton Combed Yarn Polypropylene Yarn 120/2 (D) Finer Polypropylene Yarn 120/1 (D) – Coarser

Fabric sample preparation Sample 1 - 20s Cotton with 120/1 denier polypropylene Sample 2 - 20s Cotton with 120/2 denier polypropylene Sample 3 - 40s Cotton with 120/1 denier polypropylene

With the necessary settings to produce the bi-layer structure, the above combination of fabrics was knitted accordingly. The combinations consist of coarser and finer counts in cotton and deniers in polypropylene. Cotton was the outer layer and was fed in cylinder needles where as the polypropylene was fed in dial needles which was inner layer that suits the concept of bi-layer. Fabric wet processing Dyeing is an important wet processing treatment in this work. The fabric was scoured and dyed by using Winch dyeing machine.

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COVER STORY Grey fabric Pre treatment Hot wash Dyeing Compacting

Figure 2 Wet processing flowchart The following test methods were used to test the comfort properties such as wetting, wicking, water absorbency, dryness, moisture vapour transfer, thermal conductivity, and fastness properties such as light fastness, rubbing fastness and perspiration fastness and dimensional stability of the bi-layer fabric.

Wetting Wicking Water Absorbency Dryness Moisture Vapour Transfer Thermal conductivity Air Permeability Perspiration Fastness Washing Fastness Rubbing Fastness Light Fastness

Sinking method (BS 3424) (AATCC 79:2000) (ASTM D 4935-99) (ASTM E 96-CUP METHOD) (Lees disc method) IS :11056 – 1984 (AATCC 15-2002) (AATCC 61, 2A-2003) (AATCC 8-2005) (AATCC 16-2004)

Apparel Making Apparel construction sequence

Fabrication Design Analysis Pattern Making Single Lay Cutting Garment Constructions Subjective Evaluation Figure 3 Apparel construction flowchart RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Fabric Particulars The fabric samples were analyzed after knitting. The fabric details measured were: Course and Wale count, fabric weight per unit area and fabric thickness. Wales and Course densities were measured according to the ASTM D3775 standard, using the counting glass. Fabric weight per unit area was determined according to ASTM D-3776 standard using electronic weighing balance. The thickness of the fabrics was measured according to ASTM D1777 standard with the MAG thickness gauge at a pressure of 100 Pa. Standard atmospheric conditions have been maintained for all experiments. The fabric geometrical parameters have been mentioned in the Table 2. Table 2 Geometrical parameters The wettablity of the fabric is calculated by sinking method. In this test, the property was evaluated by measuring the time required for a piece of fabric to sink completely from the surface layer of water. The results are given in Table 3. Table 3 Wetting (in seconds) Samples 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

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2870

2170

Testing

Table 1 Test methods and standards S No. Test Standard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

Cotton 3981

Polypropylene

The results show that the 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene fabric shows quick wetting time than the other two samples. Wickability Height reached by water, with respect time to which the water transported along the strip of fabric is measured. Higher wicking value show greater liquid water transport. Wickability of the fabric mainly depends upon the fabric construction, yarn regularity and the type of fabric and its characteristics. The results are given in Table 4 Table 4 Wicking (in mm) Samples

Cotton

Polypropylene

40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

80

98

20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

170

185

The result shows that the wickability of polypropylene layer is higher than the cotton layer. It is understood that man- made fiber have good wickability than natural fiber. 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene has higher wickability than the other two samples. This is because of the differences in the construction and combination of yarns in the fabrics. Water Absorbency Water absorbency is measured by allowing one drop of water on the fabric and time taken to absorb the water has been tabulated below. Water absorbency mainly depends upon the porosity of fabric and the type of fiber and yarn. The results of water absorbency are given in Table 4. Table 4 Water Absorbency (in seconds) Samples 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

Cotton

Polypropylene

300

140

20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

300

300

20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene

300

120

The results show that the time taken to absorb water for cotton face is higher than the polypropylene, because of the presence of protruding fibers on the surface of the fabric, as cotton is a natural fiber. Therefore it indicates that the polypropylene layer has quicker absorbency and perspiration removal from the body will be fast and will keep dry skin status between the garment. 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene has quicker absorbency than the other two samples. Dryness The result found that the dryness percentage for 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene fabric is higher than the other two samples. This is because of the lower water retention in cotton fabric. The results are given in Table 5.

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COVER STORY Table 5 Dryness % Sample

Dryness % 15

40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

11

20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

17

20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene

Moisture Vapour Transfer The moisture vapour transfer of the fabric is calculated using cup method. The result obtained from moisture vapour transfer of 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene is higher than the other two samples. The finer combinations have the high moisture vapour transfer due to its high porous nature. The results of moisture vapour transfer of fabrics are given in Table 6. Table 6 Moisture Vapour Transfer (in g/m2/day) Samples

Cotton

Polypropylene

40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

2164.36

20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

3826.31

3651.21

20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene

3756.31

3859.31

2250.84

The result shows that 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene has the highest permeability followed by 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene and 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene. The finer combinations have higher permeability due to more porous nature of the fabric structure. Color Fastness to Washing, Perspiration, Rubbing and Light (Gray Scale Ratio) The color fastness to washing was found to be excellent for all the fabrics. The color fastness to perspiration was found to be excellent for all the fabrics. The change in color was fair in 40’s cotton with 120/1 pp. The staining on cotton with the fabrics was found to be fair. The results of color fastness to washing, perspiration, rubbing and light are given in Tables 9, 10, 11 and 12. Table 9 Color Fastnesses to Washing SamSam- SamTest paple A ple A ple B cotcotrameters PP ton ton Change in color 4 4 4 Staining on wool Acrylic Polyester

Thermal Conductivity The thermal conductivity of the fabric is calculated using Lee’s Dis method. This test calculates the amount of heat the fabric can conduct and the cooling effect it can provide. The results of thermal conductivity are given in Table 7. Table 7 Thermal Conductivity (in w/m/k) Polypropylene Samples Cotton 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene

0.0286

0.0213

0.016

0.0169

0.012

0.0169

It is found that the thermal conductivity of 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene fabric is higher than the other two samples. This is because of the differences in the construction and combination of yarns in the fabrics. Air Permeability This test shows the amount of air that can be the fabric and the breathability of it. The following table gives the comparison of the test results for the three different samples. The results of air permeability are given in Table 8. Table 8 Air Permeability (%) Samples

Cotton

Polypropylene

40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

74.1

77.6

20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene

95.8

93.9

20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene

86.3

86.8

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Nylon Cotton Acetate

Sample B PP

Sample C cotton

4

3

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

3-4

3-4

4

4

3-4

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

PP 3-4 4-5 4-5 4-5 4-5 3-4 4-5

PP - Polypropylene Sample A - 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene Sample B - 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene Sample C - 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene Table 10 Color Fastness to Perspiration T e s t parameters

Sam. A

Sam. A

Sam.

Sam. B

Sam. B

Sam. C

PP

PP

4

cotton 4

C

cotton 4

PP 4

cotton 4

Staining on wool

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Acrylic

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Polyester

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Nylon

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Cotton

3

3

4

4

3-4

3-4

Acetate

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Change in color

4

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COVER STORY Table 11 Color Fastness to Rubbing

T e s t Parameters

Sam.

Sam.

Sam.

A

A

B

Table 13 Wear Trial (40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene)

Sam. B

Sam. C

Sam. C

1

cotton

PP

cotton

PP

cotton

PP

Dry rubbing – staining

4-5

4-5

3-4

4

4-5

4-5

Wet rubbing staining

3-4

4-5

3

3-4

4

S No.

4-5

How do you feel the absorbency of the garment How fast the sweat Evaporates

2

3

Do you feel any dampness after the sporting/ Exercising Activities

Table 12 Color Fastness to Light Te s t Parameters

F a d ing – 10 hrs.

Sam. A

Sam. A

Sam.

Sam.

Sam.

B PP

C cotton

4-5

4

cotton

PP

B cotton

4-5

4-5

4-5

Sam. C

4

Do you feel any wet Clinginess of clothing to the human body

PP 4-5

The color fastness to rubbing was found to be excellent during dry state for both fabrics than the 20’s cotton with 120/1 pp. During wet state the color fastness to rubbing was fair for both fabrics and excellent for 40’s cotton with 120/1 pp. Color fastness due to light was found to be excellent in all the fabrics.

WEAR STUDY

5

Do you feel any prickliness/ itchiness as the garment contacts the skin

6

Please suggest the feel of the fabric

7

Please rate the fit of the garment

Subjective Evaluation The purpose of subjective evaluation is to know the suitability of sports activity with respect to the product design. The sports wears were given to basket ball players. The wear study was conducted at normal temperature. Properties such as absorbency, air permeability, heat transfer, dryness and feel have been chosen to study the subjective evaluation. The subjective evaluation is purely based on the psychological feeling of sports person which is rated within five scale rating. The sportswear was given to five sports persons and average results of the wear study are tabulated in table 13. .

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Description

8

Is the garment possess any restriction for the body movement

Means square

Rating Excellent 3

Very Good 1

Good 1

Satisfa ctory 0

3.4

Very Fast 2

Faster 2

Moderate 1

Slower 0

3.4

Slightly Dampness 1

Higher Dampness 1

No Clinginess 4

Slightly Clinginess 1

Higher Clinginess 0

Very High Clinginess 0

No 3

Moderate 2

Yes 0

-

3.6

Very soft 3

Soft 1

Very stiff 1

Stiff 0

3.4

Excellent 4

Very Good 1

Good 0

Satisfactory 0

3.9

No 4

Moderate 1

Yes 0

-

3.9

Not attractive 0

-

3.9

No 0

-

3.9

-

3.9

No dampness 3

9

How is the aesthetic look of the garment

Attractive 4

10

Is the style suitable for the current fashion

Yes 4

11

Is the color combination and design enhance your look (if it is not please suggest your commands

Yes 4

Some what Attractive 1 Moderate 1 Moderate 1

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Very High

3.4

Dampness 0

No 0

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3.9


COVER STORY Table 14 Wear trial (20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene) S No.

