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SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN

OCTOBER 2012

OCTOBER 2012


30 TV-Quality DVD Episodes

HUNDREDS of Interactive Whiteboard Activities

You and your students will love our episodes on Music Theory, Instruments & Ensembles, Composers & Music History, and Music Styles! Includes Teacher Guides and resources aligned to National Standards that make lesson planning a breeze.

Eye-catching resources that grab students’ attention and encourage participation!

ow! Available N Teacher Admin Panel Issue song-building assignments within the Kid's Website, assess work, manage class lists, and more!

o Coming So

n!

Kid’s Website at QuaverMusic.com! Music-making fun for each of your students! Many activities are free, including song today! building activities, so sign-on today

iPad Apps

For use by teachers and students!

Customize your curriculum with our teacher-friendly 21st Century resources. Check it out at QuaverMusic.com/Preview

Seriously Fun! 1-866-917-3633 ™ info@QuaverMusic.com ™ Facebook.com/QuaverMusic ™ QuaverMusicBlog.com © 2012 QuaverMusic.com, LLC


15 FEATURES

OCTOBER 2012

8

Sustained by a Strong Foundation A look back at last year’s activities reveals our association’s continued strength and ability to serve its members and Texas schoolchildren well into the future. BY JOE WEIR

27

VOLUME 81 — ISSUE 3

Bullying: What Can We Do? Given the time music students spend together and how often they are in music classrooms, it is imperative to be well informed and equipped to respond appropriately and ultimately prevent this destructive behavior. BY DON TAYLOR

On the cover: Meghan Kajihara, a graduate of Ryan HS (Denton ISD), and Patricia Phillips, a graduate of Memorial HS (Spring Branch ISD), rehearse with the 2012 All-State Mixed Choir. Photo by Paul Denman.

COLUMNS President’s Notes .............................................. 4 by John Gillian Executive Director’s Notes..................12 by Robert Floyd Band Notes .............................................................20 by Ronnie Rios

40

The Inside Scoop: What Every Future Teacher Needs to Know Learn from the experience of a cooperating teacher, a recent student teacher, and a university supervisor as you prepare for success as a student teacher. BY NATE HUTCHERSON

,

WITH RUTH KURTIS

,

JONATHAN

MORSINKHOFF, AND MICHELE HENRY

53

Increase Student Interaction with Music Stations Similar to literacy stations and math centers, music stations allow you the freedom to facilitate and provide opportunities for individual and small-group interaction. Learn how you can make them part of your curriculum. BY ELASHA EDWARDS AND PAMELA GRIFFITH

UPDATES TMEA Scholarship Application Deadline Nears ...........................................2

Orchestra Notes .............................................. 33 by Lisa McCutchan

2013 Clinic/Convention: You Just Can’t Miss It! .........................................7 Why Should I Use the TMEA Housing System? ......................................... 15

Vocal Notes ............................................................46 by Janwin Overstreet-Goode

Educator Recognition Kickoff Rally at the Capitol.................................... 15 Arts Education Days at the Capitol ............................................................ 18

Elementary Notes ...........................................57 by Michele Hobizal

GoArts.org: Register and Spread the Word............................................... 31 College Division Call for Papers ................................................................. 66

College Notes ..................................................... 63 by Keith Dye

Thank You, Scholarship Donors ................................................................. 67 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

1


Editor-in-Chief: Robert Floyd

UĂ R\G@tmea.org 512-452-0710, ext. 101 Fax: 512-451-9213

Managing Editor: Karen Kneten

kkneten@tmea.org 512-452-0710, ext. 107 Fax: 512-451-9213

TMEA Executive Board President: John Gillian john.gillian@ectorcountyisd.org 3624 Loma Drive, Odessa, 79762 432-413-2266/Fax: 432-334-7174 – Ector County ISD

President-Elect: Joe Weir joseph.weir@humble.k12.tx.us 19627 Firesign Drive, Humble, 77346 281-641-7606/Fax: 281-641-7517 – Atascocita HS

Past-President: Ross Boothman rboothman@lumberton.k12.tx.us 8285 Ginger Lane, Lumberton, 77657 409-923-7858/Fax: 409-923-7819 – Lumberton HS

Band Vice-President: Ronnie Rios ronnierios@yahoo.com 22343 Paloma Blanca Court, Harlingen, 78550 956-427-3600 x 1080/Fax: 956-440-8343 – Harlingen HS

Orchestra Vice-President: Lisa McCutchan lisamccutchan1@gmail.com 17426 Emerald Canyon Drive, San Antonio, 78232 210-397-4759/Fax: 210-695-4804 – O’Connor HS

Vocal Vice-President: Janwin Overstreet-Goode MRYHUVWUHHWJRRGH#ÀVGNQHW 1406 Frontier Lane, Friendswood, 77546 281-482-3413 x 150/Fax: 281-996-2523 – Friendswood HS

Elementary Vice-President: Michele Hobizal VDOO\KREL]DO#NDW\LVGRUJ 11003 Bergamo Drive, Richmond, 77406 281-234-0050/Fax: 281-644-1690 – Wolman Elementary

College Vice-President: Keith Dye keith.dye@ttu.edu 6607 Norwood Avenue, Lubbock, 79413 806-742-2270 x 231/Fax: 806-742-4193 – Texas Tech University

TMEA Staff Executive Director: Robert Floyd |UĂ R\G@tmea.org Deputy Director: Frank Coachman | fcoachman@tmea.org Administrative Director: Kay Vanlandingham | kvanlandingham@tmea.org Advertising/Exhibits Manager: Tesa Harding | tesa@tmea.org Membership Manager: Susan Daugherty | susand@tmea.org Membership Assistant: Rita Ellinger | rellinger@tmea.org Communications Manager: Karen Kneten | kkneten@tmea.org Financial Manager: Laura Kocian | lkocian@tmea.org Information Technologist: Andrew Denman | adenman@tmea.org

70($2IÀFH Mailing Address: P.O. Box 140465, Austin, 78714-0465 Physical Address: 7900 Centre Park Drive, Austin, 78754 Phone: 512-452-0710 | Toll-Free: 888-318-TMEA | Fax: 512-451-9213 Website: www.tmea.org 2IÀFH+RXUV Monday–Friday, 8:30 A.M.–4:30 P.M.

Apply for a TMEA Scholarship Apply by November 15 to be eligible. Are you in an undergraduate music education program? Whether you just started a music education program or are preparing to begin student teaching, TMEA offers you support. Scholarships for undergraduate music majors (available only to active TMEA college student members) range from $2,000 to $2,500. One-Year Undergraduate Scholarships ‡70($DZDUGVRQH\HDUVFKRODUVKLSVWRFXUUHQWXQGHU graduate students enrolled in a music degree program at a Texas college or university leading to teacher certification. One-Semester Student Teacher Scholarships ‡70($DZDUGVRQHVHPHVWHUVFKRODUVKLSVWRFROOHJH VWXGHQWPHPEHUVVFKHGXOHGWRVWXGHQWWHDFKZLWKLQWKHWZR VHPHVWHUVIROORZLQJWKHDSSOLFDWLRQ

Are you a music teacher continuing your professional growth with graduate study? 70($VXSSRUWVLWVPHPEHUVZKRDUHFRPPLWWHGWRH[SDQGLQJWKHLU NQRZOHGJH DQG VNLOOV WKURXJK JUDGXDWH VWXG\ LQ PXVLF E\ RIIHULQJ scholarships of $1,250 to $2,500. One-Year Graduate Study Scholarships ‡$ZDUGHGWRJUDGXDWHVWXGHQWVIRURQH\HDURQO\DQGUDQJHIURP $1,250 to $2,500.

Do you teach high school seniors who want to be music educators? 70($RIIHUVXQGHUJUDGXDWHVFKRODUVKLSVIRUDSSOLFDQWVZKRHQUROO in a music degree program at a Texas college or university leading to teacher certification. Scholarships for graduating seniors range from $2,500 up to $15,000. Encourage your best and brightest seniors to apply and submit all supporting materials by November 15. Graduating Senior Scholarships ‡%LOO&RUPDFN6FKRODUVKLS\HDUIRUXSWRILYH\HDUV ‡3DVW3UHVLGHQWV0HPRULDO6FKRODUVKLS\HDUIRUXSWR five years ‡3DVW3UHVLGHQWV6FKRODUVKLS\HDUIRUXSWRILYH\HDUV ‡2QH\HDUVFKRODUVKLSVIRURQH\HDURQO\

Go to www.tmea.org/scholarships

Southwestern Musician (ISSN 0162-380X) (USPS 508-340) is published monthly except March, June, and July by Texas Music Educators Association, 7900 Centre Park Drive, Austin, TX 78754. 6XEVFULSWLRQUDWHV2QH<HDU²6LQJOHFRSLHV3HULRGLFDOSRVWDJHSDLGDW$XVWLQ7;DQGDGGLWLRQDOPDLOLQJRIĂ&#x20AC;FHV32670$67(56HQGDGGUHVVFKDQJHVWR6RXWKZHVWHUQ0XVLFLDQ32%R[ Austin, TX 78714-0465. Southwestern Musician was founded in 1915 by A.L. Harper. Renamed in 1934 and published by Dr. Clyde Jay Garrett. Published 1941â&#x20AC;&#x201C;47 by Dr. Stella Owsley. Incorporated in 1948 as National by Harlan-Bell Publishers, Inc. Published 1947â&#x20AC;&#x201C;54 by Dr. H. Grady Harlan. Purchased in 1954 by D.O. Wiley. Texas Music Educator was founded in 1936 by Richard J. Dunn and given to the Texas Music (GXFDWRUV$VVRFLDWLRQZKRVHRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOSXEOLFDWLRQLWKDVEHHQVLQFH,QWKHWZRPDJD]LQHVZHUHPHUJHGXVLQJWKHQDPH6RXWKZHVWHUQ0XVLFLDQFRPELQHGZLWKWKH7H[DV0XVLF(GXFDWRUXQGHUWKHHGLWRUVKLSRI'2:LOH\ZKRFRQWLQXHGWRVHUYHDVHGLWRUXQWLOKLVUHWLUHPHQWLQ$WWKDWWLPHRZQHUVKLSRIERWKPDJD]LQHVZDVDVVXPHGE\70($,Q$XJXVWWKH70($([HFXWLYH%RDUGFKDQJHGWKHQDPHRIWKH publication to Southwestern Musician.

2

Southwestern Musician | October 2012


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO

DEPARTMENT OF

OPPORTUNITY

EXPERIENCE EXCELLENCE

SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS )HEUXDU\WK WK

086,&87(3('8

Dr. Lowell E. Graham, Chair 500 W. University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 915.747.5606


PRESIDENTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTES IMPORTANT DATES Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Convention housing opens. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

Someone to admire B Y

J O H N

G I L L I A N

W

hen I think back over the past 26 years that I have been a member of TMEA and attend ing TMEA conventions, I am reminded of the many amazing music educators Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve met. 7KHYHU\ILUVW70($&OLQLF&RQYHQWLRQ,DWWHQGHGZDV LQDQG,UHPHPEHUVHHLQJ'U)UHGHULFN)HQQHOOZDON LQJ DORQJ WKH 5LYHUZDON $W WKH WLPH KH ZDV DV PXFK RI D VXSHUVWDU LQ P\ PLQG DV DQ\ +ROO\ZRRG $OLVW SHUVRQDOLW\ DQGZKHQKHVPLOHGSOHDVDQWO\DVZHSDVVHG,KDGWRWU\YHU\ KDUGQRWWRDSSHDURYHUO\VWDUVWUXFN<HDUVODWHU,ZDVHTXDOO\WKULOOHGZKHQ, VSRNHZLWKKLPEULHIO\DVKHDXWRJUDSKHGP\VHWRI7RN\R.RVHL&'V,ZDV absolutely a fan and admirer. My first remembrances of Dr. Fennell are from P\\HDUVRIMXQLRUKLJKDQGKLJKVFKRROEDQGUHKHDUVDOZKHQKLVSKRWRDQGD OLVWRIKLVWLSVZHUHDOZD\VGLVSOD\HGRQP\PXVLFVWDQG Similarly, I have been thrilled many times at our convention by meeting PXVLFHGXFDWLRQVXSHUVWDUV$IWHUJUDGXDWLQJIURPKLJKVFKRRO,ZRXOGRIWHQ VHHP\KLJKVFKRROEDQGGLUHFWRU0U&KDUOHV1DLO,ZDVDOZD\VWKULOOHGZKHQ he greeted me during those chance meetings, and I still enjoy my encounters ZLWKKLP,KDYHPXFKUHVSHFWDQGDGPLUDWLRQIRUKLP+HLVVWLOO´0U1DLOµ to me. , DOZD\V KRSH WKDW , WRR PLJKW PDNH D ODVWLQJ SRVLWLYH LPSUHVVLRQ RQ P\ VWXGHQWV,SODQJRRGOHVVRQVDQGZKHQ,DPLQWKHFODVVURRPZLWKVWXGHQWV ,ZRUNDVKDUGDV,FDQWRPDNHP\WLPHZLWKWKHPZRUWKZKLOH)URPWLPH to time, former students recognize me and tell me that I made a difference to WKHP7KRVHDUHVRPHRIWKHJUHDWHVWUHZDUGVLQWHDFKLQJ $VWKLVVFKRRO\HDUHYROYHV,HQFRXUDJH\RXWRWDNHDIHZPRPHQWVWRUHDG WKH70($&RGHRI(WKLFV 6WDQGDUG3UDFWLFHVIRXQGRQWKH70($ZHEVLWHDW ZZZWPHDRUJDERXWSROLFLHV,QRXUGDLO\ZRUNUHPHPEHULQJWKHLPSRUWDQW REOLJDWLRQV ZH KDYH WR RXU SURIHVVLRQ RXU VWXGHQWV DQG RXU FRPPXQLWLHV LV vitally important. ,XUJH\RXWROLYHDOLIHWKDWLVZRUWK\RIDGPLUDWLRQ,KDYHEHHQGLVWUHVVHG

Remembering the important obligations we have to our profession, our students, and our communities is vitally important. 4

Southwestern Musician | October 2012


We are proud to welcome our newest faculty members Donnie Ray Albert

Bruce Saunders

John Turci-Escobar

Ruth Ann Swenson

Gary Powell

Charles Villarrubia

Vocal Arts

Theory

Music Industry

Jazz Studies

Vocal Arts

Tuba

Listening The World is

m u s i c . u t e x a s . e d u


Do you have students interested in music business? Since 1990, the Texas Music Office in the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has provided Texans of all ages with accurate, unbiased information about our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music industry. The TMOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, EnjoyTexasMusic.com, lists more than 18,000 Texas music business contacts, as well as many helpful teaching aids and a complete descirption of the 145 Texas colleges offering music and music business degrees. The TMO: Your resource for teaching the business behind the notes.

Texas Music Office, Office of the Governor P.O. Box 13246, Austin, TX 78711 (512) 463-6666 music@governor.state.tx.us EnjoyTexasMusic.com

GXULQJ P\ FDUHHU E\ HGXFDWRUV ZKR seemed to have the admiration of many for their professional achievements, yet made personal decisions that cost them their careers and even their freedom. Recently, a former student of mine ZKR KDG EHFRPH D YHU\ VXFFHVVIXO EDQG GLUHFWRU ZDV DZDUGHG D ´7HDFKHU RI WKH <HDU¾DZDUGIRUKLVVFKRROGLVWULFW,LPDJ LQHG KLP FRQGXFWLQJ DQ +RQRU %DQG DW a future TMEA convention. The teach ers and students at his school had much admiration and great expectations for this young, rising star. -XVWGD\VDIWHUEHLQJQDPHG´7HDFKHURI WKH<HDU¾DQGMXVWEHIRUHWKHVFKRRO\HDU ZDVWRHQGKHZDVDUUHVWHGIRULQDSSUR priate conduct. Soon after being arrested, he admitted to the crime.

TMEA CLINIC/CONVENTION February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16 Â&#x2021; San Antonio www.tmea.org/convention

RBC MUSIC COMPANY INCORPORATED

6

Southwestern Musician | October 2012

0DQ\ RI XV ZHUH GHYDVWDWHG E\ WKLV VKRFNLQJQHZV/RFDODQGQDWLRQDOPHGLD OHW PLOOLRQV NQRZ WKH VWRU\ :LWKRXW D GRXEWWKHVWXGHQWVDQGFRPPXQLW\ZKHUH KH ZRUNHG ZHUH KDUPHG E\ WKH SRRU choices this young man made. A promis ing career ended in shame. When such a breach of trust occurs, not only does the profession lose a prom ising music educator and students lose a teacher, but the community may also lose UHVSHFW DQG WUXVW LQ RWKHUZLVH GHVHUYLQJ music educators. The trust that your community puts LQ\RXDVDQHGXFDWRULVLPPHQVH3OHDVH GRHYHU\WKLQJZLWKLQ\RXUSRZHUWRVKRZ that this trust is very much deserved and appreciated. 


2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention February 13–16

San Antonio

YOU JUST CAN’T MISS IT! October 2: Housing Reservation System Opens December 31: Fax/Mail Preregistration Ends

January 24: Online Preregistration Ends

LEA RN MORE

log y o n h c e t More and a s n o i s s e s olog y n h c e t y full-da ce! n e r e f n o prec

GET INSPIRED

Make Your Hotel Reservation

Over 250 expertly presented clinics for band, orchestra, vocal, elementary, and college division attendees offer a wealth of new information.

With over 60 performances and 13 open All-State rehearsals, you will hear new repertoire and learn from the nation’s top conductors.

SAV E MONEY Exhibit halls are filled with the latest products at the best possible prices. Get the latest music education supplies and much more!

