__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

NOVEMBER 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2016 | 1


2 | October 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Tom Matott • (303) 500-9465

Secretary/Parliamentarian: Chad Smith • (701) 764-6277

Executive Vice Chairman: Ken Morris • (704) 361-6035

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

Director: Alex Dees • (805) 300-4617

2nd Vice Chairman: Stephen Head • (979) 549-5270

Director: Chris Herron • (909) 721-7577

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck60@gmail.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Ken Morris

John Parmley

Tom Matott

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@gmail.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Region 13 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

David Wars

Chad Smith

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

(936) 404-2116 w5longhorns@yahoo.com

(701) 764-6277 smithlonghorns@hotmail.com

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Nelson Hearn

Kevin Rooker

Brian Varner

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

(817) 692-7843 krooker@centurylink.net

(785) 224-1005 longhorncreek@yahoo.com

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Tom Smith

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Aaron Adkins

(704) 490-9208 doublealonghorns@gmail.com

Sandi Nordhausen

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

Kenny Richardson

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Terry King

Stephen Head

(970) 352-3054 krichardson21@aol.com

Alex Dees

(850) 299-6875 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

2 | November 2018

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller* 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616 russellh@longhornroundup.com


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


COVER STORIES

16Longhorn Essentials: Chutes & Pens

If you want to be in the Longhorn business, this equipment is worth the investment. By Myra Basham

12

NOVEMBER 2018 Vol. 30 • No. 8

Time To Vote For The TLBAA Special Awards

DEPARTMENTS

Meet the nominees and find the official ballot to get your vote in.

28

2 Winter Cow Management Starts Now

Don’t wait for the harsh winter conditions

to prepare your cattle for winter.

By Heather Smith Thomas

Board Of Directors

6 Editor’s Note

FEATURES 08

31 Show Results

Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest

34

23

6 Quick Tips For Quality iPhone Photography on Your Farm or Ranch If using a cell phone is the only option, make the most of it.

By Lauren Prettyman, Ranch House Design Social Squad

25

Understanding Beef Quality Grades

26

Dams of Merit

30

The Rules of The Road…To World Show

37

Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction Results

39

Pineywoods Marketing Longhorn Sale Results

TLBT Page

40 Affiliate News

BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

42

Two Longhorn females join the Dams of Distinction role.

By the World Show Steering Committee

About the Cover: Photo courtesy of

News On The Trail

47 Index/Just For Grins

48 Calendar

Eitan and Sandy Barhum.

The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

4 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


EDITOR’S NOTES PLAN TO HANDLE THE SITUATION

What situation? Any! If you are thinking of owning Longhorns or already have a few out in the pasture, start thinking about what you’re going to do if one needs to be doctored, palpated, branded or even an ear tag put in or removed. The most basic need of any cattle operation is some sort of catch pens and a chute. For more information on this essential equipment turn to pg. 16. If you decide to reach out to one of the suppliers advertising on those pages, please tell them you saw their ad in Trails Magazine. Planning ahead for photographing your herd will be a future topic, but for now, take a look on pg. 23. If you need to catch some quick photos with your phone, there are some quick tips on getting better shots with an iPhone. Speaking of photographs, after seeing all the great photos of colorful calves on Facebook, I’m looking forward to receiving more entries in the Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest. Thank you to those who have already submitted entries. This is a great opportunity to feature your program in March 2019 Trails Magazine as a contestant and, if you’re the winner you will be feature on the March 2019 cover - all for an investment of $20. See pg. 8 for more information and get those photos submitted. You don’t want to be left shaking your ear saying “I had one more colorful….” Don’t wait until winter is upon you to start preparing your cattle for harsher weather and forage needs. You can put a plan in action now to prepare to handle winter conditions easier. It begins on pg. 28. Speaking of planning, have you made your plans to join us in Fort Worth, TX January 8-12, 2019 for Longhorn Weekend? Held during the historic Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo, this is a great time for members to bring the whole family, take care of association business, fellowship, participate in the Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale and the Open and Youth Longhorn shows. Newly elected Board Members will be seated, Executive Board will be elected and a general membership meeting will be held, all on Friday, January 8th. See the ad on the inside front cover for more information or visit www.tlbaa.org. Wondering why the Horn Showcase results are not in the November issue? Well, a monthly publication takes a lot of planning and in order for it to make it to your hands it has to be complete well ahead of the month it is for. November Trails had to be finalized as far as content long before the Horn Showcase was over. So, for now, you can find information about competition winners on the Horn Showcase event page on our website. A complete wrap-up of the event and results will be featured in the upcoming December issue. Blessings,

DEADLINE: January 2019 Issue:

Myra Basham Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

November 26th

Editor-in-Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 104 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Advertising: Karen Price • (254) 223-4470 karen@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Trace Neal • Ext. 103 trace@tlbaa.org

Registrations/Office Manager Rick Fritsche • Ext. 101 rick@tlbaa.org Membership/Registrations Dana Coomer • Ext. 102 dana@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant/DNA Specialist: Amelia Gritta • Ext. 100 amelia@tlbaa.org Special Events Pam Robison • Ext. 106 pam@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 105 theresa@tlbaa.org

