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Texas Longhorn Trails

OCTOBER 2011


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Texas Longhorn Trails


Give your breeding program Beadle Land & Cattle - Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA (408) 834-0110 • (408) 656-6266 e-mail: rlbeadle@longfibre.com

Box Z Ranch - Steven Zunker & Louis Christa 1506 Harwood Road, Luling, TX 78648 Ranch mobile (210) 827-3940 www.boxzranch.com

Buckhorn Cattle Company - Buck & Sharon Adams 110 N. Broad, Guthrie, OK 73044 www.buckhorncattle.com (405) 260-1942 • (405) 282-9800

Eagles Ridge Longhorns - Paul & Judi Sellers 3245 Sugarloaf Key Rd, U21A, Punta Gorda, FL 33955 (941) 979-2419 or (443) 624-0792 e-mail: ancopa5@yahoo.com

Kent & Sandy Harrell

15 W 6th St Ste 2510, Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 299-6402 • (918) 733-4008 www.harrellranch.com • e-mail: Kent@harrellranch.com

Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety - Little Ace Cattle Company P.O. Box 386, Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 e-mail: ketyfolsom@aol.com

PJ’s Cattle Company – Jim Swigert or Lance Swigert 2130 CR 100, Caldwell, TX 77836 Jim: (979) 224-2861 or Lance (979) 219-4902 e-mail: jim@swicoauctions.com or lance@swicoauctions.com www.pjslonghorns.com

McLeod Ranch – Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 C.R. 303A, Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Brennan & Michele Potts - Rocking P Longhorns

P.O. Box 579, Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com • e-mail: bpotts1@verizon.net

Rafter H Longhorns - Kenn Harding, Tammy Tiner & Laura Harding 200 Pershing Ave., College Station, TX 77840 (979) 777-5256 e-mail: rafter-h@rafter-h-longhorns.com

Rio Vista Ranch - Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane, Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Westfarms Inc. - Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450, Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 795-1539 Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: lwestmoreland.ees@wpsb.org


a boost with Butler genetics! Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 South Rosemary Drive • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Concho Ranch - Tony & Judy Cain 707 S. David St • San Angelo, TX 76903 (325) 657-0707 • (325) 650-4676 e-mail: tcconchoranch@hotmail.com

DALGOOD Longhorns - Malcolm & Connie Goodman (713) 782-8422 • Waller, TX e-mail: dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

Bob & Pam Loomis - Loomis Longhorns Rt. 1 Box 673 • Marietta, OK 73448 (580) 276-9265 • Fax (580) 276-3049 e-mail: loomis20@juno.com

Moriah Farms - Bernard Lankford Weatherford, TX (817) 341-4677 • (817) 319-9198 cell www.moriahfarmslonghorns.com

Rocking G Ranch - Mrs. Ramie Griffin 5005 Callais Road • Beaumont, TX 77713 (409) 892-2662 • Fax (409) 838-6926 Cell (409) 781-3215 e-mail: dayamisrockingranch@yahoo.com

Sidewinder Cattle Company - Ed Shehee, Jr. 1007 Airport Blvd • Pensacola, FL 32504 (850) 572-6595 www.sidewindercattleco.com

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. - John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

Triple R Ranch - Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Road • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 • e-mail: r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

V&J Longhorns - Vernon & Janis Webb 9303 Lone Star Rd. • Washington, TX 77880 (936) 878-2954

This space is available for your ranch listing!


Texas Longhorn Trails (817) 625-6241• (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 E-Mail: trails@tlbaa.org http://www.tlbaa.org

Staff VOL. 23 NO. 7

OCTOBER 2011

Editor in Chief: Laura Standley • Ext. 105 laura@tlbaa.org

Contributing Editor: Henry L. King Advertising: Troy Robinett • Ext. 117 troy@tlbaa.org

Rick Fritsche •

Ext. 107

rick@tlbaa.org

Graphic Design & Production Myra Basham, Art Director • Ext. 108 myra@tlbaa.org

10-12

Feature Article: Authentic Symbol of the American West By Henry King ........................10-12

Articles:

Affiliate Princess Contest ..............6-7 Division C Director Elections ........8 Leptospirosis In Cattle ..................14 By Heather Smith Thomas 2011 Autobahn Super Stakes ....15-16 By Larry Barker Vaccine - Handling & Storage ......26-27 By Heather Smith Thomas

Sales, Shows & Tours:

Departments: Officers & Directors..........................5 Message From The Chairman ..........8 TLBT Update ..................................9 News On The Trail ....................28-29 New Members ................................31 Memoriams......................................32 Affiliate News ................................38 Herd Management ..........................39 Dams Of Distinction ......................40 In Box ..............................................40 In The Pen ......................................41 Movers & Shakers ..........................44 Ad Index ........................................51 Just For Grins ................................51 Save the Date ..................................52

Heart of America Sale..........................13 Best At West Sale..................................35

About the Cover: This month’s cover features The Fort Worth Herd making it’s twice daily trip through the Stockyards. The TLBAA is a member of the “Friends of the Fort Worth Herd” and many TLBAA members have donated steers to help preserve the history represented by the herding of the Longhorn steers as well as educational opportunities for school children, history buffs and tourists. For more information about the Fort Worth Herd, turn to page 10.

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Multi-Media Designer/Photographer Coral Bucy • Ext. 109 coral@tlbaa.org

Regional Correspondents Lori Beeson • Nolensville, Tennessee Bonnie Damrow • Roca, Nebraska Paige Evans • Kiowa, Colorado Wanda Moore • Sulphur Bluff, Texas Bodie Quary • Prague, Oklahoma

Office Staff Special Events: Kim Barfield, Sales • Ext. 119 Pam Galloway, Shows • Ext. 106 Registrations: Dana Coomer • Ext. 116 Rick Fritsche • Ext. 107 Financial Services: Dawn LeBlanc • Ext. 121 Administrative Assistant: Amber LeBlanc • Ext. 100 The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 2315 N. Main, Ste. 402, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $60 per year; foreign per year $75. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 2315 N. Main, Ste. 402, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817) 625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

“We reach every TLBAA member”

Deadline: November 2011 deadline is October 1st. Printed in the USA

Texas Longhorn Trails


Alaska

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

9

Hawaii

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

Chairman of the Board: Brent Bolen • (602) 769-0900

Secretary: Scott Simmons • (618) 729-2004

Executive Vice Chairman: Lana Hightower • (903) 963-7442

Treasurer: Gary Bowdoin • (254) 640-0844

1st Vice Chairman: Donnie Taylor • (936) 422-3155

Director: Steven Zunker • (210) 827-3940

2nd Vice Chairman: Dora Thompson • (318) 872-6329

Director: Terry King • (850) 956-4154

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Nancy Dunn

Lana Hightower

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

(334) 318-0887 nancydunn2010@windstream.net

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18 At-Large Director

Steve Quary

(903) 963-7442 glcattleco@aol.com

(405) 567-3093 At-Large Director

Rich Spooner

Brent Bolen

Dora Thompson

(318) 872-6329 or (318) 871-6160 echoofambush@aol.com

(602) 769-0900 brent@tcmmasonry.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

(580) 320-4441 oxbowranch.spooner@yahoo.com Region 13 - Director

L.D. McIntyre

Donnie Taylor

Ron Walker

(403) 548-6684

(936) 422-3155 longhorn4t@msn.com

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Mark Stuck

Bernard Lankford

Region 14 - Director

(540) 752-6831 bcrstuck@hotmail.com

(817) 341-2013 MoriahFarmsBL@aol.com

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Scott Simmons

Robert Richey

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Carl R. Brantley

Gary Bowdoin

(618) 729-2004 ssimmons@copeplastics.com

(308) 750-8384 or (308) 246-5600 tejas@mcintyreranches.com

Jim Rombeck

(785) 562-6665 jimrombeck@yahoo.com Region 15 Director

Randy Briscoe (405) 375-3090 Kingrjj@aol.com

(325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com

Region 16 - Director

Doug Hunt

(336) 667-5452 TLBAA.Region4Director@yahoo.com

(254) 640-0844 Tonkawacattleco@aol.com

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Terry King

(435) 275-2112 ddlonghorns@hotmail.com Region 17 - Director

Terry Fuhriman

Larry Smith

(850) 956-4154 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

(281) 935-2811 texasslonghorns@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

(208) 860-7430 terry@fuhrimanins.com Region 18 - Director

Ray Beadle

Steven Zunker

Gene Juranka

(408) 834-0110 rlbeadle@longfibre.com

(210) 827-3940 stevenzunker@msn.com

(337) 328-7258 longhorn@camtel.net CHARLES SCHREINER III*

MAURICE LADNIER

1964-1967

2009-2010

WALTER G. RIEDEL, JR.*

J.T. “HAPPY” SHAHAN*

RICHARD D. CARLSON

SHERMAN BOYLES

ROBERT RICHEY

J.G. PHILLIPS, JR.*

JOHN R. BALL

JOHN T. BAKER

BOB MOORE*

STEVEN ZUNKER

WALTER B. SCOTT

BILL ANTHONY

RIEMER CALHOUN, JR.

JOEL LEMLEY

JAMES WARREN

DR. L.V. BAKER

GLEN W. LEWIS

BEN GRAVETT

J.W. ISAACS*

DR. W.D. “BILL” CLARK

TIM MILLER

DR. FRITZ MOELLER

1967-1969

1977-1978

1969-1971

1979-1980

1971-1973

1981-1982

1973-1975 1975-1977

1982-1984 1984-1986

1986-1988 1988-1990 1990-1992 1992-1995 1995-1998

1998-2003

2010

2010-2011

2003-2005 2006-2007 2007

2007-2009

* DECEASED

TLBAA BREED ADVISORY COMMITTEE Chairman: Dr. Bob Kropp

Dr. Harlan Ritchie

Dr. Bill Able

Marshall Ruble

Dr. Charles McPeake

Dr. Scott Schaake

Oklahoma State University

Michigan State University

Northwestern Oklahoma University

Iowa State University

University of Georgia

Kansas State University

October 2011

Dr. Randall Grooms TAES Texas A&M University

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DOB: 5/18/10

DOB: 4/4/10

DOB: 1/20/10 DOB: 12/20/10

DOB: 4/4/10 DOB: 4/30/10


DOB: 6/25/10

DOB: 4/5/10

DOB: 4/8/10

DOB: 3/20/10

DOB: 3/8/10


From the Chairman of the Board The TLBAA is at a crossroads and needs your input. Your opinion matters, so we need to discuss the future of the Texas Longhorn. I received a report from Google showing the number of hits each breed association website is generating. The Angus breed generates 56% of the hits and the Texas Longhorn breed generates less than 1% which puts us at number 15 on the Google list for cattle. We, as a membership, are no longer getting bigger. Now is the time that we (as members) have to make some decisions on the path the TLBAA needs to go. Currently the show circuit has 3 different sets of rules when you exhibit your Texas Longhorn cattle. We have separate rules for the TLBAA, the Autobahn and the ITLA. We also have 3 different shows just to see who has the biggest horns - the TLBAA's Horn Showcase, the TLMA's Longhorn World Championship and the ITLA's Call of the Horns. Our organization needs unity and transparency to take the Texas Longhorn to the next level. There are numerous polls and Facebook comments about the direction the TLBAA needs to go. "Change" seems to be the message our members are sending. The time is now for every member to step up and tell the board what you want. Are you happy with the direction of the board? Do you want unity? Do you want one organization for this great breed? Do you want to see more promotion in our breed on the national front? Do you want see one show circuit where all Texas Longhorns can be shown with one set of rules that will best show the diversity of the Longhorn? Do you want to see one horn measuring event instead of three events duplicating the same thing? This is not the time to sit back and say someone else will speak up - it is your time. Please forward me your ideas and suggestions along with what direction you would like us (the board) to take. The email address to send these ideas and suggestions to is tlbaa@tlbaa.org. The results will be published as soon as they are compiled. Thank you for your time,

Brent

t Ba_l_lo__

____

Division C Directors To Be Elected

Coming up for nominations soon will be all Division C directors, consisting of two (2) At-Large positions and Regions 13-18. Watch for your nomination form being mailed 90 days prior to our Annual Membership Meeting which will be held in Fort Worth, Texas on January 13, 2012. According to the TLBAA By-Laws, Section 2—D: At least ninety (90) days prior to the Annual Membership Meeting, the TLBAA Office shall mail to the Active and Lifetime Members a request for nomination of individual or individuals for Director in the member’s representational region. Such member nominations shall be received in the Association office no later than sixty (60) days prior to the Annual Meeting. In order that any member nominee be eligible to be placed on the election ballot, he must receive write-in nominations from five (5) members who are Active or Lifetime Members. Should there be no members nominated by the membership for a particular Region, or should a nominee decline to have his name placed on the ballot, the Board of Directors will appoint an Active or Lifetime Member in good standing domiciled within the division to fill the vacant position at the same meeting as the election of TLBAA officers.

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No less than forty-five (45) days prior to the annual meeting of the membership, the TLBAA Office or designated CPA firm shall mail official printed ballots to each qualified Active and Lifetime Member in good standing of that region or division. This ballot shall contain the names of the candidates, if any, who were properly nominated by members. All written ballots must be returned to the CPA with a postmark not less than twentyone (21) days prior to the Annual Meeting in order to be validated and counted. All ballots received will be validated and counted by an independent CPA firm or other organization experienced in voting tabulation as designated by the Executive Committee. The nominees receiving the most valid votes shall be elected. All newly elected Directors shall be installed at the Annual Membership Meeting. A tie vote will be broken by the Chairman of the Board drawing one of the names by lot. If a nominee wants a recount of the ballots in their election race, they will have to submit a formal request for a recount to the Board of Directors but not more than sixty (60) days after election results have been announced at the annual meeting. The contester or their representative would then physically go to the CPA firm and watch this recount at his/her costs.

Ballo ___ t _____

Division C Regions 13 - 18

Division A Regions 1-6 Division B Regions 7 - 12

Active and Lifetime members in good standing, domiciled within a representational division or region may nominate an Active or Lifetime member in good standing, also domiciled therein for election to the Board of Directors. Only those Active or Lifetime Members in good standing, domiciled within the division or region, may vote for the nominees from that division or region. Elections are held annually by division, on rotating basis as selected by the Board of Directors.

NOTE

To be eligible to vote, a person must be a current Active or Lifetime Member. Texas Longhorn Trails


Dear TLBT Members,

It’s about to get really busy for all of the youth exhibitors! There are shows and Longhorn events almost every weekend this fall, so make sure you get your entries turned in for the shows that you will be attending. As I had mentioned in my last letter, the Horn Showcase and State Fair of Texas will not be held on the same weekend as it has in the past. So, please mark it on your calendar to attend both if possible! The youth are having a fundraiser at the Horn Showcase called “Pen Pals.” If you are bringing cattle and don’t want to get sweaty or dirty in this heat, just sign up and the pen pals will come and feed, water, and clean your animals’ pens. If any youth are interested in helping, please contact Hannah Faske at hannahfaske@gmail.com. We would like to have as many youth there as possible. I want to thank Mr. and Mrs. Robert Richey for graciously donating a heifer for the youth to auction off at the Horn Showcase Sale. The heifer was born in March 2010, and she is not exposed. Her sire is Mitre Peak and her dam is Desperado Classey BW 54/7. She has straight Butler genetics. All of the proceeds will go to the Bright Futures Scholarship Program. If you Gloria 0/8 see the Richeys, please make a point to thank them for donating this beautiful heifer to help more kids have an opportunity to attend college or a trade school after graduation. Last year, five graduating seniors received a Bright Futures Scholarship. Please come TLBT Office: Senior Director out and bid on this heifer and help support this new Age: 15 years old scholarship program. School: Home School Our new TLBT wristbands have arrived! We will be 10th Grade selling them to raise money for the Texas Scottish Rite Number of Years in the TLBT: 6 years Hospital in Dallas, Texas. Your $5 donation will help When and how did you start raising and showthis non-profit hospital to provide free care for children ing Texas Longhorns? who have physical disabilities involving their arms, legs, I started showing Longhorns when I was 9 years old in and spine. The wrist bands are available in fifteen 2005. My first show was the State Fair of Texas. After different colors, and they are selling fast! seeing my brothers and sisters show at the Brenham In addition to the wristbands arriving, we have also Show, I wanted to give it a try! received our new hoodies for when the temperatures What are some important things you have drop. They are the same as last year, but we’ve added learned from showing and raising Longhorns? three additional colors: pink, black and navy blue. We I have learned that showing Longhorns is a privilege. If still have the hunter green and brown ones available in you really want to show, then you will work for it. some sizes as well. Showing Longhorns is a big commitment and requires a As you can see, we’ve been hard at work preparing for lot of time if you want to do well at it. the upcoming year. If you are interested in getting more involved in the TLBT, please go to www.LonghornYouth.org or contact your TLBT officers What would you tell someone just getting startor directors. I can’t wait to see you all at upcoming shows, sales and events! ed in raising Texas Longhorns? I would tell someone interested in showing Texas See You on the Trail, Longhorns that it is a great choice of cattle to work with. I would tell them they are going to have a great time making new friends and learning about the breed.

TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT

Nathaniel Faske

Sarah Faske TLBT President

October 2011

What is your favorite part of raising and showing Texas Longhorns? My favorite part of raising and showing Longhorns is competing in showmanship. I love to compete with friends and family members because we are all trying our best to win and get into those top three places.

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The city of Fort Worth celebrated its 150th birthday on June 12, 1999. One of the more spectacular and enduring elements of that sesquicentennial bash was the first public “trail drive” of the Fort Worth Herd, a group of fifteen Texas Longhorn steers representing the fifteen decades since the city’s founding. Anecdotal evidence points to perennial North Side boosters Steve Murrin and Jim Lane as the originators of the concept, although an extensive cast of enthusiasts were involved in getting that first group of trophy steers corralled in downtown Fort Worth’s Sundance Square. The first pre-parade public appearance of The Herd, however, was the night before at TLBAA’s World Show, on Friday, June 11, 1999. TLBAA’s own Dr. Bob Kropp was instrumental in locating the individual steers that formed The Herd. Two steers in that original fifteen, Carrot Top and Chocolate Chip, owned by Richard Howe, Sallisaw, OK, were veteran walkers, having been part of the Great American Cattle Drive from Fort Worth to Miles City, Montana in 1995. Others were donated by Stan Briney, Bowie, TX; Greg and Carrie Briney, Sanger, TX; El Coyote Ranch, Kingsville, TX; John T. and Betty Baker, Liberty Hill, TX; and Bob and Mary Mack McKenzie, Aledo, TX. In what was titled the “Chisholm Trail Round-Up’s Last Great Cattle Drive of the 20th Century,” the cattle were herded from pens below the Chisholm Trail mural in Sundance Square to a spot near the picturesque courthouse and Paddock Park where they were paused for dedication, speeches and ceremonies. Following these presentations, the drive continued north on Main Street, accompanied by a horseback cadre of experienced drovers and approximately 300 mounted history buffs, ranchers, dudes and cowboys. Thousands of spectators lined the route to the Stockyards. The steers, as a group and individually, were well-behaved, thanks in no small measure to fifth-generation Texas cowboy

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Texas Longhorn Trails


and rancher Tom B. Saunders IV, and a group of experienced cowmen who worked with the herd. “It was up to us to get them broke to where they would honor the horse,” said the Weatherford, Texas cowman. “It was a pretty good task and we didn’t have very long to do it. The only way you can break those steers is to get in there horseback, cut one off and hold it, and make him understand I can make him stay where I put him. We had to do each individual that way. Of course, they were older cattle and had a mind of their own. Most had been running loose and had very little done with them horseback. It took us a couple of months to get them where we could handle them good.” Saunders was the first curator of the Fort Worth Herd, a position he held for three years. “I dealt with the boys and the cattle, too, and after three years that kind of got the ball rolling. That’s the first job I ever had, especially working for a governmental body – the City of Fort Worth – and having been self-employed, it was quite an experience.” “That was really an impressive set of cattle in that first herd,” said Saunders, “and sure enough representative of what a Texas Longhorn was supposed to look like. We had 23 originally and we cut them to fifteen – representative of Fort Worth’s 150 years.” “It was a fun time in my life, being involved in that, because I have always enjoyed the history of Texas. My great-great-grandfather had six brothers, and all of them were Trail Drivers. Of course, they were in their youth, the prime of their lives in the 1870’s. (One of those brothers, great-great Uncle George W. Saunders, founded the Old Time Trail Drivers Association, which gathered the life stories of trail drivers published in the monumental Trail Drivers of Texas.)” Doug Harman, who is also deeply immersed in Western history, headed the Fort Worth Visitors and Convention Bureau at that time, and committed considerable effort in pushing the concept. “When the Fort Worth Herd was thought of for the Sesquicentennial, it was to be a seasonal thing,

October 2011

but it was so immediately successful that people said, ‘You can’t stop this; you’ve got to do it every day!’” Complaints had been made about the promotion of the historic Stockyards Area – all those empty pens and no animals – and the concept evolved out of that simple frustration. “You had the Friday night and Saturday night rodeos at the Coliseum, and you had the bull riding at Billy Bob’s,” he said, “but you could see the pens and no animals. Getting animals into the Stockyards was terribly important, and you have to credit Jim Lane for saying this has got to be authentic – the gear, the attire, etcetera. The popularity immediately won people over, and one of the other chapters is how the program developed from an educational standpoint. Its one thing to say you saw Longhorns go down Exchange Avenue and it’s another thing to say you had the opportunity to really listen to discussions about the cattle drives and the cow camps. Just talking to one of the drovers, in effect you have horseback docents throughout the Stockyards, even when the cattle are not moving down Exchange.” Although retired, Harman still works with Fort Worth’s Sister Cities program, and was preparing to entertain the mayor and top officials of Budapest, Hungary. “Whenever we have international visitors,” he observed, “we always take them out to see The Herd, and particularly cities like that find it really interesting to see how we are preserving our heritage on one hand and also using that as an element of our tourism appeal.” Tourism has also been a major force in the life and career of Kristin Jaworski, who has managed The Herd since 2002. She was raised in Flagstaff, Arizona, where her family raised mules and riding horses. She spent her summers working at the Grand Canyon, and that, she says “…is where I fell in love with tourism.” Kristin reinforced her enthusiasm for tourism by earning a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing and a Master’s in Management from Tarleton State University, assets that have made her a perfect fit for the job as Trail Boss for the Fort Worth Herd. In addition to day-today management, she has expanded aspects of The Herd to include educational programs and media relations. She has also served on the board of the Fort Worth Stockyards Business Association since 2003 and has been President since 2007. The twice-daily cattle drive is the most important aspect of Kristin’s many duties, and also the most publicly visible, but there are myriad behind-the-scenes chores that culminate in those public appearances. The Herd started with fifteen steers, but a sixteenth was added on the tenth anniversary; only one of the original fifteen – Sancho, donated by El Coyote Ranch – is still doing the daily treks. He has now been driven

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over 8500 times. New steers need to be phased into The Herd and older ones need to be retired, and Kristin is always looking for people willing to adopt these retirees -- if people meet certain criteria. “When the steers reach the end of their useful life with us, we look for them to be turned out to pasture.” The evaluation for retirement involves a combination of health, behavior and overall demeanor, according to Kristin. “The steer we retired recently was our lead steer, but in the last couple of weeks he has been the last steer. I watched him, and he was pretty much telling us he was getting old and tired, had served his time here and was ready to be turned out. I’m not sure what his age was, but he was in his twenties. But last year we retired one that was only eleven, due to injury or arthritis. When the Vet or myself makes the decision to retire, it could be at any age.” While Kristin and her drovers are responsible for day-to-day management of the animals, The Herd is also maintained by a program veterinarian, and hoof trimmer Cliff McGee comes and trims once a year. “We also have ten horses in the barn,” said Kristin, “and I am always looking to upgrade the horses as well. In fact, I have an opening right now – I’m looking for a good horse.” “What I’m looking for in a horse – they have to be very, very patient and very gentle. They are exposed to many different elements, just like these steers – it’s concerts, it’s motorcycles, pedestrians, noise, sounds, reenactor gunfights, everything. There’s a lot of pressure on them, so they’ve got to be able to handle that. They don’t work real, real hard, but they are asked to be very patient. They get a lot of ‘Can I touch your horse?’ and ‘Can I take your picture?’” Kristin doesn’t have a definite time frame for keeping a horse, but expects to keep one five years and re-sell him. “I’m still using one horse that’s an original herd horse – we’ve had him twelve years. That’s a long time. He’s still doing great, but he’s getting up there in age.” In addition to horses and cattle, Kristin is also responsible for personnel. “I have a lot of turnover in part-time drovers,” she said. “This is usually a stepping stone to a better opportunity, and we are more than happy to get them there. I do have some that stick – every full time employee was promoted from a part-time position. Right now I have four full time drovers that have been here for four years plus. They’re fairly experienced and they are a good team.” Including Kristin, there are fifteen people in the program, and the drovers take care of everything. They are involved in all the maintenance, all feeding, all clean-up, all programming. They drive the steers, feed the horses, drive the tractor and put out hay. When the program started, they were employees of the City of Fort Worth. That changed at the end of 2009, when the Convention and Visitors Bureau took over. The operation remained the same, but the management is different. In addition to the twice-daily cattle drive, the drovers also participate in an educational program called the Four Hours of Fun. Offered in partnership with Stockyards Station, the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame Museum and the Cowtown Cattle Pen Maze, it brings in about 16,000 students each year. “We teach the kids about the history of the Longhorns, the impact the cattle drives made on this area, what life was like on the trail, how the drovers were dressed, how much they made, what they ate, and the utility of the horse. We talk about branding and the utility of some of the tools they used.” When not involved in other duties, the drovers, mounted on horses and dressed in period clothing, roam through the Stockyards district and make themselves available to answer questions asked them by curious tourists.

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Members of The Herd make personal appearances, too. “It’s not unusual,” said Kristin, “for us to load a couple of steers in the trailer and haul them to a convention or a meeting or a different city where they’re having a special event. We will set up a static display with the Longhorns and drovers and do some interactive meet-andgreet type of appearances. We are not only educating them about the Longhorns but also welcoming them to our city.” In 2005, Kristin took some of the Herd to New York City, where they appeared on national television. The theme was “Hooves and Horsepower” in conjunction with Texas Motor Speedway. They took a couple of NASCAR cars, the Longhorn steers and a couple of horses to Times Square. “Basically, we were hosting travel journalists,” Kristin observed. “It was very well received and generated a lot of publicity for our city. It did a lot to put For Worth on the map as a premiere travel destination.” But even with spectacular outreaches such as this, maintaining the daily cattle drives is most important. “I had to recruit some extra help,” she said, “but we kept the cattle drives going in the Stockyards the whole time we were gone.” In addition to finding homes for retiring steers, Kristin also looks for owners who are willing to donate replacement steers for the Herd. “What we typically do with a new steer when they come into the herd,” she explained, “is introduce them to some of the more docile steers. They can get acclimated and introduced into the herd and get their pecking order established. Once that pecking order is established and the steer is comfortable with the others, we introduce them to the horses. We basically drive them in the alley from horseback so we see how they are going to respond and respect the horse. After we do that, we start driving them across parking lots, basically practicing. We want them to want to stay with the herd. That herd instinct is real important. Once they’ve developed that and want to stay with the other cattle, we drive them down the street. When they make it once and do well, they don’t ever stop – they keep going.” “It takes between thirty and ninety days for that process. I’ve had some that came in here and we had them down the street in two weeks. It’s completely dependent on the steer.” Duramax, the youngest steer ever introduced to the herd, came from Larry and Gala Johnston, Lookeba, Oklahoma. “He was just a tiny baby when I got him,” Kristin observed, “and I was afraid they would push him around too much, but they didn’t.-- they protected him. That steer has an incredible horn length for his age – he was born in 2005. He’s really, really pretty.” A steer called Dallas FW was donated by Rich and Linda Spooner of Kennewick, Washington. “That’s the steer that traveled the greatest distance to get here,” said Kristin. Reata, donated by Ed Roberts, Keller, Texas, is the most recent steer added to the cattle drive. Whelming Thunder, donated by Stephen Head, Angleton, Texas, and received about the first of August, is still in training. Valentino, donated in mid-August by Larry Smith II, Glen Rose, Texas, has just been introduced into the herd population. The activity report for The Herd in 2010 shows that well over a half million spectators attended the cattle drives, and about 16,000 students took the educational course. Add to this an unknown number of visitors to the Historic Stockyards area who were impressed by The Herd drovers in their function as docents, and it is obvious that The Fort Worth Herd is phenomenally successful as an outreach program. While its official name is “The Fort Worth Herd,” it is really “The Herd for Everyone Who Loves Authentic Western Heritage.”

Texas Longhorn Trails


Heart of America Sale Results Submitted by Justin Rombeck August 27, 2011 MArysville, Ks Auctioneer: DAn Huntington, gresHAM, Wi PeDigree reADer: Justin roMbecK, HoMe, Ks Justin Rombeck and Amanda Taylor, Home, KS.

Highlights

Tom Mehlberg, Mike Thiel and Dan Huntington, Gresham, WI; Greg Franks, Paradise, TX.

Sale Average: $1,120 Catalog Sale $675 Commercial Sale VOLUME BUYERS: Donny Robinson Quentin Soanes Dusty Leonard Dan Huntington

Todd McKnight, Pittsburg, KS.

✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯ HIGH SELLING HEIFER:

Molly and Calia Clubb, Jaymie Feldmann, Cedar Falls, IA.

$4,000

JBR Creme Brulee Consignor: JBR Longhorns Buyer: 5D Ranch/Dan Huntington

HIGH SELLING COW:

$4,000

Becky Rombeck and Jaci Dunoa, Home, KS. Mason, Ben, Matt and Dan Schmitz.

CV Rio’s Valentine Consignor: CedarView Ranch/Todd & Kelli McKnight Buyer: Quentin Soanes of the UK Each of these sellers received an additional check for $500 each for consigning such outstanding animals. David and Reagan Roberts, Canton, MO.

✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯ OTHER HIGH SELLING LOTS: $3,600 – HL R EMPRESS’S PLAYER

Consignor: HL Longhorn Ranch/John Hever Buyer: 7D Longhorns/Dusty Leonard October 2011

Bruce and Dusty Leonard, Marysville, KS. Brian and Danny Biddinger.

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Leptospirosis in Cattle By Heather Smith Thomas

There are several bacterial infections in cattle that occur worldwide, and one of the most common is leptospirosis. Illness from this type of infection is usually mild, but this disease is economically significant because it is the most common cause of infectious abortion in cattle today.