With over 25,000 attendees expected at the 2013 convention, downtown San Antonio hotels will fill up quickly. TMEA works to ensure its members receive the best possible rates at hotels within walking distance of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. Go to the convention webpage to find the link for convention housing. Keep your confirmation for future reference.

www.tmea.org/convention Southwestern Musician | October 2012

7


SUSTAINED BY A STRONG FOUNDATION 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2012 TMEA Annual Report

BY JOE WEIR

O

XU UG /HJLVODWLYH 6HVVLRQ ZLOO UHDOL]H D ZHDOWK RIFKDQJHZLWKPDQ\QHZIDFHVLQWKH+RXVHDQG WKH6HQDWH,QDGGLWLRQZHZLOOJHWWRNQRZDQHZ &RPPLVVLRQHURI(GXFDWLRQDQGVHYHUDOQHZPHP EHUVRQWKH6WDWH%RDUGRI(GXFDWLRQ 6%2( $VZHIRUJHQHZ relationships at the capitol, TMEA continues to serve our mem EHUVKLSDQGRXUSURIHVVLRQQDWLRQZLGHDVWKHFRQVWDQWH[DPSOH RIZKDWPXVLFHGXFDWLRQVKRXOGORRNOLNHDQGUHSUHVHQWLQHYHU\ FODVVURRP 2XU DFWLYLWLHV RYHU WKH SDVW \HDU KDYH IRVWHUHG WKH IRXQGDWLRQ QHHGHG IRU FRQWLQXHG JURZWK DQG WUDLQLQJ RI QHZ OHDGHUV LQ HYHU\ GLYLVLRQ RI RXU DPD]LQJ DVVRFLDWLRQ <RXU QHZ OHDGHUVKLSORRNVWRVXVWDLQWKDWFRQVWDQWVXFFHVVDVZHFRQWLQXHWR JURZDQGVWUHQJWKHQRXUDGYRFDF\EDVHLQ² MEMBERSHIP REPORT 6XVWDLQLQJ QXUWXULQJ DQG JURZLQJ PHPEHUVKLS LV NH\ WR the success of every professional organization. Amidst contin ued budgetary challenges at the state and local levels, TMEA has managed to sustain impressive membership numbers. Your dedi cation to the profession and your membership status is crucial to maintaining TMEA as the constant support of music programs VWDWHZLGH $W WKH FORVH RI WKH ² \HDU RXU PHPEHUVKLS QXPEHUVZHUHWKHIROORZLQJ Â&#x2021;$FWLYH Â&#x2021;5HWLUHG Â&#x2021;6XVWDLQLQJ Â&#x2021;&ROOHJH6WXGHQWV Â&#x2021; ,QVWLWXWLRQDO Â&#x2021;Total: 15,414 2012 TMEA CLINIC/CONVENTION :LWK RYHU  LQ DWWHQGDQFH WKH  70($ &OLQLF &RQYHQWLRQZDVDQLQFUHGLEOHRIIHULQJRISURIHVVLRQDOGHYHORS ment and musical inspiration for all. For the 12th year, TMEA

8

Southwestern Musician | October 2012

RIIHUHGFRQYHQWLRQDWWHQGDQFHWRLWVPHPEHUVDW(YHQZLWK no rate increases, the opportunities throughout these four days FRQWLQXHGWRJURZ+LJKOLJKWVIURPWKHFRQYHQWLRQLQFOXGHG Â&#x2021;ZRUNVKRSV Â&#x2021;SHUIRUPDQFHVLQFOXGLQJDVROGRXW3UHVLGHQW·V&RQFHUW IHDWXULQJWKH9LHQQD%R\V&KRLU Â&#x2021;&ROOHJH1LJKWERRWKV Â&#x2021;H[KLELWKDOOERRWKV Â&#x2021;HGXFDWRUDWWHQGHHV Â&#x2021;WRWDODWWHQGHHV TMEA AWARDED $1 MILLION GR ANT ,Q$XJXVWRI70($ZDVDZDUGHGDPLOOLRQ)LQH$UWV ,QVWUXFWLRQDO 6XSSRUW 3URJUDP JUDQW WR DVVLVW KLJKTXDOLW\ DQG VXFFHVVIXO 7(.6EDVHG ILQH DUWV SURJUDPV JUDGHV ²  WKDW ZHUHH[SHULHQFLQJFULWLFDOEXGJHWUHGXFWLRQV7KLVGLVFUHWLRQDU\ JUDQWIURPWKH7H[DV(GXFDWLRQ$JHQF\ZDVGHVLJQDWHGIRUILQH DUWVSURJUDPVZLWKDGHILQHGUHFRUGRIH[FHOOHQFHWKDWKDGVXI fered budget cuts due to the actions of the legislature during the 82nd session. :LWK D VKRUW WLPHOLQH DOORZHG IRU WKH GLVWULEXWLRQ RI WKHVH IXQGV70($PRYHGTXLFNO\WRFUHDWHDQRQOLQHDSSOLFDWLRQSUR cess for the distribution of this grant and hired Tom Waggoner to serve as grant administrator. 7KHPLOOLRQOHVVH[SHQVHVDOORZHGIRUDFFHSWDQFHRI JUDQWVWRHQDEOHVWXGHQWVWRFRQWLQXHSDUWLFLSDWLRQLQKLJKTXDO LW\VXFFHVVIXO7(.6EDVHGVHFRQGDU\ILQHDUWVSURJUDPV2IWKH WRWDOJUDQWVZHUHDZDUGHGWRPXVLFSURJUDPVWKDWUHFHLYHG RYHU  RI WKH JUDQW IXQGLQJ RWKHU JUDQW IXQGLQJ ZDV DZDUGHG WR DUW GDQFH DQG WKHDWHU SURJUDPV  *UDQW IXQGLQJ IRU PXVLF SURJUDPV ZDV XVHG IRU D YDULHW\ RI SXUSRVHV LQFOXG LQJLQVWUXFWLRQDOPDWHULDOVFRPSXWHUVDQGVRIWZDUHLQVWUXPHQW UHSODFHPHQWUHSDLUFKRUDOULVHUVDQGVRXQGV\VWHPV As a general guide, programs received grant dollars propor


tionate to the number of completed appli cations submitted in each discipline that met all the criteria. TMEA HONORS SCHOOL ADMINISTR ATORS 7KURXJKRXW WKH ² VFKRRO \HDU 70($ KRQRUHG RYHU  XSSHU OHYHO VFKRRO DGPLQLVWUDWRUV ZKR ZHUH nominated by TMEA members for being LQVWUXPHQWDOLQSUHVHUYLQJTXDOLW\PXVLF education programs on their campuses and in their districts. TMEA sent the administrator a letter congratulating them on the honor and provided the nominator a certificate to present to their administra tor in a public setting. TMEA Executive Director Robert Floyd received several responses from administrators champi oning the value of music education and thanking TMEA for this honor. Several RI WKHVH DGPLQLVWUDWRUV¡ VWRULHV ZHUH SXEOLVKHG LQ WKH -DQXDU\²0D\ LVVXHV RI SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN. $SURJUDPOLNHWKLVUHSUHVHQWVRQHZD\ ZHFDQKLJKOLJKWWKHPDQ\VXFFHVVHVSUHV ent in numerous schools across our state. )URPGLVWULFWVZLWKRQO\DVLQJOHHOHPHQ tary, middle, and high school to those ZLWK PXOWLSOH $ FDPSXVHV DGPLQLVWUD tors have great influence over a programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opportunity for success.

aged members to become engaged in OHJLVODWLYH DQG 6%2( SULPDULHV 70($ OHDGHUV DOVR FRQGXFWHG ZRUNVKRSV IRU arts administrators in the Houston area DQGWKH'DOODV)RUW:RUWK0HWURSOH[RQ KRZWREHFRPHHIIHFWLYHO\LQYROYHGLQWKH political process in their parts of the state. Floyd provided invited testimony EHIRUHWKH+RXVH&RPPLWWHHRQ&XOWXUH Recreation, and Tourism about the impact of arts education on the Texas economy. Floyd also spoke at a monthly board OXQFKHRQ RI WKH *UDPP\ )RXQGDWLRQ KLJKOLJKWLQJKRZWKH\PLJKWEHWWHUSDUW

ner to support music education in our state. TMEA leaders also exhibited at confer ences of the Texas Association of School Administrators and the Texas Association RI6FKRRO%RDUGV SUSTAINING FINANCIAL HEALTH Thanks to conservative fiscal poli FLHV EXGJHW UHVWUDLQW DQG WKH ZRUN RI our financial planner, TMEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial health is a constant of positive assets. We FRQWLQXHWRWKULYHZKLOHPDLQWDLQLQJWZR

Teachers Everywhere Are Raving About

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The students canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get enough of it! The feedback I receive is a lot of happy

parents.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;JOHN MONTGOMERY, HOLLAND, MI

LEGISLATURE AND ADVOCACY :KLOH WKH 7H[DV /HJLVODWXUH ZDV QRW in session during this past membership \HDU WKH ([HFXWLYH %RDUG FRQWLQXHG WR ZRUN ZLWK RXU OREE\LVW 0DWW 0DWWKHZV WREHJLQSODQVIRUWKHUGOHJLVODWLYHVHV VLRQWKDWEHJLQVLQ-DQXDU\ 0DWWKHZV DQG )OR\G KHOG PHHWLQJV WKURXJKRXWWKHVSULQJZLWKNH\OHJLVODWLYH PHPEHUVDQGVWDIIOD\LQJJURXQGZRUNIRU possible arts education legislation for the VHVVLRQ ,Q -DQXDU\ 70($ ZDV VXFFHVVIXO LQ influencing the amending of language LQWKH7H[DV$GPLQLVWUDWLYH&RGHWRGLV DOORZ VWXGHQWV PHHWLQJ WKH RQH FUHGLW ILQH DUWV JUDGXDWLRQ UHTXLUHPHQW E\ WDN LQJ D FRPELQDWLRQ RI WZR KDOI FUHGLWV RI DQ\ WZR VWDWHDSSURYHG ILQH DUWV FRXUVHV (except under extenuating circumstance such as transferring schools). This policy ZRXOGKDYHDOORZHG´FRXUVHKRSSLQJ¾DQG eroded effective teaching and learning in our classrooms. Throughout the year TMEA encour

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m seeing my students become

more confident in themselves.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;JANET HODEK, ST. GEORGE, UT

Scan this code or visit

http://4wrd.it/A.SiPreviewTX for a preview copy!

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Southwestern Musician | October 2012

9


2013 Admissions & Scholarship Auditions February 23rd March 9th March 23rd (Additional dates upon request) Auditions are required of all entering and transferring music majors

Degrees Offered Bachelor’s degrees in Performance & Music Education Master of Music in Performance & Music Education

NEW FACULTY MEMBERS HELP

BRING MUSIC TO LIFE

The Music Department at Texas A&M University-Commerce is honored to welcome its newest faculty members: Allan Goodwin, Associate Director of Bands and Director of “The Pride” Marching Band; Dr. David Scott, Head of the Department of Music; Dr. Chris Beaty, Saxophone and Director of “Mane Attraction” Jazz Ensemble; Jonna Griffith, Bassoon; Jennifer Glidden, Voice; and Julee Kim Walker, Flute.

A Member of The Texas A&M University System

WWW.TAMUC.EDU/MUSIC


\HDUV RI RSHUDWLQJ H[SHQVHV LQ VDYLQJV LQYHVWPHQWV &RQVHUYDWLYH LQYHVWLQJ DQG FDUHIXOSODQQLQJWKURXJKRXWWKHSDVWWZR years have set us up for a bright future ZKLOH KHOSLQJ WR NHHS PHPEHUVKLS DQG convention fees for members at an amaz LQJORZFRVW

DVVHVVWKHHQWLUHSURFHVVDVWRKRZLWEHVW serves students, members, and programs throughout the state in all performance GLYLVLRQV7KH([HFXWLYH%RDUGZLOOHYDO uate the committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s input this fall and determine the need for further study and possible change.

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TMEA SCHOLARSHIPS With continued generosity from our members, the scholarship program has remained a constant and incredible source of support for many future music edu cators, graduate students, and student WHDFKHUV2QFHDJDLQ70($6FKRODUVKLS DZDUGV LQFUHDVHG WR D UHFRUGEUHDNLQJ  EHLQJ DZDUGHG WR  LQGLYLGX als. As a former recipient of the TMEA graduate scholarship, I can honestly say that the funds provided to me made a huge difference in the affordability of my PDVWHU·V GHJUHH &RQJUDWXODWLRQV WR DOO the 2012 recipients!

ALL-STATE AUDITION REVIEW 7KH ([HFXWLYH %RDUG DVVHPEOHG D FRPPLWWHH WR UHYLHZ WKH VWUXFWXUH DQG PDNHXS RI WKH $OO6WDWH %DQGV 2UFKHVWUDV DQG &KRLUV DV ZHOO DV DXGLW audition procedures at each level. The FRPPLWWHH ZDV JLYHQ WKH FKDUJH WR

TEX AS MUSIC SCHOLARS 7KLV \HDU VDZ DQ LQFUHDVH RI VWXGHQWV DZDUGHG WKLV GLVWLQFWLRQ ZLWK  VWX dents being presented a patch and cer tificate for their dedication to scholarship

DQG PXVLFLDQVKLS &KHFN LQWR WKH 7H[DV Music Scholars program in the coming year to ensure your deserving students receive this honor. TEX AS FUTURE MUSIC EDUCATORS :LWKFKDSWHUVDQGDFWLYHPHP bers, TFME provides music students incredible opportunities to learn about careers in music and music education, WKHUHIRUHHQVXULQJWKHJURZWKDQGIXWXUH RI 70($ /HDUQ PRUH DERXW VWDUWLQJ D FKDSWHUDWZZZWPHDRUJWIPH $VZHFRPSOHWHWKLVUHYLHZRIDQRWKHU successful year in TMEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, it is important to realize that it is up to each of us to be local champions for music HGXFDWLRQ ,W LV WKURXJK VKRZFDVLQJ RXU VWXGHQWV· DFFRPSOLVKPHQWV WKDW ZH DUH poised to be the most effective music edu cation advocates, ensuring our local and state leaders appreciate that music educa tion is essential to the overall education of all students.  Joe Weir is the Choir Department Chair at Atascocita HS and TMEA Past-President.

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AVAILABLE DEGREES

2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 AUDITION DATES

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Southwestern Musician | October 2012 11


EXECUTIVE DIRECTORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTES IMPORTANT DATES Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Convention housing opens. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

Educator believers = student achievers B Y

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or the past three years I have served as a member of WKH 3DUHQW 7HDFKHU $VVRFLDWLRQ $GYLVRU\ &RXQFLO ZKLFKPHHWVVHYHUDOWLPHVD\HDUWRVWUDWHJL]HSROLF\ WRVXSSRUWSXEOLFHGXFDWLRQLQRXUVWDWH$QHTXDOO\ LPSRUWDQWJRDOLVWRLPSURYHWKHVRPHZKDWWDUQLVKHGLPDJH of the teaching profession as painted by some members of the general public, the press, and certain public officials. This FRXQFLOLVPDGHRIUHSUHVHQWDWLYHVRIDOPRVWWZHQW\HGXFDWLRQ associations, including superintendents, principals, librarians, and music educators. &RXQFLO PHPEHUV UHFHQWO\ GHFLGHG WR ODXQFK D SURMHFW WR JLYH WKH JHQHUDO SXEOLFWKHRSSRUWXQLW\WRUHFRJQL]HWKHWKRXVDQGVRIWHDFKHUVZKRSURYLGHTXDO ity instruction daily throughout the school year. The council members truly believe the success of Texas students is in large part due to the dedicated educa WRUVLQWKLVJUHDWVWDWHDQGRIFRXUVHDVWHDFKHUVZHDOOZRXOGDJUHHWKLVLVWUXH 7KHILQDOSURGXFWRIWKHFRXQFLO¡VHIIRUWVWKHQZDVWKHFUHDWLRQRIWKHZHEVLWH ZZZWH[DVEHVWHGXFDWRURUJWRRIIHU7H[DQVWKHRSSRUWXQLW\WRJLYHMXVWUHFRJ nition to our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educators on any campus in any school district across our state. Anyone can recognize a teacher, librarian, principal, or superintendent ZKRVHZRUNHQVXUHVWKDW7H[DVVWXGHQWVQRWRQO\FRPSOHWHWKHLUFRXUVHZRUNEXW also make it a banner year for public education in Texas. The goal is to recognize at least 100,000 Texas educators by completion of the 180 days of this school year. 7KH NLFNRII HYHQW ZDV KHOG RQ :HGQHVGD\ 6HSWHPEHU  RQ WKH VRXWK VWHSVRIWKHVWDWHFDSLWROZKHUHWHDFKHUVDGPLQLVWUDWRUVDQGFLWL]HQVJDWKHUHG WR ODXQFK WKH HIIRUW DQG KHDU RXU QHZ &RPPLVVLRQHU RI (GXFDWLRQ 0LFKDHO Williams, give his first public speech, appropriately praising and thanking WHDFKHUV)HVWLYHPXVLFZDVSURYLGHGE\:HVWZRRG+RQRUV%DQGIURP5RXQG 5RFN,6'FRQGXFWHGE\-DFN*UHHQ VHHSLFWXUHVIURPWKHHYHQWRQSDJH  6RZKDWUROHFDQ\RXSOD\WRPDNHWKLVVWDWHZLGHHIIRUWDVXFFHVV"$GPLWWHGO\ LW VHHPV D ELW VHOIVHUYLQJ IRU D WHDFKHUV¡ DVVRFLDWLRQ WR SURPRWH D FDXVH WR

5HFRJQL]HDFROOHDJXH\RXUSULQFLSDORQHRI\RXU own childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dedicated teachers, or a teacher ZKR LQĂ XHQFHG \RX ZKHQ \RX ZHUH D VWXGHQW Go to: www.texasbesteducator.org 12 Southwestern Musician | October 2012


WANDA L. BASS SCHOOL OF MUSIC

0 1 9 r e b m e v 9 No 8 y r a u r b e F 9 8 h c r a M TO SCHEDULE AN AUDITION:

www.okcu.edu/music ocumauditions@okcu.edu

405.208.5980


We Are The Future of Music Education Bachelors Degrees Composition Music Education Music Marketing Performance

Bachelor of Arts Degree Masters Degrees Conducting Music Education Performance Piano Pedagogy & Performance Vocal Pedagogy & Performance

In the photo - Senior Music Education major Cathryn Boethel leads a theory lesson for a class of San Antonio area middle-school students. Our music education majors get opportunities to work with students in a wide variety of rural, urban, and suburban settings through early field experiences and internships.

We Are UTSA

The University of Texas at San Antonio Department of Music

facebook.com/UTSAMusic (210) 458-4354 http://music.utsa.edu


UHFRJQL]H TXDOLW\ WHDFKHUV RU PRUH VSH cifically, for teachers to promote them VHOYHV WR WKH SDUHQWV RI WKHLU RZQ VWX GHQWV IRU VXFK UHFRJQLWLRQ +RZHYHU , do believe it is appropriate for you to rec ognize a colleague, your principal, one of \RXURZQFKLOGUHQ¡VGHGLFDWHGWHDFKHUVRU D WHDFKHU ZKR LQIOXHQFHG \RX ZKHQ \RX ZHUHDVWXGHQW The most effective method to get the ZRUGRXWPD\EHWRVLPSO\VKDUHWKHZHE VLWH ZLWK \RXU ERRVWHU FOXE ERDUG DQG let them distribute it to parents through GHILQHGFKDQQHOV7KH37$RQ\RXUFDP SXV DQG RWKHU WHDFKHU RUJDQL]DWLRQV ZLOO be launching a communication effort as ZHOO 2QHRI70($¡VVWDWHGJRDOVLVWRSDUW QHU ZLWK RWKHU HGXFDWLRQ DVVRFLDWLRQV LQ Austin for the betterment of public edu cation. In my nineteen years as executive director, this is the first project I have NQRZQRIWKDWWUXO\XQLWHVXVDOODQGGRHV not pit teacher associations against school ERDUGVDQGVXSHULQWHQGHQWVZKLFKVRPH times is the case. I encourage you to get involved and help us reach the 100,000 teacher recognition goal by the conclusion of the school year. The process is simple DQG WKH QRPLQDWLRQ LV TXLFN DQG HDV\ WR FRPSOHWH3OHDVHGR\RXUSDUWWRPDNHLWD success. Teachers deserve it! 