Description

1

How do you feel the absorbency of the garment

Rating

2

How fast the sweat Evaporates

3

Do you feel any dampness after the sporting/ Exercising Activities

4

Do you feel any wet Clinginess of clothing to the human body

Means square

Excellent 4

Very Good 1

Good 0

Satisfactory 0

3.9

Very Fast 4

Faster 1

Moderate 0

Slower 0

3.9

No dampness 5

Slightly Dampness 0

Higher Dampness 0

Very High Dampness 0

4

No Clinginess 4

Slightly Clinginess 1

Higher Clinginess 0

Very High Clinginess 0

3.9

No 5

Moderate 0

Yes 0

-

4

Very soft 4

Soft 1

Very stiff 0

Stiff 0

3.9

Excellent 4

Very Good 1

Good 0

Satisfactory 0

3.9

No 5 Attractive 5

Moderate 0 Some what Attractive 0

Yes 0 Not attractive 0

-

4

5

Do you feel any prickliness/ itchiness as the garment contacts the skin

6

Please suggest the feel of the fabric

7

Please rate the fit of the garment

8

Is the garment possess any restriction for the body movement

9

How is the aesthetic look of the garment

10

Is the style suitable for the current fashion

Yes 5

Moderate 0

No 0

-

11

Is the color combination and design enhance your look (if it is not please suggest your commands

Yes 4

Moderate 1

No 0

-

-

4

4 3.9

Table 15 Wear trial (20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene) S No.

Description

1

How do you feel the absorbency of the garment

2

3

4

Rating

Means square

Excellent 3

Very Good 1

Good 1

Satisfactory 0

3.4

Very Fast 3

Faster 1

Moderate 1

Slower 0

3.4

Do you feel any dampness after the sporting/ Exercising Activities

No dampness 4

Slightly Dampness 1

Higher Dampness 0

Very High Dampness 0

3.9

Do you feel any wet Clinginess of clothing to the human body

No Clinginess 3

Slightly Clinginess 1

Higher Clinginess 1

Very High Clinginess 0

3.4

How fast the sweat Evaporates

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COVER STORY 5

Do you feel any prickliness/ itchiness as the garment contacts the skin

No 3

Moderate 1

Yes 1

-

3.4

Very soft 2

Soft 2

Very stiff 1

Stiff 0

3.2

Excellent 4

Very Good 1

Good 0

Satisfactory 0

3.9

Yes 0 Not attractive 1

3.9

10

Is the style suitable for the current fashion

Yes 4

Moderate 1 Some what Attractive 1 Moderate 1

-

How is the aesthetic look of the garment

No 4 Attractive 3

No 0

11

Is the color combination and design enhance your look (if it is not please suggest your commands

Yes 4

Moderate 1

No 0

6

7

8

9

Please suggest the feel of the fabric Please rate the fit of the garment Is the garment possess any restriction for the body movement

3.4 -

3.9

-

The subjective evaluation study reported that 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene sportswear shows best performance among all sports wears. CONCLUSION 40’s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene, 20’s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene and 20’s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene fabric was successfully developed and the comfort properties have been evaluated objectively by testing the properties such as wetting, wicking, water absorbency, dryness, moisture vapour transfer, thermal conductivity and air permeability. Also subjective evaluation has been analysed for the sportswear for basket ball players. Objective evaluation 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene bi-layer fabric has quick wetting time than the other two samples. Polypropylene material sinks quickly than the cotton due to its tubular structure. Moisture transmission tests are important because the transmission properties determined how fast the sweat produced on the body can be eliminated. Faster the moisture transmission properties, better the ability of the fabric to enhance comfort. In order to assess moisture transmission behaviour, wicking height, water absorbency, moisture vapour transfer, drying rate are tested. Better wicking is found in 20’s cotton 120/2 polypropylene has the higher than the other two samples. Since it is well known that polypropylene has a better wicking property than cotton. 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene fabric samples have quick absorbency due to its bi layer structure. The fabric sample of 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene tend to high dryness percentage, because the fabric sample has greater proportion of polypropylene. Maximum moisture vapour transfer is seen in the sample of 20s cotton with 120/2 polypropylene. The fabric of 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene have the highest air permeability because the final combinations have higher permeability due to its porous nature. The 40s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene sample have the highest thermal conductivity than the other samples. Subjective evaluation Drape and flexibility are important parameters to improve

20

-

3.9

the comfort of the basket ball players as they influence positively the clothing fitness and the freedom to move within the match. The wearer of 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene bi layer fabric felt that the clothing offers light weight, no clinginess, no prickliness and good aesthetic look from the wearer perspective. Based on the work it is concluded that 20s cotton with 120/1 polypropylene sportswear shows better performance in both subjective and objective evaluation and it is recommended for basket ball players. REFERENCES Hatch K.L, “Textile Science”, 1993, west publishing. Co., New York, pp 26. Li.Y, “The Science of the Clothing Comfort “, 2001, Textile Progress, 1(2), pp 31. Kothari V.K and Partha Sanyal, “Fibers and Fabrics for Active Sportswear”, March 2003, Asian Textile Journal, pp 55-61. Bartels V.T., “Physical Comfort of Sportswear”, 2005, Textile in Sports, Edited by Shishoo R., The Textile Institute, Wood Head Publishing Ltd., Cambridge, England, pp 262-303. Hollies N.R.S., Custer A.G., Morinn C.J., and Howard M.E.,”A Human Perception Analysis Approach to Clothing Comfort”, 1979, Text. Res. J., 49: pp 557-564. Nordon, P., Mackay, B. H., Downes, J. G. and McMahon, G. B., “Sorption kinetics of water vapour in wool fibres: Evaluation of diffusion coefficients and analysis of integral sorption”, 1960, Text. Res. J., 10, pp 761-770 Li, Y. and Holcombe, B. V., “A Two-Stage Sorption Model of the Coupled Diffusion of Moisture and Heat in Wool Fabrics”, 1992, Vol. 62(4), pp 211-217 Li, Y. and Luo, Z. X., “Physical Mechanisms of Moisture Diffusion into Hygroscopic Fabrics during Humidity Transients”, 2000, J. of Text. Inst., Vol. 91 (2), pp 302-316 Kim, J. O., “Dynamic Moisture Vapour Transfer through Textiles, Part III: Effect of Film Characteristics on Micro Climate Moisture and Temperature”, 1999, Text. Res. J., 69(3), pp 193-202. Yi, Li. “Sensory Comfort: Fabric Transport Properties and Subjective Responses during Exercise under Cool and Hot Environmental Conditions”, 1997, JHKITA, pp 84. Li, Y., “The Science of Clothing Comfort”, 2001, Textile Progress, 1(2), pp 31. Shinjung Yoo and Roger L. Barker, “Comfort Properties of Heat-Resistant Protective Workwear in Varying Conditions of Physical Activity and Environment. Part I: Thermophysical and Sensorial Properties of Fabrics”,

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COVER STORY July 2005, Textile Res.J. 75(7), pp 523-530. Anbumani N and Sathish Babu B, ”Comfort Properties of Bi-layer Knitted Fabrics”, August 2008, The Indian Textile Journal, pp 17-28. Chen, Y. S., Fan, J. and Zhang, W., “Clothing Thermal Insulation during Sweating”, 2003, Text. Res. J., 73(2), pp 152-157, 48 Sabit Adanur.S, Sports and Recreation Textiles, ”Wellingtons Sears Hand Book of Industrial Textiles”, Technomic Publishing Co.inc. pp 475-491. Umbach K.,” Aspects of Clothing Physiology in the Development of Sports Wear, Knitting Technique”, 1993, 15(3), pp 165-169.

Karthikeyan.K, Prakash.S, Anandhakumar.B, Balasivam.K and Sathivel.S, “Development of Breathable Active Sportswear, www. fibre2fashion.com. Bahira Gabr, Ahmed TL-Salmawy and Ghada EL-Kholy, “Improving Themo-Physiological Comfort of Knitted Nylon”. , April 2010, Indian Textile journal pp14-22.

Behera B.K, Mani.M.P, Amit K Mondal and Nitin Sharma, “Comfort Behavior of Cotton Polypropylene based Bi-Layer Knitted Fabrics”, August 2002, Asian Textile Journal, pp 61-67. Sanjay S. Chaudhari, Rupali S. Chitnis and Rekha Ramkrishnan, “Waterproof Breathable Active Sports Wear Fabrics”, The Synthetic & Art Silk Mills Research Association, Mumbai. Saville, B.P “Physical Testing of Textiles”, 1999, Wood Head Publishing Ltd. Hong, K., Hollies, N. R. S. and Spivak, S. M., “Dynamic Moisture Vapour Transfer Through Textiles”, 1988, Text. Res. J., (12), pp 697706. Kim, J. O., “Dynamic Moisture Vapour Transfer through Textiles, Part III: Effect of Film Characteristics on Micro Climate Moisture and Temperature”, 1999, Text. Res. J., 69 (3), pp193-202.