The disease may be acute, with toxic blood infections causing loss of appetite, high fever, anemia, labored breathing, jaundice (yellow tinge on mucous membranes such as the gums and whites of including rats and mice. The leptospires can survive in surface the eyes), and changes in the milk if the sick animal is lactatwater, stagnant ponds, streams, or moist soil for long periods ing. A cow’s milk production will suddenly drop, with milk at mild temperatures. Leptospirosis is a common cause of inbecoming thick, yellow and sometimes blood-tinged. Subfertility, delayed breeding and early embryonic death, as well acute cases are milder, with intermittent fever. Sub-clinical as abortions or birth of premature and weak calves. (non-apparent) cases show very little signs of illness other than abortion and infertility. Most adult cattle show very little evidence of sickness, but This disease is spread by discharges and secretions (espeabout 30 percent may have one or more symptoms of acute cially urine) of sick and carrier animals, which often contamillness. In about 5 percent of cases the animal may die, due inate feed and water. Some infected animals, particularly with to septicemia, anemia or malfunction of the liver and kidneys. certain strains of lepto, appear to be healthy, yet harbor the Young cattle are often more severely affected than adults. bacteria in their kidneys and reproductive tract, shedding the After recovery from the acute period of illness, the leptospires bacteria in urine or reproductive fluids. localize in the kidneys and the animal continues to shed bacBacteria may enter a susceptible animal via the nose, teria in the urine for several months, serving as a source of inmouth or eyes by contact with contaminated feed, water or fection for other animals. urine, or through breaks in the skin on feet and legs Bacteria may enter a susceptible animal via the nose, With some types of lepto, the cow may become a when walking through contaminated water. Urine or mouth or eyes by contact with contaminated feed, carrier and shed the bactecontaminated water splash- water or urine, or through breaks in the skin on feet ria for several months or even for life.Lepto infecing into the eyes of susceptible animals can spread the and legs when walking through contaminated water. tion in a pregnant cow may cause her to abort, disease, as can breeding. usually 1 to 3 weeks after recovering from the acute stage of Calves infected before birth (in the uterus) may shed the bacthe disease. Even if she did not appear to be sick, she may teria. Once the leptospires enter an animal, they multiply in abort. Sometimes an infected cow will give birth to a live but the liver and migrate through the bloodstream to the kidneys; weak calf that dies a few days later. Abortion outbreaks from they release toxins that damage red blood cells, liver and kidlepto are thought to be most common in the last trimester of neys. gestation, but this is generally because the aborted fetuses are most likely to be seen at that stage; a cow may abort from lepto at any stage of gestation. The incubation period for leptospirosis is 3 to 7 days or Diagnosis is not always easy in an individual animal since longer after coming into contact with the bacteria. The disthe symptoms can vary so much, but the presence of lepto in ease in cattle may be mild or severe, depending on the type a herd can usually be detected by taking blood samples from encountered (there are more than 100 serotypes of leptospira, about 10 percent of the animals. Whenever there’s a higher of which there are about 40 types that can cause illness, but than normal number of abortions, lepto could be a possible less than 10 that have been recognized in the U.S.). Sympcause. toms of illness last 3 to 5 days. continued on p. 25 is caused by spiral shaped bacteria (spiro“Lepto” chetes) that affect many kinds of animals, including humans. It is often present in wildlife populations,

TRANSMISSION

SYMPTOMS

14

Texas Longhorn Trails


2011 Autobahn Super Stakes Submitted by Larry Barker August 3, 2011 was arrival day for the Autobahn Super Stakes. The Watt arena and Moncreif building, home to the Autobahn Youth Jake Smith was deemed to be the “Best in Show” in the art Tour, located on the competition. grounds of the Will During the fast paced Rogers Memorial Team Penning, David Center in Fort Vizza assembled the catWorth, TX was the The “All Around” exhibitors were Teen John M. Moore, Intermeditle for the Livestock Judgate Josh Vinson, Junior Reese Ryan and Senior Timothy Phillips destination for the ing. Judge Greg Briney the eight classes from the 154 competitors and 337 head of Texas placed the cattle for the Kylen Harrell and Remington King (not pic120 showmanship exLonghorns. Although the temperature was tured) received the Laura Harding Persever- Livestock Judging contest hibitors: Junior division over 100 degrees, the exhibitors were not ance Award presented by Laura Harding. and after the penning the Wyatt Schaper and deterred and went about the business of kids went about the business of judging the Miriam Grace Faske, Intermediate division preparing their animals for the big show. contest cattle. The first place winners by diDamian Spraberry and Dalton Deckert, That evening Rodney and Patti Mahaffey vision and recipients of a heifer calf were Teen division Barclay Brunson and Sarah supplied Little Caesars Pizza Junior Wyatt Schaper, Intermediate Travis Faske, Senior division Hannah Faske and Tilton, Teen Garrett Tanner and Senior Abigail Faske. Jacob Faske. After showmanship it was Friday morning brought the first day of time for Team Penning and Livejudging animals. Eighty nine steers in 11 stock Judging, T.M. Smith pulled classes were scheduled for Judge Dees. Alex up with a trailer load of steers and selected the Senior Champion L7 Morgan Cook Painted Desert, exhibitor Jacob Faske, for his Grand Champion Steer and the Junior Champion for his Reserve Grand Champion Steer SSS MW Gunny, exhibitor Jace Bolen. Friday afternoon’s schedule was full of opportunities to win scholarship money. The Speech contest, Extemporaneous Essay contest, Short Course quiz and Art contest were all judged Friday afternoon. The speech contest judging panel conJonah Faske ex hibiting his stee r.

to the exhibitors and their families providing a welcome relief from the heat in the barn. n. The next morning as the of West Rya ith the help w r ife he s exhibitors prepared for showshows off hi Karbowski and his crew went manship, the barn was bustling Jake about the business of building with excitement. John Chase, the pens and tagging steers. owner of the Autobahn Motorcar Group, Thirty teams gathered on the and his wife Diann had provided $140,000 floor of Watt arena waiting in scholarships for the Super Stakes and the their turn to test their mettle Judge A participants were eager to start the show. lex Dees with Kylie Bena. against the steers. Team 1 Judge Alex Dees, Yuma AZ, had the difficult posted the fastest time of 7.96 seconds and task of judging the exhibitors in showsisting of Tom Slone, Kadee Coffconsisted of steer whisperers Jonah Faske, manship. Although extremely close, Judge man and Dr. W. Lou Shields listened to 62 Josh Boone, Emily Selman and Will Babler. Dees selected the following for 1st place in speeches before making the following seOctober 2011

15


Grand Champion Bull, HD Flash Point, exhibited by Keely Dennis.

Grand Champion Steer, L7Painted Desert, exhibited by Jacob Faske.

lections for first place in the 4 age divisions: Junior Shyanne McClendon, Intermediate Josh Vinson, Teen Kylen Harrell and Senior Casey Carpenter. Essay Judge Shelby Rhoten read the 70 essays and deemed the following to be the best; Junior Reese Ryan, Intermediate Taylor Frontera, Teen Jake Vinson and Senior Samuel Faske. The Short Course quiz challenged 97 exhibitors on a wide range of topics with the following coming out on top; Junior Reese Ryan, Intermediate Josh Vinson, Teen Ian Remmele and Senior Rachel Remmele. Gary Wilson judged the 48 pieces of art submitted by the exhibitors. Gary’s winners were; Junior Lexington Harris, Intermediate Jarrett Kuhn, Teen Matthew Moore and Senior Jake Smith. Senior winner Jake Smith was deemed to be the “Best in Show”.

Junior Champion Female and Gran d Champion Female, SDR Carsons Cutie, exhibited by Dalton Deckert.

Champion Charis Magnolia, exhibitor Taylor Frontera, for his Reserve Grand Champion Female. There were 52 bulls paraded before Dees for the title of Grand Champion. Alex chose HD Flash Point, exhibitor Keely Dennis, for Grand Champion Bull followed closely by Sanddollar Traverse, exhibitor Jordan Culpepper, for Reserve Grand Champion Bull. Saturday, during the break between females and bulls, several awards were presented. Laura Harding presented the Laura Harding Perseverance Award and a

Reserve Grand Cham pion Female, Charis Magnolia, exhibited by Taylor Fro ntera.

A full schedule was on tap for Saturday with both the females and bulls being evaluated by Judge Alex Dees. Dees had the tough job of picking his Grand and Reserve Grand Champion Female from 196 top entries. Judge Dees selected the Junior Champion Female SDR Carsons Cutie, exhibitor Dalton Deckert, as his Grand Champion Female and the Senior

16

exhibitors and a fast paced favorite for Team Penning is always spectators alike.

$2,500 scholarship to Kylen Harrell and Remington King. Kimble Cattle Company’s hard work paid off and they received the Herdsman award. The “All Around” ex-

hibitor and the accompanying $1000 scholarship was awarded to the following; Junior Reese Ryan, Intermediate Josh Vinson, Teen John M. Moore and Senior Timothy Phillips. The drawing for the EziWeigh Livestock Scale System, donated by Rusty and Julie Morgan, was won by Patti Mahaffey and the Gary Crouch print was taken home by Kevin Vitek. The 2011 Autobahn Super Stakes tested the exhibitors on many levels and they handled everything that came their way. Of the 154 exhibitors, 79% won scholarship money. There were 36 first time Autobahn exhibitors and 26 won scholarships or prizes. The success of the Super Stakes and Autobahn Youth Tour is because of the dedicated support of John and Diann Chase. Without their unwavering commitment to the youth of the Texas Longhorn breed, the Autobahn Youth Tour would not be possible. The Autobahn Classic is the first stop of the 2012 Autobahn Youth Tour. The dates for the Classic are February 16-19, 2012 and, as always, the Classic will be held in the Watt Arena on the grounds of Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Contact Larry Barker (817) 988-6110 or lbarker@abahn.com if you would like to compete for the $140,000 in scholarships at the Classic. Visit AutobahnYouthTour.com for a complete list of the Super Stakes results and more information about the Autobahn Youth Tour.


1

Texas Longhorn Trails


Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

2012 Premier Heifer Sale January 14, 2012 ~ Will Rogers West Arena, Fort Worth, Texas

Deadline: October 17 , 2011

Name of TLBAA Member: ________________________________________________ Membership # _______________ Name of Animal: ___________________________________________________________ TLBAA # _______________ Heifer _____

Pair _____

PICTURE OF ANIMAL ________

OCV VACCINATED Yes _____ No _____ CONSIGNMENT FEES PER LOT ($300 per head + 5% commission)_______________________ DUE AT TIME OF CONSIGNMENT

BREEDING INFORMATION Cow Exposed to __________________________________________ From ______________ To ________________ Bull’s Name Cow Exposed to __________________________________________ From ______________ To ________________ Bull’s Name Calf at Side Information: Sex _________________ Date Calved ________________________________ Sired by _________________________________________________________

COMMENTS _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

WAIVER/CONSENT FORM (This form must be signed and returned in order to complete your consignment.) The TLBAA Premier Heifer Sale (TPHS) assumes no responsibility or liability for any guarantee made by the consignor. All guarantees are strictly between the consignor (seller) and the buyer. TPHS or the Will Rogers Complex is not responsible for the health or safety of any animal consigned to the sale. This includes loss of life, loss by theft or other perils. All consignors must comply with all the rules and regulations. The undersigned hereby agrees to conditions of the sale and agree that all guarantees are between seller and buyer. The undersigned further agrees to indemnify and hold harmless TPHS, sale employees, the Will Rogers Complex, and duly authorized representatives from any and all claims, demands, causes of action or liabilities of any nature which may arise from or are in any way related to The TLBAA Premier Heifer Sale. The undersigned agrees that if the buyer is unable to accept delivery because of Interstate health requirements, the consignor, not TPHS or its management, shall be responsible for refund or adjustment. _______________________________________________________ Owner of Animal/Consignor’s Signature

__________________________ Date

THIS FORM MUST BE ATTACHED TO ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE WITH COMPLETED TRANSFER FORM AND PICTURE. THE DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS OCTOBER 17, 2011.

P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 817-625-6241

Kim Barfield, Sales - Ext. 119 - kim@tlbaa.org Pam Galloway, Events - Ext 102 - pam@tlbaa.org


TRAIL BOSS-

$25,000

★ 12 full pages within the sponsorship pages in the Trails magazine beginning September 2011 ★ 1 Texas Longhorn Trails cover (excludes July 2012, August 2012 & December 2012)

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

2 Horn Showcase Sale Consignments 6 Horn Showcase Entries 2 page Ranch Feature in Texas Longhorn Trails Full page ad in Horn Showcase program book Full page ad in Horn Showcase Catalog

MOSSY HORN-

$4,500

★ 4 full page or 12 - 1/3 color ads within the sponsorship pages in the Trails magazine beginning September 2011 ★ A full page ad in Showcase program ★ 3 hanging banners at the Showcase ★ Ranch exhibit space at the Showcase ★ Special recognition at all events ★ Special HS logo to run on all ads if desired ★ Name listed on all HS literature: Trails, press releases, etc.

LEAD STEER -

$3,000

★ 2 Full page or 6 – 1/3 color ads within the sponsorship pages in the Trails magazine beginning September 2011 ★ 100 Overruns of one of the full-page ads to use as a marketing resource ★ A 1/2 page ad in Showcase program ★ 2 hanging banners at the Showcase ★ Special recognition at all events ★ Special HS logo to run on all ads if desired ★ Name listed on all HS literature: Trails, press releases, etc.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES TEXAS TWISTER - $1,000 ★ A 1/3 pg color ad within the sponsorship pages in the Trails magazine beginning September 2011 ★ A 1/3 page ad in the Showcase Program ★ A Hanging Banner at Showcase ★ Special recognition at all events ★ Name listed on all HS literature: Trails, press releases, etc. BRUSH POPPER - $500 ★ A 1/6 page color ad page in the Trails magazine beginning September 2011 ★ A 1/4 page ad in the Showcase Program ★ Space for a banner ★ Special recognition at all events RAWHIDER - $250

★ A Sale Pen color ad within sponsorship pages in the Trails magazine beginning September 2011 ★ A business card size ad in the Showcase Program ★ Special recognition at all events DRAG RIDER - $75

★ A breeders guide ad size ad in the Showcase Program ★ Special recognition at all events

YES! I WANT TO SPONSOR THE 2011 TLBAA HORN SHOWCASE! NAME: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________TLBAA# ____________________________ ADDRESS: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY ____________________________________________________________STATE __________ZIP __________________PHONE ________________________________________

SPONSORSHIP LEVEL: ❑ TRAIL BOSS $25,000

❑ MOSSY HORN $4,500 ❑ LEAD STEER $3,000

❑ TEXAS TWISTER $1,000 ❑ BRUSH POPPER $500 ❑ RAWHIDER $250 ❑ DRAG RIDER $75 FORM OF PAYMENT: ❑ CASH ❑ CHECK Mail or Fax Form to: Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 Fax: (817) 625-1388 • Phone: (817) 625-6241

❑ CREDIT CARD# ____________________________________________________________________________ CARD TYPE: VISA MASTERCARD DISCOVER EXP. DATE:_______________ CID# ____________ NAME ON CARD: ______________________________________________________________________________

For more information on these packages, contact Kim Barfield at (817) 625-6241.


SPONSORS Mossy Horn Sponsors: Bernard Lankford, Weatherford, TX • Sand Hills Ranch, Mansfield, LA • Triple R Ranch, San Angelo, TX Diamond D Ranch, Red Oak, TX • Ron & Barbara Marquess, Ben Wheeler, TX

Lead Steer Sponsors: Rick Friedrich, Houston, TX

Texas Twister Sponsors: Ty Wehring, Yorktown, TX • Terri & Sherri Adcock, Lamesa, TX • Clinard Longhorn Partnership, Rockdale, TX • Joel & Shirley Lemley, Blackwell, TX Doug & Sandy Stotts, Houston, TX • Mike Crawford/Pam Watkins, Rockwall, TX • Kathy Kittler, Carlisle, AR • Mike & Kim MacLeod, Palo Pinto, TX Eric & Anna Redeker, Alice, TX • Gary Becker, Waco, TX • South Texas Longhorn Association, Lockhart, TX

Brush Popper Sponsors: Steve & Rene Azinger, Houston, TX • Ron & Donna Garison, Doyline, LA • T.M. & Jean Smith, Boyd, TX Texas Longhorn Breeders of the Gulf Coast Association, Houston, TX • Suzanne & William Torkildsen, Fayetteville, TX

Rawhider Sponsors: East Texas Longhorn Association, Van, TX • Texas S Longhorns, Spring, TX • Vance & Cammie Farner, Niotaze, KS • Ron Walker, Redcliff, Albert, Canada Dr. Lee & Linda Ragains, Sallisaw, OK • Kris Peterek, Weimar, TX • Glenn E. Phipps, Santo, TX • DeSoto Town & Country, Stonewall, LA Cactus Rose Longhorns, Edna, TX • Ray Beadle, Los Gatos, CA • Lee & Linda Blackwell, Fredericksburg, TX • Concho Ranch, San Angelo, TX Mark & Tammey Stuck, Sumerduck, VA

Drag Rider+ Sponsors: Ron & Kevin Asbill, Tyler, TX • Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, TX • B&N Farms, Shreveport, LA • Steven Zunker & Louis Christa, Luling, TX

Drag Rider Sponsors: Jody Shaw, Prospect, TN • K&T Longhorns, Rusk, TX • Gary & Lisa Baugher, Sitka, AK • Proctor Ridge Ranch, Woodville, TX • JBR Longhorns, Home, KS

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Wednesday, October 12, 2011 12 noon – 7pm – Cattle Begin Arriving

Thursday, October 13, 2011 8am – 2pm 3pm – 6pm

– Receive Cattle – Measure Cattle – Raffle Ticket Sale – Door Prizes – Skull Measuring Contest – Test Your Measuring Ability – TLBAA Booth Open – Roping Contest – Purchase Chances To Rope A Steer Head – Photo Contest 4pm – AI Seminar – Gary Bowdoin 4:30pm – 7pm – Cocktails & Hor d’oeuvres

Friday, October 14, 2011 8am – ??? 8:30am

October 2011

–Measure Cattle –Raffle Ticket Sale –Raffle –Skull Measuring Contest – Test Your Measuring Ability –TLBAA Booth Opens –Roping Contest – Purchase Chances To Rope A Steer Head –Silent Raffle –Gas Ticket Raffle –Branding Board – Bring Your Brand To Leave Your Mark – Photo Contest

9am 10am 11am 1pm

– Lean Beef Seminar — Lean Beef Committee – Hired Hand Seminar — Molly Clubb – H.O.R.N.S. Seminar — Darlene Aldridge, DVM – Miniature Demonstration & Discussion Eric Reddiker & Julie Pack – Followed by Miniature Measuring 2 pm – Bright Futures Scholarship — Suzanne Faske 2pm – 4pm – Twisty Horn Contest Judges: Charlene Semkin, Cliff Whitfill, Wes Watson 5:30pm-7:30pm – Cowtown Opry Singers & Happy Hour 7pm – Banquet and Awards