Why Should I Use the TMEA Housing System? To Help Make Registration Affordable Although TMEA does not receive a monetary commission for rooms reserved LQ RXU EORFN RXU FRQWUDFWHG FRVWV ZLWK WKH FRQYHQWLRQ FHQWHU DUH GLVFRXQWHG EDVHGRQWKHWRWDOURRPVVROG/RZHUFRVWVIRUWKHFHQWHUWUDQVODWHLQWRFRQWLQXHG ORZUHJLVWUDWLRQIHHV To Prevent Hotel Attrition Penalties To reserve the needed hotel rooms to house our convention attendees, TMEA contracts for almost 5,000 rooms on peak nights. If a certain threshold of rooms VROGLVQRWPHW70($LVVXEMHFWWRSHQDOW\ZKLFKFRXOGXOWLPDWHO\EHSDVVHG RQLQGXHVRUUHJLVWUDWLRQIHHLQFUHDVHV$OVRORZKRWHOSLFNXSFRXOGWULJJHUWKH DGGLWLRQRIUHQWDOIHHVIRUODUJHPHHWLQJVSDFHZKHUH$OO6WDWHHQVHPEOHVUHKHDUVH To Ensure You Stay in a Nearby Hotel TMEA contracts for all available rooms in the nearby hotels. While in a rare LQVWDQFH\RXPD\JHWDORZHUUDWHWKURXJKDQ,QWHUQHWVLWH\RXUXQWKHULVNRI losing your reservation upon arrival. To Avoid More Stringent Housing Policies For many conventions and meetings, attendees booking housing outside the reserved block is becoming a problem. In some cases this has resulted in poli FLHVWKDWUHTXLUHDWWHQGHHVWRSD\DKLJKHUUHJLVWUDWLRQIHHLIWKH\GRQRWERRND URRPLQVLGHWKHEORFN6XSSRUWLQJRXUKRXVLQJSURFHVVZLOOSUHYHQWWKH([HFXWLYH %RDUGIURPKDYLQJWRLQVWLWXWHVXFKDSROLF\

Reservations Open October 2 w w w.tmea.org /convention

TMEA Joins Texas PTA and New Commissioner of Education to Honor Texas Teachers

Michael Williams, Texas Commissioner of Education

Leslie Boggs, Texas PTA

Representative Diane Patrick

Sharon Goldblatt, Texas PTA

Westwood HS Honors Band Southwestern Musician | October 2012 15


Congr atulations 2012 Mark of Excellence National

Wind Band

National Winners Class A

Canyon Ridge MS Honor Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coppell MS North Honor Winds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Downing MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grisham MS Honors Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hernandez MS Honor Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Class AA

Byrd MS Symphonic I Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Canyon Vista MS Honors Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cedar Park MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doerre MS Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Longfellow MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McMeans JH Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shadow Ridge MS Honor Winds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T.A.Howard MS Honor Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trinity Springs MS Honors Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Westbrook Intermediate Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Winners listed in alphabetical order

Amy Allison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Austin, TX Joel Ashbrook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coppell, TX Mike Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flower Mound, TX Betty Bierschenk-Pierce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Austin, TX Cathy Humphrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Round Rock, TX Kevin Graham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duncanville, TX Mark Piwetz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Austin, TX Manuel C. San Luis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cedar Park, TX Matt Fehl, Jennifer Prine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring, TX Brad Zimmerman, Deidra Denson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Falls Church, VA George Liverman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katy, TX Chris Meredith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flower Mound, TX Nathaniel Neugent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arlington, TX Dean Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keller, TX Rick Brockway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friendswood, TX

Class AAA

Fredericksburg HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Rauschuber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fredericksburg, TX North Lamar HS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Randy Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paris, TX

Class AAAA

Douglas Anderson SOTA Wind Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frisco HS Wind Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vandegrift HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vernon Hills HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wylie East HS Wind Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Class AAAAA

Clear Lake HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College Park HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dulles HS Honor Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marcus HS Wind Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKinney Boyd HS Honors Band. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plano East Senior High Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Woodlands HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Shawn Barat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacksonville, FL Gregory C. Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frisco, TX Jeremy Spicer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Austin, TX David Tribley, Randy Sundell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vernon Hills, IL Glenn Lambert, Paul Heuer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wylie, TX Joe Munoz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Houston, TX Charlotte N. Royall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Woodlands, TX Joe Pruitt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sugar Land, TX Amanda Drinkwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flower Mound, TX Joe Nunez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKinney, TX Evelio Villareal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plano, TX Gabe Musella, Terri Risinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring, TX Joni Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Woodlands, TX

New Music Division

Clear Creek HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephen Meyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . League City, TX Cypress Ranch HS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Russell Holcombe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cypress, TX

Commended Winners Class A

Cobb MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . DeSoto West MS Wind Symphony . . . . . . Leander MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . North Ridge MS Honors Band . . . . . . . . . School for the Performing Arts MS Band

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Marty Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frisco, TX Ryan DeLaGarza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DeSoto, TX Cathy Teltschik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leander, TX James Smith, Jessica Shadman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Richland Hills, TX Robin Barker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lexington, KY

Cook MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fowler MS Symphonic Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indian Springs MS Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kealing MS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knox JH Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lopez MS Honors Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Running Brushy MS Honors Band. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Space Center Intermediate Symphonic Band. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warren MS Honors Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wiley MS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Michael Dick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Houston, TX David Dunham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frisco, TX David Puckett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keller, TX Mark Gurgel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Austin, TX Jennifer Dillard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Woodlands, TX Andy Post . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . San Antonio, TX Edward Pagliai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cedar Park, TX Donald McCandless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Houston, TX Adam Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forney, TX Garland Chiasson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leander, TX

Class AA

Class AAA

Bushland HS Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregg Diamond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bushland, TX

Class AAAA

Canyon HS Symphonic Band . . . . . Forney HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . . . McKinney North HS Honors Band . Western Hills HS Wind Symphony .

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Mike Sheffield . Mark Poole . . . . Alan Harkey . . . Eric M.Mullins .

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Brian Casey . . . . . . . . Alexander Kaminsky . Daniel Galloway . . . . . Andy Sealy . . . . . . . . . Jeff Bradford . . . . . . . Gloria Ramirez . . . . . . Diane Vasquez . . . . . . Jack Green . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . Clute, TX . Gainesville, FL Sugar Land, TX . .Carrollton, TX . . . . . Dallas, TX . . . Houston, TX . . . Houston, TX . . . . .Austin, TX

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Mark Eastin . John Yoon . . . Jeff Bradford Alan Harkey .

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. . . Granbury, TX . . Greenwich, CT . . . . . . Dallas, TX . . . McKinney, TX

Class AAAAA

New Music Division

Granbury HS Wind Ensemble. . . . . . Greenwich HS Wind Ensemble . . . . . Lake Highlands HS Wind Ensemble McKinney North HS Honors Band . .

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Thanks to Wind Band adjudicators Gary Garner, James Keene, and Larry Livingston. With 184 entries, the Mark of Excellence progr am has now received entries from 35 states. More information at www.foundationformusiceducation.org/mark-of-excellence.

TX TX TX TX


Orchestr a

Wind Band, Orchestr a, Percussion, and Jazz Winners National Winners HS Full Orchestra Cinco Ranch HS Symphony Orchestra...................................... Brett Nelsen, Ray Jones, Troy Eads ..................................................... Katy, TX Cypress Woods Full Symphony Orchestra ................................ Victoria Campion ............................................................................ Cypress, TX

HS String Orchestra

Dulles HS Honors Orchestra ..................................................... Michael Alan Isadore ................................................................ Sugar Land, TX Plano East Senior High Chamber Orchestra ............................ Betsy Thomas ...................................................................................... Plano, TX

MS Full Orchestra

Kealing MS Symphony Full Orchestra ..................................... David Jarrott ......................................................................................Austin, TX

MS String Orchestra

Kealing MS Symphony Orchestra ............................................. David Jarrott ......................................................................................Austin, TX Salyards MS Chamber Orchestra .............................................. Glynnes Lanthier ............................................................................ Cypress, TX Sartartia MS Symphony Orchestra ........................................... Ann Victor, Sophia Hsieh .......................................................... Sugar Land, TX

Youth Orchestra

Houston Youth Symphony ......................................................... Michael Webster ..............................................................................Houston, TX

Commended Winners HS Full Orchestra

Dulles HS Honors Symphony Orchestra ................................... Michael Alan Isadore ................................................................ Sugar Land, TX Shepton HS Symphony Orchestra ............................................. Joshua Thompson, Ellie Murphy ........................................................ Plano, TX

HS String Orchestra

Stephen F. Austin HS Symphony String Orchestra .................. Carolyn Vandiver ...................................................................... Sugar Land, TX

MS Full Orchestra

Lanier MS Symphony Orchestra ............................................... Laurette McDonald, Ali Jackson ....................................................Houston, TX

MS String Orchestra

Fort Settlement MS Orchestra .................................................. Angela Peugnet ......................................................................... Sugar Land, TX Johnston MS Sinfonia................................................................ Jose Rocha ......................................................................................Houston, TX

Youth Orchestra

Jazz Percussion

The Youth Symphony of Central Virginia ................................. Charles West.......................................................................... Charlottesville, VA

National Winners HS Percussion Ensemble

Brazoswood HS Percussion Ensemble ...................................... Eric Harper .......................................................................................... Clute, TX

MS Percussion Ensemble

Cook MS Percussion Ensemble ................................................. Michael Dick ...................................................................................Houston, TX

Commended Winners HS Percussion Ensemble

Spring HS Percussion Ensemble ............................................... J.D. Guzman ...................................................................................... Spring, TX

MS Percussion Ensemble

Desert Springs MS Percussion Ensemble ................................. Gary J. Coble ................................................................. Desert Hot Springs, CA

National Winners HS Jazz Ensemble

Temple HS Highlighters ............................................................ Brent Mathesen ................................................................................. Temple, TX Wheeling HS Jazz Band I .......................................................... Brian J. Logan ............................................................................... Wheeling, IL

MS Jazz Ensemble

McMath MS Tiger Jazz Band ..................................................... Travis E. Harris ................................................................................Denton, TX

Open Class

NJPAC Wells Fargo Jazz for Teens Ensemble ........................... Jeffrey Griglak ................................................................................. Newark, NJ

HS Jazz Ensemble

Commended Winners

Birdville HS Jazz Ensemble ....................................................... Mike Cheripka ............................................................ North Richland Hills, TX Brazoswood HS PM Jazz Band .................................................. Brian Casey .......................................................................................... Clute, TX Jackson Liberty HS Jazz Ensemble ........................................... Scott Katona.....................................................................................Jackson, NJ

MS Jazz Ensemble

Indian Springs MS Jazz Band ................................................... Christopher Sebesta ........................................................................... Keller, TX Thanks to adjudicators Anthony Maiello (Orchestr a), Lalo Davila (Percussion), and Shelly Berg (Jazz). This year's project had 184 entr ants. The Mark of Excellence progr am has now received entries from 35 states. More information at www.foundationformusiceducation.org/mark-of-excellence


Arts Education Days at the Capitol Who: What: When: Where: Why:

O

Texas fine arts students Arts Education Days at the Capitol March 4–5, 2013 Texas State Capitol To champion fine arts education Go to www.tcqae.org to apply.

n March 4–5, 2013, the Texas Coalition for Quality Arts Education (TCQAE) will host its 11th Arts Education Days at the Capitol. Each day will be a celebration of the importance of the arts and arts education featuring performances by outstanding arts students (music, art, theater, and dance) from throughout the state.

The first day will begin at 9:30 A.M. with an orientation on the day’s events. At 10 A.M., students will deliver information about Arts Education Days and the importance of the arts to state legislators and the Texas Education Agency. Beginning at noon on both March 4 and March 5, student groups will perform in the capitol rotunda, including jazz bands, orchestras, choirs, dance ensembles, theater performers, and art students. This is an incredible performance opportunity for your students and is an equally significant advocacy opportunity. With the State Legislature in session, your presence at the capitol demonstrates the result of their support for quality music education opportunities for all students. Apply now to be a part of this exciting event! Go to www.tcqae.org to learn more and apply. 

Give your students an experience they’ll never forget and show our state’s decision makers why they must continue to support quality music education.

Congr atulations to the 2012 Mark of Excellence National Chor al Honors Winners National Winners

Commended Winners

High School Mixed Chorus

High School Mixed Chorus

Duncanville HS A Cappella Choir ................. Ty Shaw .................. Duncanville, TX

Spring HS Chorale .................. David Landgrebe ............Spring, TX

High School Open Class Spring HS Chamber Choir ..... David Landgrebe, Steffanie Dean .................Spring, TX

Middle School Treble Choir Shadow Ridge MS 8th Grade Treble Choir................Lyn Zeller....................... Flower Mound, TX

Middle School Open Class

High School Open Class Duncanville HS A Cappella Men’s Choir ....... Ty Shaw ................. Duncanville, TX Jasper HS Combined Judy Putney, Women’s Choir .................... Dana Kelly ........................Plano, TX

Middle School Treble Choir Clear Creek Intermediate Summer Brauer, Treble Choir ........................ Skyler Rossacci ..... League City, TX

Clear Creek Intermediate Summer Brauer, Mixed Choir ........................ Skyler Rossacci ...... League City, TX

Thanks to Chor al adjudicator Kenneth Fulton. This year’s project had 184 entr ants. The Mark of Excellence progr am has now received entries from 35 states. More information at: www.foundationformusiceducation.org/mark-of-excellence

18 Southwestern Musician | October 2012


University of North Texas

College of Music

Auditions Regional Auditions (live percussion auditions offered on campus only)

Saturday, January 19, 2013 (Chicago) Saturday, January 19, 2013 (Los Angeles)

University of North Texas Campus Saturday, January 26, 2013 Friday, February 1, 2013 (Graduate Percussion, Piano, Voice, and String Auditions ONLY)

Saturday, February 2, 2013 Saturday, February 23, 2013


Inspiration is priceless

BAND NOTES IMPORTANT DATES October—Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2—Convention housing opens. October 26—Deadline to receive All-State Jazz audition CDs in the TMEA office. November 10–11—All-State Jazz judging. November 15—TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 15—Specialty instrument application postmark deadline. December 15—Dual certification deadline.

B Y

R O N N I E

R I O S

W

here do you keep your inspirational treasures? Do you store them away in your brain so that you can occasionally reflect on them in the times when you need some inspiration? Do you share them with others to release the emotion you carry inside you? Do you use those thoughts to motivate you to take action in your everyday life? As a college student or young teacher, you might hear an incredible performance and be immediately motivated to practice. Or when we watch the Olympics, we might become inspired to go out for a walk or jog. These are the people who take inspiration and put it into action. This is not only what we can do, but exactly what our students can do every day! In 1993, I attended the Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic and wandered into the Miami Sr. High School Jazz Ensemble performance. After joining the audience in several standing ovations and encores, I was greatly inspired and convinced that I wanted to someday be there with a group of my students. In 2003, I had the opportunity to make that dream a reality. It is imperative that we teachers be inspirational for our students. With our inspiration, they can take their learning to new heights. Our students know if our lessons are making an impact or not. They also know if we are bringing passion to the table. Use the moments that inspired us and moments that continue to inspire to take action for our students. It is imperative that we do this. Not only will this perhaps inspire the life of a student but it will also keep the passion alive in our classrooms. Inspire someone today, or be inspired by someone today. And pass it on. You’ll love the results.

December 31—TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 12, 2013—Area Band and Vocal auditions. January 24, 2013—TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13–16, 2013—TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio. 20 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

Passion is absolutely necessary to achieve any kind of long-lasting success. I know this from experience. If you don’t have passion, everything \RX GR ZLOO XOWLPDWHO\ À]]OH RXW RU DW EHVW EH mediocre. — Donald Trump


University of Nebraska–Lincoln School of Music in the Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

IN MUSIC & DANCE

TWO GREAT EVENTS

you won’t want to miss.

Midwest Cup Show Choir Invitational January 12, 2013

Application Deadline: October 1, 2012

The 2,200 seat Lied Center for Performing Arts will be the venue for the 2013 Midwest Cup Show Choir Invitational. Show choirs from across the Midwest will be featured at this event. Look for details soon at music.unl.edu/choir/midwest-cup-show-choir-competition

Winter Festival for Winds and Percussion January 18–20, 2013 Application Deadline: November 9, 2012 The Winter Festival is a unique concert band and chamber ensemble festival for high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The festival is designed to give participants an outstanding and comprehensive playing experience. Festival participants are chosen through a recorded audition process. Students attending the festival are involved in three different ensembles: an honor band; a chamber ensemble coached by one of the School of Music's talented applied wind and percussion faculty; and a large symphonic band that combines the festival honor band with the University Wind Ensemble. Students also participate in a masterclass with the applied wind and percussion faculty. More information is available at www.unl.edu/band/winter_festival.shtml

® ®

music.unl.edu The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC


Specialty Instrument Auditions Applications and CDs for specialty instruments must be postmarked by December 15. The specialty instrument for 2013 is contrabassoon. Go to the AllState Band Audition Material page on the website for information and to download the application. 'XDO&HUWLÀFDWLRQ Students who qualify to advance to Area in Band and Vocal organizations must complete a Dual Certification form and submit it to the Region President by December 15. On this form, the student declares the track in which he or she will continue to audition for qualification to All-State at the January 12 Area auditions. The Dual Certification form is found on the Band Division Forms page located under the Band Division menu on the TMEA website. 2013 Clinic/Convention Update Keep in mind that as of October 2 you can make a convention housing reservation from www.tmea.org/convention.

Take time to review the hotel choices to decide which properties you would prefer. Some hotels sell out so quickly that you should have multiple options in mind. As many of you did last year, remember to take a moment to preregister online. It’s the simplest way to complete your convention registration! For more information, go to go to www.tmea.org/convention. Band Division Offerings From Thursday through Saturday, our convention will feature over 50 clinics targeted for Band Division members. In addition, you may observe our 2013 AllState conductors during their rehearsals. Make sure to stop by a rehearsal during your convention attendance. This could be an incredible source of inspiration for you as you prepare for the remainder of the school year and beyond. Mallory Thompson 5A Symphonic Band Conductor Mallory Thompson is Northwestern University Director of Bands, Professor of Music, and Coordinator of the

Conducting Program. As the third person to hold the university’s director of bands position, she conducts the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, teaches undergraduate and graduate conducting, and administers all aspects of the band program. Thompson first conducted the Northshore Concert Band in 1999, and

2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention February 13–16

San Antonio

OUR CLINIC/CONVENTION IS FOR BAND DIRECTORS! Over 50 clinics on the latest instructional tools and materials for band directors Open All-State rehearsals Middle, high school, and college band concerts The latest teaching supplies & more More than 4,000 band directors attend

www.tmea.org/convention 22 Southwestern Musician | October 2012


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she has been the artistic director since 2003. Prior to joining the Northwestern faculty, Thompson held similar positions at the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the University of South Florida. Thompson received a bachelor’s degree in music education and master’s degree in conducting from Northwestern University, where she studied conducting with John P. Paynter and trumpet with Vincent Cichowicz. She received her doctoral degree from the Eastman School of Music, where she studied with Donald Hunsberger. Thompson has appeared as a conductor or clinician at College Band Directors National Association conventions, the Midwest Clinic, the Interlochen Arts Academy, numerous state music conventions, and the Aspen Music Festival. She has also appeared as a guest conductor with the United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own,” United States Army Field Band, United States Air Force Band, West Point Band, United States Navy Band, Dallas Wind Symphony, and Symphony Silicon Valley.