THE MOST IMPORTANT DYNAMIC OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY WILL BE ITM 2016 INTERNATIONAL TEXTILE MACHINERY EXHIBITION increased interest. ITM 2016 International Textile Machinery Exhibition and concurrent HIGHTEX 2016 International Technical Textile & Nonwoven Trade Fair expected to attract 1200 exhibitors and more than 60.000 visitors from 72 countries,will be held at Tuyap Fair Convention and Congress Center on June 1-4. Latest technologies nationally developed in textile machinery industry will be debuted at ITM 2016Exhibitors from 72 countries will meet more than 60.000 visitorsduring the exhibition that will be the most important dynamic of the textile industry in 2016. Being held with the partnership of TUYAP and TEKNIK FUARCILIK and support by TEMSAD in 12 halls with the participation of 1200 manufacturing companies, ITM 2016 Exhibition and HIGHTEX International Technical Textile & Nonwoven Trade Fair will be the largest gathering for textile technologies, which Turkey and the region havehosted so far. Istanbul, the heart of the world; ITM 2016, the address for textile industry ITM 2016 International Textile Machinery Exhibition isheld in Istanbul, one of the world’s most strategic locations in geographical terms, will be a meeting point for all the industry representatives. Istanbul, the West’s doors to the East and the East’s doors to the West has a position as the centre of textile industry. ITM 2016 where brands intending to become one of the actors in the world market will exhibit their innovative technology investments and new products will be the address for textile industry in 2016. Sales for ITM 2016 completed Money traffic in the world causes industries regionally eitherto rally or to restrain. It is anticipated that the2016-2017 season will be extremely positive for the region. The depreciation of EU, particularly in the Euro region, against dollar compared to previous years will further highlight Euro as an exporter. It will also lead Europe to cut down purchases from the Far East. Lately, IMF has raised its forecast of growth of Turkey in 2016 from 3.2 to 3.8. The most clear indicator for this is the strong demand in ITM 2016. Sales for ITM 2016, the largest edition since it’s foundation / ever, have been concluded by April. Strategic importance of Turkey in textile and apparel has a great share in the increase in the number of exhibitors. ITM 2016, growing by 55% compared to ITM 2015, has further

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All eyes and ears will be on Istanbul

At ITM 2016 Exhibition during which latest textile machinery and technologies will be presented, all eyes and ears of the textile world will be on Istanbul. Growing withthe strong demand for participation, ITM 2016 will be a meeting point for both domestic and foreign manufacturers and exporters. Turkey, the most significant market for textile machinery manufacturers, stands out in the conjunctional structure of the world. Being organized under the motto: “Textile Exhibitions are held in the Land of Textile” since 2004, ITM Exhibitions have become an important brand for Turkey and the surrounding countries. ITM 2016 bearing a significant added value for our country, will be an outstanding exhibition preferred by world’s textile machinery manufacturers. Worldwide Promotional Activities ITM Exhibitions gain worldwide attraction with its visitors as well aswith its exhibitors. In addition to local textile manufacturers showing keen interest, each exhibition is also visited by purchasing committees, groups of investors and professional visitors from all over the world. Particularly at 2013 Exhibitions, besides theneighboring countries, visitors from textile-investing regions in the world such as Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia, Iran, Egypt, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Africadrew attention. An increased number of visitors from Europe and Asia, particularly Iran and countries, is expected for the ITM 2016 Exhibition. In this direction, worldwide promotional meetings and press conferences have been organized for ITM 2016 Exhibition. Activities are still running anywhere from Europe to Far East, from USA to Africa.

HIGHTEX 2016 will be held simultaneously

HIGHTEX 2016, the6th International Technical Textile and Nonwoven Trade Fair, will be held in Hall 11 at Istanbul Tuyap Fair Convention and Congress Center on June 1-4, 2016. At HIGHTEX 2016 Exhibition, the first and only event in its field, raw materials for technical textiles, intermediary and final products and production technologies will be seen together. The fact that HIGHTEX 2016 Exhibition, the largest gather for technical textiles in the Middle East and Eastern Europe, will be concurrently held with ITM 2016 Exhibition will create a highly positive and efficient synergy.

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COVER STORY

Dr. Schenk GmbH 37 / Martinsried - 82152 Planegg, Germany

WHY AOI IMPROVES THE QUALITY OF FILTER BASE MATERIAL AND COATINGS AND REDUCES PRODUCTION COSTS

ABSTRACT Automatic optical inspection systems (AOI) are well known tools for controlling product quality in web / film production lines (such as plastic films, metal bands, paper, and many more). Applying those solutions to monitor the quality of filter materials such as nonwovens, paper and textiles is not as common yet though. These materials are produced as continuous web material; due to their rough surface, AOI systems have to apply special and dedicated evaluation methods to distinguish between the structures in the material and information resulting from irregularities and local defects. Following the control of the base materials AOI is also applied for checking the quality of filter materiFig. 1: Smart cameras als after converting steps (such as coating or laminating, or also cutting and folding). In detail in-line AOI offers: • Quality Control for detection of local product irregularities Small local irregularities and defects (such as foreign fibers, particles, holes and many more) can Fig. 2: Optical in-line inspection system for quality and process control of textiles and disturb or inhibit the funcnonwoven materials tion of the filter. Multi-channel camera systems allow the comprehensive, precise and fast evaluation and classification of such irregularities. This avoids further processing of defective material as well as investing money and production capacity in finishing (e.g. cutting, coating, laminating, …) material, which has to be rejected in the end. It is also a safeguard against the delivery of defective products to the customer. • In-line Monitoring of material properties, covering the full width of the inspected material Parallel to the detection of small local defects the AOI system can evaluate material properties over the whole width and length of the material. Examples are the material thickness, density/porosity, coating homogeneity, surface topology (roughness), and many more. The same cameras used for local defect detection pick up and immediately evaluate overall material values. In this way the results can be fed back without delay (i.e. by adjusting one or more line parameters) to control line

22

performance. • Process Control for optimization of the production process The challenge here is implementation of automated feedback of production parameters enabling automatic and immediate reaction when the AOI detects process deviations. The presentation will close with a demonstration of these methods using production examples. This includes also experiences achieved in new applications such as separators for batteries and gas diffusion layers (GDL) for fuel cells. It will also show how the application of AOI systems helps to control and qualify the function of the final product prior to its delivery to the customer. KEYWORDS Quality control, Optical Measurements, Online Control, Defect Detection, Particle Detection, Process Monitoring and Optimization Introduction Automatic optical inspection systems (AOI) are well known tools for controlling product quality in web / film production lines (such as plastic films, metal bands, paper, and many more). Applying those solutions to monitor the quality of filter materials such as nonwovens, paper and textiles is not as common yet though. These materials are produced as continuous web material; due to their rough surface, AOI systems have to apply special and dedicated evaluation methods to distinguish between the structures in the material and information resulting from irregularities and local defects.

System components

The AOI system is composed of three main subsystems: • Digital line cameras: EasyInspect applies cameras based on CMOS technology with integrated evaluation electronics (i.e. smart cameras). Due to their pre-evaluation only relevant data is transferred to the evaluation PC, which speeds up the data transfer and the analysis of the defects.

• Line illuminations:

Generally the illuminations consist of rows of LEDs, which provide excellent brightness. Additionally, the illumination can be cooled (best by liquid cooling), which prolongs the lifetime of the LEDs to several years (typically far more than 5 years) and provides stable light output.

• Evaluation system: All data is evaluated in a PC. A professional LINUX operation system ensures stable function of the PC. Evaluation is done in three steps: o Identification of defective areas (patches) o Analysis of the corresponding defect type; this helps the operator to immediately get back to the defect source in the line o Quality evaluation, providing an overview of the overall properties of the material and the performance of the production line. All data is fed into a data base (e.g. SQL) and can be processed in-

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COVER STORY line and off-linevat any time.

Fig. 3: Main AOI System components

Fig. Three main aspects in quality control by AOI: Detection of local product irregularities Small local irregularities and defects (such as foreign fibers, particles, holes, etc., see Fig. 4) can impact or inhibit the function of the filter. Multichannel camera systems allow comprehensive, precise and fast evaluation and classification of such irregularities. This avoids further processing of defective material as well as investing money and production capacity in finishing (e.g. cutting, coating, laminating, ‌) material, which has to be rejected in the end. It is also a safeguard against the delivery of defective products to the customer.

eras used for local defect detection pick up and immediately evaluate overall material values. In this way the results can be fed back without delay (i.e. by adjusting one or more line parameters) to control line performance.

Fig. 6: Base weight monitoring (10 gsm / 40 gsm / 60 gsm / 150 gsm)

Fig. 7: Monitoring of material density for detection of too thin /too thick areas

Fig. 8: Detection of inhomogeneous coating by AOI

Due to the high number of gray values processed by the smart camera the analysis of material properties is very sensitive. EasyMeasure evaluates 65.536 gray values which equates to a resolution of far below 1 %. Fig. 9: Gray values / resolution of EasyMeasure Fig. 4: Examples of local defects in filter base materials

In some cases the simple evaluation via gray value amplitudes does not work, so a more sophisticated detection of defects is applied: gray value histograms allow for elimination of the disturbance of the material texture and by this achieve separation of the real defects from artefacts. In the example below a weaving defect in a textile web is detected by evaluating the difference in the histogram shape (position of the histogram in the gray value range and the corresponding gray values):

Fig. 5: Filter textile with weaving defect

In-line Monitoring of material properties, covering the full width of the inspected material Parallel to the detection of small local defects the AOI system can evaluate material properties over the whole width and length of the material. Examples for such properties are material thickness (base weight, grammage), density/porosity, coating homogeneity, surface topology (roughness), and many more. The same cam-

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Process control for optimization of the production process An AOI installed in a production line will help eliminate and sort out defective material.Consequently, material that does not meet the manufacturers’ quality requirements is not delivered to the customer. A second and more important effect of AOI inline quality control system is the possibility to control and optimize the production process. As problems in the product quality are reported with almost no time delay, the operator can react very fast to keep the production within the process window.In a second step, implementation of automated feedback of production parameters is possible, enabling immediate automatic reaction when the AOI detects process deviations