Saturday, October 15, 2011 8am – 12pm – Viewing Of Sale Cattle (Sale Cattle May Be Viewed Throughout The Event. Sale Cattle Located in the Burnett/Tandy Pens) 11am – 1pm 1pm 6pm

– Fall Horn Showcase Luncheon – Fall Horn Showcase Sale (West Sale Arena) – Cattle Released

Sunday, October 16, 2011 8am – 12pm

– Cattle Load Out

! s U n i o J e Com 21


1

Texas Longhorn Trails


October 2011

23


Horse ❖ Cattle ❖ Pet Food ❖ Garden Birds ❖ Wildlife ❖ Clothing ❖ Gifts

Rodney Headrick ❖ Manager Mon - Sat 8:00 a.m. – 6 p.m. P.O. Box 327 • 2379 Hwy. 171 Stonewall, LA 70178 (318) 925-0303 (318) 925-0998 Fax: (318) 925-1327

ou Y k n a h al T i c e p s y A ver ur Sponsors! to all of o

I might not be the prettiest calf… but not many calves have a FULL BEARD at birth?? SH Rocky Blue x SH Peach Brandy

Watch for Ms!E in the circu

SAnD HiLLS RAncH

Dora Thompson, Mansfield, LA • 318-872-6329 echoofambush@aol.com • www.sandhillsranch.com

24

Texas Longhorn Trails


continued from p.14 tle that may not show any signs of disease. These bacteria are continually shed in the urine or any discharges from the reTreatment for lepto is most effective if given early in the productive tract, serving as a continual source of infection in course of the acute disease, before serious or irreversible damthe herd. This type of lepto can also be passed from the dam age is done to the liver and kidneys. Treatment in later stages to her fetus. For best protection against the various strains of of chronic infedctions can be helpful, however, to reduce lepto, calves should be vaccinated at about 4 to 6 months of shedding of bacteria and shorten the carrier stage. Antibiotics age, and cows should be vaccinated twice a year. are effective; consult your veterinarian regarding choice of anLeptospirosis can be introduced to a herd by purchasing tibiotic and duration of treatment. an infected cow, from pigs or wildlife mingling with cattle, or rodent urine (contaminating feed or water). Even if your cows never come into contact with other cattle, they can get lepto Recovered animals are generally immune to the type of from dogs, mice, wild animals such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, lepto they encountered, but still susceptible to infection from deer, elk, antelope, etc. or other carrier animals urinating on other types. There is a a feed ground or into a vaccine available against Even if your cows never come into contact with other cat- water source. Deer eat5 of the most common ing with cattle, or in kinds of lepto (Lep- tle, they can get lepto from dogs, mice, wild animals such haystacks can spread tospira pomona, L. griplepto. Thus the best potyphosa L. hardjo, L. as raccoons, skunks, foxes, deer, elk, antelope, etc. or other protection is semi-ancanicola and L. ictero- carrier animals urinating on a feed ground or into a water nual vaccination. haemorrhagiae), giving It also helps to limit immunity against these source. The best protection is semi-annual vaccination. the access of rodents types for about 6 and wildlife to cattle months. feed and eliminate cattle access to surface water used by other There is another serotype, hardjo-bovis, that is not covered livestock. Draining or fencing off swampy areas that might in the 5-way vaccine, but there is a specific vaccine that can be harbor leptospires is another good preventative measure. Ingiven for this one. Unlike the other types of lepto, hardjofected or recovered bulls should never be used for breeding bovis infects animals for a longer period of time (sometimes until they have been treated to reduce shedding of leptospires. for life), residing in the kidneys and reproductive tract of cat-

TREATMENT

PREVENTION

October 2011

25


By Heather Smith Thomas

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To be effective, vaccines must be properly stored and handled. Dr. Matt Miesner, Assistant Professor, Clinical Ag Practices, Kansas State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital says that whenever we have a disease outbreak in a herd or an increase in problems we always wonder what happened. “You wonder if it might be caused by exposure to a serious disease challenge, or due to stress, poor nutrition, individual variation in vaccine response, but we also have to look at whether the vaccine was properly handled--and this can often be the easiest thing to fix,” he says. Vaccines can certainly be ruined by improper storage and handling. “The important thing about storage is that vaccines need to be kept cold and dark—from the place you purchase them from, through transport to your place, and until they are used. Even when taking them from the refrigerator in your house to the chute, and at the chute, they need to be kept cold and dark. You also need to know how the vaccine was stored before you got it, so it helps to purchase from reputable sources,” says Miesner. Try to keep the vials cool and out of direct sunlight when you take them out of the cooler to fill your syringes. Keep a lid on the cooler, and place it somewhere in the shade. “If something happens to delay your work—as when cattle break out and everyone takes off to go gather them again—don’t just put your syringe down on a barrel and forget about it. Even a short time sitting out in the sun can inactivate a modified-live virus vaccine,” he says. If you have a delay, put the syringe into your cooler. Have a lid on the cooler to keep out sunlight and dust. “I’ve seen some handy set-ups where producers have coolers with holes in them, almost like little holsters for the syringe barrels—and ice bags inside the coolers--where you can stick the syringe into those holes and the barrel fits all the way in (with only the handle sticking out),” he says. This can keep the contents of the syringe cool and out of the sun whenever you aren’t using it, without having to continually open the lid of the cooler. All you have to do is grab the handle of the syringe. Keep your vaccine cool in hot weather, and protect it from freezing in cold weather. “A good insulated container should hopefully keep the vaccine at proper temperature. If you set the syringe down (instead of putting it back in the cooler) while you do something else, and it freezes, this will also damage the vaccine. Just thawing it out won’t resolve the problem because the freeze-thaw process will be detrimental.” If the needle freezes up between animals, you can have a jar of warm water to stick the needle into, but you don’t want the vaccine itself to be continually freezing and thawing. “Always use a new, sterile needle for refilling your syringes. You don’t want to put a dirty needle into a new bottle, especially when mixing up a modified-live vaccine. The product should always be going out the needle, and nothing coming back through unless it’s a new needle, or it will contaminate the contents of your syringe.” When using modified-live vaccines that have to be reconstituted (adding the sterile fluid to the dried vaccine), only mix up the amount that you know you will be using up within an hour. Texas Longhorn Trails


“Producers or feedlot crews who are working a lot of cattle might use several bottles of vaccine at a time, but you don’t want to mix them all up at once. Cow-calf producers, especially, if they are working cows and palpating as well as vaccinating (and maybe taking time to do some dehorning or looking at eyes or teeth) may take longer. It’s wise to buy the vaccine in smaller bottles, so you can use up each one within that hour window. If it’s mixed for too long, it can lose effectiveness,” says Miesner. In many situations, using 10-dose vials might be preferable to 50-dose vials. Even though it might be cheaper per dose in the larger size, this won’t save any money if the vaccine is worthless by the time you are using the last portion of that big bottle. If you are giving more than one vaccine, it’s also important to make sure you don’t grab the wrong syringe when refilling them. “It’s wise to either color-code the syringes with tape or label them in some way. If you were to draw another kind of vaccine into the wrong syringe, it could inactivate that whole load. Mixing vaccines probably won’t cause adverse reactions in the cattle, but can certainly make the vaccine less effective,” he explains. Putting a modified-live virus vaccine into a syringe that previously held your 8way clostridial killed vaccine could inactivate the modified-live virus vaccine. “Even worse would be to grab a syringe that you’d used for giving an antibiotic, and loading it with vaccine. Things sometimes get crazy when you’re in a hurry or distracted by a problem, and I’ve seen some things like that happen. The sad thing is, a person often doesn’t realize it until it’s already done,” he says. “The person in charge of the operation usually understands all these things about proper storage and handling, but it’s important that everyone on the crew also knows how important this is,” says Miesner. Things can go wrong and when that happens, the crisis become the most urgent priority in everyone’s mind, but they should always keep in the back of their mind the importance of taking proper care of the vaccine. Always read the labels of the vaccines you are about to use. “Look at expiration dates, injection dose, route of administration, whether it needs to be boostered later, etc. Sometimes the company might change the volume of the dose (several vaccines have switched from 5 cc to 2 cc, for instance) and route,” he explains. Some of the previous intramuscular vaccines are now given subcutaneously. “Fewer vaccines are given IM, but you should always read the label, to make sure, and to know where it’s supposed to go. Some vaccines, depending on what is in them—whether it’s just a lepto vaccine or includes a respiratory vaccine as well, for instance— may be a different volume. Knowing what the dosage should be, and making sure you have the syringe adjusted properly for that dose, is very important. That particular vaccine may not be the same volume/dose as it was last year,” he says. Many of the changes have occurred to try to comply with BQA requirements—to reduce tissue damage and reactions--giving smaller doses, and giving the product subcutaneously rather than October 2011

IM. “If you are only vaccinating a few animals, it pays to use small, individual dose syringes. Measuring out 2 cc in a 10-dose syringe or even a 10 cc syringe is never as accurate. With the small syringe, you know you have accurate dosing, and can also use a new, sterile needle for each animal,” says Miesner. That way you can be sure to draw out an accurate dose with a new, clean needle, and eliminate the spread of blood-borne disease between animals, nor causing a problem with use of a dirty needle. “It’s also good to periodically inspect your equipment. Syringes should be cleaned and inspected before each use, to make sure they are working properly and calibrated correctly for the vaccine you’ll be using. For cleaning, I always recommend just boiling water (no disinfectants—since those may leave a little residue that can inactivate a modified-live vaccine). Any kind of soap will also leave a film on the surfaces, even if you can’t see it. Plain hot water is best,” he says. “Even if you don’t totally inactivate the vaccine, a residue might reduce its effectiveness. Some animals aren’t going to respond to vaccination anyway, under the best circumstances. If you administer a damaged vaccine, another percentage of the herd will not develop immunity. In bad situations we may find that possibly 20 to 30% of the animals we stuck a needle into didn’t respond. Now, not only do we have herdmates that are more susceptible to disease, but they may amplify some disease pathogens, presenting a greater challenge to the rest of the herd. So you are really going to reduce the over-all effectiveness of the vaccine if it’s compromised in any way,” he explains. Sometimes a syringe doesn’t work smoothly and people want to lubricate the plunger. “The best thing to lubricate it with is just the first vaccine you pull into it, using it to lubricate things, rather than using any foreign material.” You can also buy new rubber stoppers for the older guns that start to stick. It’s always a good idea to keep a supply of extra parts. “When you put the syringes back together you can make sure they are calibrated properly. When cleaning, squirt various set volumes of hot water into smaller syringes and check the accuracy of multi-dose syringes. Sometimes the calibrations can be off, and adjustments need to be made.” It’s also good to keep checking the syringes while you are working the cattle. “Sometimes you get through and have an extra dose or two (or run out too soon) and wonder why. Make sure you are actually giving a 2 cc dose, for instance. Some syringes may start leaking, and some of the plastic syringes may crack,” he says. It’s wise to have some extra syringes and spare parts at the chute, to replace something in an emergency, so you can keep on going. “Most producers have done this long enough that they know what they might need, and can have it there at the chute in a tackle box.”

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NEWS On the Trail... How Now, Proud Cow?

Courtesy of The Gilroy Dispatch; Written by Blair Tellers; Photo courtesy of Lora Schraft, Staff Photographer Glossy hides rippling with brindle stripes, handsome faces splashed with freckles, dramatic eyebrows to rival Elizabeth Taylor, eyelids draped in feathery lashes and highlighted by lines of color. They're beauty queens, all right. Bovine beauty queens. “To me, you can't find six prettier cows than the ones you're looking at right now,” says Ray Beadle. He waves his hand at an attractive group of cows, lounging in a 350-acre pasture in San Benito County. Unflinching, the lovely livestock stare back inquisitively like big, docile dogs. Beadle adds, “That is, if you're into cows.” Reared in the concrete streetscapes of Los Angeles, the now 71-year-old Texas Longhorn breeder became smitten with Western nostalgia at a young age. Admiring his cowboy uncles from the Midwest, an adolescent Beadle practiced roping on fire hydrants. Now tending to 50 cows, 20 heifers and four bulls, the white-haired rancher is an eclectic form of bovine enthusiast. “I treat him with respect,” says Beadle, eyeballing a 1,600-pound male named Swampbuck from the opposite side of a barbed wire fence. Taunted by a fetching female in heat, the 3year-old bull sporting 65-inch horns flapped his upper lip, making unsuccessful passes at a looker named Picasso. “He's like a 16-year-old kid with a six pack of beer and his mother's car for the first time on a Friday night. You don't turn your back on him, because he's full of it,” says Beadle. Representing the California, Hawaii and Nevada chapters of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America founded in 1964, Beadle attends meetings and votes on the direction of the TLBAA, for which he sits on the board of directors. The organization strives to protect the Longhorn's “unique heritage;” promoting the national legacy of a breed once considered more endangered than the buffalo in 1933. Of the 80 Californian ranchers belonging to the association, Beadle says about 20 “extremely active” breeders keep herds of more than 20 to 25 Longhorns. Between Morgan Hill, Gilroy and San Benito county, a number of residents maintain anywhere between 10 to 15 Longhorns for hobby or sporting purposes such as team roping, he says. In terms of raising registered Longhorns for pedigree and showmanship, however, Beadle’s herd is the largest out of half a dozen ranchers in the South Santa Clara and San Benito counties. Although he “never saw it going this far,” Beadle’s become something of a paternal cow shepherd since purchasing six Longhorns 15 years ago in Texas. He works in Gilroy, lives in Los Gatos and drives to

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Hollister five days a week to visit his cudchewing family. “Look at them come like that. Do most kids obey you like that?” he says, twisting around in the front seat of his white SUV, or, “traveling office,” and peering out the driver’s window. Anticipating food, the bulky creatures broke into a brisk trot as they pursued Beadle's vehicle on an overcast weekday morning. Classified as registered Butler Texas Longhorns, the dapper-looking herd descends from one of seven pure bloodlines originating in the early 1900s in Texas. The livestock roams the bucolic heart of Rancho San Justo, situated on the western border of the San Juan Oaks Golf Club in Hollister. “If they got out on that golf course, it would be the end of Ray Beadle,” he jokes. Solid-colored calves are sold primarily as roping cattle. Beadle’s secondary market is meat, although he says longhorn beef is less fatty and not a substantial commodity in the food industry. Raising longhorns isn’t so much of a moneymaking venture. Rather, Beadle's uncommon hobby is fueled largely by enthusiasm for breeding stunning livestock with “curb appeal.” He says ranchers, doctors or lawyers who “just want something fancier grazing in their front yard,” often purchase his animals as living landscape ornaments. This includes locals with two to 10 acres who opt for an attractive form of weed abatement. “Then one thing leads to another, they get a bull and pretty soon they got a calf and then they’re in the business,” he jokes. Beadle says he's paid up to $19,000 for one cow (which was purchased with partners Malcolm & Connie Goodman for an embryo program), sold others for high dollar amounts and estimates his prettiest cow, Kim, is worth the most in his current herd. It’s an arresting price tag for a four-legged lawn mower, but the attractive beasts Beadle's, in particular, with their grandiose head accessories and shiny coats sprayed in brilliant fans of patterns - merit a doubletake. Longhorns make the iconic Jersey cow look blasé. “Some people call them art,” said Beadle, indicating to a speckled female named “M&M.” “You won't see faces like this any other place.” Standing amid his flock of lumbering friends in the middle of a field, the scene is reminiscent of a man feeding ducks in the park as Beadle tosses green alfalfa cubes to cows clamoring for treats. It’s rather miraculous he leaves unscathed, considering his large pets have 65-inch horns weighing 40 to 50 lbs sprouting from their heads. As the animals rove in close proximity, the collision of horns brushing against horns emits a soft percussion of click, click, clicks. “Hey!” yells Beadle as a scraping noise erupts in the background.