24 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

Her professional aff iliations include the College Band Directors National Association and the American Bandmasters Association. December 2011 marked the release of rising, her fourth CD with the Northwestern Symphonic Wind Ensemble on the Summit label. Lawrence Stoffel 5A Concert Band Conductor Lawrence Stoffel is Director of Bands at California State University/Northridge (Los Angeles). Known for his enthusiasm at rehearsals, concerts, and clinics alike, Stoffel was named California’s music professor of the year in 2010 by CMEA. He recently performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Sounds About Town concert series, ClarinetFest 2011, the Los Angeles Bach Festival, and the Trisha Brown Dance Company (New York), and he conducted the 2011 California All-State Honor Band. Previous teaching positions include Northern Illinois University (where he was honored with the Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award), Eastern Illinois University, the University of California/San Diego, and

at high schools in Pasadena and Buena Park, California. With a breadth of scholarly and artistic interests, Stoffel is published and lectures on topics pertinent to the profession, from musical interpretation to band transcriptions, from the use of religious music in the public schools to band in the school curriculum, from copyright law to band


discography. He holds a doctor of music degree from Indiana University, master of music degree from the University of Colorado, and bachelor of arts in music and master of education degrees from UCLA. His professional affiliations include NAfME, CBDNA, and NCBA. He has received honorary membership in Tau Beta Sigma, Kappa Kappa Psi, Pi Kappa Lambda, and Phi Mu Alpha.

Roby G. George 4A Symphonic Band Conductor Roby G. George is Associate Professor of Music and Director of Bands at Indiana State University, where he conducts the Wind Orchestra, teaches conducting at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and coordinates all facets of the band program. Prior to his appointment at ISU, he held positions as Assistant Director of Bands at the University of Illinois/Champaign, Director of Bands at Fisk University, the University of Dayton, New World School of the Arts, and Florida International University. A native of Miami, George earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music education from Florida State University and a doctorate of musical arts degree from the University of CincinnatiCollege Conservatory of Music. As a guest conductor and clinician, George has worked with a myriad of high school honor bands, college and university ensembles, and all-state bands, and he has given workshops on such diverse subjects as conducting pedagogy, rehearsal techniques, Stravinsky, and jazz.

During his tenure at FIU and continuing now at Indiana State University, George hosts the Summer Institute for Conductor Training that attracts participants from all over the Americas. Willie Hill All-State Jazz Ensemble Conductor Willie Hill is Director of the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts/ Amherst and a Professor in Music Education. He received his bachelor’s degree from Grambling State University and earned MM and PhD degrees from the University of Colorado/Boulder. Hill was a Professor in Music Education and the Assistant Dean at the College of Music at the University of Colorado/ Boulder for eleven years, and he was also Director of Education for the Thelonious Monk Institute in Los Angeles. Hill also taught instrumental music for 16 years and served as instrumental music supervisor for four years in the Denver Public Schools. His professional activities in the Denver metro area include the following: former member of the Denver Broncos Jazz Ensemble; regular performer at the Denver Auditorium Theater, Paramount Theater, and Boettcher Concert Hall; guest soloist with the Garden City Community College, Hastings College, the University of Colorado, and the University of Denver Jazz Ensembles;

freelance performer with George Burns, Liza Minnelli, Lena Horn, Lou Rawls, Ben Vareen, Lola Falana, Johnny Mathis, Sammy Davis Jr., Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, Jon Faddis, and more. Hill received the prestigious Lawrence Berk Leadership Award presented in 2001 by the International Association for Jazz Education. In 1998 he was inducted into the Colorado Music Educators Hall of Fame, and in 2008 he was inducted into Grambling State University’s Hall of Fame. Hill is a national artist/clinician for Yamaha Musical Instrument Company, and he has authored and coauthored multiple texts on jazz history and pedagogy. 

Southwestern Musician | October 2012 25


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ver the past five years, the topic of bullying ullying has gotten a lot of attention. Deeply l disturbing d b virall videos and news reports of suicides by the victims of bullying have shed light on the brinks of despair some children reach after this repeated abuse. While few bullied students are driven to suicide, research has shown that the damaging effect to their self-esteem can carry into adulthood.1 Among the most disturbing reports are those in which teachers, students, or administrators knew about abuse but did nothing to stop it. Given this reality, learning more about bullying and how to intervene should be a top priority for all music teachers. Fortunately, Texas educators have worked diligently to address bullying in ways that can empower students, teachers, and parents. In 2011, Texas passed anti-bullying legislation via House Bill 1942 to address harassment in Texas schools. School districts are now required to implement staff development that will empower communities to deal with the problem effectively, according to the particular needs of their region. Furthermore, anyone interested in obtaining multiple sources for bullying prevention can find excellent information through the Bully Prevention State Initiative linked from www.tmea.org/smlink/bully. The following are highlights of some key information derived from these sources that might help teachers, students, and community members ensure a safe environment for all. Strategies for recognizing bullying and intervening can be especially useful for music teachers who often have deep bonds with students and their parents. With additional rehearsals and activities held outside the regular class time, music teachers often interact with students more than other teachers do. Some students even choose our classrooms as their preferred hangout during free time. For others still, our rooms serve as safe havens from bullying. Our ability to recognize the signs of bullying and to provide

useful strategies for all involved might be a lifeline for students who feel no one else understands. According to Rod Pruitt, the director of the Bully Prevention State Initiative, one reason people may be reticent to report bullying is that they sometimes have difficulty distinguishing between bullying and incidental meanness. Bullying is defined by three basic characteristics: an intention to harm, repetitive occurrence, and an imbalance of power. Pruitt describes one- or two-time events as incidental acts of meanness; however, by the third repetition, negative behaviors should be considered bullying. Of course, any act of unkindness should be addressed immediately, but continued bullying takes a special toll on students and may require further attention. While bullying at school is demeaning, the use of technology and social media has exacerbated the problem, making it even more difficult for students to escape their tormenters. As teachers, our line of authority becomes somewhat blurred when a student is bullied through social media. Legally, issues in the home are the parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; responsibility. However, when incidents outside the school affect learning, schools can intervene, making a partnership between parents and the school community especially important. Many of us may imagine bullies to be physically intimidating in their stature. But in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cyber world, bullies may come in all sizes, from the biggest, toughest boy in the class to a petite, Southwestern Musician | October 2012 27


sometimes to the point that they end up being disciplined for inappropriate behavior by authority figures. Because their behaviors may be brash, these victims may appear to be bullies themselves. However, due to the imbalance of power between victim and bully, they almost always lose the battle. Their reactive behaviors may often result in a loss of social status. demure girl with pigtails. In general, bullies often fall into two broad categories: well-connected or isolated. Well-connected bullies may have high self-esteem, be overly concerned about their popularity, and have a desire to control others. On the opposite extreme, isolated bullies may be depressed, have low self-esteem, and may have difficulty empathizing with the emotions of others. These students may also be easily pressured by peers or less involved in school than typical peers. Overall, bullies seek power, a desire that can become especially prevalent during the transition from elementary school to middle school. Often incredibly selfconscious, some will do whatever it takes to elevate themselves to a higher social

position than their peers. Those who witness inappropriate models from parents or siblings who intimidate or demean others may emulate these behaviors in their quest for power. And importantly, some began as bully victims. Bullied themselves, they focus their frustrations on others to achieve their own sense of power. Victims of bullying, or targets, may also fall into two common categories. Some are the shy, quiet students who may lack social skills and have few friends. When confronted, they can become meek as a mouse as fear overcomes them. In contrast, some victims may be described as highly reactive. When confronted, they lash out quickly and dramatically—

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While bullies may account for about 10% of the students, and victims for 20%, a good 70% of the student population falls in the category of bystander. Witnessing bullying can be traumatic. Some students may be outraged, while others may simply look the other way for fear of becoming targets themselves. While few may condone the behaviors, many students may simply not know how to intervene effectively without risking their own safety. The Bullying State Initiative provides several strategies for bystanders that may be helpful. Targets of bullying may be more susceptible to abuse when they are isolated from others. Students with more social clout can serve as protectors simply

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by including potential victims in their groups, such as sitting with them at lunch. Should a bystander witness bullying, they can help diffuse the situation by addressing the victim, rather than the bully. The goal is to get the victim away from the bully by saying something like, “Hey, Ms. Smith is looking for you. Come with me.” And perhaps most importantly of all, bystanders need to be taught how to make good reports. A good report focuses on three distinct features with pertinent details: (1) exactly what happened, (2) where it happened, and (3) who was involved. However, students may be reluctant to report bullying to adults if they fear retaliation from offenders; therefore, it is crucial that bystanders understand their reports will not get anyone in trouble. Rather, their reports can help teachers place themselves in physical locations that may prevent future occurrences. Bullying is more likely to occur in areas outside the classroom, including hallways, bathrooms, locker rooms, and buses. Student reports can alert teachers about problem areas within their environment so that the adults can better monitor them. While details are important, students need to be taught what kind of detail to provide and what to ignore. In the midst of stress, some students may want to begin with a history of conflict between students that goes back five years. While this may be ultimately helpful for later counseling, they should understand that a good report focuses on details pertinent to the event in question. Alternatively, some students may leave out important information by simply saying, “Joe was

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being mean to John,” or “Anna was picking on Isabella.” They need to be taught to provide exact details about what “being mean” or “picking on” means. While bystanders have tremendous power to curb bullying, victims should learn some strategies to protect themselves. Most people understand that ignoring the bully usually does not work—but neither does an overreaction full of false bravado. Both approaches may reek of insecurity, thus encouraging the tormentor to illicit further response. A simple “stop and walk” approach may be most effective. By telling the bully to stop, the victim clearly identifies that they are not the most vulnerable target on campus. Then rather than waiting to see what happens, the victim should walk toward a teacher or another group of students to avoid isolation. Learning how to say “stop” effectively is crucial, and it is something with which students will likely need help. When bullied, students can be under so much stress that without having had previous practice, they can forget what to do. A weak, questioning tone full of insecurity will be ineffective. Alternatively, overreacting by screaming and making threats diminishes power. Victims should look the bully squarely in the eyes while maintaining a confident posture. Ideally, their voice will be sufficiently strong, without overreaction. Role playing with teachers can serve as a useful, and even humorous, teaching tool. As teachers model the inappropriate behaviors, students can step in to model and practice appropriate strategies.

While preventive strategies may be useful, it is also important that teachers and administrators follow up on bullying incidents with victims, bullies, and bystanders. Victims may feel a sense of shame and embarrassment. Teachers can alleviate these ill feelings by providing a supportive environment, educating students about school bullying policies and their rights, and referring them to counselors if appropriate. The follow-up for bullies should include a review of school policies and possible counseling. However, getting to the root of the issue may be a lengthy process.

Because many bullies are looking for power, teachers might be able to help these students find positive venues through which to channel their energies in appropriate ways. In elementary settings, simple duties such as helping to clean Orff instruments (with parental permission, of course), being in charge of the CD player for the day, or passing out recorders might provide leadership roles that students find validating. In secondary settings, students could help set up chairs and stands, file music, or take roll. Finally, follow-up for bystanders should include a review of strategies discussed above in a supportive, helpful environment. Texas law now mandates faculty training to alleviate bullying in the schools, but legislators have left the means of intervention up to each district to determine, according to their needs. Not surprisingly, one-time assemblies are ineffective. The most effective programs are those in which teachers, students, parents, and community members work together on an ongoing basis. The more we can engage with all students, their parents, and community members, the more likely we will be able to effect change. Through collaboration and cooperation, we can help set a respectful, positive tone in our classrooms, the campus environment, and the community at large.  1. Dan Olweus, “Victimization by Peers: Antecedents and Long-Term Outcomes,” in Social Withdrawal, Inhibition and Shyness in Childhood, eds. K. H. Rubin & J. B. Asendorpfz, 315–342 (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlabum, 1993); Siobhan Hugh-Jones and Peter K. Smith, “SelfReports of Short- and Long-Term Effects of Bullying on Children Who Stammer,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, 69 (1999): 141–158; and Amanda M. Jantzer, John H. Hoover, and Rodger Narloch, “The Relationship Between School-Aged Bullying and Trust, Shyness and Quality of Friendships in Young Adulthood,” School Psychology International, 27 (2006): 146–156. Don Taylor is an Associate Professor at the University of North Texas. He also serves TMEA as the Chair of the SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN Review Committee.


Because every Texas student deserves a TXDOLW\ÂżQHDUWVHGXFDWLRQ s the countdown quickens to the November election and the January legislative session, advocacy for quality fine arts education must increase. TMEA is leading that effort, in conjunction with the Texas Coalition for Quality Arts Education, by reviving the GoArts campaign that has been vital in the past three legislative sessions. As leaders of the GoArts campaign, we are advocates for education policies, primarily at the state level, working to ensure all Texas students have opportunities to study music, art, dance, and theater. We inform the public and policy makers about the many

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ways that arts education benefits our students and our state. GoArts sends its supporters email updates about official actions and proposals that may affect arts education opportunities for students in Texas schools. GoArts also provides information about the benefits of arts education and suggestions for how supporters can let elected officials and policy makers know they support quality arts education in our schools. Visit www.GoArts.org often for updates on our latest advocacy activities and to find out ways you can continue to help ensure every Texas student receives a quality fine arts education.

www.GoArts.org Because every Texas student should receive: Â&#x2021; $ZHOOEDODQFHGHGXFDWLRQ Â&#x2021; 4XDOLW\ÂżQHDUWVLQVWUXFWLRQ Â&#x2021; 3URWHFWHGLQVWUXFWLRQDOWLPHIRUDUWVHGXFDWLRQ Â&#x2021; 2SSRUWXQLWLHVWRSXUVXHWKHLUSDVVLRQ

Register Your Support

Help educate our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision makers about the importance of protecting fine arts education by registering your support at www.GoArts.org. Share this information with your music groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supporters and booster organizations and encourage them to do the same.

Link to GoArts.org $GG D OLQN RQ \RXU DUWV RUJDQL]DWLRQ KRPHSDJH WR WKH *R$UWVZHEVLWHZZZ*R$UWVRUJDQGHQFRXUDJH\RXUZHEVLWHDXGLHQFHWRUHJLVWHUWKHLUVXSSRUW

Download Print- and Web-Ready Materials

Spread the word about this campaign by including GoArts.org information in your concert programs, calendars, and announcements, on your website, and more. Print- and web-ready materials are available in multiple file types, sizes, and colors on www.GoArts.org.

:KHQWKLV45FRGHLVVFDQQHGE\D PRELOHGHYLFHZZZ*R$UWVRUJZLOO RSHQ'RZQORDGWKLV45&RGHLPDJH IURPWKH*R$UWVRUJGRZQORDGVSDJH ,QFOXGHLWRQ\RXUSURJUDPÂśVZHEVLWH DQGSULQWLWLQ\RXUFRQFHUWSURJUDPV Southwestern Musician | October 2012 31


ORCHESTRA NOTES Why do you teach? B Y

L I S A

M C C U T C H A N

I

hope everyone has had a fantastic opening of the 2012– 2013 school year. This year seems to have gotten off to a really smooth start for me. While this is my 30th year to teach, I am still enjoying every minute of it! Whether this is your first or your 30th year, I hope that as the school year gets more stressful and demanding that you can still remember how much you enjoy being a music educator. Have you ever thought about what made you decide to teach? Was there a teacher in your life who made you feel special as a student and as a musician? In a recent faculty group activity, our principal brought up these questions for us to ponder: What made you decide to go into teaching? Is it acceptable for a fourteen-year-old student to choose to fail? What is more important—what a student has learned or the responsibility we give our students? It was very interesting to hear teachers from other departments describe their reasons to teach: summers off, vacation time, their parents were teachers, they did not know what else to do, and more. The fine arts teachers’ responses included that a music teacher had recognized their talent, the creativity involved, the love of music and students, the passion, and the competition. In response to the second question, many teachers believed that if a student isn’t working to a certain potential, they would ultimately fail. The fine arts teachers believed that encouraging all students is a priority and that with this encouragement, failure is not even considered. Finally, most teachers believed that classroom learning is more important than student responsibility. Fine arts instructors believed that giving students more responsibility leads to a successful learning environment.

IMPORTANT DATES October—Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2—Convention housing opens. October 15—Postmark Deadline for HS String Honor Orchestra CDs and other entry materials. October 20–21—HS String Honor Orchestra judging. October 27—Area recording date. November 10–11—Area CD judging. November 15—TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 15—Specialty instrument application postmark deadline. December 31—TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013—TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13–16, 2013—TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

The students we teach want to get better, want to be motivated, and want to be successful. Southwestern Musician | October 2012 33


Artists believe in Yamaha. “I play Yamaha because it’s the sound I’ve been looking for. Playing in venues large and small all over the world, I can always find the right sound. I thoroughly rely on the Yamaha SV-250 Pro for my electric playing. Yamaha thinks about the musician when it comes to electric violin design. I love this instrument!”

Mads Tolling Two-time GRAMMY® Award-Winning Violinist Turtle Island Quartet, Mads Tolling Quartet

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I believe that fine arts teachers help students become successful. Many students feel very comfortable in our presence. They feel encouraged. The students we teach want to get better, want to be motivated, and want to be successful. Even students with lesser talent can feel successful in our classrooms. We need to be enthusiastic, encouraging, patient, and motivating. We are often the reason some students come to school and stay in school. Why did I become a teacher? I had a passion for helping students, I love bringing families and communities together through music, I love the competition, and I love knowing that I have made a difference in others’ lives. As author and management expert Ken Blanchard said, “There is a difference between interest and commitment. When you are interested in something you do it only when it is convenient. When you are committed to something, you accept no excuses, only results.” 2013 Clinic/Convention Update It might seem like our convention is in the distant future, but just like everything

else in our year, it will be here before you know it! As of October 2 you can make a convention housing reservation from www.tmea.org/convention. Take time to look through the hotel choices to decide which properties you might select when you make a reservation. Some hotels sell out so quickly that you should have multiple options in mind. As most of you did last year, take a moment to preregister online. It’s the fastest, simplest way to complete your convention registration! Go to www.tmea.org/convention for registration information and much more. 'XDO&HUWLÀFDWLRQ Remember that orchestra students may also audition in band or choir, but once a student is notified of placement in either the All-State Jazz Ensemble or AllState Orchestra (strings), he or she may not advance to Area in another All-State group. Specialty Instruments For the 2013 All-State orchestras, the specialty instrument is contrabassoon. Specialty instrument recordings and entry forms must be postmarked

by December 15 and sent to the TMEA headquarters. Download the application from the Orchestra All-State Audition Material page (at the bottom). All-State Repertoire The program for the Symphony Orchestra is Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. The Philharmonic will perform Blow It Up, Start Again, Newman (visit Jonathan Newman’s website to listen to this selection), Elegy To the Memory of My Friend, Serge Koussevitzky, Hanson, and On the Waterfront, Symphonic Suite from the Film, Bernstein. The String Orchestra will perform Adagio for Strings, Barber, Divertimento, Bartok, and Sinfonia no. VII in D, Mendelssohn. All-State Conductors This year, I am so excited to be working with Gary Lewis (Symphony Orchestra), Allen Tinkham (Philharmonic Orchestra), and Tanya Simons Ratner (String Orchestra). I am certain our All-State students will enjoy this year’s preparation for the All-State concerts under these fine conductors’ tutelage.