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COVER STORY

Fig. 11: Advantages of applying an AOI in the production Fig. 10: AOI for analyzing and optimizing the production process

SURAT REPORT Textile City Surat is now Embroidery Hub

• In last 15 years, more than 1 lac embroidery machine installed with more than 5000 crore investment. Many decades ago,Kolkata is the hub for embroidery &Surat is famous for Polyester Synthetic Fabrics with Sarees& Dress Material. In year 20012002, Embroidery machine started installation in Surat city, due to demand of Value addition fabrics. • Value Addition fabric is in demand. Indian manufactured machines with imported machine from Japan, Taiwan, Italy, China, Korea installed in the city. Whether its sarees or dress material 90% finished fabrics are with embroidery or hand work. Now a day in bed covers, fashion bags, curtains, everywhere demand of embroidery increased. Demand of Suratembroidered fabrics is more in international market than domestic market. Embroidery machinery sector innovating new high speed & quality work machines. Multi, Schiffali and many more new machines planned to installed very soon in the market. • Due to increase in demand of Embroidery work; demand of threads, laces, gottapatti, stones also increased. In surat city, Punagaon, kapodra, Varacha, A.K. Road, Ved Road, etc. lace have big market. • Connected industrialist with embroidery now innovating in fabrics with Butta, patch work, lace with work, new designs in small patches, work on net fabrics, etc. previously this fabrics are made by Mumbai market , but now surat becoming new wholesale market, so surat will get advantage for same. Mudra loan need to be given to powerloom sector. • If mudra loan will be announced in power loomsector , then 23 lacspowerloom will be upgraded. • During the inauguration of SITEX 2016, textile commissioner Dr.Kavita Gupta told that currently textile industry gotRs. 1480 crore fund in union budget, but they are expecting more funds from government. Now in C2 power loomup gradation government giving Rs. 15000 to Rs. 40000, which should be taken advantage of. • Mudra funds will benefit the surat city industrialist, surat will be one of the mega powerloom cluster in near future, tenders for same also will be float in near future.

IA-TUFS SOFTWARE launched

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Dr.Kavita Gupta, Textile Commissioner told that request for TUFS scheme, Subsidy, other questions will be resolved from new software launched by textile ministry. In this software “First In& First Out” basis all requests will be handled. TUFS request have UDI generation, inspection, allocation with deadline, this system gives textile officers effectivework flow. All TUFS request can be seen online, transparent system made by government. List 1 & List 2 will be clear soon.

Textile Unit’s Solar Panel has 50% Subsidy

For energy saving and energy new avenue as Solar energy for weaving, spinning, processing, embroidery , machinery sector, government is planning to have 50 % subsidy on the use and installation of solar panel. Environment friendly energy as solar energy, wants to boost in TUFS scheme also. Year 2016-17, Technical Textile Market size will be 1.5 lac crore in India. Textile commissioner stated,use of Technical Textiles like Geo Textiles, Medical Textiles, and Protective Textileetc increased from past many years, It will be still increase up to 1.5 lac crore. Centre of Excellence getting grant from Ministry for this sector. Surat being synthetic fabric & Polymer hub, technical textile have lot of opportunity in this sector. TUFS help also included in this sector. Surat Industrialist given following suggestions to Textile Commissioner: • Pending Request of TUFS need to be resolve fast. • Surat Yarn Bank needs more funds. • Rethink on Processing sector “Zero liquid discharge policy”. • Textile International Buyer Seller meet should be arranged, supported by ministry. Wedding Season:SuratiGhaghraCholi, Saree, Dress Hit After holi, good sales of value added traditional wear, which sales at Rs. 500 to Rs. 2000. Buyers are from UP, Bihar, Haryana, Rajasthan, many more states from Northern India. Wedding season fashion changed very rapidly, dyed, printed, embroidered, lachasarees have a good demand. Synthetic raw grey fabrics 60 grams, Shiffon, Georgette fabrics with print, dyed, net, value added embellishment have a great demand in this wedding season.

www.textilevaluechain.com

April 2016


MACHINERY FOCUS

Sustainable Technologies in Textile Machinery Shri Avinash Mayekar

MD, Suvin Advisor Pvt. Ltd.

Sustainable Technology

Introduction: = Sustainable technology refers to the technology which Economic Growth caters the needs of the present without compromising + the ability of future generation Environmental Protection to meet their own needs. It enables more valuable use of the natural resources & greatly reduced ecological impact among other technological benefits. Though sustainable technology deals with energy efficiency, reduction in pollution, use of renewable sources, it should also be economically sustainable! The consumption of natural resources has been increased exponentially in past decades in rapidly industrializing countries & it is relatively recently that we have started recognizing the unpleasant consequences of the carefree attitude towards the natural environment. Textile industry is among the most essential consumer goods industry in the world as it is one the basic needs of the man. Today, the world of fashion is glamorous & very stylish; however its impact on ecology worsening day by day. Textile industry is condemned of being one of the most polluting industries in the world. Not only production but consumption of textiles also produces waste. At every stage of the textile production, vast amount of energy, clean water & chemicals are being used to process the textiles & apparels. In turn these processes generate air, water & soil pollution through untreated effluent generation & waste generation which place heavy burden on environment. More than 2000 types of dyes, chemicals & other auxiliaries are being used in Textile Industry. The World Bank estimates that almost 20% of global industrial water pollution comes from the treatment and dyeing of textiles. Some of the toxic chemicals cannot be filtered or removed. Dyeing, washing and after-treatment of textiles requires large amounts of fresh water. Cotton production accounts for 2.6% of annual global water usage. A single T-shirt made from conventional cotton requires 2700 liters of water and a third of a pound of chemicals to produce. Millions of gallons of wastewater discharged by mills each year contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (HCHO), ammonia, chlorine, heavy metals such as lead and mercury & other pigments. These chemicals cause both environmental damage and human disease. Effluents released from mills are often at high temperatures and pH, which exacerbate the problem. Conventional cotton is highly dependent on pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers to grow. In many regions, insects limit cotton production and some of these pests become resistant to pesticides. Not surprisingly, cotton pesticides and herbicides account for 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of all pesticides used worldwide each year. Untreated dyes cause chemical and biological changes in our aquatic system, which threaten species of fish and aquatic plants. The presence of these compounds also makes practical water use unhealthy or danger-

April 2016

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ous. The enormous amount of water required by textile production competes with the growing daily water requirements of the half billion people that live in drought-prone regions of the world. By 2025, the number of inhabitants of drought-prone areas is projected to increase to almost one-third of the world’s population. If global consumption of fresh water continues to double every 20 years, the polluted waters resulting from textile production will pose a greater threat to human lives. Today, the growing awareness of environmental issues makes customers to select ecofriendly products over conventional products. While the end-consumers of textiles were earlier concerned with only the finished product, there has been an increasing drive to better understand the input materials, the relevant production processes and their implications on the environment, be it air, water or soil. Ignorance and indifference to these will no longer remain an option for the textile supply chain, so it has become imperative that Textile Industry should address such issues within our supply chain & adopt better and cleaner technologies. Moving to greater degree of sustainability in our industrial processes and systems requires that we achieve better balance between social, economic & environmental aspect of the textile production. With the increasing awareness environmental issues posed by Textile industry, many of technology providers are working towards the improvement of technology to reduce the environmental damage created by the Textile Industry & reduce the consumption of energy, water & chemicals. Some of the innovative environmentally efficient technology solution at reduced production cost. The Textile Wet processing industry is now in the spotlight due to the recent Detox campaign by Greenpeace and will have to align with the goal of zero discharge of hazardous chemicals by 2020 that is being pursued by several leading International Brands & Retailers.

Some of Sustainable Technologies in Textile Machineries:

Following are the technologies are currently being used worldwide as an answer to sustainability:

Exhaust Piece Dyeing: A combination of advantages of long tube machine design with aerodynamic fabric transportation principle has been developed by THEN with their new development the THEN­ AIRFLOW® LOTUS ma­ chine which is the world’s first long tube machine to operate using to the orig­ inal aerodynamic princi­

THENAIRFLOW® Machine

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MACHINERY FOCUS ple. The objective of the development was to create a system that would be especially suitable for the wet processing of delicate, easily creased, cellulose and synthetic fibre knits and wovens with a high percentage of elastane fibre, which are used in the lingerie, sport, leisure and swimwear segments. Resource benefits focus on ultra-low liquor ratio 1:2 to 1:5 with associated reduction in water demand, effluent volume and loading from reduced salt consumption when reactive dyeing and a reduced energy requirement. FONG’S have further refined their JUMBOFLOW machine with Advanced Intelligent Rinsing (AIR) with the option of a conductivity measurement to detect when the concentration of electrolyte has reduced after reactive dye processing to a concentration where the rinsing is transferred to the soaping stage, thereby optimising water consumption. THIES have further developed their ecoMaster machine incorporating Multi Contact Dyeing from the double liquor : fabric interchange design to permit reduced dyeing times and low liquor ratios from 1:3 for synthetics to 1: 4.5 for cotton fabrics, and an auto control of the rinsing procedure using RINSEtronic software to further reduce process times and water consumption.