A cow was scratching its head on the grill of his car. He calls most out by name: “Bit-O-Honey,” “Maybelline,” “Painted Girl,” “M'mm M'mm Good.” Of the last cow mentioned, “she's so friendly, she'll crawl up in the car with me.” The females - called heifers if they're never been bred; cows if they have - are in heat every 20 days. Beadle puts the bulls and females in one pasture to mingle starting Sept. 15, resulting in a a crop of cute calves 9 months later. “It's like an Easter egg hunt,” he says, scanning the yellow landscape for fuzzy baby heads poking out from the grass. “You never know what color they're going to be.” As his herd grows, so does Beadle's knowledge and interest in local ranching culture. “There's a lotta history in this area. “It's not just the cattle,” he said, pulling out a faded, dog-eared book titled “East of the Gabilans.” According to its text, the 34,615-acre San Justo Ranch was purchased by two families – the Flints and Bixbys – in 1855 from Francisco Pacheco for $25,000. By prearrangement, the families sold half of the ranch to Colonel Hollister, who in turn sold his portion to the San Justo Homestead Association for the town of Hollister. While cattle ranching on California’s central coast dates back to mission times, Beadle channels what local Hollister rancher Allan Renz calls “a rapidly disappearing lifestyle.” According to the 2010 crop reports for San Benito and Santa Clara Counties, the two regions had a combined 45,062 head of cattle with a production value of $20,274,000. The Santa Clara County Farm Bureau estimates 300 ranches operate today. Between his wife, four daughters and five grandchildren, Beadle is the lone ranger intrigued with Longhorns and their link to American history. “None of my family has an interest in this,” he says. “It's amazing.” When asked to summarize the draw of raising Longhorns, a pastime he replies, “Why do some people snow ski? Why do some people have Pekinese dogs for pets? Or Great Danes? I'm just a kid that grew up in Los Angeles, who likes this way of life.”

Texas Longhorn Trails


The Fort Worth Herd: Twice Daily Cattle Drive Celebrates City’s Authentic Western Heritage Courtesy of TRAVELHOST of Dallas/Fort Worth The Texas Longhorn and the American cowboy are two of the most enduring symbols of the Old West. They’re a big reason why Fort Worth earned the nickname “Cowtown” and they formed the core of the great cattle drives of the late nineteenth century. The romance and mystique of cowboys and cattle drives can be seen every day with the Fort Worth Herd – 16 Texas Longhorns driven by genuine Texas cowhands throughout the heart of the Stockyards National Historic District – offering an unforgettable glimpse into the past. “We are ambassadors for the City of Fort Worth and its’ authentic Western heritage,” said Kristin Jaworski, Trail Boss for the Fort Worth Herd. “Our job is to educate visitors from around the world about the importance of the cattle drives to Fort Worth. We enjoy showcasing these majestic creatures and representing our City every day.” The Fort Worth Herd has become the single most recognizable symbol of the City of Fort Worth, and is literally irreplaceable as an icon of Fort Worth’s rich history and extraordinary present. Created in 1999 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Fort Worth, the Herd features one steer for every decade since the City’s founding. Since the inaugural cattle drive on June 12, 1999, the drovers have driven the Herd along East Exchange Avenue twice every day – at 11:30a.m. and 4pm. – weather permitting. All of the clothing and gear is authentic to what the drovers would have worn during the cattle drives of the 1800s. Visitors can also see the Herd between the cattle drives at the observation area behind the Livestock Exchange Building. In addition to the twice-daily cattle drives, The Herd offers educational programs and opportunities for visitors of all ages. The programs are represented by cowboys and cowgirls as a fun and educational demonstration about the tools, equipment and techniques uses during the cattle drive era of the late 1800s. The historical presentation depicts the impact made by the drovers, horses, and cattle on the Texas economy and culture of the period. The Herd is also available, by reservation, for appearances at corporate events and conferences.

Star Creek Ranch Vistors

Submitted by Star Creek Ranch Darlene Aldridge, DVM and John Parmley of Star Creek Ranch had the honor of hosting visitors from as far away as Cumberland, Maryland. Bill Robertson of Pearland, TX called to say he and his wife, Wendy, had out of town guests that had never seen a Texas Longhorn except in pictures and wondered about the possibility of a tour of Star Creek Ranch. We are always delighted to have guests and show off our wonderful Texas Longhorns so we invited them out. They got to meet a few animals up close and personal, including Stars Reign of Stars, a gentle calf that loves to be petted, and Starbase Commander, our awesome bull, who always comes to the Ranger to have his head and horns scratched. They were all surprised with the calm and gentle nature of the cattle. Our guests had a wonderful time and were thrilled with the tour of the Texas Longhorns. Pictured from left to right: Dave and Elaine Kamauf of Cumberland, Maryland and Wendy and Bill Robertson of Pearland, Texas.

Famous Named Longhorn Wins During California State Fair Christina DeMaria and her Longhorn cattle made their mark on their local KCRA news station. Christina had named her Longhorn heifer “XC Deirdre Fitzpatrick” after a local news anchor. Four days before the California State Fair, Christina contacted the new station about the famous heifer competing during the event. The new anchor followed their journey from the ranch to the fairgrounds. Not only did Christina and XC Deirdre Fitzpatrick come home with media cover, but also a championship during the California State Fair. The links to the story are listed below: http://www.kcra.com/video/28705645/detail.htm http://www.kcra.com/video/28726926/detail.htm http://www.kcra.com/video/28712393/detail.html

Johnson Family Addition Cohen Jay Emch was born on August 1, 2011. He weighed 6 lbs. and 9 oz. and was 18 inches long. We congratulate grandparents Ed & Sheryl Johnson, Molalla, OR, parents David & Heidi Emch of Canby, OR and big brother Brennen on the newest addition to their family!

Billingsley Receives Degree From Texas Christian University On August 5, 2008, former TLBAA ETrails coordinator and Trails writer Antoinette Vega Billingsley graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from Texas Christian University in Fort Worth. She completed the university’s 15-month accelerated nursing program offered to people who hold a previous bachelor’s degree. She earned her first bachelor’s degree in 2003 in journalism and Spanish. Billingsley, whose in-laws are Longhorn breeders and TLBAA members, plans to work in the DFW area.

John Billingsley. Antoinette Vega Billingsley, Dolly Hudgins, Cay Billingsley, and Beth Billingsley.

WE WANT YOUR NEWS!

If you or someone you know in the Longhorn world has something to share, please send it to laura@tlbaa.org to be included in News on the Trail.

October 2011

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$30.00 Per Person (includes reception, lunch, dinner and seminar) $10.00 Per Additional Guest For Reception and Dinner

Friday, November 11, 2011 8:00-10:00 pm Reception (Food, Drinks, Band) Saturday, November 12, 2011 8:00 am Registration

Staybridge Suites LaQuinta Quality Inn Comfort Inn

(For Those Who Didn’t At Reception)

8:30 am 9:00 am 12:00 noon 1:15 pm 1:30 pm 2:00 pm 5:15 pm 5: 45 pm 7:30 pm

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mation to help all be presenting infor ll wi s er eed br n of Texa s d tio an s sec a cross producer m ed nc fro e rie m pe co ex rs t ke os ea m sp e e k, Lana HighSome of th Perez, Jim Rombec proved program. e Th aig im Cr an y ild , Sex ing str bu du to er in rs S he ranc s in the cattl b, Amy Jo Pilm er,D VM, Felix na er oth d an s er eed r br & Roge Hutton, Club Longhorn idge D VM, MollHyooks, Robert Richey, Justin Rombeck dr Al e len ar D , er tow ntative, Russell Technologies Represe name a few !! to I TL A President

TLBAA Speaker Conference Begins Lunch (Provided by James Lee) Meet Back ITLA Speaker Conference Speakers Topics to include: feed/nutrition; judging/show issues; herd sire selection; animal health issues; reading pedigrees; herd Panel Discussion 1 management; marketing; internet marking; developing crossbred market potentials; lean beef program; breed characteristics; Panel Discussion 2 artificial insemination; panel discussions. For TLBT members: Livestock pens and animals available for hands on livestock demonstrations and judging participation. A whole day devoted to planning successful strategies for the show ring, building Dinner a future for an animal retired from the show circuit, and an opportunity to learn from some of the best judges in the breed. For more information or registration forms: www.rockinalonghorns.com Rockin A Longhorns, 408 Moore Street, Ingram, Texas 78025 (979) 575-9998 or (830) 367-5813 • rockinalonghorns@gmail.com

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Texas Longhorn Trails


Since August 1, 2007 over 3333 applications for membership to the TLBAA have been submitted. We would like to say, “WELCOME!” to each of you. You are in great company as you join the over 4,700 members that share the same passion as you…the Texas Longhorn. We are always mindful of our purpose, “to protect the unique heritage of the Texas Longhorn, to preserve the purity of the breed, and to promote Texas Longhorns as a distinct breed while encouraging its future through promotion, education and research.” At the TLBAA we have many established services to honor this purpose. Whether it is our registration department, special events such as shows and sales throughout the year or our award winning publication the Texas Longhorn Trails, we are here to serve you, our valued member. Once again WELCOME we hope to see you all soon! Doug and Susie Winters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James, Jr. & Jeanne Nixon . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Spencer Johnson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Corinne Conley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ID Samuel DuBose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hayden Cowan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SD Ritys & Rylan Venable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CO David Mills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Glenn Balog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brent L. Keen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WY Jason D. Walter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Phillip K. Stephens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Reser Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Huey A. Dawson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WY Steven W. Clark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AR David J. & Deborah M. Cohen. . . . . . . . . . TX Frank & Jane Applewhite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Five Star Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Lindholm Ranch Management LLP. . . . . . TX C. Dale & Merle Luttrell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AL Jim & Judy Hartman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Troy & Darnell Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Randy & Karen Reynolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kortnie & Andrew Dotson . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Dezarah Bliss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX William C. Payblas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James K. Fletcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Julius Mosser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Green Valley Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kaden Wieczorek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Tim Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NC Mefford 7 Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK CA Cen Ranch Interest, LP . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Morgan Dunsmore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Ryan & Jennifer Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Ann Kothmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Doug Ruppert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PA John C. & Taber Meyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jeff & Ruthi Rogers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IA David L. Ragsdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kim Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Tommy & Charlotte McIntosh . . . . . . . . . . TX Ralph & Elena Lease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Michael And Tracie Winger. . . . . . . . . . . . OR Jerry Parr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX

Gary & Diane Johnson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Suzanne & William H. Torkildsen, M.D . . . TX Aaron Meyerhoff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Scott & Denita Young. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nick Noyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ID Bob Schmidtke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Joel & Marge Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Ivan L Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MO Marcus J Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX MacKinlie Tucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Larry Don Graves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James Edenton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Tim McDougall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Lutt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Randy and Camille Buckner . . . . . . . . . . . AL Mark Allen Harden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA Taryn K Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA John & Connie Hamlin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Triple W Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Foresee Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA Yarborough and King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Philip Nauret. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Don & Betty Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Davis Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brian M. Vidosh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Clint W. Coleman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Duane Jamerman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WY Stuart E Gray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Alex W. Vidosh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Erin Jeanne Blanchard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Kenneth & Sandy Parker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bill Duncan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Matt & Rachel Johnson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MN A Bar P Cattle Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Barbara Baker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Back-N-Forth Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Quinn & Teri Shaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Carter Hooper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Heath Herman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TN Marie Crain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dos Arrows Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Marty & Hollie Wade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jane Copeland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Colton Phillips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Emily Ingram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL

Chance Kearney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA Kobe Mosser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Marie E Davis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AZ Jordan Mosser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Chad Birdwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brian & Tasha Olds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jerry H. Hodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James R. Weed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Carson Tucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Gary C. Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Sydney Jo Tucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Mark & Lisa Cummings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Coolamon Grazing Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . NSW John Beam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hired Hand Software, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . IA Michele Reed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Bypass Trust uta Mickey & Donnie Geron . TX Terry Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Terry and Sherri Adcock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Frank & Eddie McKinney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Darlene Mears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Riley Clinard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Fred King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KY Max & Monte Sue Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Steve & Rhonda McIntosh . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Wade & Lyn Lancaster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX MCA Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Susan Burton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kenn & Robbin Swann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Lead Hill Longhorns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AR Tony & Shirley Sisneros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Bettina & Travis Mathis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kennedy Kropp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK Kimble Cattle Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX William Mc Cutchan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Hacienda PBT, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Upton Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PA Paul Tittor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Brenda Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX William Burton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Travis Cole Booth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CO Megan Ashley Stine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Raymond, Teri & Brandt Taylor . . . . . . . . . TX Darlene Parsons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NM Tanner Brett Wilmeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MS

Gay Lazarine Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Castle Rock Longhorns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Shelby Johnston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jacob Sylvie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Joe Tucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Patrick Mathis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Dalli Anders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NE Wallace Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Clarence L. Jr. & Bilita Merritt . . . . . . . . . . TX Eleanore M. Kobetz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Walton Ballew. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jude Verret . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Lane Tyler McConnell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Abigail Bliss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Alexis (Lexi) Andersen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Lacie Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Scott McDowell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA Preston Rosebrock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX James Wade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Eytcheson Ranches, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX 5 G Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Paul H. Cleveland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Kalli Winters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Cap Rock Gap Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Ronald L. Franklin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VA Will Doolittle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Jacob Doolittle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KS Ron & Sally Bates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Joe Muse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK David & Robyn Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NSW Martha Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CA Rick & Lynne Stauffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FL Carson Jenkins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Joseph Kast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Braylin Miller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Nevaeh Bray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Richard & Marybeth Braun . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Diamond K Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jim & Sarah Stone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Hannah Watkins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Stark Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Lane Visser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WA Howard & Tammy Houston . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Colt Cantrell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX 5C River Camp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX Jennifer Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TX


IN MEMORIAM Daniel "Pat" Gallagher

Carol Carlson A memorial service was held August 31, 2011 at the Edmond, OK Campus of LifeChurch.TV for Carol Carlson. Carol Jean Carlson, born on August 10, 1944 in Wichita, KS, passed away on August 29, 2011 at her home in Oklahoma City, OK. Carol was the daughter of Fred Albert Carlson & Betty Jean (Perry) Carlson. She is survived by her sister Debbie and husband Jim Glover; their children: Kristen Glover Galyean & Jared Edwin Glover. Carol was well known in Oklahoma and Texas for her love and knowledge of Longhorn cattle; building her own herd in 1995. She operated CC Land & Cattle Co. as well as A-1 & Able Bonding Co. of OKC. In addition to her love of cattle, she rescued multiple dogs of various breeds & sizes throughout the years. Carol’s first insurance sales job was with Modern Woodmen of America, later becoming brokerage manager for the HornbeckRobinson Transamerica Agency. During a one year stint with a moving company she met the owners of a bonding business which she later purchased as A-1 & Able Bonding Co in 1989 and remained a leader in the bonding business for 21 years. Carol was a lifetime member of the Texas Longhorn Marketing Alliance and active member of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. She enjoyed showing, buying and selling Longhorns, “her babies”, at many Longhorn championships and events. Carol will be remembered as a savvy businesswoman, a true dog lover, a Longhorn cattle advocate and a hard-working, vibrant personality. She will be greatly missed by many. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her name to the: Free To Live Animal Sanctuary, P.O. Box 5884, Edmond, OK 73083 or to the Oklahoma Humane Society, 9300 N. May Ave., Suite 400-281, Oklahoma City, OK 73120.

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Daniel "Pat" Gallagher, 85, was born in Inman, NE, and died Wednesday, July 27, 2011, in his home in San Luis Obispo, CA. He attended and graduated from O'Neill Nebraska High School and was a World War II veteran. After he was discharged from the U.S. Army, he move to San Bernardino, CA, and attended junior college. It was there he met and married Erma Harlacher in 1949. They have been residents in San Luis since 1961, and Pat worked as a Correctional Sergeant at the California Men's Colony from 1961 to 1985. One of his passions was raising Longhorn cattle, which he did for the past 30 years. He could usually be found with a pitchfork and a truck bed full of hay, surrounded by his cattle at the property in Paso. He was a member of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. Pat was an active member of the Catholic Church At Mission San Luis Obispo. Pat is survived by his wife of 60 plus years, Erma Gallagher; two children: John, his wife Lynn and two grandchildren Reilly Marie and Caden Patrick; and Kathy Knapp and her husband, Paul Knapp. Memorial donation in memory of Pat may be made to your favorite charity.

William Henson Brown William Henson Brown, 19, of Ruffin, NC passed away on Saturday, August 6, 2011, due to a fatal truck accident. Funeral services were held on Tuesday, August 9, 2011 at Ruffin Stacy Baptist Church with Rev. Michael Tillman officiating. William was born in Gwinnett County, Georgia to Barbara Troxler Brown and the late David Patrick Brown who died last February due to cancer. Will was employed by Nortex Cattle, served as a Boy Scout and was a member of Ruffin Stacy Baptist Church. When his father passed away in February 2010, Will stepped up as he took care of the cattle, farm and family. He is survived by his mother, Barbara Troxler Brown; his sister: Jennifer Brown Gantt and husband Jon D. Gantt; his brother: Benjamin Don Brown; grandmother: Elsa Garrity Troxler; aunts: Kay Brown and Jean Learly; uncles: Larry Brown and wife, Linda Brown and John Stupak and girlfriend Kamryn Chapmon and many other loving family members and friends. Texas Longhorn Trails


www.BlueMountainLonghorns.com Aubrey & Marva Herring • (918) 653-3647 • Heavener, Oklahoma

Longhorn Cage $2,225

Paul Warford

work-your-cows.com 918-507-2222 paul@pccattlepens.com

CALLING FOR NOMINATIONS FOR AWARDS! All members of the TLBAA are encouraged to send nominations by email to awards@tlbaa.org. Nominations should be in written format with reasons on how/why the individual nominated fulfills the criteria of the award. All nominees are to be active TLBAA members, in good standing.