Printed in the U.S.A. Member

Cash Cow Issue 6 | November 2018

(817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


Affiliates

Affiliate Relations Committee Invites You To Enter The

Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest In the Texas Longhorn industry there are events that look at two out of three aspects of the breed, conformation and horn, but never has there been an event that features the uniqueness of colors so evident in the breed. This year the Affiliate Relations Committee will be offering TLBAA members the “Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest” respectfully titled after longtime Nebraska Texas Longhorn Association President, Rodger Damrow, who was Rodger Damrow very fond of colorful calves. Here’s how the contest will work: • A colorful photo of an active TLBAA member’s most colorful calf born in 2018, will be submitted to the TLBAA office. The picture must be high quality. Preferred format is digital file from a camera, saved and sent at maximum file size. If using a cell phone, please do not use zoom. Get close to the calf. If sending a print to be scanned it must be at least 8 x 10 inches and printed out as a photo (Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Office Stores). • A $20 entry fee made payable to the TLBAA is to be included with the photo. • Members can enter more than one animal, but each entry must have a TLBAA registration number. • Contest will be open until December 31st, 2018. • Winners will be decided by an independent judge not involved in the contest. • Winners will be announced during the Longhorn weekend in January. • The winning entry will be featured on the front cover of TRAILS. (If possible, think vertical when snapping the photo) The additional finalists will be featured elsewhere in the magazine. Entries must be e-mailed or mailed to the TLBAA office by December 31st. Get involved, check your 2018 calves and pick your entries for this new contest. For questions or concerns, email Tina DuBose (tinadubose10@gmail.com), Deb Lesyk (halters.buckets@yahoo.com), or Myra Basham at the TLBAA office (myra@tlbaa.org). Let’s see if we can have entries from every state and country that has TLBAA members. Make it fun and encourage other members to send entries.

8 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com

JOIN THE STAMPEDE! www.ButlerLonghornMuseum.com THINK OF TEXAS AND YOU THINK OF LONGHORNS. The Longhorn is synonymous with Texas and its ranching history. Yet few Texans or visitors to this state realize that by the beginning of the 20th century, Longhorns were on the verge of extinction. Today, the Longhorn is alive and well due to the efforts of seven pioneer breeders who refused to allow these animals to become extinct. A huge thank you to our Butler Breeders of today for continuing to preserve this magnificent bloodline for future generations and for its continual support of the museum and its mission. The Butler Longhorn Museum is located in the heart of the League City Historic District. The former homestead and surrounding land has been transformed with the help of patrons and volunteers into a state-of-the-art museum dedicated to telling of the story of Milby Butler and his role in the amazing comeback of the Texas Longhorn. This museum chronicles Texas history in coordination with our school’s curriculum.

1220 Coryell Street, League City, Texas Contact us to schedule a tour, corporate event, wedding or for more information on the museum. Docents available for tours of historic League City. The Museum is a 501(C) 3 non-profit organization. Phone: 281-332-1393 Email: info@butlerlonghornnuseum.com

www.ButlerLonghornMuseum.com

Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com (210) 232-1818 Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

EDUCATIONAL CENTER

How You Can Help: We need benefactors like you to assist us with the funds needed to maintain and expand the museum’s innovative exhibits and educational center. These activities are important in teaching and promoting our local heritage. Contact the museum for more information to make a donation or to volunteer. Purchase Art: Help fund our art, science and history exhibits. Purchase original works of art, prints and other items in our gift shop or online.

BREEDERS INFORMATION:

Butler Longhorn Museum

BPT Longhorns Ben & Phyllis Termin Weatherford, TX 817-374-2635 luvmylonghorns@gmail.com

If you would like to know more about the Butler Breeder ’s Invitational or the Butler bloodline and to research Butler pedigrees, please visit: www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155 Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 • Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 • Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com This space is available for your ranch listing! Call Karen Price: (254) 223-4470 or Karen@tlbaa.org

Butler Breeder’s Futurity

James K. Turner (936) 689-1914 the5tcorp@yahoo.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com


Membership

Division A Director Nominations Due Please Note: To be placed on the voting ballot, an active TLBAA member in good standing must receive 5 nominations from active TLBAA members in good standing. If you are interested in becoming a director, please make sure your membership is active and your account is current. TLBAA will be seeking nominations soon for all Division A directors, two At-Large positions and directors to represent Regions 1-6. Nomination forms will be mailed 90 days prior to the TLBAA Annual Membership Meeting in Fort Worth, TX, January 18, 2019. 1. Nomination Ballots were mailed out to Division A Members October 18, 2018. 2. Nomination Ballots must be returned to the CPA postmarked no later than November 19, 2018. 3. In order for an individual to be placed on the final ballot, they must receive at least 5 nominations from Active or Lifetime members of the TLBAA. 4. The final ballots will be mailed out December 4, 2018. 5. Final ballots must be returned to the CPA postmarked no later than December 28, 2018. 6. Newly elected Directors will be announced January 18, 2019 at the General Membership Meeting during Longhorn Weekend in Fort Worth, TX. The TLBAA By-Laws, Section 2-D, Membership, state: “At least ninety (90) days prior to the annual Membership Meeting, the TLBAA office shall mail to the Active and Lifetime members a request for nomination of individual or individuals for Director in the member’s representational region. Such member nominations shall be received in the Association’s office no later than sixty (60) days prior to the Annual Meeting. In order that any member nominee be eligible to be placed on the election ballot, he must receive write-in nominations from five (5) members who are Active or Lifetime members. Should there be no members nominated by the membership for a particular region, or should a nominee decline to have his name placed on the election ballot, the Board of Directors will appoint an Active or Lifetime member in good standing domiciled within the division to fill the vacant position at the same meeting as the election of TLBAA officers.