2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention February 13–16 San Antonio OUR CLINIC/CONVENTION IS FOR ORCHESTRA DIRECTORS! Over 30 clinics on the latest instructional tools and materials for orchestra directors Open All-State orchestra rehearsals Honor Orchestra and All-State concerts University orchestra performances The latest teaching supplies & more Over 800 orchestra teachers attend

www.tmea.org/convention Southwestern Musician | October 2012 35


Gary Lewis Symphony Orchestra Conductor Gary Lewis is the Director of Orchestras and Professor of Music in the College of Music at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he conducts

Twelfth Annual

Lynn Harrell Concerto Competition for Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass and Piano Application Deadline: February 8, 2013 For complete details, contact the Dallas Symphony Education Department at 214.871.4006 or visit www.studiodso.com

the University Symphony Orchestra and oversees the entire orchestra program. He also leads the graduate program in orchestral conducting, including both the master’s and doctoral levels. Lewis is also Music Director and Conductor of the Midland-Odessa Symphony Orchestra. As a strong advocate of music education, Lewis has presented many in-service workshops for public school educators, as well as numerous presentations at state and regional music education associa-

tion conferences. In addition, he has conducted many all-state orchestras across the U.S. In 2010 Lewis played an important role in the creation of the Greater Boulder Youth Orchestras and continues to serve as the founding Artistic Director of the organization and conductor of its Symphony Orchestra. Lewis has served on the faculties of Texas Tech University, Ohio State University, the University of Michigan, and Abilene Christian University. He received a master’s degree in conducting from Texas Tech University and bachelor’s degree in music education from the University of Oklahoma. His postgraduate work includes participation in the Pierre Monteux School for Orchestral Conductors and the Tanglewood Conducting Seminar. Allen Tinkham Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor Allen Tinkham is increasingly recognized as one of the most gifted conductors and teachers of his generation. He is hailed by the Chicago Tribune as one of Chicago’s most important “educators, mentors, and inspirational guides

Inspire The

performance of your life

2013 Audition Dates: February 2, 9, & 16 music.colorado.edu/apply

36 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

301 UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0301 | 303.492.6352


A U D I T I O N D AT E S S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

December 1, 2012

January 19, 2013

February 9, 2013

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

February 1, 2013

March 2, 2013

( VO I C E A N D K E Y B O A R D O N LY )

F R I D AY

January 18, 2013

( V O I C E O N LY )

( V O I C E O N LY )

Auditions are required of all entering and transferring music majors. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Baylor University School of Music /NE"EAR0LACEs7ACO 48  www.baylor.edu/music and click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;For Prospective Studentsâ&#x20AC;? s$ELORIS?!CEVEDO BAYLOREDU


in the training of tomorrow’s orchestral professionals.” As Music Director of the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestras (CYSO), he has led the Symphony Orchestra in four international tours and has won two Youth Orchestra of the Year Awards and two Programming of the Year Awards from the Illinois Council of Orchestras.

38 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

A champion of contemporary music, Tinkham has won eight ASCAP awards and is further committed to teaching 20th-century repertoire to young musicians alongside more traditional orchestral repertoire. Season highlights with CYSO include works of Ligeti, Messiaen, and Schoenberg along with Poulenc’s Gloria, Debussy’s La Mer, and Strauss’s Also sprach Zarathustra. As a guest conductor, engagements this season include the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Colorado Symphony. Tinkham is also on faculty at Columbia College of Chicago and the New York Summer Music Festival. Tinkham began his conducting career mentoring under James DePriest and Murry Sidlin as Apprentice Conductor of the Oregon Symphony Orchestra. He received his BM from the Eastman School of Music under David Effron and his MM from the University of Michigan under Kenneth Kiesler, and he continued studies at the American Academy of Conducting in Aspen studying under David Zinman.

Tanya Simons Ratner String Orchestra Conductor A strong advocate of new music promotion and music education through orchestral playing, Tanya Simons Ratner holds a master’s of music studies (orchestral and choral conducting), a bachelor of music education (string/classroom teaching) and a bachelor of music (violin/voice) from the University of Queensland, Australia. She has had additional conducting study with Larry Rachleff, Music Director at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University. In 2000, Simons Ratner was awarded a Churchill Fellowship, which enabled her to study conducting and to research youth orchestra management in Austria, Canada, and the United States. Prior to moving to the U.S. in 2003, Simons Ratner was a conductor with the Queensland Youth Orchestra Council and worked at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music, Griffith University, where she taught undergraduate conducting and directed the young conservatorium orchestras. In 2004, she was appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, Tennessee, where she directed the University Orchestra and taught violin/viola. Ratner was also the founding Director of the Clarksville Youth Orchestra. Currently, Ratner is a freelance conductor and violin studio teacher. Her engagements include conducting the Kalachakra Festival honoring the Dalai Lama on his 76th birthday, the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, SHEP Orchestra, Brisbane, Australia, Texas All-State String Orchestra, and the Houston Civic Symphony. 


Competitive Scholarships & Performance Awards

Audition Dates November 17, 2012 January 26 – 27, 2013 February 23 – 24, 2013 (see website for details)

Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Arts Accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music

Music Department Faculty Jason Hoogerhyde, Department Chair

Conducting & Ensembles

Music Literature

Lois Ferrari, Orchestra & Wind Ensemble David Guidi, Jazz Ensemble Kenny Sheppard, Chorale & Southwestern Singers

J. Michael Cooper, Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Lindsey Evans

Keyboard Vincent Lam, piano David Polley, organ Pamela Rossman, piano Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano David Utterback, piano Robert Warren, piano

David Asbury, guitar Delaine Fedson, harp Steve Kostelnik, guitar Eri Lee Lam, violin Jessica Gilliam-Valls, double bass Tim Washecka, viola Hai Zheng, violoncello

Music Education

Theory & Composition

Lois Ferrari Kenny Sheppard

Jason Hoogerhyde Eileen Meyer Russell Kiyoshi Tamagawa

Strings

Voice & Opera Theatre Bruce Cain Kathryn Findlen Kenny Sheppard Nicholas Simpson Dana Zenobi

Woodwinds, Brass & Percussion Robert Cannon, trumpet Anna Carney, clarinet Patrick Creel, horn Susan Douglas, oboe David Guidi, saxophone Adrienne Inglis, flute Erin Martysz, percussion Eric Stone Miller, bassoon Eileen Meyer Russell, low brass 1001 E. University Ave Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 863-1504 music@southwestern.edu www.southwestern.edu/sarofim/music


S

the inside s co o p WHAT EVERY FUTURE TEACHER NEEDS TO KNOW

BY N ATE H UTCH ERSO N, W ITH RUTH K U RTI S, J O N ATH A N M O R S I N K H O F F, A N D M I C H E L E H E N R Y 40 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

tudent teaching is the culmination of a music education major’s college experience. Most student teachers have confidence in the knowledge and skills gained over the course of their college career. But beyond the content taught through that coursework lie the practical realities of teaching. What does my cooperating teacher expect from me? Will the students work hard for me? How does the copier work? Where do I eat lunch? Where do I park? As student teaching approaches, these considerations often cause more anxiety than any potential musical challenge. The best way to face these uncertainties is with information. Talking with those who have been through the student teaching process—from every angle—can be extremely helpful. The following Q&A is intended to do just that—to offer information from a panel of experts who represent different perspectives in the student teaching experience. The questions asked by Nate Hutcherson, a music education major preparing to student-teach in spring 2013, were answered by Ruth Kurtis, a former cooperating teacher, Jonathan Morsinkhoff, a recent student teacher, and Michele Henry, a university supervisor. Anyone approaching their teaching semester will certainly have questions specific to their situation. We hope the following information will offer answers to some of the questions common to most student teachers.

WHAT IS THE MOST VALUABLE PART OF THE STUDENT TEACHING EXPERIENCE? Ruth Kurtis (cooperating teacher): Learning what to do and what not to do, creating your own teaching style (by discovering what works for others and for you), becoming confident in yourself, and mastering content are most important. You will spend a lifetime learning and honing these skills, so enjoy the journey! I also caution that you have to have a high degree of honest introspection and use of common sense. As a cooperating teacher (CT), I don’t have the time to teach common sense. Jonathan Morsinkhoff (recent student teacher): Balance being a teacher with being a learner. Although you are finally teaching students, you need to observe and learn from the cooperating teacher. While student teaching, seek to emulate the cooperating teacher’s methods so that students can get to know you and so you can learn new methods. Michele Henry (university supervisor): It’s what I call the shifting spotlight—from you as student to you as teacher. Until this point, the focus has been on you as student—you improving your performance skill, you demonstrating your knowledge of theory and history, you displaying a beautiful conducting pattern. Suddenly, now the focus is on your students—their performance, their knowledge, their responses. It doesn’t matter if you do everything perfectly, if they don’t. You will spend a great deal of time figuring out how your students learn and what you need to do to best facilitate that learning. This change of mindset can be very challenging, but it can also be very rewarding. WHAT DO I NEED TO DO PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF STUDENT TEACHING? JM: It is extremely important to meet with and talk to your CT. If you are teaching at multiple schools you will need to meet with each of your CTs—high school, middle school, and elementary. When you meet them, dress professionally, refer to them using “Mr.” or “Ms.” titles from the start, and discuss


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expectations—what you’ll be doing, what your CTs want you to do, and how you will fit into their program. If your university supervisors have given you a project or anything to complete over the semester, make sure to review that with your CTs. MH: Do your homework. Find out all you can about the school, the community, the students, and your CT. If you have a chance to do some observation at the school prior to student teaching, you will be way ahead of the game once your official student teaching placement begins. Also, you should go shopping. Even if you have several semesters until student teaching, begin assembling your professional wardrobe now. It can be expensive to buy a new wardrobe at once, so purchase a little at a time. If your closet reflects that of a typical college student, you likely don’t have many clothes appropriate for teaching. It’s amazing the difference it can make in your confidence when you are professionally dressed. (It also can keep you from being mistaken for a student in the faculty lounge!) RK: Be open to a new definition of success (other than what you experienced as a student). Each community defines success differently. This may affect what directors believe students can achieve personally and musically, as well as the role of music education in a community. How does your CT define success? Is that different from the community or your university? WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO DO ON THE FIRST DAY OF STUDENT TEACHING? MH: Be early! Your CT wants to know that you are reliable. Don’t be shy! Take the initiative to approach the students and other teachers; show interest in who they are. First impressions are lasting impressions. JM: Your CT may or may not have you teach the first day. Every situation is different, and you may be required to teach a beginner class, sectional, or piece of

42 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

music right off the bat. Whatever it may be, say “yes sir” or “yes ma’am,” and get it done. Also, before you go home for the day, always ask your CTs if there is anything you can do for them. This will show that you care about them, their program, and that you are willing to do whatever it takes to help. RK: Be active in the classroom, take notes, make observations, and learn to think with the mind of a teacher. Ask the CT if they want you to be stationary, playing, or roving in the room. Be flexible. Much of teaching is planning and adapting to the moment, mood, and challenges at hand. Watch your CT and look for motivation strategies, pacing, how they disguise repetition, and what percentage of achievement is acceptable for the stated goals. Nate Hutcherson (2013 student teacher): Reflect on what you thought about student teachers in your own classes, and think about how students will see you. I remember really liking the student teachers who were not shy but rather sought to build relationships immediately. WHAT DO I CALL MY COOPERATING TEACHER? RK: It really depends on the CT’s personality and what boundaries they want to set. Start formally by always using “Mr.” and “Ms.” titles in the classroom. You may become more informal when the CT offers to be referred to on a first-name basis, but do this only in non-teaching situations. WHAT SHOULD STUDENT TEACHERS CONSIDER IN DISTINGUISHING THEMSELVES FROM THEIR STUDENTS? JM: Student teaching is a cool role that you have only once, so take advantage of it! Be the teacher—you need to have a level of separation and distance from the students in attire, actions, and behavior. Make sure you are learning as much as you can from your CT and that you are taking advantage of being in front of real students every day.

WHAT ARE MY CHANCES OF TEACHING INDEPENDENTLY IN THE CLASSROOM? RK: It’s very likely! My personal plan is to establish an increasing transfer of time and responsibilities to the student teacher (ST). Once they establish momentum in rehearsal, I allow them to teach independently and simply leave my office door open to monitor the classroom from a distance. Many cooperating teachers will troubleshoot discipline with nonverbal means while the ST is on the podium. This means that the ST may yet need to establish those boundaries for themselves. Some CTs may plan to leave the classroom occasionally to give you a real-life experience. They may monitor by having a video camera or recording the rehearsal for feedback purposes. HOW SHOULD I HANDLE LESSON PLANS? JM: You have to plan, plan, and plan some more. When it comes to making a great first teaching impression and getting the students really involved with learning, the more you plan, the better it will go. Make sure you take the time to plan your lessons and include more material than you plan to teach. MH: Each school and each teacher will have their own requirements and habits for lesson planning. While at that school and with your cooperating teacher, you should follow those practices for any plans you have to submit officially, even if you have another method of planning for your own use. You may not see your CT create similar hardcopy lesson plans. It is often the case that veteran teachers do not write out detailed lesson plans in the same way that new teachers should. After gaining substantial experience, it becomes less necessary to write down every step of the process—particularly for a piece of music you are teaching for the tenth time. However, this doesn’t get you off the hook now—plan! HOW DO I GAIN THE RESPECT AND COMMAND OF THE STUDENTS? JM: Work on engaging the students and being positive at all times. Be willing to teach in many different ways, and use many teaching strategies including visual, aural, and kinesthetic. Letting students take the lead at some points can


Proudly introducing our new

faculty & staffâ&#x20AC;Ś Dr. Eric Allen, assistant professor of music and assistant director of bands, is conducting the Symphonic Band, teaching undergraduate conducting, and assisting with direction of the Goinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Band from Raiderland. He earned bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees in instrumental music education from Florida State University, and a doctor of musical arts in conducting from the University of Minnesota, where he studied with Craig Kirchhoff. Allen served as director of bands at Sebastian River High School in Florida for over ten years, where his ensembles consistently earned top honors. William Averill, vocal coach, is at home equally at the piano, harpsichord, fortepiano, and organ. He has performed throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia in repertoire ranging from early baroque to avant-garde. Averill HVWDEOLVKHGKLPVHOILQWKHÂżHOGRI opera, having coached over sixty productions in the US and abroad. He studied at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC, where he completed bachelor degrees in piano, Ă&#x20AC;XWHDQGPXVLFHGXFDWLRQDPDVWHURI music in vocal accompanying, and an artist diploma in opera coaching. He holds a doctoral degree from the Early Music Institute of Indiana University- Bloomington. Averill taught at the prestigious Indiana University School of Music and served on the faculty at Ohio University. Baritone Gregory Brookes, visiting assistant professor of voice, has completed all requirements for the doctor of music degree from Indiana Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jacobs School of Music. After receiving a bachelor of music in clarinet performance from the University of Calgary, he pursued graduate work at the Eastman School of Music where he earned a master of music in vocal performance and literature. He has been a faculty member of Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University, St. Lawrence College and Colorado State University, teaching applied voice, vocal pedagogy, song literature, opera history, opera workshop and freshman voice studio. He was also director of opera at Colorado State University.

Katrin Meidell, violist, received her bachelor of music (magna cum laude) from Boston University, where she studied violin and viola, and earned a bachelor of arts in psychology. Meidell earned the master of music from New England Conservatory with academic honors, where she studied with and served as teaching assistant to violist Carol Rodland. Meidell completed her doctor of musical arts at the University of North Texas, studying viola performance with Dr. Susan Dubois and music and medicine with Dr. Kris Chesky. Meidell, visiting assistant professor of viola at Texas Tech University, regularly performs in professional ensembles across Texas. Sergeant Major Chuck Seipp retired in August from his post as senior trumpet soloist with the United States Army Band, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pershingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ownâ&#x20AC;? and joined the music faculty as visiting assistant professor of trumpet. Seipp holds a bachelor of music education degree from The University of Kansas and the master and doctor of musical arts in trumpet performance from Catholic University of America. As element leader of the Concert Band, Sergeant Major Seipp performed with the Army Band since 1980, participating in global events and PDQ\RIÂżFLDO:DVKLQJWRQ'&HYHQWV and Presidential functions. Seipp also performed with the Ceremonial Band, Herald Trumpets, and Brass Quintet. He was featured numerous times as soloist with the Concert Band, Orchestra and Brass Band. Nataliya Sukhina has joined the School of Music as a senior staff accompanist. She is a graduate of 3URNRÂżHY&ROOHJHRI0XVLF8NUDLQH and earned the master of music at the Tchaikovsky National Academy of Music of Ukraine. Sukhina studied at the University of North Texas for the doctor of musical arts and the graduate DUWLVWFHUWLÂżFDWHLQSLDQRSHUIRUPDQFH FRQWHPSRUDU\FKDPEHUPXVLFRUJDQ harpsichord, and fortepiano.

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help create personal ownership within the classroom. RK: Because I tend to have intense rehearsals, I allow the students to interject humor, as long as they can pull back to the focus of the rehearsal. I believe that one of the most challenging skills we teach our students, regardless of the content area, is how to listen. HOW CAN I GET THE MOST OUT OF THE STUDENT TEACHING PROCESS? MH: Take advantage of every opportunity. If your cooperating teacher asks if you’d like to do something, the answer is always yes! Then do it right away. Even better, be proactive. Rather than waiting to be asked, ask what you can do. And even better yet, notice what needs to be done, and do it before being asked. Student teaching is your full-time job—it’s certainly true for your cooperating teacher! If your cooperating teacher is working, you should be working. You are expected to be present for all the same duties and activities—faculty meetings, parentteacher conferences, bus duty—all of them.