Email nominations to

awards@tlbaa.org. If unable to email, you may fax or mail to the TLBAA office and it will be forwarded to the Awards Committee.

October 2011

Make plans to attend… The 2012 TLBAA General Membership Meeting, Premier Heifer Sale and Fort Worth Livestock Show Events Polish your boots and grab your hat, then head to Fort Worth from January 13-17 for a TLBAA event extravaganza, filled with exciting Texas Longhorn fun. Events begin Friday with the TLBAA Annual General Membership Meeting, 10:00 AM, Radisson Hotel Fossil Creek, Fort Worth, TX. Not much time for rest, because you’ll want to get up early on Saturday and make your way to Will Rogers Complex to get a first look at some of the finest heifers in the Longhorn industry that were selected for the TLBAA Premier Heifer Sale. Get your seat saver and bid number, because you’re going to want a good view and a chance to bid on these outstanding Longhorn heifers. No need to go home yet, Longhorns will be showing off at the Fort Worth Livestock Show and Rodeo at the Will Rogers Complex. The Longhorn Show begins on January 16 with the Youth Show and resumes the next day, January 17 for Open Show. There’s only one place for a Longhorn lover to be in January and that’s Fort Worth! (See Save the Date calendar on page 52 for specific times on all events.)

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WORKING CATTLE OR CATTLE THAT WILL WORK! The easy way to work Longhorn cattle! • Can be shipped by common carrier anywhere in the U.S. • Galvanized pipe and steel sheeting • Grease inserts for easy maintenance & operation • Vaccinate or deworm cattle • Palpation gates • Measure horns • A.I. cows

We’ve got dw!hat you nee

The Official Chute of the TLBAA Horn Showcase

line video of the Check out our onon our website! chute in action

END OF TRAIL RANCH Mike or Debbie Bowman • P.O. Box 40 • Benton, KS 67017 • Home (316) 778-1717 • Work (316) 838-6194 Check out our website - www.endoftrailranch.com • mbowman@wildblue.net • wichitafence-dab@sbcglobal.net

TEXAS CATTLE  TRICHOMONIASAS REGULATIONS

Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) http://www.tahc.state.tx.us 34

Texas Longhorn Trails


Best at West Membership Sale August 6, 2011 WEST, TX AUCTIONEER: BRIAN UPTMORE, WEST, TX COMMENTATOR: GARY BOWDOIN SALE MANAGEMENT: TLBAA SALES MANAGEMENT DIVISION Photos by Laura Standley

TLBAA Treasurer Gary Bowdoin and parents, Sue & Frank Bowdoin, Crawford, TX.

Jim and Pam Young, Graford, TX.

Barry Chin, Del Valle, TX with TLBAA’s Kim Barfield.

Dr. Tim Roddam, Ben Wheeler, TX.

Matt Vanek, Clarence Harabis and Daniel Harabis, Victoria, TX.

Richard and Lis Shea, Mountain Home, TX with Ted Uptmore, West, TX. October 2011

Glenn Phipps, Santo, TX and Kim Barfield.

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S P O N S O R E D B Y T H E T E X A S L O N G H O R N B R E E D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F A M E R I C A

PRE-CATALOG CONSIGNMENT FORM PICTURE OF ANIMAL _____________ CONSIGNMENT FEES _____________ $100.00 plus 5% ($50.00 Up Front for Pre-print Catalog)

OCV VACCINATED _______________

Name of TLBAA Member: __________________________________ TLBAA#

______________

Name of Animal: __________________________________________ TLBAA#

______________

_____ Heifer

_____ Cow

_____ Pair

_____ Bull

_____ Steer

BREEDING INFORMATION Cow Exposed To ________________________________ From __________ To ____________ Bull’s Name

Cow Exposed To ________________________________ From __________ To ____________ Bull’s Name

Calf at Side Information:

Sex ________________

Date Calved ______________

Sired by ________________________________________________ COMMENTS ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ WAIVER/CONSENT FORM (This form must be signed and returned in order to complete your consignment) The Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America (TLBAA) assumes no responsibility for any guarantee made by the consignor. All guarantees are strictly between the consignor (seller) and the buyer. The TLBAA or the auction venue is not responsible for the health or safety of any animal consigned to the sale. This includes loss of life, loss by theft or other perils. All consignors must comply with the rules and regulations. The undersigned hereby agrees to conditions of the sale and agrees that all guarantees are between seller and buyer. The undersigned further agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the TLBAA, sale employees, the auction venue, and duly authorized representatives from any and all claims, demands, causes of action or liabilities of any nature which may arise from or in any way relate to the sale. The undersigned agrees that if the buyer is unable to accept delivery because of Interstate health requirements, the consignor, not the TLBAA or its management, shall be responsible for refund or adjustment. _______________________________________________ Owner of Animal/Consignor’s Signature

____________________________ Date

THIS FORM MUST BE ATTACHED TO ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE WITH COMPLETED TRANSFER FORM. M A N A G E D B Y T H E T E X A S L O N G H O R N B R E E D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F A M E R I C A S A L E S M A N A G E M E N T D I V I S I O N


ARK-LA-TEX

Dave Overdorf, President • (936) 637-9277

At the end of July the Ark-La-Tex members got together for a Princess Party fund raiser. We each entered pictures of our best heifers and asked three people to judge them to find the best heifer to represent the Ark-La-Tex Affiliate in the TLBAA's Affiliate Princess Competition. This year's heifer was chosen and will compete against other affiliate heifers throughout the US, Canada and Australia. Look for it in this issue of the TRAILS magazine. Every year, the Ark-La-Tex affiliate hosts a fall show. At the show, youth members are put in a drawing for a donation calf. The youth members who win calves need to keep records of the money spent raising each calf, and they are also required to send a letter every couple of months to the people who donated their particular calf. This teaches the young people to be aware of the money spent, record keeping and it also gives them a chance to meet adults who love the Longhorns as much as the kids do. The Autobahn Youth Tour was held in early August and several of the calves that were donated were there including: Johnny Horton BCB shown by Tracey Weldon, SH Gold Rush Rodeo shown by Cortney Petrich, SH Freeway Ten 5/10 shown by Hunter Winkel, SH Dark Superior 6/10 shown by Allyn Ryan, SH Rattlesnake T-bone 15 shown by Caleb Phillips, SS Tex Ritter shown by Kelsey DeLaCruz and Mc Lintock shown by West Ryan. We are so proud of you kids, keep up the good work, and we look forward to seeing you this fall.

North Texas Longhorn Breeders Association

Kevin Rooker,, President (817) 692-7843 • rooker@hughes.net

A Big ‘Ol Thank You once again goes out to John and Dianne Chase for sponsoring another excellent Superstakes. Also, to Larry Barker for a job well done! Congratulations to all NTLBA Youth who participated in the Autobahn Motorcar Group YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP TOUR! A special WooHoo to the following: Kylie Bena- 3rd in team penning; Keely Dennis- 4th speech, 2nd essay; Tanner Hudson- 4th team penning; Tara Moore- 4th showmanship; Rachel Remmele- 2nd team penning, 1st quiz; Ian Remmele- 1st quiz; Carson Tucker- 4th team penning; Wesley Meadows- 3rd quiz; Jake Vinson1st essay; Josh Vinson- 1st speech, 2nd team penning, 1st quiz and Intermediate “All Around”; Haley Horne- 4th showmanship, 4th team penning; Madison Horne- 2nd essay Mark your calendars for the North Texas General Membership Meeting and Field Day to be held October 29, 2011 at the Tabor Ranch in Jacksboro. The 2011 Holiday Longhorn Extravaganza hosted by the Wise County Youth Project group, will be held December 2 & 3 at the Decatur Fairgrounds. Contact any Wise County Youth or Tina Cook for additional information. Entry deadline will be November 22, 2011. Just a reminder, one of the requirements to apply for the North Texas Scholarship, is that the applicant must show in both the North Texas Affiliate Spring Show and the Holiday Longhorn Extravaganza Show. We are currently looking for a possible change of venue for our Spring Show in March. If you have any suggestions, please contact Kevin Rooker. Thanks to Hired Hand Software for getting us back on track with our website. Please visit the website at www.ntlba.org. For information regarding the North Texas Affiliate, please contact Kevin Rooker, President at 817-692-7843 or rooker@hughes.net.


TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

October - Herd Management Guide Spring Calving: 1. Wean spring born calves that are approximately 7-8 months of age. If you are involved in a performance program, the calves should be weighed at weaning and their weights adjusted to a 205-day equivalent and weaning ratios calculated. 2. Vaccinate newly weaned calves with 7way Clostridial bacterin (blackleg and malignant edema) as well as IBR-PI3BVD and deworm to control internal parasites. Cull bull calves should be castrated prior to weaning. 3. Replacement heifers should definitely be vaccinated for blackleg, malignant edema, leptospirosis, IBR and brucellosis, if not already vaccinated. 4. As fall approaches and grass matures, realize that the protein value of your pastures will decrease below levels necessary to satisfy nutritional requirements of gestating females. The feeding of 2 pounds of a 40% crude protein supplement or 4 lbs. of a 20% crude protein supplement will provide additional protein and energy intake above that received from the forage. Heifers will require even more supplemental feed, since they should be gaining approximately one pound per day. 5. Review cow body condition at weaning. Develop a winter feeding program that will insure that cows will maintain an adequate body condition prior to calving. 6. Continue fly and tick control programs. Anaplasmosis problems can continue until frost, so observe cow herd closely for animals losing body condition and appearing anemic. Commercial supplements containing 150 grams of chlortetracycline per 50 lbs. of salt are available. Continuous feeding of the tetracycline medication during the fly season should provide adequate protection against the disease.

Fall Calving: 1. Beginning in October, provide supplemental feed for bulls grazing dry, dormant range grass according to age and condition of the bulls: (a) feed mature bulls 3-4 pounds of a 40% crude protein range cube daily, (b) feed young bulls 8-10 pounds of a high energy, 20% crude protein cattle cube daily; and (c) supplement additional feed as necessary to keep bulls in good body condition as breeding season approaches. 2. Conduct breeding soundness exams and fertility checks on all bulls prior to October 2011

the breeding season. 3. The nutrient requirements for energy, protein, minerals and vitamins of lactating females increase substantially. During the first 3-4 months of lactation, a 1000 lb. cow with average milking ability (producing 10 lbs. of milk daily) requires 11.5 lbs. of energy, 2 lbs. of protein, 0.06 lbs. of calcium, 0.05 lbs. of phosphorus and 36,000 international units of vitamin A per day. Warm season pasture grasses are approaching dormancy and sufficient nutrients must be supplied to the lactating females in the form of protein and/or energy supplements as well as mineral and vitamin mixes to meet their nutrient requirements. If pasture grass is plentiful, but dormant and poor in quality during this time of year, then protein is generally your first concern. A 1000 lb. cow in good body condition with average milking ability should generally be fed at least 1.5 lbs. of crude protein from a protein supplement, depending upon the protein value and availability of the dormant pasture grass. Feeding 3-4 lbs. of a 40% CP supplement, 4-6 lbs. of a 30% CP supplement or 6-8 lbs. of a 20% CP supplement per head per day should be adequate to meet most protein and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement (20% CP, 30% CP or 40% CP) should be based upon cheapest source of protein. Price per pound of protein may be determined by dividing the cost per pound of protein supplement by the percentage of crude protein in the supplement. A source of salt as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding supplemental hay plus higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20% crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. If pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing or poor rainfall during the summer, then energy is your first concern. Feeding a medium (8-10% crude protein) hay free choice plus 2-3 lbs. of a 20% CP supplement daily or approximately 15-20 lbs. of a high quality (15-17% crude protein) hay per head per day will provide an excellent source of energy and protein for the females. If winter pasture is available, then the females should not need additional energy or protein

supplementation. Young, lactating females have 20-25% greater supplemental needs than mature cows. Watch body condition closely and increase supplemental feed accordingly. 4. Even though Texas Longhorns are known for calving ease, difficult births may arise. Check first-calf heifers (due to calve) and pregnant cows daily for possibility of calving difficulties. Once fetal membranes (water sac) have been expelled and ruptured, assistance should be provided if calf delivery has not occurred within 30-60 minutes. 5. Colostrum, first milk, consumption during the early hours of a calf’s life is essential for passive absorption of important antibodies needed for protection from disease. Absorption of antibodies found in colostrum ceases after 24 hours after birth; therefore, a newborn calf should receive at least 2 quarts (5-6% of birth weight) in first milk within the first 6 hours to insure adequate antibody protection. Commercial sources of colostrum may be purchased or the first milk from other cows may be frozen for later use. Many females, especially first-calf heifers, do not produce sufficient colostrum, and there is no way of knowing how much the calf has nursed. Baby calf scours are typically the result of inadequate consumption of colostrum during the early hours of a calf’s life. Clean calving areas and proper attention to the newborn may reduce exposure to disease organisms and reduce incidence of scouring problems. 6. Dip navels of newborn calves in a 7% tincture of iodine solution when you happen to be there shortly after birth as a preventive measure of navel ill problems. 7. At 12-14 months of age, vaccinate replacement heifers with intramuscular IBR/BVD (modified live virus), a 7-way Clostridial booster, 5-way Leptospirosis, and vibrosis at least 60 days before breeding. Consult a local veterinarian on vaccine types and other vaccinations recommended in the area. Deworming is recommended prior to spring grass. 8. Evaluate the growth of your yearling heifers as well as first-calf females. The goal should be to have your yearling heifers weight 65% of their mature weight by first breeding (14-15 months of age) and have a weight of 85% of their mature weight, including the weight of the fetus, prior to calving at 23-25 months of age.

39


JOIN THE ROLL OF HONOR The Dam of Disctinction Award recognizes a cow that has had five consecutive calves, the first being born before her third birthday. A Dam of Excellence must have had 10 consecutive calves, starting with the first being born before her third birthday. The Dam of Merit Award is designed to recognize those Texas Longhorns that stand out in the area of production among Texas Longhorn breeders. If you would like to nominate your female for the Dam of Merit Program, please call the TLBAA office for a nomination Form.

IN BOX As the editor, I receive various interesting photos along with explanations either through the mail or e-mail. I would like to share some of them with you inside the Trails magazine each month. If you have an interesting tid-bit or photo that may not be suitable for “Just for Grins”, please send them to me. You may end up in the next issue of the Trails!

Carrying On The Tradition Submitted by Sheryl Johnson

Dam of Merit Roll of Honor Dams of Excellence Bell La Squaw Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan CO Barbwire David M. Hillis, Austin, Texas Cross M Cherokee Miss Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Dewlap Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico F 3F Bevo’s T J Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico G&L True Obsession Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas High Hope, FD Bo & Dorie Damuth, Magnolia, Texas Miss CP Ruler 562 T.M. & Jean Smith, Bar S Ranch, Boyd, Texas Miss Peppermint Ed & Sheryl Johnson, Molalla, Oregon Picabo Phantom Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Rawhide Lady Pebbles Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan SP Hija Ben Tanksley, Alpine, Texas US 89076 Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Westhaven Ranger Reddy Fraser West, Ione, California WT Miss Mona’s Liberator Pearl Longhorn Ranch, Allen & Suzanne Perry, Evant, Texas

Dams of Distinction

Regan Johnson exhibited her Longhorn heifer, Daffney, at the Deschutes County Fair. The fair was held in Redmond, Oregon on August 3-7, 2011. Regan received the Sportsmanship award during the event.

In A Bind.... Submitted by David Smith, Frost, TX

Speaking of horns… every have to saw away the center support from your homemade hay ring while the thing you are trying to free would like nothing more than to stomp a mud hole in your rear while freeing her? She’s free, and I’m still in one piece.