Cold Pad Batch Dyeing

For vertical knitted fabric operations there is a renewed interest in reactive dye application by cold pad batch application due to the lower consumption of water and reduced effluent loading, with a claimed reduction in variable costs of between 15 and 30%. The resultant fabric has a much cleaner stitch definition due to no surface abrasion, and to produce a similar g/sq.m fabric as exhaust dyeing, an increase in stitch density should be considered at the knitting stage if the Cold Pad Batch application route is in ended. Developments in machine design are mostly for open width processing using sophisticated auto-centre and edge uncurling devices but also include dosing pumps, low-liquor troughs and configurations to allow dye application in the nip as well as in the low-liquor trough. Also on modern pad rollers the pressure can be adjusted across the full width to allow uniform liquor pick-up to eliminate side-centre-side variation. Integrated heating and cooling systems have also been developed to ensure constant temperature in the pad trough regardless of the time of day/season and thus improve the reliability of the process re liquor stability/hatching time

Continuous Dyeing

Econtrol® Process: The Econtrol® process utilises the innova­ tion of the Thermex Hot Flue from MONFORTS. The innovation exploits the thermodynamics of water evaporation from cellu­ lose to provide the optimum temperature and moisture condi­ tions within the Hot Flue dryer ideal for the efficient fixation of the specially selected reactive dyes. MONFORTS have in con­ junction with DyStar further developed the successful Econtrol® process and at ITMA Munich in 2007 launched the new Econtrol T­CA process for the coloration of polyester/cellulose blends. This development combines the humidity control for reactive dyes with a Thermosol unit for application of new Dianix®

T-CA disperse dyes and a new auxiliary package which obviates the need for an intermediate reduction clear process. The savings in chemicals, water, and energy are significant. Along with newest machine technology, the right dye selection also places an important role & hence to maximise the synergy between innovative machinery design and application process to deliver productivity, cost efficiency, and environmental benefits, it is critical to optimise dye selection.

Energy Efficiency:

Energy efficiency is an integral part of sustainability. For many years textile finishing has operated with chemical and thermal processes which, by present-day standards, can have a severe impact on the environment. The energy costs are high, and the use of chemicals absolutely essential. But with innovative ranges and advanced auxiliaries, Monforts has succeeded in optimising these processes. The savings benefits that have been achieved in recent years are in some cases, quite considerable. Monforts Eco Applicator An excellent example highlighting how the Blue Competence concept can influence the R&D activities is the Matex Eco Applicator; a unit which significantly reduces the initial moisture content before the drying process. The challenge of sustainability is to save natural resources without compromising production quality of the final products. The ECO Applicator ensures reduced energy consumption, faster drying and higher productivity compared with standard equipment such as padding systems. Padding is a process employed in the textile industry for wet Monforts Eco Applicator treatment of textiles. The fabric or ‘substrate’ is transported through a trough containing the finishing or dying liquor. The term ‘liquor’ is generally used to refer to an aqueous liquid in which textiles are washed, bleached, dyed or impregnated. It contains all the dissolved, emulsified or dispersed constituents such as dyestuffs, pigments or chemicals. During the further course of the production process, the substrate is transported through rollers to remove the excess liquor. A liquor absorption of 70 % - which is a typical value in standard padding application - means that 100 kg of textile fabric has to absorb 70 kg of liquor. After the impregnation process, the wetted fabric is dried in a final step by means of a Montex stenter. For this process, drying energy is required which, in the textile finishing industry, is a major cost factor. Influencing factors for the energy consumption and costs of drying processes are the initial moisture content, residual moisture content, drying temperature and relative water vapor content of the ambient air. The degree of initial moisture is the crucial point for determining how much evaporation heat and energy is necessary for drying. Benefits: Reduction the liquor pick up, which is the means of operation of the Monforts Matex ECO Applicator, results in less evaporation heat and lower operating costs. With the ECO Applicator, the liquor is not applied to the fabric by dipping it through a trough but by using steel rollers which transfer the required amount of liquor onto the fabric. With lower waste water contamination the application unit becomes a resource-conserving alternative to padding.

Monfort’sEcontrol® process

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April 2016


MACHINERY FOCUS Recent Developments:

Brazzoli has developed a ‘Green Label’ version of its InnoEcology fabric-rope-dyeing machine, which it says is geared to reducing consumption of water, steam, energy and chemicals, as well as to increasing machine productivity, while maintaining the final product quality. As an example, Brazzoli says a jersey fabric that, in 2011, on an earlier generation of the machine, required 35 litres of water per kg/ dyed can now be processed with only 28 litres. The carbon footprint has been reduced to 1.51 kg/CO2 per kilo of fabric, equal to 0.5 kg/CO2 per T-shirt. In India recently, Alliance Machines Textiles of France, displayed a new dyeing machine that uses air technology to reduce water usage. The new, low-liquor-ratio Riviera Eco+ Green is a single-tube machine that uses air to rearrange the fabric at each revolution, just before it comes into contact with the liquor. This is said to avoid creases, especially on delicate fabrics. The air is not used for fabric transport. Monforts is shortly to launch a retrofit heat-recovery system for its Montex stenters. This will allow existing users to achieve the same energy gains as with new machines, where the system comprises a compact, air-to-air heat exchanger, installed within the roof structure of the stenter. This uses energy from the exhaust gas to preheat up to 60% of the incoming fresh air entering the stenter and depending on production conditions, delivers energy savings of 10-30%.

Future of Textile Industry:

In conventional textile dyeing, large amounts of water are used both in terms of intake of fresh water and disposal of wastewater. On average, an estimated 100–150 litres of water is needed to pro­ cess 1 kg of textile material, with some 28 billion kilos of textiles being dyed annually. Water is used as a solvent in many pre­ treatment and finishing processes, such as washing, scouring, bleaching and dyeing. Hence, the elimination of process­water and chemicals would be a real breakthrough for the textile dyeing industry, and it seems this has now come to fruition, with the launch of the world’s first ever industrial dyeing machines that uses super carbon dioxide (CO2) as a replacement for water. Dyeing with CO2 “When carbon dioxide is heated to above 31°C and pressurised to above 74 bar, it becomes supercritical, a state of matter that can be seen as an expanded liquid or a heavily compressed gas. In short, above the critical point, carbon dioxide has properties of both a liquid and a gas. In this way supercritical CO2, has liquid-like densities, which is advantageous for dissolving hydrophobic dyes and gas-like low viscosities and diffusion properties, which can lead to shorter dyeing times compared to water. Compared to water dyeing, the extraction of spinning oils, the dyeing and the removal of excess dye can all be carried out in one plant in the carbon dioxide dyeing process which involves only changing the temperature and pressure conditions; drying is not required because at the end of the process CO2 is released in the gaseous state. The CO2 can be recycled easily, up to 90% after precipitation of the extracted matter in a separator. DyeCoo Textile Systems BV has achieved the unachievable, emancipating the world of fabric manufacturing from the troubles of water-based textile dyeing process for once and for all. A dyeing machine named “DryDye” that utilizes carbon dioxide (CO2) instead of water and extra textile chemical agents is a highly innovative waterless textile dyeing

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breakthrough achieved by the Dutch company. CO2 dyeing technology has become more intelligent and energy efficient with the discovery of the DryDyedyeing ma­ chine. Though the waterless dyeing technology using CO2 was invented in Germany almost two decades ago, no commercially viable machine was developed until now. DyeCoo Textile Sys­ tems is undoubtedly the laurelled victor acclaimed by the textile techies around the globe. Though the machine is capable of dye­ ing polyester at batches of 100 to 150 kg, work is under progress to accentuate the functionality of the waterless textile dyeing machine. The day is not far when reactive dyes for cellulosic are to be used resulting in greater all round efficiency and a better fabric dyeing.

Summary:

If we see awareness on the hazardous effluent generated & amount of energy consumed during the entire manufacturing process of textiles & apparels amongst the end-consumers, it is very limited. Many of them are not even aware that some of the dyes & chemicals used are carcinogenic and life threatening. Some of the retailers and brands in western countries have taken a green initiative to produce goods in most sustainable manner. On the contrary, there is very little awareness amongst Indian manufacturers & end consumer about the harmful impact on the environment. Some of the processing units are still discharging untreated effluents which are polluting water bodies. Some of the dyes and chemicals can even cause chronic diseases. It is very important to brin g about awareness amongst textile manufacturers & end-users. Entire textile value chain should take the initiative to manufacture the goods economically with sustainable processes & technologies with minimum or no impact on environment or consumer. Technology is a key to reach sustainability targets of the Textile industry. With volatile commodity and energy prices as well as requirements from brands, retailers, consumers and governments, sus­ tainability has become a significant competitive factor for textile manufacturers. Sustainability is an issue with hard economic aspects. It has become a significant competitive factor. Techno­ logical upgrading is one of the keys to realize sustainable tex­ tile production and so remain competitive. Some of remarkable innovations in technology have paved the way for sustainable production technologies, but there is huge scope further for all technology providers to upgrade technology which will help in economical production of the goods in sustainable manner!