Division A Highlighted in Yellow No less than forty-five (45) days prior to the annual meeting of the membership, the TLBAA Office or designated CPA firm shall mail official printed ballots to each qualified Active and Lifetime Member in good standing of that region and division. This ballot shall contain the names of the candidates, if any, who were properly nominated by members. All written ballots must be returned by U.S. mail to the CPA with a postmark not less than twenty-one days prior to the Annual Meeting in order to be validated and counted. All ballots received will be validated and counted by an independent CPA firm or other organization experienced in voting tabulation as designated by the Executive Committee. The nominees receiving the most valid votes shall be elected. All newly elected Directors shall be installed at the Board of Directors meeting prior to the general membership meeting. A tie vote will be broken by the Chairman of the Board drawing one of the names by lot.” Division A TLBAA members, watch for your nomination form in the mail. For a complete set of TLBAA By-Laws, including all sections regarding the election of Directors, visit www.tlbaa.org/tlbaa/official-handbook/

We look forward to seeing everyone at the general membership meeting January 18, 2019 in Fort Worth, TX. For more information about Longhorn Weekend and the Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale see ad on inside front cover 10 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


Awards

Time To Vote For the TLBAA Special Awards The TLBAA special awards will be presented Friday evening, January 18, 2019 as a part of Texas Longhorn Weekend. Nominators provided background information on each nominee. All active TLBAA members in good standing are encouraged to vote for one fellow breeder in each of the categories for the special honors. Votes can be emailed to awards@tlbaa.org. If unable to email you may fax to the TLBAA office, and it will be forwarded to the awards committee. Deadline for votes: December 20th, 2018, 5pm CST, no late ballots will be accepted. Only the official ballot with member name and TLBAA # included will be accepted.

Dave Evans Breeder of the Year Award Alex Dees We would like to nominate Alex Dees for breeder of the year. She has a superior breeding program and has supported us as a member of the board of directors. She is a very positive person with the ability to motivate others. What more could you ask for.

Bill & Judy Meridith Bill and Judy are a Cornerstone of the Longhorn industry. They continuously strive to improve their breeding program by acquiring the best genetics regardless of expense. In this I’m not saying their program is purchased, but their substantial financial contributions have made enormous impacts on breeders in the Longhorn industry. The Meridith’s have enabled other Longhorn breeders to reinvest in their programs, thus advancing and strengthening the Longhorn industry in general. Bill and Judy were the breeders of the high selling animal at the End Of Trail Ranch dispersal sale. They are the ONLY breeders to produce two bulls measuring over 90” TTT with several more predicted to reach that measurement in the immediate future. The Meridith’s have generously participated through sponsorships of the TLBAA and many other organizations promoting the Texas Longhorn breed. Their giving hearts have been witnessed by their generous participation in purchasing and/or purchase and re-sale of animals donated for worthy causes at Longhorn sales. Their proudest endeavor was building the Wellington Christian Academy, providing scholastic excellence in a Christ-centered environment for children. 12 | November 2018

This award is about animals produced, and clearly the Meridith’s have a proven breeding program producing superior genetics. I feel we should also reflect and reward Bill and Judy as humanitarians. They have made a huge impact on the industry and have done so in a quiet and humble way.

Carla Payne Carla Payne is the epitome of a great Longhorn rancher. Her cattle are the ones to beat in the show ring. Her many class winners at the TLBAA World Show include one Reserve World Class bull and two World Class Grand Champion Non-Haltered Mature Cows. Some of her famous cattle are Buckshot, Overlord C P, Indian Girl and Boomerang C P. Carla was voted “Outstanding Rancher 2018” by the Denton County Soil and Water Conservation District this past year – and she artificially breeds her Longhorns herself! Let’s hear it for Carla Jo!

John & Brenda Oliver John & Brenda, of Oliver Longhorns, for the many awards throughout the years, for all of the shows they participated in with so many animals In so many classes and groups. They show beautiful animals from an impeccable program. They have built their program on honesty, integrity, & hard work. They also give endless hours to helping the TLBT program for their shows and animals as well. I feel they are very deserving of this nomination and of this award.

See Page 15 for Official Ballot Please submit your ballot by December 20, 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Jack Phillips Award

Terry King I would like to nominate Terry King for the Jack Phillips award. He has supported and encouraged everyone in this breed that he has come in contact with. Few breeders have done more for the breed in every aspect asking nothing in return.