WHAT FURTHER SUGGESTIONS WOULD YOU OFFER FUTURE STUDENT TEACHERS? JM: One important thing I learned was to have extra sets of clothes in my car—both casual and dress clothes. You never know what can happen in a school day, so be prepared. Also, be patient and manage your time carefully. There may be days you’ll be at the school for 12 hours or more. You need to be flexible and remember the love and passion for teaching that you have. MH: Be willing to be mentored. The reason you are there is to learn from someone with more knowledge and experience than you. Know that you are going to make some mistakes—don’t be defensive and don’t make excuses. Always be professional. Take copious notes. Keep a notebook available at all times. Write down phrases, words of wisdom, strategies, and other ideas that you encounter. This will become one of your most valuable resources. RK: You don’t get credit for saying or teaching the right things unless you see

the positive result in the way the students respond and perform. Let your barometer of success be student-driven. Be clear with your intentions and goals. Work for an environment of trust and team. Don’t let fear of failure keep you and your students from achieving the most. Students will achieve only to the degree that you challenge them.  Nate Hutcherson is a senior music education major at Baylor University. He is looking forward to student teaching in spring 2013. Ruth Kurtis is a retired orchestra director who supervised numerous student teachers during her 33-year career. Jonathan Morsinkhoff is in his second year of teaching as assistant band director at Horn HS and Terry MS in Mesquite. Michele Henry is Associate Professor of Music Education at Baylor University where she teaches choral music methods and supervises student teachers.

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VOCAL NOTES

From the classroom to the concert stage B Y

IMPORTANT DATES October—Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2—Convention housing opens. November 15—TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 15—Dual certification deadline. December 31—TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 12, 2013—Area Vocal and Band auditions. January 24, 2013—TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13–16, 2013—TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

J A N W I N

O V E R S T R E E T - G O O D E

D

o your choirs sound great in your choir room? Does that sound change when you move into your performance venue? The following suggestions are offered for your consideration to help make that transition from a rehearsal site to a performance setting. Start preparing for the transition while still in your rehearsal space. As you begin establishing the standing arrangement, have students write on their music the names of the people between whom they are standing. Just the act of writing those names will reinforce the position, and they will see it every time they look at their music. Because rehearsal time in your performance space may be limited, consider exposing your students to other areas of the school to work on singing in other physical settings while still listening to blend, tone, etc. One colleague suggested scheduling rehearsal time in your performance space prior to the start of school as it might be more available. Experiment with riser placement. If your risers allow, try changing the configuration—maybe a shallower curve, or conversely, a deeper arc. Try adjusting the distance of the risers from the front of the stage; a proscenium arch could help propel the sound to the audience. If your stage has a full-stage acoustical enclosure, find the acoustic sweet spot. If you use a traditional sound shell, experiment with that placement. Adjust the height if that is an option, or adjust the spacing behind the risers.

Practice does not make perfect—practice makes performance. Perfect practice makes perfect. 46 Southwestern Musician | October 2012


Depending upon how much rehearsal time you have in your performance space, you might need to adjust your choir’s standing position for a more optimum sound. Add a row, create more space between the singers, or move them closer together. Separate the sections or mix them up. Don’t be afraid to use more of the stage floor—consider spreading out the students on the risers and on the stage in front of the risers. Not only do we have to worry about how the choir sounds, we also have to worry about where they sit and how they enter the stage. Rather than seating them in the front of the audience, consider seating them two by two on outside aisles. I seat my choirs on opposite sides of the auditorium and alternate back and forth during the concert—as one choir exits stage left, the next choir enters stage right. And if they are seated in pairs, they can enter the stage in double rows, which cuts in half the time needed to move to the stage. Seating them along the outside aisles also allows parents and other audience members to sit closer to the stage and reduces talking within the choirs. You may have to take time to teach the stu-

dents how to get on the risers in double rows (use the end section as a “staircase”), but once they figure it out, the process can work very smoothly. Regardless of how students enter the stage, be sure to practice that method—more than once. If you are performing in a venue where you don’t have the opportunity for prior rehearsal, make sure you have a seating chart. The following practical suggestions are from Jennifer Gallagher, choir director at Nolan Ryan JH in Alvin: A few rehearsals before the concert, I give each student a note card and we write down the logistics of the concert for their choir. It is important that they do it in their handwriting. They note things like “after this song . . .” “watch so-and-so for your cue to stand,” “exit stage left,” and more. I take all of the cards (each choir has a different color) and tape them to the seats in the house where they will sit (and from which they come to the stage). When the students arrive, they find their color card and sit down in their seat. Throughout the concert, they can look at their card and know exactly what to do. We never end up with that awkward switching moment on the risers where people weren’t in their

right order. My students know what to do, when to do it, and this allows me to focus solely on conducting. Practice every aspect of the performance experience, including the audience’s recognition of the choirs’ accomplishments. Demonstrate how you will acknowledge your students when you bow. They must learn to be gracious recipients of ovations by smiling and not talking. Also be sure to recognize your accompanist, who is an integral part of your performance. You are now ready for your concert, but before it begins, remind your audience and your students of appropriate concert etiquette. If you have consistent problems with restless or noisy children in your audience, see if one of the service organizations on your campus could provide childcare. North Shore HS offers a baby station in the lobby. Juice boxes and bags with goldfish or animal crackers are available to parents with restless children. Parents are encouraged to use the baby station until the child calms enough to return for the remainder of the concert. If you have downtime while choirs are transitioning to the stage, use that time

2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention February 13–16 OUR CLINIC/CONVENTION IS FOR CHOIR DIRECTORS!

San Antonio

Over 20 clinics focused on vocal pedagogy Open All-State rehearsals Middle, high school, and college choir concerts The latest teaching supplies & more More than 1,800 choir directors attend

www.tmea.org/convention Southwestern Musician | October 2012 47


to make announcements about upcoming concerts, recognition of Region Choir members, booster club officers, fundraising opportunities, etc. This also helps prevent the audience from talking while choirs are moving. For a holiday concert, invite the audience to sing along with holiday songs while the choirs are moving. Optimally, your choirs will move quickly and efficiently and there will be little wasted or dead time to fill. Practice does not make perfect—practice makes performance. Perfect practice makes perfect. Do not overlook any aspect of your performance situation. I hope your concerts this year are outstanding! Thanks to Derrick Bready, Denise Eaton, Jill Fetty, Jennifer Gallagher, Sam Harris, Enrique Collazo, Jan Juneau, and Jo Scurlock-Dillard for their contributions to this article. 2013 Clinic/Convention Update As of October 2 you can make a discounted convention hotel reservation from www.tmea.org/convention. Take time to review the hotel choices to decide which properties you would prefer. Some

48 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

hotels sell out so quickly that you should have multiple options in mind. As many of you did last year, take a moment to preregister online. It’s the fastest, simplest way to complete your convention registration! Go to www.tmea.org/convention for registration information and much more.

the world of choral music, we are in for a real treat in February.

'XDO&HUWLÀFDWLRQ Students who qualify to advance to Area in Band and Vocal organizations must complete a Dual Certification form and submit it to the Region President by December 15. On this form, the student declares the track in which he or she will continue to audition for qualification to All-State at the January 12 Area auditions. The Dual Certification form is found on the Band Division Forms page located under the Band Division menu on the TMEA website. Vocal Division Offerings From Thursday through Saturday, our convention will feature 22 clinics targeted for Vocal Division members. In addition, you can observe our 2013 All-State conductors during their rehearsals. With these three well-respected conductors in

Brad Holmes All-State Mixed Choir Conductor Brad Holmes is Director of Choir Programs at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois. His extensive guest conducting schedule has included all-state, ACDA Honor Choirs, and church music festivals throughout the United States.


TCU Director of Chorale Studies, Dennis Shrock conducts the TCU Concert Chorale in Fort Worthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Stephen Presbyterian Church

PerformCreate


International conducting engagements have taken him to England and the Far East, directing choirs from Korea, Japan, China, and the Philippines. In 2000, he was a Visiting Fellow in Residency at Cambridge University, England. Choirs under his direction have toured to 35 countries in Europe, South America, East Asia, the South Pacific, and Australia. His compositions are published by Santa Barbara Music Press, Morning Star Publishing, and First Step Publishing. Upon earning a DMA degree from Arizona State University, Holmes became a member of the choral faculty at Luther College. In 1991 he accepted his current post at Millikin University. During his 21-year tenure at Millikin, the choral program has blossomed to five traditional choirs and a variety of smaller vocal ensembles involving more than 300 students and five nationally recognized conductors. Under Holmes’s leadership the Millikin University Choir has gained a national reputation, due in part to five invitations to perform at ACDA national and regional conferences. In addition to annual two-week tours across the U.S., the choir has recently toured in China, Taiwan, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and throughout the United Kingdom. They recently recorded their sixth CD, How Sweet the Sound, on Millikin’s First Step Records label. Sharon Hansen All-State Women’s Choir Conductor Sharon Hansen is Professor and Director of Choral Activities at the University of Wisconsin/Milwaukee, where she conducts the UWM Concert Chorale and teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in conducting and choral literature. Hansen is also founder and music director of the Milwaukee Choral Artists, one of just a handful of professional women’s vocal ensembles in the country. With the Milwaukee Choral

Jefferson Johnson All-State Men’s Choir Conductor Jefferson Johnson is Director of Choral Activities at the University of Kentucky, where he conducts the University Chorale and Men’s Chorus. He also teaches advanced choral conducting, choral methods and literature, and directs the graduate program (MM and DMA degrees) in choral music. A native of Atlanta, Johnson received a bachelor of music degree from the University of Georgia, master of music degree from the University of Tennessee, and the doctor of musical arts degree from the University of Colorado. While living in Atlanta, Johnson was also a member of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus and Chamber Chorus conducted by Robert Shaw. Artists, Hansen has commissioned almost 50 new works for women’s voices and has championed music in 29 languages from more than 40 world cultures. Widely known as a conductor and master teacher, Hansen has conducted the Romanian National Radio Choir, the Gächinger Kantorei and Bach Collegium-Stuttgart, the Stockholm Conservatory Chamber Choir, the Moldavian and Oltenian Philharmonic Choirs in Romania, and the University of Regensburg Symphony Orchestra in Germany. Ensembles under Hansen’s direction have appeared at state, regional, and national ACDA and NAfME conferences. She has served as guest conductor and clinician with all-state choirs, music festivals, and honor choirs in more than 25 states. Author of the book Helmuth Rilling: Conductor—Teacher, Hansen is a member of the Editorial Board of The Choral Journal. She also authored the chapter “Women, Conductors, and the Tenure Process: What’s Up in the Academy” in the book Wisdom, Wit, and Will: Women Choral Conductors on Their Art. She has a signature music series with Santa Barbara Music Publishing and Hal Leonard.

TMEA CLINIC/CONVENTION February 13–16 ‡ San Antonio www.tmea.org/convention 50 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

Johnson’s instructional video Ready . . . Set . . . Sing! is published by Santa Barbara Music Publishing. Johnson maintains an active schedule as an adjudicator and guest conductor for high school and collegiate choirs throughout the U.S. and he has conducted honor choruses in 32 states. University of Kentucky choirs under Johnson’s direction have performed at fourteen conventions of choral music educators. Most recently the UK Men’s Chorus was featured in performance at the 2011 ACDA National Convention and at the 2012 ACDA Southern Division convention. The UK Chorale has toured extensively, with recent performances in Paris, Washington D.C., the Bahamas, and New York City. 


Control your mie class with an iPad ®

Yamaha Music in Education (MIE) is a technology-based general music program with a unique and engaging method, a special two-student keyboard, and now a new iPad app that gives teachers total control of instruments and learning materials from anywhere in the room. The iPad also gives teachers instant access to MIE textbooks and other course materials, making the job of teaching far more fun and effective. The app works with the MIE3 system as well as some older configurations. For more information about MIE, visit 4wrd.it/mieswm5 or scan the code below. Or, email miesales@yamaha.com today if you have questions about the iPad app’s compatibility with your current MIE classroom system. ©2012 Yamaha Corporation of America. All rights reserved. iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


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Increase Student Interaction with BY ELASHA EDWARDS AND PAMELA GRIFFITH

D

ifferentiating instruction and providing student choice in the elementary music classroom can seem like a daunting task. One simple solution that can also increase student engagement is the inclusion of music stations. Based on the same concept as literacy stations and math centers, music stations allow you the freedom to facilitate and provide opportunities for individual and smallgroup interaction. Many of our TEKS and standard music concepts are ideally suited for station work. Stations have been used successfully for providing skill practice, obtaining information, and acting as a culminating activity to a unit of study. Some of our favorite stations topics are: ‡5K\WKP

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STARTING OUT As musicians, we are accustomed to a more sit-and-get approach with our students, much like a conductor leading an HQVHPEOH,WFDQEHGLIILFXOWIRUDWHDFKHUWRUHOLQTXLVKWKDWFRQtrol and allow students to be more responsible for their own learning. One of the greatest obstacles we had to overcome was simply making the commitment to try.

M U S I C STATIONS Begin by reviewing your curriculum to find a concept area or XQLW\RXFRQVLVWHQWO\WHDFK,WFDQEHKHOSIXODQGDORWOHVVLQWLPLdating to limit your early attempts to a single grade level. Keep in mind that younger students use work stations daily in their other classrooms and will adapt to the procedures very easily. Start small and commit to a minimum of 2–3 class periods to implement stations. Select your activities carefully, and reflect on how you might be teaching these activities if you weren’t in a station setting. Take time to explain logistics, give instructions, and set expectations before the students begin working. Load your stations with opportunities to practice skills (something there is never enough time for) and include a variety of pairings (e.g., working individually [on a computer], with a partner [playing a game], or in small groups). Always take time to have some type of assessment—it will give you direct feedback on the success of each station and the students’ mastery of the concept, and it will provide valuable insight into the overall experience of your students. Southwestern Musician | October 2012 53


offer a clever way to assess your studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; skills and provide that rare one-on-one time in your music classroom. When considering station activities for younger students, process-oriented is typically more effective, while a more balanced approach works best with older students.

Select your activities carefully, and UHĂ HFWRQKRZ\RX might be teaching them if you werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in a station setting. Stations donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t replace your curriculum. They simply provide a different method of delivery. Stay open-minded and experiment until you discover what is comfortDEOHIRU\RXUFODVVURRPHQYLURQPHQW,WLV not unusual for us to continually modify from minute to minute, class to class, and even year to year. Now that we have incorporated stations into our toolbox for delivering information, skill building, and assessment, we have grown more confident that stations work and are filling voids in our studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; musical growth.

your filing cabinets and closets and dig out all of those games and fun activities that get the kids engaged. Teacher-made and purchased games work great in a stations setting, as do the plethora of computer games, websites, and SmartBoard activities available online. Activities: There are two kinds of station activities:

CREATING MUSIC STATIONS A great way to start is to browse through

Performance stations (singing, playing, or performing a skill for the teacher)

54 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

Â&#x2021;SURFHVVRULHQWHG HJJDPHVDQG manipulatives) and Â&#x2021;SURGXFWEDVHG ZKHUHWKHVWXGHQW completes something tangible).

GETTING ORGANIZED Stations are great fun for students, but they can sometimes be stressful for teachHUV ,W¡V HVSHFLDOO\ GLIILFXOW WR DFFHSW WKH idea of giving up control of the classroom to allow for a more learner-centered environment. With some thoughtful consideration before you begin, you can set clear goals and expectations that will foster success for you and your students. Here DUHVRPHTXHVWLRQVWRDVN\RXUVHOIDV\RX think about setting up stations in your classroom: Â&#x2021;+RZPDQ\VWXGHQWVVKRXOGEHDW HDFKVWDWLRQ" It depends on the work being done in that station, but 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 students per station works well. Â&#x2021;+RZPDQ\VWDWLRQVGR,QHHG" This depends on class size. To keep the


Always take time to have some type of assessmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it will give you direct feedback on the success of each station, the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mastery of the concept, and it will provide valuable insight into the overall experience of your students. numbers at each station manageable, consider how many students are in the class. Five stations can work for an average class size of 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30. If the classes are larger, a few more stations will be needed. Â&#x2021;:KHUHGR,SXWWKHVWDWLRQV" Space the stations out around the perimeter of your room and place one in the center. If the teacher is a station, you can use your desk area as one too. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to vary the type of stations so that students are alternating between active and sedentary activities. Â&#x2021;+RZGR,GHFLGHRQJURXSV" A variety of options are available to group students, from totally random (students pick a number at the door as they enter) to very deliberate (the teacher forms the groups before class time, considering abilities and behavior concerns). Students can choose which stations to visit, or they can be assigned by the teacher. Â&#x2021;:KDWGR,GRLIVWXGHQWVILQLVK EHIRUHLWLVWLPHWRVZLWFK" Sponge activities can be provided (the use of task cards makes this easier), or students can keep a folder of their station work with them, allowing them to pull out unfinished work if they have some free time. Another solution is to allow the students to revisit any station once they have completed their work, allowing them to move at their own pace. Â&#x2021;+RZGR,KDQGOHLQDSSURSULDWH EHKDYLRU" Deal with behavior in the same way you

would in a whole group activity. Whatever expectations are set in your room should remain in place during stations time. Â&#x2021;+RZGR,FROOHFWZRUN" The previously mentioned work folder is one option, another is to have a central collection area for finished work (a turnin basket) or a collection basket at each station. Â&#x2021;+RZZLOO,LQFOXGHVKDULQJWLPH DWWKHHQGRIFODVV" Use some sort of stop signal where everyone returns to their places as they would in whole class work and ask for volunteers to share or call upon students. You can start by asking students to identify their favorite stations or those they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like and describe why. A little impromptu concert is also fun if playing instruments is part of the lesson. THINKING AHEAD Preteaching the station activities makes these days run much more smoothly. When students know what to do, they ZRQ¡WKDYHWRDVNVRPDQ\TXHVWLRQVDQG FDQ JHW VWDUWHG RQ WKH DFWLYLW\ TXLFNO\ Before you begin, consider teaching the following to your students: Â&#x2021;KRZWRXVHWKHHTXLSPHQWDQG materials; Â&#x2021;KRZWRVKDUHDQGWDNHWXUQVZLWK materials; Â&#x2021;KRZWRXVHWKH´,&DQÂľDQG´7DVNÂľ cards (instruction cards that the teacher prepares ahead of time, letting

the students know what to do at the station, what materials they need, and what they should do when they are finished); Â&#x2021;KRZVWXGHQWVVKRXOGVROYHSUREOHPV that arise (e.g., ask three others before me, phone a friend, use a help signal); Â&#x2021;KRZWRSXWWKLQJVDZD\DQG Â&#x2021;KRZWRVZLWFKWRDQHZVWDWLRQ PXVW they wait for your signal, or can they change whenever they are ready?). TRACKING PROGRESS We have found it helpful to track what our students have accomplished in their stations work. These are some of our favorite tracking tools. Menus: &UHDWHGOLNHDUHVWDXUDQWPHQX in this form of station tracking, students DUH GLUHFWHG WR FRPSOHWH WKH ´PDLQ GLVK LWHPVÂľEHIRUHWKH\FDQFKRRVHIURPDVHOHFWLRQRI´VLGHGLVKHVÂľ,IWKHUHDUHILYHRUVL[ side dishes, the students might be tasked with completing three of their choosing. ,I VWXGHQWV FRPSOHWH WKH UHTXLUHG LWHPV early, they can choose from a selection of fun dessert items. Tic-Tac-Think: This works best if you can come up with nine stations for the students. Set up a 3Ă&#x2014;3 table that looks like a tic-tac-toe board, with the name of a station in each box. The students must draw a straight line through any three boxes (as they would if they won a game of tic-tac-toe) and complete those three VWDWLRQV ,I WKH\ ILQLVK HDUO\ WKH\ FDQ choose from other stations on the board. Southwestern Musician | October 2012 55


Pick 2: This is essentially the same as tic-tac-think but with fewer choices (perhaps four or five). The students choose two activities to complete. This works well with younger students or shorter class times. Checklists: Students are provided a list of all available stations and simply check off those they complete. They might have a set number of stations that must be completed or they could be expected to complete all stations. The checklist works well in either situation. Badges: Smaller than a checklist, this might be a large mailing label with the station names printed on them. Students can wear the badge or put it on a small piece of paper they carry with them as they travel the room. With small stickers at each station, they place a sticker by the name of each station as it is completed. Again, the teacher can set the goal for the number of stations completed. ASSESSMENT Assessing the station work your students accomplish is a great way to hold them accountable for their learning and to

56 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

track gaps in concept mastery. There are a number of ways to evaluate the learning of your students. Products: Any product (piece of paper or written task) can be graded just as you would if the whole class had completed it WRJHWKHU,GHDOO\VWDWLRQVFDQSURYLGHGLIferentiated assignments for students to show their mastery of a concept. This will give you the flexibility to assess each student individually. Performances:,IDPXVLFDOWDVNVXFKDV learning a composition, is a station choice, a time of sharing at the end of the class period can provide you with the chance to hear these performances individually and to assess playing skills. Goal setting: A grade can be assigned based on how many station activities the student completed given the expected number. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget that student interaction is easily documented. Main Dishes: ,Q WKH PHQX WUDFNLQJ idea above, main dish items are designed to be completed by everyone in the class. That makes it easy to use those activities for assessment. Show What You Know: This idea

features the teacher as a station. Students rotate through this station with the teacher to sing or play instruments or to DQVZHUTXHVWLRQV MAKING ROOM FOR STATIONS IN YOUR CLASSROOM Stations can be used to kick off a new unit, can provide practice time in the middle of a unit, and can be a fun way to complete and assess mastery of a concept at the end of a unit. We have found music stations to be most effective when we sprinkle them throughout our curriculum, like adding spice to a dish. Whether you see your classes twice a week, once every eight days, or somewhere in between, there is a place for stations in your music classroom. They allow you to interact with your students in a new and exciting way thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun for all.  Elasha Edwards is a Music Specialist at Flower Mound Elementary in Lewisville ISD and Pamela Griffith is a Music Specialist at Serna Elementary in North East ISD.