40

Bayou Daisy Dr. Eugene & Jolie Berry, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Bayou Princess Dr. Eugene & Jolie Berry, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Bell La Squaw Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Cross M Blue Velvet Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Cross M Delta Becca Jim & Wanda Taylor, Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Cross M Delta Charisma Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Cross M Salsa Jim & Wanda Taylor, Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Cross M Star Spangled Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Cross M Texas Ruby Red Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Cross M Whelming Matrix Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Cross M Whelming Sandy Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Delta Amber Phillip Bell, Arlington, Texas Diamond W 952 Meadowwood, Charley & Doris Snyder, Elgin, OK

Dillons Fancy Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico Dixie Heather 3G Ranch, Loyd &Bettie Gibbs, Gainesville, Texas Dolly Joel & Shirley Lemley, Blackwell, Texas Double L’s Miss Elegant Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, Texas Emperor’s Lucy Creek Gary Kudrna, Ennis, Texas Fandangos Husker Barnard Longhorns, Richard & Janice Barnard, Tekamah, Nebraska FCF Honeymoon Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, Texas FCF 16th Avenue Mitch Bryant, Katy, Texas FCF Too Sexy For My Sox Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, Texas Fiona Moonshine Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Folsom Falls Posh Folsom Falls Ranch, Fred & Marijo Balmer, Folsom, New Mexico GC Little Star Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico G&L Enchantment Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas G&L True Obsession Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas G&L Silver Sage Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas G&L Star Spangled Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas Granite Daisy Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Indian Girl 636 Carla Jo Payne, Slidell, Texas JRJ WR 978 Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Ksanka Lily Belle Robert & Sheryl Greene, Eureka, Montana Lizzy’s Splash Eagles Nest Ranch, Ben & Ilse Myren, Colville, Washington Lupemitedookay Debra Lesyk & Dwight Overlid, Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada Meadowwood’s Carmen Charley & Doris Snyder, Elgin, Oklahoma Meadowwood’s Clementine Charley & Doris Snyder, Elgin, Oklahoma Meadowwood’s Tango Brink Longhorns, Frederick, Oklahoma Picabo Phantom Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Rawhide Lady Pebbles Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan Rusty Zipper Frank & Barbara Renfro, Clinton, Montana S-D Sparkle Plenty Rudy & Marilyn Bowling, Kaufman, Texas Silver Sage Double D Arena, Outlook, Saskatchewan 3W Legends Country Erin Lazy JP Ranch, Dublin, Texas 3W Pot of Independence Dale & Bev Sorem, Nevada, Iowa Westhavenreddy'sspecks Broadhorn Ranch, Douglas & Katie McDonald, Fernley, Nevada WT Miss Mona’s Liberator Pearl Longhorn Ranch, Allen & Suzanne Perry, Evant, Texas

Texas Longhorn Trails


3 1 2

1. Bill & Sandy Buck, Krum, TX; 2. TLBAA’s Rick Fritsche with Clark Smith, Bonham, TX; 3. Jim Gladden, Tallahassee, FL; 4. Lonnie Goolsby, Morgan Mill, TX with TLBAA’s Kim Barfield.

4 October 2011

41


Longhorn Working Chute Designed for Longhorn Cattle but will work most anything that will not fit into the regular working chute.

Simple and easy to operate. Excellent fo r AI, embryo transfers, pulling blood, vaccination and much more. This chute is designed with horns in mind. These working chutes are rapidly becoming very popular throughout the Longhorn industry. L ONGHORNS S INCE 1978.

R 2, Box 5 • Bazine, KS 67516 (785) 398-2311

For Immediate Press Release from Dickinson Cattle Company

Fall Fling Customer Appreciation Day Oct. 8, 2011, Dickinson Cattle Co Inc Barnesville, Ohio 43713 USA Educational demonstrations on livestock management, handling, humane branding, breeding, profit, bloodless humane castration, proper care and herd health. Info: www.texaslonghorn.com or 740 758 5050 Complete information attached below: Each year DCCI puts the big pot in the little one and invites old and new friends to enjoy an educational and fun filled "Customer Appreciation Event." Fall colors are exploding, the weather is perfect; if not -- a covered pavilion. A great event is planned for those who love good cattle and sincere ranch friendships. If you have not attended in the past, what are you waiting for? Here is the plan, which includes a free lunch for customers of rib sticking delicious lean beef brisket; don't miss out. Presentations include: “Surviving Change,” “The Killer that Must be Killed.” Family photos for all, squeeze chutes -- good, bad and expensive, calf branding, special semen rates, pasture bus tours, see 4 over 80” legends, and more. The chuck wagon style lunch is free. The educational demonstrations and ranch narrated bus tours are $15 for adults and $5 for children. If you are a DCCI cattle buyer bring your last purchase invoice; one admittance per invoice. That is your ticket. Sorry, this is the way it is~~~or, we would be feeding barbeque to everyone from here to Ft. Worth. Profits from the Fling will be given to the R-CALF USA legal fund. RSVP pronto. We need to make sure there is enough food for Michelle Obama and her cab driver. Come and help celebrate DCCI’s 44th year with Texas Longhorns. Call for details, map, airport and motel info. Rooms blocked with special low rate. 740-758-5050.

42

Texas Longhorn Trails


Electric brands shipped within 24 hours. Electric number sets 3 or 4 inch – $290 Plus Shipping & Handling

• Semen Collection & Processing • CSS Available Facility • Storage • Shipping • Supplies • AI • Embryo Collections • AI Training Schools

Personalized Brands: One Letter-$95 Two Letters-$105 Three Letters-$115

At our facilities or on-farm collecting

Pamphlets Available At Most Livestock Auctions

1-800-222-9628 FAX: 800-267-4055 P.O. Box 460 • Knoxville, AR 72845

Web site: www.huskybrandingirons.com

Super Bowl Sittin’ Bull

Bob Woodard

903.521.7904

Brenda Barton

903.567.4044 (Office)

Craig Barton

903.920.3223

18035 FM 17 • Canton, TX 75103 Toll Free 1.866.604.4044 Fax 903.567.6587 www.championgenetics.com

Coach Air Force One

Mountain Home, Texas

1-800-YO RANCH charlie4@yoranch.com Proud member of the TLBAA and TLMA

Join us in Cowtown during the Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo for the Texas Longhorn Weekend and Premier Heifer Sale.

January 13-17, 2012 October 2011

43


Monthly Movers & shAkers

Registrations and Transfers from August 1, 2011 to August 31, 2011

Division A

Division B (cont.)

Division B (cont.)

Division C (cont.)

Mark and Tina Stewart Earl Kehler Kathy Kittler Bud South S & P Enterprises, Inc. Holland Farms, Inc. James Bryant Underwood Longhorns Brynmore Farm LLC Double 'N' Cattle Ranch Randy and Camille Buckner Benjamin C. Gravett Jeffrey Hudspeth B. Eugene Berry, M.D. Hudson Longhorns Kasar & Lisa Kety Larry and Charlotte Gribbins Mike and Shirley Thiel Aaron Adkins Bronze By Cooley Carl R. Brantley Jim Steffler Calvin Deemer Dwain Aguillard Fred King Hidden Acres Ranch, Inc. J & J Farms Jody Shaw Merton Hauck Mozella Acres NEL-TAM Longhorns Nor-Tex Cattle Ray & Donnah Stavig T and C Longhorns Westfarms, Inc.

Dr. Zech Dameron III Hickman Longhorns, Inc. Rick Friedrich B. M. & Wanda Buchanan Jim Terry/Dr. Coral Noonan-Terry Bob and Cathy Iversen H & L Ranch Lazy JP Ranch Kurt Twining David Plummer Davis Green, LLC Glenn Garrett Schumacher Cattle Company Steven Zunker Young Ranch @ Flat Rock Crossings Vida Nueva Ranch Allen & Suzanne Perry Brent & Cynthia Bolen Cactus Rose Longhorns Clark and Jill Smith Cody M. Himmelreich Davis Green Doug and Sandy Stotts George W. Wilhite Johnnie L. Goff Terry and Sherri Adcock Lynda Pat Natus A & A Cattle Donnie Taylor Frank Anderson, Jr. Gary Kudrna Gary & Teresa Bowdoin Guthrie Creek Longhorn Cattle Jerusalem Ridge Ranch J II C B, Ltd. Richard & Sharon Parr S. Ann Wight Struthoff Ranch W.A. (Al) Vinson William Buck Dubravka Romano Lonnie and Kit Goolsby Bill & Freida Golden Dennis and Pam Thonsgard Dwain & Teresa Gilliam Frank & Eddie McKinney Gamestock Ranch Glenn E. Phipps James & Amy Roesler John Oliver Kay L. Roush Ken Harris Kevin and Laureen Rooker Kyle & Whitney Mayden

Lazy T Ranch Manuel or Sharlyn Gonzales Mike and Kim MacLeod Ronnie & Jackie Mullinax Stephen P. Head Wayne Wunderlich Ann Kothmann Jim and Jean Murray Joe Cunningham Alison and Andy Peters Billy Thompson & Gary Jenkins Bob Schmidtke Chris Schaper Clinard Longhorns Dave & Althea Sullivan David & Lynda Bradley Double B Lonestar Longhorns Frank Anderson, III Gary and Carolyn Huebner Hjalmar (Mike) Beijl Keith Steele Kenneth Johnson La Pistola Cattle Co. Larry Jester Larry & Robyn Lonero Laura A. Harding Loyd & Bettie Gibbs Marty & Hollie Wade Matthew J. Durkin Matt Hill MCA Ranch Mike & Alicia Karbowski Mike & Judy Bullard Rafter D Ranch Randy & Miki Bienek Ron & Kevin Asbill Stacy and Andy Martinez Steve Day Swing'n Star Ranch Terry Brown Wes and Carol Chancey John Stockton Susan Burton William T. & Sandra J. Martin

William Mc Cutchan Jeffrey Vonk Doug Hunt Oren & Dianna O'Dell River View Ranch Vel and Warren Miller Beere Cattle Company FIFTY TALL Ranch Alexandra Dees Red Hills Ranch Chuck Van Horn Warren and Cathy Dorathy Lipperts Exotics Ranch McGill Ranch Buckhorn Cattle Company Janiece A. Mc Daniel Mike Mc Clanahan Todd and Kelli McKnight Daniel & Angelina Fey Del Vic Farms Orton Cattle Co. Rockin J Longhorns Carole Muchmore Charley E. and Doris Snyder Justin Hansen Pace Cattle Company Sagacorn Longhorns Shane & Shannon Kearney Bill and Jo Le'AN Don Anderson Lyn C. C. Lewis Boyd & Judy Bambrough Bruce Rose Chris Bandley Dave Hodges Donald & Sharron Wiens Double L Mesquite Ranch Fairlea Longhorn Ranch, LLC Gary Don & Joanna Taylor J5 Longhorns Joe Bill Thompson John Murphy J Wade and Kristi Wilson Kenneth J. & Valerie J. Webb Kent and Christine Bladen Pamela Kay & Ronald Miller Randy and Jamie Briscoe Ray or Virginia Walker Rodney Lind Susan Walker Thate Cattle Co. Two Heart Bar Ranch Paul & Patti Gilbreth

Division B Stone Broke Ranch Michael McLeod Tom and Cay Billingsley John & Ursula Allen Trigg & Traci Moore H.C. Carter Circle Double C Ranch Star Creek Ranch Brian Brett Suzanne & William H. Torkildsen, M.D. Sandra K. Nordhausen John R. Randolph Linda Alexander Rafter X Ranch Stephanie Kay Bradley

44

Division C Wyoming Longhorn Ranch Bob & Pam Loomis Mike & Debbie Bowman Lawrence Morgan Longhorns Jim & Betty Civis Ben And Ilse Myren Terry Jim Hedgpeth

Texas Longhorn Trails


Join Us! We’re Growing Fast! a small group of concerned cattlemen banded together to preserve the unique heritage of Texas Longhorn cattle. With this goal, they established the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America (TLBAA) to maintain the breed registry and to promote the magnificent breed to as many persons as possible.

In 1964,

the purposes of the TLBAA remain the same. In addition, the Association has expanded its membership services as the number of Texas Longhorn enthusiasts has increased to an all-time high.

Today,

The Advantages of Membership Include: ★ State of the art Registration Department to maintain four ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

decades of herd registry. Active, dedicated officers and directors. Dedicated and knowledgeable staff. Network of national and international affiliates. Active youth organization – the Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow (TLBT). Youth Show Circuit and Youth Hall of Fame. Strong World Qualifying Show Circuit and a World Exposition. Hall of Fame. Canadian show circuit for breeders in the North. Weekly Internet newsletter, E-Trails. Breed Advisory Committee of dedicated animal scientists. Horn Showcase for official horn measurements. Active Foundation Board to preserve the history of our association and the Longhorn breed. Yearly subscription to Texas Longhorn Trails monthy magazine.

★ Educational Web site. ★ Sales Management Division with cattle sales available to the membership.

★ Riding steer group – another unique use for the Texas Longhorn. Educational breed seminars. Group field days. Futurities. Commercial breeding programs. A.I. Certified Sires. Dam of Merit program. Member of state and national cattle organizations. Exclusive computer software program to keep your herd updated. ★ Advertising campaigns in world circulated publications. ★ Mail-in voting for regional directors.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

THE GREATEST BREED OF CATTLE IN THE WORLD AND THE BEST GROUP OF PEOPLE ANYWHERE! Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 817/625-6241 • Fax 817/625-1388 www.tlbaa.org

TLBAA Membership Application

MEMBERSHIP NUMBER _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

Please draw your brand inside the box exactly as you wish to be recorded.

Reading of Brand _______________________

Name:______________________________________________________ Other Name: ________________________________________________

New Active Member*

100.00/yr

Address: ___________________________________________________

Renewal Active Member

100.00/yr

City, State, Zip: ______________________________________________ Home Phone: (

)______________Office Phone: (

)______________

Ranch Phone: (

)______________Fax Number: (

)______________

LATE ACTIVE MEMBER RENEWAL (After Aug. 31)

1000.00

Lifetime Member Website Address: ____________________________________________ Email Address: ______________________________________________ PAYMENT OPTIONS:

VISA

DISCOVER

MC

Check or Money Ord.

125.00

New/Renewal Junior Member (18yr. & Under) **

25.00

New/Renewal Outrider (Associate Member) (pays Non-Member rates for animal work)

75.00

Monthly Breed Publication (Texas Longhorn Trails)

60.00

Card No.:___________________________________________________ Expiration: ________________ CID# ( 3-digit code on back) ____________ Referred by:_________________________________________________

**Junior Member Birthday ___/___/___

SS# ________________________

All dues must be paid by U.S. Funds.

* New Active Membership includes New Member Welcome Package and subscription to the Texas Longhorn Trails monthly publication. Texas Longhorn Trails subscription ONLY rate is $60 US address or $75 (US) foreign address. TLBAA Membership dues may be deducted as an ordinary and necessary business expense; however they are not deductible as a charitable contribution.

October 2011

45


BREEDERS GUIDE ARKANSAS

FLORIDA

KANSAS

CALIFORNIA

EAS CAT Y LOC TLE ATO R!

NORTH CAROLINA

For more information on upcoming TLBAA sales and events call Kim Barfield at (817) 625-6241

OKLAHOMA

MICHIGAN

NEBRASKA READ E-TRAILS for news on upcoming TLBAA Sales and Events. Go to www.tlbaa.org and click on E-Trails

46

Texas Longhorn Trails


OKLAHOMA

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

READ E-TRAILS for news on

CENTRAL TEXAS

upcoming TLBAA Sales and Events. Go to www.tlbaa.org and click on E-Trails

For more information on upcoming TLBAA sales and events call Kim Barfield at (817) 625-6241

SOUTH TEXAS OREGON

PENNSYLVANIA Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information. (817) 625-6241 October 2011

47


SOUTH TEXAS

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTHEAST TEXAS

READ E-TRAILS for news on

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

upcoming TLBAA Sales and Events. Go to www.tlbaa.org and click on E-Trails

WEST TEXAS

CANADA ALBERTA Call in, ask for your H.O.R.N.S. password and take control of your herd inventory and membership information. (817) 625-6241

48

Texas Longhorn Trails


TEXAS LONGHORN T•R•A•I•L•S

Please send an acknowledgement to: Name ________________________________________ Address ______________________________________ City ____________________ State _____ Zip _______ My Name _____________________________________ Address ______________________________________ City ____________________ State _____ Zip _______ October 2011

Enclosed is my gift of ___ $25 ___$50 ___$100 __$_____

___ In memory of: ______________________________ ___ In honor of: ________________________________ Name of person to be remembered. Please print. Please mail form and donation to the Texas Longhorn Breeders of America Foundation, P.O. Box 4430, Ft. Worth, TX 76164.

49


ClASSIfIEdS AUCTIONEERS

THE GREAT PUMPKIN SEZ!!!