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BRAND FOCUS

Journey of Good company to Great Company ! Shri Rushin H.Vadhani AGM – Market Research & Product Development AYM Syntex Limited (Formely Welspun Syntex Ltd) “Greatness is not function of circumstance, greatness is largely matter of conscious choice & discipline” quotes Jim Collins, legendary management Guru. With technological revolution & availability of best talents in world, companies are gearing to become good to great. The challenging question lies with the management & governing boards of good companies to turn it into great companies. Or the matter of fact is about perception what management thinks & acts as their companies being already great ! The companies become good or great with visionary leadership & right people sharing the same vision across hierarchies in the company. When it comes to getting started, good-to-great leaders understand three simple truths. First, if you begin with “who,” you can more easily adapt to a fast-changing world. If people join the company because of where they think it’s going, you’ll be in trouble when you get 10 years down the corporate journey and discover that you need to change direction because the world has changed. But if people join the companies principally because of all the other great people are part of journey, the company will be much faster and smarter in responding to changing conditions. Second, if you have the right people in your company, you don’t need to worry about motivating them. The right people are self-motivated: Nothing beats being part of a team that is expected to produce great results. And third, if you have the wrong people in the company, nothing else matters. You may be headed in the right direction, but you still won’t achieve greatness. Great vision with mediocre people still produces mediocre results. Jim Collins in his book, Good to Great, mentions seven characteristics of companies that turned from “Good to Great “ • Level 5 Leadership: Leaders who are humble, but driven to do what’s best for the company. • First Who, Then What: Get the right people, then figure out where to go. Finding the right people and trying them out in different positions. • Confront the Brutal Facts: Confront the brutal truth of the situation, yet at the same time, never give up hope. Companies need to accept challenges/ weakness internally & externally – accept, analyse& execute solutions. • Hedgehog Concept: Three overlapping circles: What lights your fire (“passion”)? What could you be best in the world at (“best at”)? What makes you money (“driving resource”)? • Culture of Discipline: The management should inculcate culture of disciple across hierarchies with focus on results, customer satisfaction & maintaining competitive edge.It should be in line

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to vision of company. Company sticks to its core discipline—first the people, then the direction—no matter how dire the circumstances. • Technology Accelerators: Using technology to accelerate growth, within the three circles of the hedgehog concept. Advance Technological tools like Customer Relationship Management (CRM) softwares , Financial Softwares , Marketing & brand building ,Sales force management etc have to be driven aggressively . Adapting cutting edge technology will always strengthen competitive edge. • The Flywheel: The additive effect of many small initiatives; they act on each other like compound interest. Companies to encourage employees to innovate ,improviseeveryday in their routine work thus adding value & result to work. It will be collective small efforts at individual level shaping into giant step towards innovative change. Companies that make the change from good to great have no name for their transformation—and absolutely no program. They neither rant nor rave about a crisis—and they don’t manufacture one where none exists. They don’t “motivate” people— their people are self-motivated. There’s no evidence of a connection between money and change mastery. And fear doesn’t drive change—but it does perpetuate mediocrity. Nor can acquisitions provide a stimulus for greatness: Two mediocrities never make one great company. Technology is certainly important—but it comes into play only after change has already begun. And as for the final myth, dramatic results do not come from dramatic process—not if you want them to last, anyway. A serious revolution, one that feels like a revolution to those going through it, is highly unlikely to bring about a sustainable leap from being good to being great. However , I believe greatness is an aspiration – a very honourable one. But no company is perfect, even if it performs well year after year. Greatness, like, many objectives, is in the eye of the beholder. One simple test for greatness is how a company is experienced by its constituents – its customers, its associates, its owners, and business partners ! Key References: 1) Good to Great by Jim Collins 2) Built to last by Jim Collins 3) www.wikepedia.org 4) www.freakonimcs.com

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April 2016


POST EVENT REPORT

Event Report- SDC EC’s Colour Event 05/2016 Half Day Seminar - Andheri The Society of Dyers and Colourists, India (SDC EC) organised a half day seminar on “Clean and Green Garment Processing” on Friday, 4th March, 2016. This event was attended by more than 110 delegates from brands, retailers, processors, faculties and students. The event began with the lighting of lamp by Dr Ela Dedhia, Mr Sachin Pulsay, Mr. VR Sai Ganesh, Mrs Lipika Nair, Mr Sumit Gupta, Mr. Harish Punjabi, Mr Vijay Sane, Prof. Bhate and Mr. Sandeep Singh. This was followed by Welcome Address, delivered by Mr Sachin Pulsay, Hon. Chairman, Mumbai Chapter, SDC EC. The Key Note Address was delivered by Mr Harish Punjabi, G.M. Marketing, Virgin Apparels (India) Pvt.Ltd. Speaking on the theme, he recalled the old times when people could ignore the need for ‘clean and green garment processing’, but he emphasised that now it has become not only important but really urgent to take concrete steps to follow this theme. He further stated that we cannot take the planet for granted. This was followed by a presentation by Dr Ela Dedhia, Chairperson, SDC EC, India. She spoke about events workshops and competitions organised by SDC EC in past years. He took the audience through various lectures, half day seminars, competitions and other events organised by SDC EC in recent past. Mr Yogesh Gaikwad, Director, SDC International Limited, presented about Society of Dyers and Colourists, UK and its global activities in detail. He informed the audience about SDC’s three major contributions • SDC holds the secretariat for the BSI committee TC1/81 and ISO committee TC38/SC1 which have responsibility for the 105 series of test methods for Colour Fastness and Colour Measurement • Colour Index – the definitive reference for all dyes and pigments • CMC formula for Instrumental Colour Assessment Inaugural session was followed by Technical Session, which comprised of three presentations and a panel discussion. The First presentation was on ‘Green Chemistry’ given by Dr. Ravichandran L, Director – Technical & Business Development, Atlantic Care Chemicals. He gave a detailed presentation on processing by using environmental xenobiotics, green chemistry and by enzymes. The second presentation was by Mr. Jaydeep Umalkar, Marketing Manager, SF Dyes Pvt Ltd. The title of his presentation was “Green Colouration of Garments”. He spoke about new processesEcoDip, Ecotint and Salt Free Dyeing. He also touched upon challenges and advantages of green colouration. The third presentation was by Mrs. Rajeshree Netalkar, Manager Textile Solutions, Atul Ltd. The title of her presentation was same as the theme of the seminar- ‘Clean & Green Garment Processing’. She spoke about several brands’ expectations in fields of RSL & Compliance; Technical advances for resource utilisaiton and Social & environmental expectations. This was followed by a Panel discussion. The theme of the panel was, ‘Clean and Green Garment Processing: Who Pays?’

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This panel was moderated by Mr VR Sai Ganesh, Hon. Secretory SDC EC. The panellists were Mr. Aniket Satam- Proprietor Aniket, Mr. Padmakar Nandusekar- MIDC; Mr. Rajesh Desai- WashnWear, Mr. Siddhartha Wilson - Spykar Jeans and Mr. Shiva Kumar, Archroma. The panel discussion was opened by Sai Ganesh who introduced the topic and emphasised that with ZDHC by brands has made the topic very important and it needs urgent attention of all the players involved in supply chain. Nandusekar informed that processes are categorised by MIDS in red, orange and green categories for consent management. Textile wet processing comes under red category, while spinning/ weaving come under green category. He also told that there are eight textile parks in state of Maharashtra. Shiva Kumar opined that all pay a price for the environment. We have to look at larger picture and cannot ignore costs associated with healthcare/ medicines, originating from irresponsible industrial practices. Desai emphasised that water is the biggest problem, in his field of garment processing. Satam presented about green initiatives by designers, like khadi denim, upcycling, insta fashion, interactive fashion etc. He also emphasised that there is a market for eco-cautious product and buyers will pay a premium for it. Wilson stressed that products made in environment friendly manner need not be always expensive. There needs to be a higher seriousness along the supply chain for the cause. The panel discussion was followed by discussion and questions from the attendees. The event was supported by Atlantic Care Chemicals, SF Dyes Pvt Ltd, A.T.E. Enterprises Private Limited, Zen Technologies, Vaishnavi Global Pvt Ltd. Mr Sumit Gupta, Hon. Secretary, Mumbai Chapter, SDC EC extended the formal vote of thanks on behalf of the organisers. The seminar was followed by dinner. This half day seminar was organised by Mumbai Chapter of Society of Dyers and Colourists Education Charity (SDC EC), India.

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COTTON REPORT

SUSTAINABILITY OF THE COTTON SUPPLY VALUE CHAIN

(Either All Will Survive Or None Will) Mr. Manish Daga MD, COTTON GURU cottongurutm@gmail.com

No individual segment of the textile supply chain, whether it is farming, ginning, spinning, and weaving, processing, or garmenting, can survive alone. Every segment is inter-dependent. We must learn to look at the bigger picture. History has taught us that the world remembers those great people who have “given” something to mankind and not taken from us. It is most important to have sustainable cotton supply value chain so has to benefit all the segments of the textiles industry. Cotton Fibre: A Truly Sustainable and Renewable Natural Resource y Cotton has been known to sustain for more than 5000 years of human history. Also, cotton will continue to grow for more 5000 years, which cannot be said for petroleum products like polyester. y Every year, cotton plantation cycle renews the crop which is an unending process. y Cotton is the most comfortable and breathable fibre compared to synthetic or blended fibres. y Thus, cotton is an eco-friendly “Sustainable and Renewable Natural Resource”. What do you mean by Sustainability? Sustainability has become an important topic of discussion in the world, not only because it helps businesses give back to the society but also because it helps to conserve energy and remain competitive. Sustainability is no more a CSR initiative because it has its own business dimension. Protecting the environment & natural resources is a key element of sustainability. Companies need to develop sustainable strategy that focuses on the entire supply chain starting from understanding the needs of their stakeholders, raw material procurement, product development, manufacturing, transportation, & handling finished products. Sustainability = more efficiency, more saving, more profits. 3 pillars of sustainability: People, Planet, Profit:

PEOPLE: The customer is the key to both quantifying and communicating the supply chain’s value.

PLANET: Sustainability is all about longevity, being able to plan ahead of the challenges of tomorrow. Protecting the environment and natural resources is a key thread of sustainability concept. PROFIT: Consistency in sustainability will pay back rapidly in terms of financial as well as environmental growth. For example, a 50,000 sq meter “Green building” can save about USD 30,000 in electricity costs and at least USD 15000 in water costs. Supply chain management: Supply chain management is the backbone of an organization. It has an important role to play in moving goods more quickly to their destination. It has become the most critical business discipline in the world today. The supply chain encompasses all of the activities associated with moving goods from the raw-materials stage through to the end user like: y transportation y Warehousing and inventory control y Sourcing, procurement, and supply management y Strategy, planning and execution of products and services y How to create a sustainable future for the textile industry

SWOT (STRENGTH, WEAKNESS, OPPORTUNITY, THREAT) ANALYSIS SEGMENT

CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

FUTURE OUTCOME

FARMER

Currently cotton cultivation is unsustainable with marginalized profits

While the world is flooded with cotton, availability of high quality is extremely limited

More crop per drop. Profits will depend on amount of high quality cotton produced.