Keith & Tina DuBose Keith and Tina DuBose are long­time supporters of the Texas Longhorn Industry. They should be recognized for their continuous offering of time and knowledge to multiple affiliates. Keith is President of the East Texas Longhorn Association and Director-At-Large for Division B of the TLBAA. He is a fifth-generation Texas Longhorn breeder, for years encouraging others to take interest in the breed. Tina is President of the Ark-La-Tex affiliate and former Chairwoman of the Affiliate President’s Committee in which she still serves as a member. She has helped encourage growth and participation within the TLBAA by instituting president’s meetings in Billings, Montana, Grand Island, Nebraska and Pueblo, Colorado. This has increased involvement throughout the nation. Both Tina and Keith are involved through judging shows throughout the area. They encourage others, especially youth to show cattle and get involved in regional affiliations. Their own family has continued this tradition and has become active members of the Longhorn industry. The above qualifications are just a snapshot of the generosity Keith and Tina DuBose have given the Texas Longhorn Industry. I can think of no one else who is more deserving of this award. We are lucky to have two people who are so committed to seeing this breed thrive.

Cody & Taylor Himmelreich We nominate the Himmelreichs for their dedication to the Texas Longhorns, the time and efforts they have spent to help the youth with showing their animals and for donations of their own animals for the youth programs. As the criteria for the Jack Phillips award is “someone who works selflessly for the breed and the breeders,” this young couple fits the criteria easily. Cody is outspoken and stubborn, but respects rules and guidelines, helps others and is very involved in the conformation shows. Both Cody and Taylor are advocates of continual improvement in the breed and are comfortable sharing their knowledge with others.  Perhaps it is his size, but Cody doesn’t get intimidated, and will work hard for what’s right for the members. They are good with new members, interested in promoting youth and getting young ones started correctly, and they celebrate and support the successes of many. They do the jobs asked of them, and they believe in the breed.

Jim Rombeck I would like to nominate Jim Rombeck for the Jack Phillips award. Jim Rombeck has given selflessly to the Texas Longhorn world since the conception of JBR Longhorns in 1997. Not only does he participate in traditional sales as buyer and seller, but also gives back to the industry tenfold. Since buying Wyoming Warpaint in 2001, he has only missed two Horn Showcases. Donating time to help on the floor with moving cattle, penning, and anywhere else that’s in need of an extra hand. For the last four years he’s been in charge of the measuring at the official Horn Showcase location as well as chairing the satellite locations. Over the last two years he has increased the number of satellite locations. Jim has also served on the board of directors being voted in three full terms as well as filling vacant seats twice. On the board, he has been on the executive committee and served as executive first chair. A phrase by JFK was “not what the country can do for you but what you can do for your country.” I do believe that Jim Rombeck took this phrase to heart. It is not what the association can do for him, but what he can do to help promote the TLBAA and the Texas Longhorn breed.

Elmer Parker Lifetime Achievement Award Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower I nominate the late Dr. Gene & Mrs. Lana Hightower for their impeccable breeding quality and standards, for always encouraging & welcoming new and upcoming breeders, for their dedication to the breed and to the association and for their amazing heart that they have both effortlessly given to the longhorn cattle, the breeders, and to teaching and sharing their love and knowledge with others.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 13


Awards Scott Hughes I would like to nominate Scott Hughes for the Elmer Parker Award. Scott is one of the older breeders and has been one of the strongest supporters in the association. He loves the cattle and people involved with the Longhorn world. He tries in every way to be a positive influence in everything he does.

Mel Raley Rising Star Award Tucker Hilbert We would like to nominate Tucker Hilbert for rising star. Tucker is about as knowledgeable as any young breeder I have known. I believe he will be a force to be reckoned with in the near future.

gether our last  two newsletters in a new format, and is always ready to design an eye catching information page. He  is beginning  to have success in the show ring, and this fall will be showing his first calves carrying his own brand. He is a true promoter of the breed and will eagerly talk about Longhorns to most anyone he meets. His enthusiasm and willingness to make new affiliate events successful has helped us to attempt new challenges, knowing we have him in our corner to accomplish those goals. I think Mel Raley would be pleased to see him receive the award as he has been a strong starter and will continue to be an advocate for the breed.  He is so willing to listen and to share his knowledge with perspective new members. He credits his beginning interest in Longhorns to Sunrise Camp where he attended for two summers and learned to show the beautiful breed and to be proud to address anyone he encountered. I am pleased to nominate Derek Overlid for the Mel Raley Rising Star Award. 

Austin & Taylor Rohr Derek Overlid Would like to nominate a young man who is developing his own small show herd and has become very involved in our affiliate and sits as a current director. He is always eager to help, to learn, to discuss and share information with other members. As he is younger than most of our members, we look to him for help with technology issues on our social media pages. He has stepped up and has put to-

14 | November 2018

Bought low quality cattle like everyone else does. Immediately sold them, studied and started putting great cattle together. Has sponsored events to help out, has helped the youth, has promoted Longhorns and been a great advertiser. Now has one of the best sires in the breed in only 3 short years. Has helped bring everyone together from a business side.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TLBAA SPECIAL AWARDS 2018 BALLOT ONLY THIS OFFICIAL BALLOT WILL BE ACCEPTED - Printable version available at www.tlbaa.org Please Be Sure to put your name and Member Number at bottom

All TLBAA members are encouraged to vote for one fellow breeder in each of the categories for the special honors.