Tip of the month: cookie sheets B Y

M I C H E L E

I

ELEMENTARY NOTES

H O B I Z A L

love itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;love itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;love it! One of my favorite ideas that is easy and inexpensive is creating a magnetic music staff XVLQJDQLQH[SHQVLYHPHWDOFRRNLHVKHHW&UHDWHWKHVWDII with strips of black electrical tapes on the cookie sheet, and use round magnets for the music notesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! How many times have your students been working with notes on staves when someone accidentally bumps the paper and the notes go everywhere? With a metal cookie sheet and magnets, the notes stay in place. This is my creative tip for my favorite month. This time of year, my third, fourth, and fifth graders are working on varying levels of difficulty in stick passing games. When the students have rehearsed VHYHUDOWLPHV ,OLNHWRXVHGLIIHUHQWVRQJVZLWKDVROLGVWHDG\EHDW ,UHSODFH some of the sticks with glow sticks. The glow sticks are usually in abundance DURXQG +DOORZHHQ EXW FKHFN RQOLQH IRU ORZHU SULFHV 8VH 5D\ 3DUNHU -U¡V VRQJ´*KRVWEXVWHUVÂľRUWKHROGLH´0RQVWHU0DVKÂľDQGKDYHDJUHDWWLPH7R reinforce rhythms, divide your class into several groups. Each group receives DEHDWRUEHDWSKUDVH/RRNIRU+DOORZHHQPXVLF&'VWKDWLQFOXGHVFDU\ songs (or scary-funny) that have a solid beat. Play the music while each group says their rhythmic phrase. You can have all groups perform at once or bring in and out different groups (each group is still saying only their rhythmic phrase). This is also a perfect time to bring in the classics with minor pieces. Also consider showing your students how music has changed. One of my favorite

IMPORTANT DATES Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Convention housing opens. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

What would a child learn sooner than a song? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Alexander Pope Southwestern Musician | October 2012 57


examples is Night on Bald Mountain by Mussorgsky. Play it for your students and then offer them another version such as the dance remix version of Night on Bald Mountain (you can find these on iTunes). Hint . . . this can be an ideal song to play with the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rhythmic phrases. :DQWPRUHLGHDVIRU2FWREHU"-RLQXVRQ Edmodo (instructions on the next page). Music is fun!

What Does TMEA Have to Offer Me? Answer #2 /DVW PRQWK , JDYH \RX GLUHFWLRQV WR the World of Music video-hosted on our convention webpage for you to show your administrators to help them understand what our convention has to offer. 7KLVPRQWK,HQFRXUDJH\RXWRSD\\RXU membership dues if you have not done so VLQFHWKHQHZ\HDUDFWXDOO\EHJDQ-XO\

,¡YHKHDUGPXVLFWHDFKHUVVD\´,RQO\SD\ P\GXHVZKHQ,JRWRWKHFRQYHQWLRQ¾,I TMEA were only about the convention, we would not have membership dues; we would only pay a registration fee to attend the convention. However, membership in TMEA provides you much more than the incredible four days of professional growth each February. Our membership ensures you have a voice at the state level through the leadership of TMEA who constantly monitor the actions of decision-making bodies and stand up for you when music education in Texas may be affected. Membership allows you access to low-cost liability insurance, a subscription to SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN, access to the TMEA Mentoring Network, job vacancy information, advocacy materials, resources, an ever-improving website, and an amazing office staff who will help \RX LQ DQ\ ZD\ SRVVLEOH , FKDOOHQJH \RX to find another organization that charges only $50 dues for all that TMEA has to offer you! Come Join the Gang on Edmodo! All TMEA elementary music teachers should be able to join our group on this

58 Southwestern Musician | October 2012


ZHEVLWH )ROORZ WKHVH VLPSOH VWHSV DV , ZLOO continue to highlight offerings available to you on Edmodo throughout the year:  *RWRZZZHGPRGRFRP  &OLFN´,¡PD7HDFKHUÂľWRVHWXS\RXU account (itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free!). 3. When you have created your account, ILQGWKHZRUG´*URXSVÂľRQWKHOHIW side tab.  &OLFNRQ-RLQ 5. The code of TMEA Elementary Music Teachers is 98LVK0. 6. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! Now you can check out everything in the library. *RRG OXFN DV \RX FRQWLQXH LQWR WKH upcoming holiday season thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full of wonderful teaching opportunities for every music educator! 2013 Clinic/Convention Update As of October 2, you can make a discounted convention hotel reservation from w w w.tmea.org /convention. As PDQ\ RI \RX GLG ODVW \HDU , KRSH WKDW you will again take a moment to preregLVWHURQOLQH,W¡VWKHIDVWHVWVLPSOHVWZD\

to complete your convention registration. *RWRZZZWPHDRUJFRQYHQWLRQIRUUHJistration information and much more. Convention Helper or Volunteer As you make your plans to attend the convention, please consider volunteering to be a presider, office helper, or to work in convention registration. To volunteer, go to the TMEA website, and under the Elementary Division menu item select the Volunteer to Help page, or simply email me at sallyhobizal@katyisd.org. Texas Elementary Invited Clinicians We are fortunate to have an abundance of wonderful teachers here in Texas. With VRPXFKH[SHULHQFHDYDLODEOHWRXV,DP SOHDVHG WR DQQRXQFH WKH 7H[DV ,QYLWHG &OLQLFLDQV IRU WKH  70($ &OLQLF &RQYHQWLRQDUH%HQ7RUUHVDQG*DEULHOD Montoya-Stier. When you plan your convention schedule, be sure to look for their clinics. Ben Torres Texas Invited Clinician Ben Torres is in his ninth year in

5LFKDUGVRQ,6'ZLWKWKLVDVKLVILUVW\HDU as the Kâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 music specialist at Brentfield Elementary in Dallas, and his first year DVWKH--3HDUFH$UHD7HDP/HDGHU3ULRU to this, he was the music specialist at 5LFKODQG(OHPHQWDU\IRUILYH\HDUVZKHUH KH GLUHFWHG WKH 5LFKODQG 5RFNHW &KRLU DQGWKH5K\WKP5RFNHWV2UII(QVHPEOH D70($,QYLWHG3HUIRUPLQJ*URXS  and served as the Berkner Area Team

2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16

San Antonio

OUR CLINIC/CONVENTION IS FOR ELEMENTARY MUSIC TEACHERS! Over 40 clinics for elementary teachers Inspiring elementary music performances Nationally recognized featured clinicians The latest teaching supplies & more Over 2,000 elementary teachers attend

www.tmea.org/convention Southwestern Musician | October 2012 59


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Leader. Torres received his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in music from West Texas A&M 8QLYHUVLW\LQ&DQ\RQ+HFRPSOHWHGKLV Orff Schulwerk training at SMU and has taught movement and recorder in the OHYHOVFRXUVHDWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI&HQWUDO Arkansas, movement and recorder in the OHYHOVFRXUVHIRUWKH$OEXTXHUTXH3XEOLF Schools, and recorder in the levels course at SMU. He also serves as the secretary for WKH1RUWK7H[DV&KDSWHURIWKH$PHULFDQ Orff-Schulwerk Association. Gabriela Montoya-Stier Texas Invited Clinician *DEULHOD 0RQWR\D6WLHU UHFHLYHG KHU bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in music education from the University of New Mexico and her masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in music education IURP ,QGLDQD 8QLYHUVLW\%ORRPLQJWRQ ZKHUHVKHDOVRFRPSOHWHG.RGiO\OHYHOV,

,,DQG,,,6KHFRPSOHWHGKHU2UIIFHUWLILFDWLRQ OHYHOV , ,, DQG ,,, IURP 7ULQLW\ University. She is the author of El Patio

de Mi Casa ERRN DQG &'  D 0H[LFDQ childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s folk song collection published E\*,$ She is also a contributing author to Music in Elementary EducationE\-RKQ: Flohr and Valerie Trollinger. She was recently selected to serve in the Kâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2 Music 7(.6 5HYLHZ &RPPLWWHH 'XULQJ WKH summers, Montoya-Stier is on the faculty IRU WKH 7H[DV 6WDWH .RGiO\ &HUWLILFDWLRQ program at Texas State University and WKH $XVWLQ ,6' .RGiO\ &HUWLILFDWLRQ program. Montoya-Sier has been teaching with 1RUWKVLGH,6'VLQFH$XJXVWDQGKDV presented workshops throughout the U.S. She believes in nurturing every childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical abilities through singing, playing instruments, and movement. 

Learn Boldly. Live to Inspire. SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE: Da capo Award in Music Up to full tuition per year Jones Fine Arts Award for Music Majors Up to $4,000 per year Performance Awards for Non-Majors Up to $2,000 per year Scholarship Audition Dates: Sun., Feb. 24, 2013 @ 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 p.m. Sat., March 23, 2013 @ 10 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201C; noon Sat., April 20, 2013 @ 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 p.m.

Texas Lutheran University Contact 1.800.771.8521 or e-mail dboyer@tlu.edu

62 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

For speciďŹ c qualiďŹ cations for each award, visit www.tlu.edu/music or scan the QR code above with your smartphone.

Bachelor of Music in All-Level Music Education Bachelor of Music in Performance Bachelor of Arts in Music


Mentoring: the College Divisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role B Y

K E I T H

COLLEGE NOTES

D Y E

T

he term mentor comes to us from the name of the charDFWHU LQ *UHHN P\WKRORJ\ ZKRP 2G\VVHXV ZKLOH involved with the Trojan War, chose to mind his affairs and also teach and protect his son, Telemachus. By modern definition, a mentor is an experienced advisor and supporter. ,QSUDFWLFHPRVWRIXVDUHIRUWXQDWHDQGWKDQNIXOWREHDEOHWR recall at least one individual who performed this role in our proIHVVLRQDOOLYHV7KLVOHDGVPHWRP\TXHVWLRQDUHZHHDFKVHUYLQJ in this capacity to the best of our capabilities? Obviously, we all continually mentor our students through our positions as educators, whether working in an elementary music teaching space, rehearsal hall, or college classroom. Where each of us may need to enhance our efforts is in the arena of peer mentorship. 2I SULPDU\ LPSRUWDQFH LV WKH H[DPSOH ZH VHW IRU RWKHUV ,Q WKH ZRUGV RI $OEHUW6FKZHLW]HU´([DPSOHLVQRWWKHPDLQWKLQJLQLQIOXHQFLQJRWKHUVLWLV WKHRQO\WKLQJ¾7KLVFHUWDLQO\LVQRWDQHZFRQFHSW%XWGRZHWDNHWKHQH[W HTXDOO\LPSRUWDQWVWHS"'RZHPDNHRXUVHOYHVDYDLODEOHWREHWKDWQHHGHGH[SHrienced advisor and supporter to the degree that we should? Should we also work tirelessly as part of a professional system to identify, encourage, and enroll more inexperienced colleagues who would benefit from a mentor-protÊgÊ relationship? A central reason TMEA and other professional organizations exist is for

Every music education graduate going on to teach in a Texas school should be given the opportunity to be supported through the TMEA Mentoring Network.

IMPORTANT DATES Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Renew your TMEA membership and preregister for the 2013 convention. October 2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Convention housing opens. October 9â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Registration deadline for the College Fall Conference. October 12â&#x20AC;&#x201D;College Fall Conference in Austin. October 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Call for papers. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 18, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;CTME Leadership Summit at Dallas Baptist University. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

Southwestern Musician | October 2012 63


mentoring. These organizations were formed to serve and support those who joined together as a community of people engaged in related occupational pursuits. However, as the community grows larger, there is an increasing need for the counsel to become more deliberate and intentional lest its members, especially new members, become isolated and the benefits of membership become unintentionally reduced. ,Q WKH SDVW 70($ DQG RWKHU RUJDQLzations have initiated efforts to mentor new music educators. We are not too far removed from the time when TMEA 5HJLRQ 9LFH3UHVLGHQWV ZHUH FKDUJHG with facilitating mentoring programs. Most recently TMEA Past-President Mike Ware worked with the Foundation for Music Education in conjunction with TMEA to establish the Music Educator 5HVRXUFH 1HWZRUN 0(51  0(51 efforts were coordinated by a regional network of band, orchestra, vocal, and elementary volunteer advisors. Many positive mentoring relationships began and flourished through this program. Despite the good intentions behind

these prior programs, it appeared that a large number of new music educators were being missed. As Executive Director 5REHUW )OR\G UHSRUWHG KHUH ODVW PRQWK the TMEA Executive Board and staff are currently working on reimagining the possibilities of organizational mentorship. Key to this new framework will be the college and university music teacher preparation programs and faculty. An effective channel of communication and cooperation between TMEA and those who prepare teachers will allow deliberate and accurate identification of students who will soon enter the profession. The goal would be that every music education graduate going on to teach in a Texas school would be given the opportunity to be supported through the TMEA Mentoring Network. As Mr. Floyd indicated last month, all ideas to help improve the program will EH FRQVLGHUHG 6SHFLILFDOO\ WKH &ROOHJH Division and its members should be an integral part of the design, development, DQG IXQFWLRQ RI WKHVH QHZ HIIRUWV &70( officers should incorporate a new mission for their chapters by identifying future

educators and embracing the importance of the opportunity to participate as proWpJpV &ROOHJH PXVLF HGXFDWLRQ IDFXOW\ members should adopt a systematic way of reporting their current and future graduDWHV DQG WKHLU VXEVHTXHQW MRE SODFHPHQWV Finally, what mentoring means to music educators should be re-examined. Mentoring can mean much more than a periodic meeting or correspondence between the mentor and protĂŠgĂŠ. 5HDGLO\ DYDLODEOH WHFKQRORJLHV FDQ PDNH communicating much easier and more meaningful. Videoconferencing, sharing UHFRUGLQJV YLD WKH ,QWHUQHW DQG VHFXUH social networking all hold the potential to make the mentoring process more efficient and effective. Using new technologies in the mentoring process should also strongly resonate with younger teachers. , FKDOOHQJH \RX WR UHYLHZ WKH LVVXHV RI this important topic as outlined by our Executive Director and make this obliJDWLRQ RI WKH &ROOHJH 'LYLVLRQ D SULRUity topic of conversation between you and your colleagues within your school. Bring your ideas to the October meeting

2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention

February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16 San Antonio OUR CLINIC/CONVENTION IS FOR COLLEGE FACULTY AND STUDENTS! Over 45 clinics for college faculty and students The latest music education research unveiled Nationally recognized featured clinicians The latest teaching supplies & more Over 3,600 college faculty & students attend

www.tmea.org/convention 64 Southwestern Musician | October 2012


Degree Programs Bachelor of Arts in Music Bachelor of Music in Performance Bachelor of Music (teacher certiďŹ cation)

Performance Opportunities Symphany Orchestra Wind Ensemble Concert Band Big Purple Marching Band Jazz Ensemble Jazz Combos Percussion Ensemble Steel Drum Band A Cappella Chorus University Chorale Opera

Audition Dates Friday, November 16 Saturday, February 16 Friday/Saturday, March 1-2 Friday/Saturday, April 5-6

Contact Us acu.edu/music 325-674-2199 music@acu.edu


of the division, or email them to me at keith.dye@ttu.edu. This is a huge undertaking, but it is also arguably one of the most important tasks we can promote as professional educators. Important Notices Â&#x2021;2Q2FWREHUWKH&ROOHJH'LYLVLRQ ZLOOKROGWKH)DOO&RQIHUHQFH ´&KDOOHQJHV,QVLJKWV6ROXWLRQVÂľDW WKH70($RIILFHLQ$XVWLQ,KRSH you can set aside the date and work to ensure a meaningful representation in DWWHQGDQFHIURP\RXUFDPSXV&KHFN your email for the agenda that was distributed in September. Â&#x2021;7KHFDOOIRUSDSHUVWREHSUHVHQWHG at the convention poster session has been issued. The deadline is 2FWREHU$GGLWLRQDOGHWDLOVDUHLQ the adjacent frame on this page. Â&#x2021;9ROXQWHHUVIRUWKHFRQYHQWLRQDUH always needed and appreciated. Whether you are interested in presiding over division sessions or helping with registration, the always-willing volunteer force guarantees our convention remains a world-class HYHQW7RYROXQWHHUJRWRWKH&ROOHJH Division menu from www.tmea.org and select Volunteer to Help. CTME Notes Janna Carroll, Director of Public Relations and Communications *UHHWLQJV IURP WKH &ROOHJLDWH 7H[DV Music Educators Board! We are pleased to announce the details of Leadership 6XPPLW ÂłRQH RI &70(¡V DQQXDO events to serve music education chapters across Texas. Our goal with this event LV WR FXOWLYDWH FXUUHQW OHDGHUVKLS TXDOLties within each future music educator with the hopes that one day our generation will have the same set of outstanding OHDGHUVKLSTXDOLWLHVRIWKRVHZKRSUHFHGH XV7KHPLVVLRQRI&70(LVWRLQFUHDVH professionalism, advocacy, and networking activities across and within campus chapters around the state. Save the Date: Leadership Summit  ZLOO EH KRVWHG E\ 'DOODV %DSWLVW 8QLYHUVLW\ -DQXDU\ ²-DQXDU\   This event is open to all local chapter members, and we would love to see as many as possible attend! For students within the area, the cost of the event will EH ² +RZHYHU ZH XQGHUVWDQG 66 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

that not everyone is within commuting distance. Therefore, hotel accommodations will be made for those who need them, bringing the cost of the weekend WR DSSUR[LPDWHO\  RU OHVV &70( LV providing a scholarship for one freshman from each university who would

like to attend. The scholarship will cover housing, food, and registration costs for the weekend. The registration form can be found at ctmeweb.org. Email comSOHWHG UHJLVWUDWLRQ IRUPV RU TXHVWLRQV WR collegiatetexasmusiceducators@gmail.com. We look forward to seeing you there! 