GINNER

Weak sourcing strategy and bale management

Spinning mills around the world demand high quality sustainably produced and processed cotton

Competition will shift to quality more than price

SPINNER

Inconsistency in supply of quality cotton

Establishing supply chain for sourcing quality cotton

Focus on sourcing cotton that meets consumer demand

Customer is king

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April 2016


COTTON REPORT More labour intensive and highly competitive

Working efficiency of machine as important as cost and utility

Profitability will be aligned with efficiency

PROCESSOR

High volume, high impact source of water pollution and consumption

Designing and processing products in terms of reducing environmental impacts and energy cum water consumption

More socially responsible and innovative

GARMENTOR

Supply Cotton apSustainabilchain transpar- parel consumers ity and supply ency demand higher chain transquality goods parency will become vital for consumers

GOVERNMENT

Policy for sustainability of cotton supply value chain

Promote Growth of research and in- more industries dustry catering for value addito value addition tion of supply chain by products

RESEARCHER

Poor yields, Scarcity of water, Utility of by-products

Increase productivity, reduce costs and wastages, conserve energy

WEAVER

Introduction of quality seeds and Eco friendly fertilizers, insecticides, pesticides, etc

Sustainable Apparel Supply Chain:

REDUCE (Emission, Pollution, Water & Power consumption, input costs) – REUSE – RECYCLE (all possible bi-products & waste) Path to sustainability: 1) Bi-Product Utilization (Eg. Cotton): y Delinting of ginned seeds. y Protein Enrichment of Cottonseed Hull (outer covering) y Pre-Treatment of seed for higher oil recovery. y Use of Cotton stalks Raw Material for particle board making & briquettes. 65% of Cotton ball is seeds. We can make multiple uses of

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seeds. Also, cotton stalk which is normally cut and thrown away or burnt, can be used as raw material for packaging & fuel. 2) Innovation and value addition to meet future consumer demand: Futuristic consumer demand & functional requirements can be addressed by smart innovation such as Technical Textiles, use of etextiles in medical & apparel industry, Intelligent or Smart Textiles,

etc. E-Commerce & nano technology are the future. Branding & Social media are vehicles of Success. Both the above paths of bi-product utilization & innovation will increase the value of the product compared to the cost. Also, it will help unlock the potential value of product or service. Key to sustainability: increase consumption Governments of both China & India are struggling to sell Cotton. Crops are expected to reduce but sale of cotton is a matter of concern for all governments. The practical solution is to increase the consumption of cotton apparel so that more cotton is consumed. Everyone in the value-chain will be able to benefit if each bale of lint is tested for fibre attributes, bales are segregated based on their fibre properties with main emphasis on fineness & spun. The quality of yarn produced improves considerably, particularly for properties such as evenness, thick & thin places & neps. This in turn results in production of better quality fabric & garments Future of Cotton supply chain management: • Cultivation of cotton by design, & not by accident. • Meeting sustainability targets is a ‘Customer requirement’ & an ‘opportunity’ rather than a problem. • Sustainable factories will save substantially on energy & resource consumption. Advantage for Asia: Ever increasing number of consumers. • E-commerce will lead to a significant increase in consumption. • There is an explosion of demand from the young & earning generation. •

COTTONGURUTM ’s suggestions to promote the use of sustainable cotton fibre: • The use of tissue paper & plastic & paper bags is harmful for the environment. • Cotton handkerchiefs & cotton bags are the best & sustainable alternatives.

31


FIBRE & YARN EXPORTS REPORT

India Report COVERAGE EXTENDED TO 26 PORTS NOW

Beginning from this month, this report will cover 26 ports in India (as against 19 ports earlier) which accounts for 85% of cotton yarn and 60% of non-cotton yarn (excluding sewing threads) exported from India. Henceforth, we will be also faster in releasing this report around mid of every month. We continue to cover export data on fibre and filament yarns along with spun yarns in this report (For the ports covered, please see “Notes to Report”). SIMILAR REPORT ON FABRIC IS UNDER PREPARATION While this report is dedicated to fibres, filaments and spun yarns, we are preparing a separate report covering all kinds of fabric exports from India. Like this report, it will provide in-depth analysis and statistics of fabric exported from 33 ports in India accounting for 90% of total volume and value of export. We shall be glad to offer early bird scheme for this report. To know more about the scheme call us on 022-66291104, 66291141. INDIA’S OVERALL EXPORT DROP SLOW DOWN IN FEBRUARY India’s merchandise exports declined in February 2016 valued at US$20.74 billion (INR141,515 crore), down 5.6 per cent (up 3.7 per cent in INR terms) compared to the levels in February 2015. Total exports for the period April-February 2015-16 was down 16.7 per cent at US$238.4 billion (INR1,556,576 crore, down 10.8 per cent) over the same period last year. Imports in February 2016 were valued at US$27.3 billion (INR186,155 crore) and were 5 per centlower (4.4 per cent higher in INR terms) over the level of imports in February 2015. Thus, cumulative imports for the period April-February 2015-16 was US$351.80 billion, down 14.7 per cent (INR2,515,835 crore, down 8.7 per cent) over the same period last year. The fall in Indian

exports is in tandem with other major world economies. Crude oil imports declined 21.9 per cent in February 2016 and 40.5 per cent drop during April- February 2015-16. In similar comparison, non-oil imports were 0.5 per cent lower in February 2016 and 2.75 per cent lower in April-February, 2015-16. As a result, trade deficit for the period April-February 2015-16 was at US$113.4 billion, which waslower than the deficit of US$126.3 billion in April-February 2014-15. READY-MADE GARMENT PRICES TO RISE 2-5% The union budget 2016-17 has proposed to change the excise duty on branded readymade garments and made up articles of textiles with a retail price of INR1,000 and above from ‘Nil without input tax credit or 6 per cent/12.5 per cent with input tax credit’ to ‘2 per cent without input tax credit or 12.5 per cent with input tax credit. The textile industry is set to pass on the excise duty on ready-made garments in the budget, resulting in a price rise of at least five-six per cent. BANGLADESH IMPORTS 49% COTTON FROM INDIA According to the latest data from Bangladesh Textile Mills Association (BTMA), Bangladesh imports 49% cotton from India to meet its demand. Last year, it imported 6.10 million bales, of which 2.99 million bales or 49% were imported from India registering a 36 per cent growth over 2014. According to BTMA President Tapan Choudhury India has become the single largest source of cotton import for Bangladesh due to rapid shipment, better quality, price competitiveness and settlement of dispute in a relaxed manner. “Bangladesh is highly dependent on Indian cotton, the basic raw material for the textile industry, and dependency on a particular country is not good for us”, Tapan said. VIETNAM ERODING INDIA’S SHARE IN CHINA YARN MARKET Spun yarn exports in February 2016 were up by 22.8 per cent in volume terms while it declined 17.3 per cent in value terms. Spun yarn (all kinds) shipments were at 158 million kg worth US$307.9 million or INR2,080 crore, implying per unit realisation of US$1.94 per kg. This was down US$0.95 from February 2015. Chinese demand for Indian yarn has been reduced due to rising imports from Vietnam which is the second largest yarn exporting country to China. Also, China restricted foreign yarn imports since domestic prices were lower than import prices after taking account of import tariffs and taxes there. However, the fall of cotton yarn exports from India to China was partly offset by a rise to other destinations, like Bangladesh. In February 2016, 87 countries imported spun yarn from India, with China accounting for 27.4 per cent of the total value with imports edging down 1.3 per cent in terms of volume YoY and plunging 45.3 per cent in value YoY. Bangladesh, the second largest importer of spun yarns, accounted for around 17.8 per cent of all spun yarn exported from India. However, export to Bangladesh surged 178.2 per cent in volumes and 16.4 per cent in value. Egypt was the third largest importer of spun yarns, which saw volume rising 3.3 per cent and value declining 5.3 per cent. These three top importers together accounted for more than 50 percent of all spun yarns exported from India in February. Cotton yarn export was at 139.3 million kg in February with 74 countries importing yarn worth US$255.7 million (INR1,728 crore) in February 2016. The average unit price realization was at US$1.84 a kg, down US$0.83 from previous month and US$1.06 down from

32

www.textilevaluechain.com

April 2016


FIBRE & YARN EXPORTS REPORT the same month a year ago. China was the largest importer of cotton yarn from India in February, followed by Bangladesh and Egypt. The top three together accounted for more than 57 per cent of cotton yarn with combined volume at 102.5 million kg worth US$147.4 million. Their respective unit price realization was US$1.46 a kg, US$1.23 a kg and US$2.65 a kg. Pakistan, Turkey, Poland and Thailand were among the fastest growing markets for cotton yarn, and accounted for 9.1 per cent of total cotton yarn export value. Eleven new destinations were added for cotton yarn export, of which, Honduras, Finland, and Bulgaria were the major ones. Twelve countries did not import any cotton yarn from India, including Dominican Republic, Panama, Côte d’Ivoire, Mozambique and Czech Republic. They had imported yarns worth US$1.76 million in February 2015. In February 2016, significant deceleration was seen in export to France, Syria, Slovenia, Chile and Brazil. Combed cotton yarn accounted for 66.4 per cent of cotton yarn exported in February with volumes at 101.9 million kg worth US$169.8 million. Carded yarn export was at 29 million kg. Their respective unit value realization was US$1.67 per kg and US$2.34 per kg. Open ended yarn export was at 5.8 million kg at an average price of US$1.62 a kg.