Votes can be emailed to awards@tlbaa.org. If unable to email, you may fax to (817) 625-1388, and it will be forwarded to the awards committee.

Deadline for votes: December 20th, 2018, 5pm CST, no late ballots will be accepted. ­––DAVE EVANS BREEDER OF THE YEAR AWARD––

r Alex Dees, Harper, OR

r Bill & Judy Meridith, Wellington, KS

r Carla Payne, Slidell, TX

r John & Brenda Oliver, Malakoff, TX

––JACK PHILLIPS AWARD––

r Keith & Tina DuBose, Ben Wheeler, TX

r Cody & Taylor Himmelreich, Dayton, TX

r Terry King, Westville, FL

r Jim Rombeck, Lyons, KS

––ELMER PARKER LIFETIME AWARD––

r Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, TX

r Scott Hughes, Rutherfordton, NC

––MEL RALEY RISING STAR AWARD––

r Tucker Hilbert, Bennington, KS

r Austin & Taylor Rohr, Tyler, TX

r Derek Overlid, Lloydminster, SK, Canada

Member Name _____________________________________

TLBAA Member # ______________

ONLY THIS OFFICIAL BALLOT WILL BE ACCEPTED - Printable version available at www.tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 15


Facilities

Longhorn Handling Essentials:

Chutes and Pens How does a horn through your leg or a cow running away with a panel hanging off her horn sound? As a now wiser breeder stated, “You can’t be in the business, if you don’t have a chute.” Not all pre-chute experiences are as dramatic, but they all illustrate the inherent risk of working cattle without one. Kevin Rooker, a breeder for more than 15 years and active in the Longhorn show world, shared his experience pre- and post-chute: “When we first started our herd and worked Longhorn cattle, we did not have a chute. Our vet was not really excited but he tolerated it temporarily. We used temporary panels as a chute. We would put the cattle between two panels, with a gate in front of them to worm, vaccinate, etc. This was dangerous but seemed to work at the time. Then one day, as we were working on a cow, she tried to jump over the gate. She was successful but severely damaged the gate. Luckily she did not seriously hurt herself. It was at this point we decided that this process was too dangerous for us, the vet and the cattle. We then had a set of pens built with both a smaller calf chute for branding, castrating, vaccinating and otherwise caring for calves, and

Common Situations When Restraint is Necessary — Removing or applying ear tags — Branding (required if registered) — Treating Injury — Applying Topical Medication — Vaccinations or other injections — Helping a cow accept a calf — Milking if necessary — Measuring horns — Any type of veterinary examination — Trimming hooves — Palpation — Artificial Insemination 16 | November 2018

also we have a larger WW Longhorn chute in the pen area for handling the older animals and can vaccinate, palpate, AI, trim, measure and otherwise care for the larger animals. Having worked animals with and without a chute, we would highly recommend using a chute for the safety of the animals and the handlers. It also makes the tasks such as vaccinating, blood draws and measuring so much easier.” While there are Longhorns out there who have been turned loose on remote pasture and left alone, that is the exception to the norm. Most Longhorn owners vaccinate, doctor when necessary, and may even palpate or A.I. their own animals. Many breeders also have interest in collecting weights and horn measurements. The list of routine tasks that should be performed while the animal is in a chute is long. (See below) While there are still cowboys around that can rope and throw a Longhorn for doctoring or branding on the ranch, most owners and veterinarians prefer to work with animals that are safely confined in a squeeze chute. Not only for the safety of the people, but the animals as well.

What is a chute?

Simply put a chute, or squeeze chute is a device, usually constructed of heavy pipe or panels, which hold cattle by closing in on them from the side until they are unable to move around and may be safely handled by people. It may or may not be a part of a more extensive holding pen system designed to move animals quietly towards the squeeze chute. Equipment referred to as a Longhorn chute usually has horizontal openings with fewer vertical bars to allow the horns to safely go through the panels. These chutes often do not include head catchers commonly used with commercial beef or dairy cattle. Each system designed for Longhorns has its own design variations that may have pros and cons for your needs. If you choose to build your own, look at others first. Make strength of material, safety of cow and handler, and secureness of the chute first priorities. The type of chute suitable for you is based on needs and preference and it is strongly advised that you see different types of chutes in use so you can see what would work best for your operation, both how it needs to be secured/set up and the ease with which you can accomplish what you need to with your cattle.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