Terry H. Brink Auctioneer P.O. Box 928 Frederick, OK 73542 580-335-5732 580-335-4126 Mbl. e-mail: brinkauction@pldi.net www.brinkauction.com

Brian Uptmore Auctioneer (254) 826-3725 Day (254) 379-4283 Cell

Pure traditional/progressive Texas Longhorns! Color, horns, functional efficiency, correct bags and testicles, no floppy navels and gentle dispostions.... You can have it all at the Flying D Ranch! Reasonable prices, over 200 head to choose from a 28 year breeding program. Let us help in putting your new herd together or adding quality Texas Longhorns to your current herds. To schedule a ranch tour or just talk Longhorn, call: Dorie Damuth • Flying D Longhorn Ranch Magnolia, Texas • 281-356-8167 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com

THATE Cattle Company

JoelAuctioneer Lemley P.O. Box 471 Blackwell, TX 79506

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North—utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

(507) 235-3467

325-668-3552

www.lemleyauctionservices.com TX. License 15204

Bruce E. McCarty Auctioneer Weatherford, TX

(817) 991-9979 BID, BUY & SELL SEEK THE TRUTH: read "The Real Butler Story" by Don Limb. Send only $19.90 to Limb Cattle Co., 8375 Lone Star Rd., Washington, TX 77880-5205, 936-878-2988. View excerpts at www.limbcattle.com.

OLIVER LONGHORNS

www.oliverlonghorns.com Cattle for sale “To God Be The Glory”

joliver@mytocn.com (972) 268-0083

REAL ESTATE

CATTLE FOR SALE JONES RANCH – Home of Gunman genetics. 4-Sale: progeny of the great Gunman bull and his sons, Grand Slam & Hocus Pocus. We are now featuring cattle sired by J R Premium and K C Just Respect by Hunt's Demand Respect. (719) 539-2771. Web: http://gunman1234.tripod.com. E-mail: thejonesranch_1@hotmail.com. BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS- Check our new Web site with "Super Sales" and herdreduction prices. Tazman (Gunman) genetics. Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK (580) 7659961, www.beavercreeklonghorns.com LONGHORN SEMEN- Bold Ruler, Boomerang C P, Coach, Diamond W Paycash, Emperor, JM Sue, VJ Tommie, Watson 167 & more. www.oliverlonghorns.com. John Oliver (972) 268-0083.

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

New Location: Sallisaw, OK (918) 774-9107 • (918) 855-4907 new web site:

At SAND HILLS RANCH we enjoy working with NEW BREEDERS & offer QUALITY GOOD HORNED STRAIGHT BUTLER & BLEND cattle, many to choose from & an attractive OWNER FINANCE PKG, Dora Thompson (318) 8726329 echoofambush@aol.com Mansfield, LA www.sandhillsranch.com Located near the Texas Line & Shreveport.

www.lonewolfranch.net

www.oakhill-longhorns.com (620) 673-4050

HOME & RANCH REALITY TRIGG MOORE Ofc: (254) 965-5500 Fax: (254) 965-5532 Cell: (254) 396-5592

Co-Owner/Agent 936 S. Hwy 281 Stephenville, TX 76401 Email: trigg@c21homeandranch.com

www.c21homeandranch.com

TRADE & BARTER TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breeds’ top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days (512) 454-0476 / Weekends (830) 644-2380.

TRANSPORTATION

LIVESTOCK TRANSPORTATION Ted Roush (713) 299-7990 Cell (979) 743-4439 Home www.asocl.com or troush57@hotmail.com YOU CALL - I HAUL! HAULING - Anywhere-Anytime We specialize in Longhorns. Dan Tisdale (940) 872-1811 Mobile: 940/841-2619

WESTERN DECOR Specializing in mounted steer horns, cow skulls, horn furniture, hides M.P. & K.D. HORN and LEATHER SHOP 408 E. Drew • Ft. Worth, TX 76110 817-927-8061 • Fax: 817-927-7970 E-mail: MPKDhornshop8061@msn.com Web site: www.hornandleather.com

TEXAS LONGHORN T•R•A•I•L•S (817) 625-6241 • Fax (817) 625-1388 trails@tlbaa.org

Classified ads are $15.00 for 25 words. Box ads are $25.00 per inch. Deadline is the 25th of the second month preceding publication.

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www.tlbaa.org 50

Texas Longhorn Trails


A DVERTISERS ’ I NDEX A

Adcock, Terry & Sherri ..................48 Almendra Longhorns....................46 Anderson, Frank Jr. and III ............3 Autobahn Motorcar Group ........17

B Bar H Ranch....................................46

Beadle Land & Cattle................2, 46 Beargrass Ranch..............................47 Best At West Sale ......................36-37 Billingsley Longhorns....................48 Blue Mountain Longhorns ..........33 Bond Ranch ....................................46 Box Z Ranch................................2, 48 Brett Ranch ......................................47 Buckhorn Cattle Co. ................2, 47 Bull Creek Longhorns ..................48 Butler Breeders ..............................2-3

C

C.C. Land & Cattle Co. ................46 C R Ranches ....................................47 Carpenter, Bo & Sylvia ..................48 CedarView Ranch ..........................46 Champion Genetics ......................43 Chisholm Range Ranch................23 Civis Ranch......................................32 Concho Ranch ..................................3

L

M Marquess Arrow Ranch ..............IBC

McLeod Ranch ..................................2 Miller, Tim ......................................46 Morgan Livestock ..........................42 Moriah Farms ............................3, 47 Mosser Longhorns ........................48

Western Stock Show ....38 N National Northbrook Cattle Co...................47 No-Bull ............................................43

P

E

Eagles Ridge Longhorns..................2 El Coyote Ranch ........................1, 47 End of Trail Ranch........................ 46 ET Longhorns..................................46

F

4 T Longhorns ................................48 4 Star Ranch ....................................46 Fort Worth Stock Show ................41

G H

Gross, Ray ........................................42

J

Harrell Ranch ....................................2 Helm Cattle Co. ............................47 Hickman Longhorns ....................48 Husky Branding Irons ..................43 J.T. Wehring Family Ranch ..........47 Jack Mountain Ranch....................48 Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. ................3 Junction Hill....................................47

K Kittler Land and Cattle Co. ..23, 46 A Ranch ................................IFC L Lazy Lemley Longhorns..................23, 48 Lightning Longhorns ....................47 Little Ace Cattle Co...........................2 Lone Wolf Ranch ....................34, 46

October 2011

Just For Grins Create an original caption for this photograph and win a TLBAA cap! (Only first-place winners receive prizes.)

Photos for “Just for Grins” are welcome, but they cannot be returned. Send your caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 Please specify which month your caption is for. Email entries should include address.

P&C Cattle Pens ............................33 Panther Creek Longhorns ............48 Pearl Longhorn Ranch ..................48 PJ’s Cattle Company........................2 Premier Heifer Sale..................18-19

Ranch ......................................46 R R&R Rafter H Longhorns..........................2 RC Larson Longhorns....................31 Red Peak Ranch..............................48 Rio Vista Ranch ................................2 Rocking F Ranch ............................34 Rocking G Ranch..............................3 Rocking P Longhorns ......................2 Rosebud’s Flatrock Ranch ............48 Royal Heritage Farm......................46 Running Arrow Farm ....................43

Longhorns ........................3 D Dalgood Deer Creek Longhorns..................48 DeSoto Town & Country..............24 Diamond Q Longhorns ..............47 Diamond S Longhorns ................46 Dick’s Ranch Supply......................43 Double LB Longhorns ..................48

Longhorn Designs..........................34 Longhorns & Lace Benefit & Sale..30 Longhorn Sale Pen ........................34 Loomis Longhorns ..........................3

S

7 Bar Longhorns ............................47 Safari B Ranch ................................47 Sand Hills Ranch............................24 Semkin Longhorns ........................47 Sidewinder Cattle Co.......................3 Smith, T.M. & Jean ........................47 SS Longhorns..................................47 Stotts Hideaway Ranch ........48, BC Stringer, Lee......................................42 Struthoff Ranch ..............................48

T

Texas Longhorn Breeders Conference ......................................30 TLBAA Horn Showcase ..........20-21 Triple R Ranch (MI) ......................46 Triple R Ranch (TX) ..................3, 22 Triple T Longhorns ........................47 T Spur Longhorns ..........................46

U Underwood Longhorns................46 V V&J Longhorns..................................3 Ron ....................................48 W Walker, Westfarms, Inc...................................2 White Rock Ranch..........................25 Wichita Fence..................................34

Y

YO Ranch ........................................43

Photo courtesy of River View Ranch, Linn Grove, IA.

September photo FirSt-place Winner: “Let’s Play Peek-A-Boo!” Wendy hastings, art, tX ◆

Coming Next Month:

Apparel/Home Furnishings/Christmas Gifts 51


Save the date! Texas Longhorn Coming Events OCTOBER 2011

OCT 1-2 • Texas Rice Festival Longhorn Show, Winnie, TX. Carol or James Gentz, Jr. (409) 296-2434 or (409) 267-5232. www.texasricefestival.org. Qualifying Haltered and Youth. OCT 7-9 • CATL Far West Qualifying Show and Official TLBAA Horn Showcase Satellite Measuring Site, Kings County Fairgrounds, Hanford, CA. Entry Deadline Sept. 24, 2011. Gail Moore (559) 779-1455 cell, (559) 583-8115 office. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. OCT 7-9 • Heart of Texas Fair, Heart O’ Texas Fairgrounds, Waco, TX. Online entries only at www.hotfair.com. Deadline-9/16/11. Sue Bowdoin (254) 486-2581. Qualifying Youth. OCT 13-15 • TLBAA Longhorn Weekend & Horn Showcase, Fort Worth, TX. Kim Barfield (817) 625-6241 or kim@tlbaa.org or Pam Galloway pam.galloway@tlbaa.org. OCT 15 • Horn Showcase Sale, Fort Worth, TX. Kim Barfield (817) 625-6241 or kim@tlbaa.org or Pam Galloway pam.galloway@tlbaa.org. Consignment deadline: Aug. 1, 2011,www.tlbaa.org. OCT 21-23 • State Fair of Texas, Dallas, TX. Trigg & Traci Moore Traci@Triple-T-Longhorns.com or (254) 796-4269 or (254) 396-5592. Entry deadline September 1. Qualifying Halterd & Youth. OCT 22 • NILE Longhorn Show, Billings, MT. Chuck Gams (406) 652-5783. Qualifying Halterd, Free & Youth. OCT 29 • Deer Creek Longhorns Fall 123 Sale, Brenham, TX. Bruce Hazelwood, Farm Mgr. (979) 277-8016 or Frank Hevrdejs (713) 341-5706. www.dclonghorns.com OCT 29 • Nebraska Texas Longhorn Assoc. Annual Sale, Beatrice Livestock Auction, Beatrice, NE. Roger or Bonnie Damrow (402) 423-5441 or brdamrow6@aol.com. Delwin Smeal (402) 568-2353 or Larry Long (308) 530-7272. www.beatrice77.net.

NOVEMBER 2011

NOV 4-6 • Louisiana State Fair, Shreveport, LA. Donnie Taylor (936) 414-1401. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. NOV 5 • Marquess Arrow Production Sale, Ben Wheeler, TX. Ron & Barbara Marquess (903) 833-5810 or (903) 570-5199. NOV 5 • Texas Longhorn Fall Sale, Oyen Crossroads Centre, Oyen, Alberta. To consign or for info: Ron Walker, Box 58, Redcliff, Alberta, T0J 2P0 or (403) 548-6684. NOV 11-12 • Texas Longhorn Breeders Conference, Helotes, TX. James Lee (979) 575-9998 or (830) 367- 5813. www.rockinalonghorns.com or rockinalonghorns@gmail.com. NOV 11-13 • ARK-LA-TEX Fall Show, George Henderson Expo Center, Lufkin, TX. Donnie Taylor (936) 414-1401 or Bobbye DuBose (409) 384-8120. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. NOV 18-20 • Kaufman Police Association First Annual Longhorn Show. S&S Arena, Terrell, TX. East Texas Longhorn Association. Entry Deadline: November 1. Joel Norris (972) 533-4945 or (972) 932-3648. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. NOV 20 • Tri-State Longhorn Sale,Crawford Livestock Market, Crawford, NE. Art & Hayley Anders (308) 665-2457 H, Art cell (308) 430-4009; Hayley Cell (308) 430-4008.

DECEMBER 2011

DEC 2-3 • Holiday Longhorn Extravaganza, Wise Co. Sheriff’s Posse Grounds, Decatur, TX. (NTLA & The Wise Co. Youth Project) Tina Cook, P.O. Box 504, Paradise, TX 76073 (940) 399-7993 or tcook@pisd.net. Qualifying Haltered and Youth. DEC 3 • TLBAA Best at West Membership Sale, West, TX. TLBAA (817) 625-6241 www.tlbaa.org.

Let us know about your upcoming events! (817) 625-6241 or email us at laura@tlbaa.org. 52

JANUARY 2012

JAN 13 • TLBAA Annual General Membership Meeting, 10:00 AM, Radisson Hotel Fossil Creek, Fort Worth, TX; Kim Barfield (817) 625-6241 or kim@tlbaa.org or Pam Galloway (817) 625-6241 or pam.galloway@tlbaa.org. JAN 14 • Texas Longhorn Premier Heifer Sale, West Arena, Fort Worth, TX. Kim Barfield (817) 625-6241 or kim@tlbaa.org. Pam Galloway (817) 625-6241 or pam.galloway@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org JAN 16-17 • Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo, Watt Arena, Fort Worth, TX. Trigg & Traci Moore (254) 796-4269 or (254) 396-5592 Trigg Cell. Qualifying Haltered &Youth.

FEBRUARY 2012

FEB 16-19 • Autobahn Classic, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Entry deadline: Jan. 31, 2012. Larry Barker (817) 988-6110 or lbarker@abahn.com. FEB 18-19 • Sierra County Longhorn Show, Truth or Consequences, NM. Lynn Starritt, TLBNM Sec./Treas., (915) 252-4118 cell or (915) 886-7063 fax. www.tlbnm.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. FEB 24-26 • San Angelo Stock Show, San Angelo, TX. Dennis Urbantke (325) 655-3500 or (325) 656-9321. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth.

MARCH 2012

MAR 2-3 • Longhorns & Lace Benefit & Sale, Red River Sale Barn, Marietta, OK. www.longhornsandlacesale.com Tessa Wheeler Millsap, Improving Genetics, (254) 315-6548, tess2305@aol.com; Molly Clubb, Hired Hand Software, (319) 269-8903, molly@hiredhandsoftware.com. MAR 2-5 • Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, Houston, TX. Entry deadline Dec 1 online. www.hlsr.com Qualifying Haltered, Youth and Trophy Steers. MAR 23-25 • Stillwater Shoot-Out, Stillwater, OK. Steve & Bodie Quary (405) 567-3093. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. MAR 31 • B&C Show Me Fall Longhorn Sale, Brookfield Livestock Auction, Inc., Bus. Hwy. 36, Brookfield, MO. Sayre Auction & Sale Management, Bill Sayre (660) 258-2973 or cell (660) 734-0827 or Shawn (660) 734-8782.

APRIL 2012

APR 13-14 • 3 Amigos Sale & Social, Red River Sale Barn, Marietta, OK. Sponsored by Buck Adams, Bob Loomis & Larry Stewart. www.lazyllonghorns or (432) 561-5879. APR 13-15 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Washington County Fairgrounds, Brenham, TX. Susan Young, (713) 294-6334 or email susanbyoung@hotmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free and Youth. APR 20-22 • Rockdale Spring Show, Rockdale, TX. Sandi Nordhausen (512) 898-2401 or sandi@nordy.com or Patsy Davidson (518) 898-0321 or pmd22@juno.com. Qualifying Haltered and Youth. APR 27-28 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield, KS. Mike Bowman (316) 778-1717 or www.endoftrailranch.com.

MAY 2012

MAY 4-5 • Red McCombs 32nd Anniversary Fiesta Texas Longhorn Sale, Johnson City, TX. www.redmccombslonghorns.com Alan Sparger - alan@redmccombslonghorns.com or (210) 445-8798. MAY 18-19 • Millennium Futurity, Glen Rose, TX. Bill Davidson (405) 258-7117 or mlflonghorns@sbcglobal.net www.mlfuturity.com

AUGUST 2012

AUG 4 • Hudson-Valentine Invitational Longhorn Sale, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Lorinda Valentine (254) 584-2218.

Texas Longhorn Trails



Texas Longhorn Trails