MANMADE FIBRE YARN EXPORT FALLS AGAIN

were found for polyester yarn this February, of which, Mexico, Sudan, Syria and Russia were the major ones. Viscose yarn export was valued at US$6.38 million or INR43 crore and volume at 2.07 million kg, implying average unit price realization of US$3.07 per kg. They were exported to 24 countries with Belgium at the top worth US$1.77 million. It was followed by Iran with imports worth US$0.95 million. Both these markets accounted for 43.6 per cent of all viscose yarn exported in February. Bangladesh, China, Sri Lanka and USA were the fastest growing markets for viscose yarns while South Korea, Guatemala, Turkmenistan, Mauritius and Italy were the new major markets. Pakistan, Canada, Spain and Germany were the major ones among the 9 countries that did not import any viscose yarns during the month BLENDED YARNS EXPORT RISES AFTER RECENT FALL Blended spun yarns export was worth US$36.4 million in February, up 4.9 per cent YoY while volumes rose 9.7 per cent to 13 million kg. During the month, 6.4 million kg of PC yarns was exported worth US$16 million. Another 4.7 million kg of PV yarns valued at US$12.9 million were exported. Acrylic/cotton yarn prices were down 9.3 per cent YoY. In February, 1.2 million kg of other blend of yarns were exported worth US$5.7 million. Bangladesh and Egypt were the largest importers of PC yarn from India in February followed by Morocco. Argentina, Pakistan, Indonesia and Poland were the fastest growing markets for PC yarns while Chile significantly reduced its import of PC yarns from India. Dominican Republic and Ecuador were among the 13 countries that did not import any PC yarns from India during February. Honduras was the major destination among the 16 new markets found in February. In February, US$12.9 million worth of PV yarns were exported from India with volumes at 4.7 million kgs. Turkey and Iran contin volume at 3.39 million kg worth at US$8.9 million. Honduras and Dominican Republic were the new major markets for PV yarn while 12 countries did not import any PV yarn during the month, including the major ones like Brazil, Chile and Djibouti.

FILAMENT YARNS EXPORT PLUNGE IN FEBRUARY

100% man-made fibre yarns export was at 6.03 million kg in February, comprising 2.85 million kg of polyester yarn, 2.07 million kg of viscose yarn and 1.10 million kg of acrylic yarn. Polyester yarn exports were down 7 per cent in value while viscose yarn exports were up 11.1 per cent during the month. Acrylic yarn exports saw a drastic plunge of 40.7 per cent in February. Unit price realization was down US cents 15 a kg for polyester from a year ago and that of viscose yarn was up US cents 21 a kg. Acrylic yarn unit price realization was down US cents 6 a kg year on year basis. Polyester spun yarns were exported to 43 countries in February aggregating US$6.12 million with a unit price realization averaging US$2.15 a kg. A total of 2.85 million kg was exported, of which, 15.4 per cent was shipped by USA alone. Seven new destinations

April 2016

www.textilevaluechain.com

33


FIBRE & YARN EXPORTS REPORT In February, all types of filament yarns export aggregated31.6 million kg, declined 56.9 per cent YoY while value wasdown 16.9 per cent to US$50.9 million. Filament yarns include polyester, nylon, polypropylene and viscose filament yarns and were exported to 78 countries during the month. More than 87 per cent of filament yarns were of polyester, of which, DTYs were the largest at 68.3 per cent. In February, 30.1 million kg of polyester filament yarns were exported worth US$44.7 million. Turkey and Brazil continued to be the major importers of polyester filament yarns, followed by Bangladesh. The three together accounted for 42 per cent of polyester filament yarn exports. Brazil was also major importer of polyester DTYs and Turkey was major importer of PFYs. Sri Lanka was the major importer of nylon filament yarn in February with volumes at 42,000 kg worth US$0.32 million. In value terms, USA and United Arab Emirates were the other largest markets for nylon filament in February, worth US$0.32 million. Polypropylene filament yarns were exported to 15 countries in February with volumes at 192,000 kg worth US$0.34 million. Djibouti was

the major importer of PP yarns. Bangladesh and Paraguay were the other major importers of PP filament yarns in February. Around 968,000 million kg of viscose filament yarns were exported in February to 19 countries from India valued at US$4.1 million. During the month, 180,000 kg of VFYs were exported to Japan. It was followed by Germany and Turkey. COTTON EXPORT PRICE MOVES UP, VOLUMES DOWN Cotton fibre export was at 121.6 million kg or 715,505 bales (of 170 kg each) in February which was down 10.3 per cent YoY and was valued at US$177.8 million, up 8.1 per cent. Bangladesh and Pakistan were the largest importers of cotton with combined volumes at 474,415 bales amongst the 17 countries that imported cotton from India. Exports of manmade fibre were at 13.8 million kg, worth US$19 million. These included ASF, PSF, VSF and PPSF. Belgium and Iran were the largest importers of PSF during February while Pakistan and Israel were the major importer of VSF, in similar comparison. Vietnam was the dominant buyer of ASF.

SHOW CALENDAR

May 2016 2-5

IDEA 2016 BOSTON Place : Boston,

Information.aspx

22-24 HEIMTEXTIL Place : New Delhi / India,

info: www.inda.org

4-5 Textile Machinery Expo Place : Ahmadabad/ Gujarat, info : www.textilemachineryexpo.com

6-8

SCREEN PRINT INDIA 2016 Place : Mumbai/ India, info : spi2016.screenprintindia.com

20-23

TEXFAIR 2016 Place : Coimbatore/ India, info: www.simamills.org

June 2016 31st May-2 june Hometex 2016 Place : Banglore/ India, info: www.homtex.in

1-4

2-4

HIGHTEX 2016 / ITM 2016 Place : Istanbul, info: www.hightex2016.com / www.itm2016.com.tr NONWOVEN TECH ASIA Place : Mumbai/India, info: www.nonwoventechasia.com

14-16 CHINA YIWU INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION Place : China, info : http://yiwutex.com/YIWUTEX16 /Home/lang-eng

34

July 2016

info: http://heimtextil-india. in.messefrankfurt.com/

1-3

HGH INDIA 2016 Place : Mumbai/ India,

1-3

IIGF- INDORE Place : Indore/ MP,

info : www.hghindia.com

info : www.iigfindia.com

13-15 National Garment Fair Place : Mumbai/ India, info : www.cmai.in

19-21 F&A – NEW DELHI Place : New Delhi/ India, info : http://delhi.fnashow.in

26-28 Fashion Connect Place : Banglore/ India,

16-18 YARNEX Place : Tirupur/ India, info: www.yarnex.in

October 2016

11-13 FILTECH 2016 Place: Cologne/ Germany, info : www.filtech.de 12-14 TECHTEXIL CHINA Place: Shanghai/ China, info: www.techtextilchina.com

18-21 IFAI EXPO 2016 Place : CHARLOTTE, NC, info : http://ifaiexpo.com

21-25 ITMA ASIA + CITME 2016 Place: Shanghai/ China, info : www.itmaasia.com

November 2016

10-12 ICTN 2016 Place : Delhi, India, info : www.textileconferenceiitd.com

info: www.fashionconnect.co.in

23-26 YFA Place: New Delhi/ India,

August 2016 7-9

KNIT SHOW 2016 Place : Tirupur/ India, info: www.knitshow.in

September 2016 7-9

CAITME Place : Uzbekistan,

info: www.yfatradeshow.com

December 2016 3-8

INDIA ITME 2016 Place: Mumbai/ India, info: www.india-itme.com

info: http://www.caitme.uz

www.textilevaluechain.com

April 2016


TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN.qxp_Layout 1 20.01.16 12:25 Seite 1

FILTECH October 11 – 13, 2016

Cologne – Germany FILTECH is the largest and most important filtration event world-wide. FILTECH is the international platform solution provider for all industries covering every market segment. This Exhibition is a must for all those concerned with selling, purchasing, designing or researching filtration and separation equipment and services.

The Filtration Event

www.Filtech.de

Free Visitor Ticket for T Te extile Value Chain Readers Invitation Code: TVCatFILTECH Pre-register at www.filtech.de/ticket.jsp

Join the worlds largest Filtration Show


Meenakshi Enterprises Bangalore Meenakshi Enterprises Bangalore is a trading company dealing with several woven and non woven fabrics for industrial and domes c applica on. The company is associated with high quality manufacturers for the fabric produc on. Main raw materials are Co on, Polyester co on, Nylon and Polyester. The applica on of the fabrics are in rubber industries as liners, fabrics for Garment industries, fabrics for making carry bags, fabrics for medical applica on,

Meenakshi Enterprises Bangalore, G 105 Meenakshi Apartments, C Lingappa Block 3rd Cross Timmaya Garden Devagowda Road RT Nagar Bengaluru 560032

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jacke ng fabrics in belt industries and so on. The company can also supply the fabrics as per the customer requirement.

For Enquiries Contact:

Ph: 91 80 23330885 |Mobile: 91 7090944777 | Email: meenakshienterprisesbangalore@gmail.com

Manufacturer of Polyester Staple Fibre For Non-woven And Tex le Grade In Any Colour, Cut Length And Denier As Per Customers Specifica on. Plot No 47c, Dss Ltd Industrial Estate,village Piparia, Silvassa, Ut Of Dadra And Nagar Haveli – 396 230 Email :Mail@vmsfibre.com Contact No. 93223 27799 / 9819011924

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VMS INTERNATIONAL


Cover Price

36 issues

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APRIL 2016  

TECHNICAL TEXTILE SPECIAL

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