By Myra Basham

One reminder when deciding on your budget for a chute... always inquire about shipping cost and, if there are extra charges for If you have to ask why you need a chute set-up if you need help with that. designed differently for Longhorns… Some common features (not all options on every Longhorn chute) n he queeze hute to be considered when choosing a working chute are: If you purchase a chute, hopefully you saw it dem• Palpation gates onstrated so you are familiar with its operation before • Sides that lower or panels that open to access the exposing your cattle to it. If you decide to construct one side and head of your own, be sure the first animal you test it on is a • Sides that open on both sides for options on how calm one. You want to discover any areas that need imanimals enter and exit provement without a struggling animal in it. • Horn stops or tail bars to keep the animal from movBeing able to operate your chute quietly, smoothly ing forward or back as much and calmly is key to keeping your Longhorns from be• Ease of stabilizing the chute or working it into your coming stressed or agitated, even fearful, when in the pen set up chute. With the many options available to obtain used and When pushing the side closed on the animal, do not new Longhorn-specific chutes, you should be able to hit or push hard or it will only create resistance. Let the find a chute that works for your budget and needs. After slow movement of the gate and the position of your all a trip to the emergency room or hospital and down body encourage movement of the animal into the chute. time from working can hurt your pocket far more than Once you get the animal secured, step back and watch the cost of a chute.

I T

S

C

CALMNESS IS KEY While a chute can help get the job done even when a Longhorn resists being handled, every effort should be made to keep the whole process calm and easy for the cattle. Beyond potential injury to you or the animal, stressing cattle can lead to: • Lower conception rates when using A.I. • Increase in illness • More difficulty handling the animal in the future • Dark cutting meat if stressed before slaughter Eyes are a good indicator of stress level. The more white showing, the more agitated the cow is.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 17


Facilities for signs that the animal is fearful. In the confines of a chute, the most obvious signs of agitation is showing the whites of the eyes, constant bellowing and a continued attempt to resist and move in the chute. Stroke the animal through the side but don’t pat it. According to cattle handling expert Dr. Temple Grandin, an animal can mistake a pat-pat-pat as hitting or light scratching as the tickling of an insect. Strong firm strokes with pressure simulates how cows push against each other for comfort, and may help reassure the cow in the chute. When working outside the chute, keep your movements slow and your voice quiet. If an animal is not settling down in the chute, yelling and hitting will just make it worse. Remember, for ease of future working in the chute, you want the cow to have as positive an experience as possible. With that in mind, the first time a Longhorn is introduced to your chute do not do anything that is negative. Run it in, give it a treat, keep it short and let her go. Grandin explains that cow memory is sensory based so it associates objects and places with good or bad experiences. When releasing the cow from the chute, be sure to position yourself where you will not be hit by a swing-

18 | November 2018

ing gate or penned between the gate and a fence if the cow for some reason hits it. Also, be aware that they may spin quickly or come out fast. Don’t be too close thinking the cow will be calm or move in one certain way when released. It only takes one unforeseen change in the environment such as a dog running by, a backfire or the wind making something flap suddenly, to startle an animal and cause it to jump or run out quickly.

Working Pens

It is important to have some type of corral or pen system to move cattle toward entering the squeeze chute, especially when you commonly work them on your own. If your chute is self-standing and not permanent, portable panels may be used to create a small pen in which to hold a couple of Longhorns. Cattle do not like being separated from herd mates and it is best to not pull one completely away from other cattle. They are herd animals and respond best when they know there are others around. Moving several into a catch or holding pen instead of just one will make for less stress and easier handling. As herd animals, they are used to following each other. Many holding pen, alleyway and chute system designs allow a natural flow that plays off the instincts of the cattle. Solid walls, removing distractions and avoiding sharp contrast in the field of vision are all ways to improve cattle movement toward your chute. There are many good resources for learning about moving cattle on Dr. Grandin’s website, www.grandin.com, and sample layouts of cattle handling facilities. Although some material is geared toward the commercial beef industry, the principles of cattle behavior, moving cattle and safe handling techniques are all applicable to Longhorn operations of all types. Most cattle handling systems will consist of a catch area where cattle may be held in a larger group. Depending on the complexity of the set up there is usually a smaller holding pen and then an alley leading the cattle to the chute. Usually the last small pen is actually open to the squeeze chute and the animal can be calmly pushed in. There are many effective set ups to get from the pasture or trailer to the chute with less stress, but there are many more ways to do it incorrectly. It is worth taking the time to learn more about successful, low stress handling on Dr. Grandin’s website. She

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


Facilities has free videos available to watch as well on everything from moving cattle to setting up low stress cattle working facilities.