CALL FOR PAPERS 7KH &ROOHJH 'LYLVLRQ 5HVHDUFK &RPPLWWHH LV SOHDVHG WR DQQRXQFH WKH FDOO IRU SURSRVDOV IRU SUHVHQWDWLRQV DW WKH 70($ &OLQLF&RQYHQWLRQ 5HVHDUFK 3RVWHU Session. The committee invites submissions from members in all TMEA divisions, including college students. Selected authors will present their research at an informal session in which interested music teachers can learn about the research and discuss its applications to music teaching. Prepare an abstract of approximately 750 words that provides a concise yet thorough summary of the research, and paste it directly into the body of an email to $P\6LPPRQV5HVHDUFK3RVWHU6HVVLRQ2UJDQL]HUDQG3UHVLGHU$WWKHWRSRIWKH message, include the project title, author(s), institutional affiliations (of all), and the principal authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s email address, mailing address, and phone number. Each selected presenter will prepare a 40" Ă&#x2014; 40" poster that describes the research and will provide abstracts for interested individuals attending the poster session GXULQJWKH70($&OLQLF&RQYHQWLRQ

Submission Deadline: October 15, 2012 Submit to: Amy L. Simmons, PhD, TMEA Research Committee School of Music, Texas State University DP\VLPPRQV#W[VWDWHHGXÂ&#x2021;

Remember to Renew Your Membership All TMEA 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2012 memberships expired June 30. Also, if covered, liability insurance expired August 20. Renew now to ensure you receive the benefits of your TMEA membership for the entire year.

Renew Online Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Click Renew from

www.tmea.org/membership Verify and update your email and mailing addresses. Your receipt and membership card are sent to your email address.

The TMEA membership year ended June 30. Renew now, and remind your colleagues to do the same!


Thank You, Scholarship Donors $XJXVW²$XJXVW Amanda Abbott Bross Pamela Joyce Adair Roxanne Alexander Crystal Alexander-Duckett Sara Alfred Stephanie K. Allison Joe Alvear David R. Amelung Julieanne Roberts Amos Kitty Amshoff Tim Andersen Amy K. Anderson Cindy Anderson David C. Anderson Dr. Stephanie K. Andrews Travis Angel Andrew Anker Richard Lawrence Armstrong Mike Ary Shirley E. Astwood Jennifer Augello Rebecca Aune Rebecca Luvy Azard Deanna S. Badgett Barbara Jean Bailey David A. Barbick Debra L. Barkey Carolyn M. Barksdale Suzanne Barnes Matt Barnhart David Barr Elias F. Barry Edith C. Barton Gary Dwayne Barton Karen Kay Batsel Ronald Wayne Behrends Kayla Bender Patsy A. Biedenfeld Michelle Marie Bilek Julie A. Birkner Karen Blackstone Thomas Richard Blanco, Sr. Jayne Bledsoe Richard Douglas Blomquist Adam Bodine Kay Bollom Patricia F. Bonner Kurt Bonnett Ross Alan Boothman Nannette Avant Borden Patrick Aloysius Bowen Stephanie Bowen Beverly Bradburn Marcus Keith Bradford David W. Bradley Jennifer Brandt Chris Brannan Julia Upton Brister

Karen A. Bronson Kevin Broome Judith Ann Brown Bryan Andrew Buffaloe Veronica R. Buggs Rhonda Gay Buie Sarah Elizabeth Bunk Lisa Burks Jamie L Cabot Sherrill H. Calvert Debbie Campbell Randall Lee Capshaw Anna Carney Kristin Carpenter John Woodrome Carroll Cindy L. Casillas Cinjin L. Casillas Nancy Caston Robert Caston Russell Andrew Caston Virginia B. Catherwood Sarah Jane Chambers Lauren Chauvin Joel Chavarria Garland Ray Chiasson Woody E. Christman Sandra Clampitt Betsy M. Clark Jennifer Cahill Clark, PhD Robert G. Clarke, Jr. Steven Christopher Cline Royce Ray Coatney Jodi Coke Sarah Elizabeth Cole Deborah L. Colley John Everett Collins Kelly Comfort Dr. Brian Conklin Charles Consaul Eric Contreras Christopher C. Conway Donald C. Cook Eric L. Cooley Kim Cooley Dr. Al Corley Paula B. Corley Donna Cotter Robert Cotter Mary Frances Cowart Paul Crockett Cliff Croomes Lorie Crowder Richard Crowder Nancy Crownover Alexander Cruz Michael A. Cruz Daniel Alberto Cuevas Dr. Jennifer Dalmas

Melissa Danforth Anu Mathai Daniel Susan G. Daniell Lucas Darger Traci Davidson Laura L. Davis Lisa Davis Robin Frances Davis Traci Rene Davis Julie Breeden De Hoyos Dr. Michael Dean Russell Dean Lauren Dennis Dr. Scott Deppe Kelly Ann Desjardins Alicia Rogers Desoto Howard James Desselle IV Mike L. Devenport Carol Dewar Dawn Dillard Jonna Ditto Catherine Dixon Lara Dixon Gary P. Doby Hugo Alfred Doege Joseph Dombrowski Robert Donahue Eric L. Donalson Brian W. Donnell Ryan Dore Nellie T. Doty Cynthia E. Douglas Deborah Downey Rick Driscoll William Cody Dry Darrin M. Duff LaRae A. Duff Joel W. Duskin Karen Fontenot Earnest, PhD Marc Alan Easley Denise Renee Eaton Richard A. Eckstein Bryan Edwards Elasha Edwards Adam Ellard Dale E. Ellis Ida Lee Ellis Exie Jo Elmore Olivia Kaye Epperson Debra Carmack Erck Donna Estrada Linda Ewton Michael A. Fahey Dr. Tommy Fain Judy Farley Rebecca Farrar Antonio Favela Matthew Fehl

Wade A. Fennell Jeff Fentem Julie Ferguson Lonnie Ferrell Dr. Richard K. Fiese Tate Fincher Melonie Ann Fineout Gaye H. Fisher Lauren Elizabeth Fisher Lance Flisowski Efrain Flores, Jr. Kelly Ann Flores Rachel A. Forester Tom E. Forgue Thomas Richard Forrest II Julia Forsythe Jeff K. Fox Dr. Graeme Francis Patricia F. Franco David Earl Frazier Jennifer Adams Frierson Brian Frock George A. Frock James Robert Fry Patricia Frye Jackie Fullerton Julie Funston Jeanie Gainey James M. Gallaher Jana Galloway Cristobal Garcia Kevin Garcia-Hettinger Beverly Alleen Garms Steve R. Garms Hector Garza Junelle Gatza Daniel Gee Howard Geisel Matthew Gelband Jeanette Gentry Tiffany Gibson Kevin Wayne Gilpatrick Richard Thomas Gist Martin Godoy, Jr. Mary J. Gohary IV Amie Goins Geoffrey N. Golden Pearl Gonzales-Owens Arturo Gonzalez Christina M Gorchos Liz Grant Raegan Grantham Clorese Vernetta Gray-Porter Steven D. Griffing Jonna Griffith Charlsie Anne Griffiths Dylan Groff Jeanne A. Gunn

Emily Gurwitz Forrester L. Halamicek Clyde Hale Samuel Hale Cindy Hallo Brian J. Halverson Gregory Alan Hames Julie Hamil Susan Hanlon Kimberley Hanna Kristine M. Hanzlik Bethany Hardwick Katie Hardy Dr. Amy Marie Harris Rocky D. Harris Robert F. Hastings Norma Hawes Kristy Denise Hayes Van L. Hayes Brandon S. Haynes Craig C. Haynie Steven D. Hearn Bobby W. Heathcock Elaine K. Heinze Hope Hennecke Van A. Henry Deborah Hernandez Michael Anthony Hernandez Jill Hesson Dean Hill Shaun Patrick Hillen Mary Lynn Hokett Brandon Michael Holt Donna Holt Priscilla Ochran Holt, PhD Rachel Holt Ty Alden Hood Joy A. Hope Ann Hornack Michael Huestis Jocelyn Hund Libby B. Huntington Rev. Daniel Hutchins Carl Erwin Idlebird Alexandra Jackson Mitzi Nell Jackson Raymiah Jackson Vanessa Jackson Marian Jacobs Michael C. Johnson Michael J. Johnson Randy Johnson Shirley Ann Johnson Allison Jeanette Johnston Christie M. Jones Dustin Jones Victoria Falkner Jones Addie Brieanne Jordon

Southwestern Musician | October 2012 67


Emmelynn Junek Joseph Jung Amy Jurchisin Michele Kahne Myron Scott Karner Cynthia D. Karr David T. Kastor Gaylene Lilley Kelley Kathryn Ann Kendle Matthew Kent Malvina David Keselman Natalia Andreevna Kharlova Teresa Colleen Kile Blair King Peter Kline Heather Leigh Klossner Hubert Wessley Knight, Jr. Melody Knott Marc Edward Kondrup Chris Kosterman Kathryn M. Kuddes Bonnie Kuehl Charles L. Kuentz Stephen Paul Kujawa Rebecca Francis Kyriakides Nick La Rocca Samuel Labordus Cheri Lafferty Jessica Lane Laura K. Lane LuAnn Lane Dennis A. Langevin Phil Louis LaRocque Casey Latham Janet Paderewski Lattanzi Darla B. Lawless Jennifer Lawrence Jed Alden Leach Patrick Leaverton Colleen LeBourgeois Barbara Lee James R. Lee George Leon Shawna Marie Lien Yi-Jan Liu Dr. Douglas Lockard Rachel Lockard Lelah Loftin Daniel D. Lonie Andres J. Lopez Linda D. Loudenback John Richard Lovelace Nicholas A. Luggerio John David Luker David Mairs Susan M Malone Patrick A. Mann David Martinez Deborah Kathleen Martinez Viridiana Martinez Michael Mason Maya Sevelen Mathews-Silva Alexandr Matros Earl A. Mattei Marilyn Mattei Celeste A Matthews

Larry Matysiak Mary Matysiak Justin Mauldin Benjamin May Scott William McAdow David Lynn McAllister Terrill A. McBee Donald W. McCandless Tim McCormick, Sr. David McCullar Lisa M. McCutchan Wade McDonald Jared McEntyre Angus McLeod Lewis Nathan McMahon Patrick McMurrey Dr. Carol McNabb Goodwin Barton McNeely Timothy J. McWright, Jr. Claire H. Meador Joe A. Mehling Penelope J. Meitz Dinah Jean Menger Sherry Merritt Frederick George Meyer III Stephen Joseph Meyer Arthur Miller Johnny Miller Kimberly Dee Ann Miller Margaret Elizabeth Miller Rita F. Minter Warren G. Mize Charlotte Moellering Eric Moellering Vicki Lynn Moffatt Nathan G. Monk Gabriela Montoya-Stier Ryan Joseph Moore Susannah Moorman David W. Moran Stephanie Mouat Dr. Christopher Munn Robert Allyn Munoz Gabriel Musella Tammy M. Musser J. Bryce Myerhoff Reece Nagai Daniel Najera Melinda M. Najera Samantha Nalundasan Angela Lee Neal Mineasa Nesbit Tommy A. Neumann Paul Noel Hyungnam Noh Josh Nowlin Nan Oliver John S. Olsen Kirk Overmoe Diane Owen John Kelly Owen Donnie Owens Mickey Owens Robin Owens Kelly Ann Pallagi Michael O. Parker, Sr.

68 Southwestern Musician | October 2012

Jennifer Dawn Parra Terry L. Parrish Stan D. Paschal Tracey C. Patterson Sharon F. Paul Deborah Payne Kay Payton Brian B. Peacock Suzanne R. Pecht Jose Luis Pelaez Karen Ermine Penn Jerri Allison Penney Charles R. Pennington Nicole Pennington Joey Clark Pereira David Z. Perez Deborah Perkins, PhD Dr. Diane C. Persellin Dr. Kathy Petree Betty Bierschenk Pierce Ronald J. Pingor Christopher William Pittman Benjamin L. Ponder James Robert Popham Brian Potter Juli Purcell Powers Dana S. Pradervand Danny Prado Lisa Pranter Deborah Kea Prihoda Lucy Mae Proctor Judith W. Pruitt Andy Pruyn Alexander Scott Pruzon Lynn Pyle Estephan Quintela Jane Elizabeth Rabalais Chris Rackley Dr. Brian S. Ransom Jamie Lauren Reason Alacia R. Reid Evelyn Joyce Reiffert Amanda Thompson Reilly Andy Rein Wieslaw Rentowski, D.M.A. Barbara Ann Reuter Christine Rewolinski Dora Ann Reyes Rodrigo Reyes Thomas James Rinn David L. Rives Jamie Rives Kristi Roark Dr. Richard W. Robbins III Steven Robbins Erin Roberts Katharine H. Robinson Daniel Alejandro Rodriguez Jennette Cecilia Roesner Jennifer Romig Mary Alice Rosenboom Stephen Hunter Rothermel Dr. Danna Rothlisberger Dr. Michelle Roueche Charlotte Neleen Royall Susan M. Rozanc

Robert D. Rubio Brian Joseph Ruiz Priscilla Jane Rundquist Stephanie B Rusnak Andrew M. Russell Brent Renee Samford Emilio Santos Daniel Dominic Savedra Brandt Delmer Sayger Brian Sayre Paul Schmidt Jon Schriver Adam R. Seltzer Pauline Sexton Abigail Shaw Erick Nathan Shaw Dr. L. Scott Sheppard Nick A. Shine Stuart Shulman Rebecca Simonfalvi Zachary L Sims Rachael White Sitka Kevin R. Sluder Lisa Smith Mark Smith Robin Smith Walter W. Sparkman Lindsey Joanna Spitsberg Staci A. Spring Kelly W. Sprowls Tammy Dee Stallcup Jerry Stallsmith Rebecca D. Stapper Michele Stehling Kevin Stehr Catherine Yvonne Stevenson Patrick Allen Stevenson Steven L. Stevenson David C. Stone Elizabeth Stone Robert Stovall Robert J. Straka Christine Stratton John Stuart Stephanie Sunder Dominic Talanca Billy Talley Shannon Denise Talley Laura Taylor Norma Ella Taylor Valerie Tegeler Denise E Thomas Jennifer Thomas Justin Wade Thomas Christopher Thomasson Elisa T. Thompson Ellen Nicole Thompson Julie Thompson Tim Wayne Thompson Morgan Tinsley Hannah Tolleson Melissa Lea Townsend Kimberly J. Tucker Olivia G. Tucker Gina Anne Valverde Mari Esabel Valverde

Walter Van Gieson Sandra E. Vandertulip Kay Vanlandingham Raul Vara Mark A. Varian Nancy Joan Vines Dr. Jennifer Rebecca Voges Carlene S. Wadley Timothy J. Wadley Dr. William K. Wakefield Jo Wallace-Abbie Larry Dean Ward Gabrielle Watanabe Robyn Watson Daniel A. Webbon Gary Wells Andrea Marie Welty Peachey Rebecca Kathleen Wernham Kathy H. White Ronald White Leslie Whittemore Brittany Lynn Wilbourn Helen Wilcox Tanner J. Wilemon Christina Wilke Amy E. Williams Charles Edward Williams Gene Williams Dorothy Farrar Wilson Stephanie Withrow Michelle Womack Glenda S Wood Kevin George Wood Walter J. Wright Mark Wynn James Yates, Jr. Timothy Michael Young Dean Zarmbinski Lyn J. Zeller Donald Richard Zidlicky Anna Lynn Zientek Clay Steve Zientek Katherine L. Zrust


“I don’t think they know they’re learning. The air in the room is electric!” Sandi Chasson, Director of Music

Breezin’ Thru Theory music theory and composition program makes learning fun and gives students the thrill of making music!

Teachers across North America are sharing stories about their phenomenal results. See for yourself why everyone loves Breezin’ Thru Theory – try the online E-binder, games & composition activities at breezinthrutheory.com. Why it’s loved It’s fun to compete with concepts like Mad Dash Drills. Students pick up theory fast and start making real music. No one gets left behind. Perfect for Grades 5-12!

New for 2012/13 NEW ÀH[LEOHSULFLQJSODQV Whether you’re a classroom teacher, homeschooler or have a private music studio, there’s a plan to get you breezin’ thru!

See for yourself at www.breezinthrutheory.com Or call 1-855-265-3805 (toll free)

interactive Mad Dash Drills – over 200 to choose from NEW 2-Minute Timer – Race against the clock NEW Auto scoring - instant feedback – and MORE! NEW

Woohoo – start breezin’ thru!


l to the a d e P â&#x20AC;&#x153; e h t t u P Winners y Time! r o e h T h it w â&#x20AC;? l a t e M

VISIT US ONLINE: Â&#x2021;3URGXFW9LGHRV Â&#x2021;)XQ&KDOOHQJH6KHHWV Â&#x2021;7HDFKLQJ3RGFDVWV Â&#x2021;(DU7UDLQLQJ9LGHRV Â&#x2021;.:RUNERRN6HULHV Â&#x2021;5HSURGXFLEOH&XUULFXOXPV Â&#x2021;NewMEDALLION6HULHV 

$QDFFHOHUDWHGFRXUVHIRUDGXOWVFROOHJH VWXGHQWV ODWHEHJLQQHUV

View or Download Our Online Catalog

www.TheoryTime.com

AVE A WE H OK! LO NEW

Toll Free:

1-877-224-3407 School Purchase Orders Accepted

October 2012 | Southwestern Musician  

Southwestern Musician

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