Moving Cattle

Forget all the westerns where you saw a herd of wild Longhorns being chased by whooping cowboys. That is not reality when working with your Longhorns today. Cattle, no matter how gentle are still livestock and herd animals and process their environment like all other cattle do. Unless really pushed into a position to feel threatened or being overly protective of a calf, most Longhorns will move according to where in their flight zone a person (or threat) is. All your movements and the set up of your pens and alleys should take advantage of this. In order to keep the process of transporting and working large numbers of beef cattle efficient and with as little injury and stress as possible, extensive research has been done on the subject. While your Longhorns may be accustomed to humans and come when called, they still possess the same memory-forming process and basic instincts as all other cattle. A common experience many breeders have related, even shown video of on Facebook, is that their herds will come running if they think they are getting treats or being fed. Take advantage of that positive experience by taking them into the pens and then feeding a few

20 | November 2018

Overhead view of a cow, indicating flight zone, point of balance, blind spot, and handler position to start and stop animal movement. Adapted from Grandin and Deesing, 2008.

cubes. In their memory it will be a good experience and they will go easily into the catch pens in the future to be worked. The flight zone of cattle is something to be learned and used as an aid to moving them where you want them to go without chasing them. Think of the flight zone as the animal’s “personal space”. When you are outside of the flight zone the animal does not move. Once you advance into the animal’s flight zone it moves away. The shoulder area is the point of balance. Approach the animal behind the shoulder and it will normally move forward, ahead of the shoulder it will move backwards. Avoid the area directly behind the animal as it is a blind spot and the likelihood of startling the animal is high. The flight zone can vary from cow to cow, and when you want movement to stop make sure you’re outside the flight zone. Using driving aids such as sticks, paddles or flags (avoid electric aids) should be simply as an extension of your arm into their flight zone or to “block” their path and turn them. Your goal is to guide the cattle not battle them. Understand that cattle balking is often a reaction to something in their environment. Dr. Grandin suggests looking at the surroundings from the cow’s level. Be aware of bright patches of light across the ground or fence, dark entrances to alleys, flapping flags, chains or ropes even if they are away from the area you’re working in. Cattle have excellent memories and they know what the pens are supposed to look, sound and smell like. Other common items that can cause cattle to not want to move forward are vehicles they can see through the panels, a coat hanging on the fence, plastic bottles and bags laying in sight or moved by the wind - anything with contrast or that is unusual they are apt to hone in on it. While the first reaction is to stop suddenly and stare, if there is a threat perceived rapid backing up or trying to turn and go the opposite direction is the next stage. Another danger of pushing too close to an animal to move it is the likelihood of cattle kicking. Some people

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


The Kick Zone Mature cattle tend to kick forward, to the side, and then back (top). Calves tend to kick slightly out to the side then back or straight back (bottom)

assume that a cow only kicks behind her. They actually tend to kick forward and sideways as much or more than straight back. These movements are seen often when they are discouraging a calf from nursing. For people, it gives a wider area that you have to be aware of potential kicking. Other behaviors common to cattle that can affect their human handlers is their tendency to head butt, push each other with their bodies and use horns to knock each other around. These instinctive behaviors kick in whenever cattle move in a group and if you are in the wrong place when the jostling starts you may become just another part of the group that a cow is knocing around in.

Pens and chutes can make working your Longhorn cattle much easier and safer, but it still takes thought and care to prevent injuries to humans and animals.

Your Next Step

If you do not have a chute of any type yet, start researching now. Whether you want to purchase one or fabricate your own, take the time to go to a Longhorn property or event where a Longhorn-specific chute and pen/alley system is in use. Think about your facility and what would be easy to implement and work effectively for you. For those too short on time or fabrication skills to want to tackle it on your own, contact the various dealers advertising in these pages. Most not only offer new chutes, but used ones as well. Many will offer to set up a chute for you and demonstrate the use of it. Some of the companies offer pen set ups as well. When you prepare your budget keep in mind the value of your time and safety when looking at cost. Also consider that it is a long-term investment as they are built of durable materials and usually are easy to resell if the need arises. If you already own Longhorns and have not set up the means to work with them, please be proactive and do it now. When you go out and see a sick or injured animal that needs tending,you will be relieved that you planned ahead.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 21


Facilities

Scoring Cattle Temperament in the Chute Score 1- Docile. Mild disposition. Gentle and easily handled. Stands and moves slowly during processing. Undisturbed, settled, somewhat dull. Does not pull on headgate when in chute. Exits chute calmly. Score 2- Restless. Quieter than average, but may be stubborn during processing. May try to back out of chute or pull back on headgate. Exits chute promptly. Score 3- Nervous. Typical temperament is manageable, but nervous and impatient. A moderate amount of struggling, movement and tail flicking. Repeated pushing and pulling on headgate. Exits chute briskly. Score 4- Flighty (Wild). Jumpy and out of control, quivers and struggles violently. May bellow and froth at the mouth. Continuous tail flicking. Score 5- Aggressive. May be similar to Score 4, but with added aggressive behavior, fearfulness, extreme agaitation and continous movement. Score 6- Very Aggressive. Extremely aggressive temperament. Thrashes about or attacks.

Cattle with Chute Score of 5 and 6 should be culled. Source: North Carolina State University Extension; www.ces.ncsu.edu

22 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Marketing

By Lauren Prettyman Ranch House Social Squad

6 Quick Tips For Quality iPhone Photography on Your Farm or Ranch With the advancement of smartphones, cameras on phones have gotten better and better. Now, thanks to those advancements, you can take fairly high-quality photos any time you want – quickly and easily! Follow these helpful tips to make sure you are taking professional-looking photos with your iPhone or smartphone. 1. Wipe off your lens regularly. If the photo looks blurry, try cleaning the lens with a soft cloth or your tshirt, and take the photo again. 2. Avoid using zoom at (almost) all costs. Unless you have an iPhone 7 Plus, the zoom on your phone camera makes photos very pixelated. It is always better to move closer to the subject to get up-close photos. Your feet are the best zoom you have! If you must zoom, take the photo without zoom and crop the photo after you’ve taken it for the best quality in that situation. 3. Tap on the screen while taking a photo to adjust focus and brightness. If you tap on the screen while the camera app is open, you can choose where to focus. Once the focus square appears where you want it, you can adjust the brightness by moving the sun icon on the right side of the focus square up & down (up for

brighter, down for darker). You can also hold down on the screen to lock the focus in. 4. Your phone doesn’t snap the photo until you take your finger OFF the shutter button. Keep this in mind so that you stay still as you release the button to avoid blurry photos. 5. Use the home screen camera short cut. If you tap the home button to light up the home screen, you can swipe from right to left across the screen and access the camera immediately and without having to unlock your phone. This will allow you to take pictures more quickly! 6. Snap photos with the volume button. The volume up button on the left-hand side of the phone works as a shutter button. Turn your phone sideways and the volume up button is right under your finger just like a regular camera. Now that you have these tips in mind, you are ready to take beautiful photos of all of the animals and landscapes on your farm or ranch! Originally published as a blog for Ranch House Designs. www.ranchhousedesign.com. Printed with permission.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 23


26 | January 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Longhorn Beef

Understanding Beef Quality Grades Beef grading sets the standards for the various quality levels of beef. The beef grading program uses highly trained specialists and sometimes grading instruments to determine the official quality grade. Beef quality grading is voluntary and administered by the USDA and paid for by beef packers. The grade is primarily determined by the degree of marbling — the small flecks of fat within the beef muscle. Marbling provides flavor, tenderness and juiciness to beef and improves overall palatability. Other grading factors include animal age, and color and texture of the muscle. PRIME Prime beef is produced from young, wellfed cattle. It has abundant marbling, is produced in smaller quantities than other grades, and is often sold in hotels and restaurants. Prime roasts and steaks are excellent for roasting, grilling or broiling. CHOICE Choice beef is high quality and produced in high-

est quantity, but has less marbling than Prime. Choice roasts and steaks, especially from the rib and loin, will be very tender, juicy and flavorful. They are suited for roasting, grilling and broiling. Less tender cuts are perfect for slow-cooking. SELECT Select beef is slightly leaner than Prime and Choice because it has less marbling. It can lack some tenderness, flavor and juiciness as compared to the higher grades. Select grade beef often benefits from slow-cooking or from marination prior to grilling or broiling. NO ROLL | Standard and Commercial grades of beef are frequently sold as ungraded. Because No Roll does not carry a grade designation, there is a risk it will not be as tender, flavorful and juicy as products graded Prime, Choice or Select. Information/photos courtesy of Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. www.BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 25


Dams Of Merit

New Dams of Distinction Join Roll of Honor Daisy 221, owned by Richard Whalen of 4W Ranch, and Good Knight Plum Coco, owned by Dwight Overlid & Deb Lesyk of Double D Arena, have now joined the Dams of Distinction. The Dam of Merit Program has been available for TLBAA members for many years as a tool to recognize those Texas Longhorn females that stand out in the area of production among Texas Longhorn breeders. Often overlooked as an effective marketing tool, this list is an official record of the positive reproductive record of Longhorn females. How can it benefit in your program? First, among fellow breeders, it shows your dedication to building a herd on a foundation of solid, reproducible genetics. No one can afford females that do not produce offspring regularly and this record shows off those dependable genetics in your herd. Second, among other cattle breeders, it promotes the cost effectiveness of the Texas Longhorn breed. Dependably producing a calf every year is a trait every breed hopes for in a female. Such evidence of productivity can sway other cattle owners to consider bringing Longhorns into a crossbred program or starting a secondary herd of Longhorns. You may even turn them into 100% Longhorn owners! Third, among those who have never owned livestock or own other types of livestock, the thought of generating

a little regular income from that beautiful, unique piece of history is always a plus. If you’re a hobbyist or simply an animal lover, you still want to know that when you’re ready to see calves on the ground, it will be high odds that the process will go smoothly. What’s the cost to you to get your female on the list? Only $25 plus a little time investment. You will need to make sure that as your females calve, you have updated their progeny records in H.O.R.N.S. If you have a female that qualifies, simply call the TLBAA office and speak to registrar Rick Fritsche, or drop him an email at rick@tlbaa.org and he will provide you with the necessary form to fill out to submit your dam for verification. Rick will also help with any questions you may have about “calf at side” information in H.O.R.N.S. Once the progeny have been verified, your dam will be added to the list which appears in TRAILS magazine, and you will receive a Dam of Merit certificate for your records. This is an affordable and easy benefit for members to promote a very important positive trait of Texas Longhorns that make owning them that much more satisfying. **NOTE: This is not a record TLBAA tracks for you. It is up to you, as a owner/breeder, to notify us when your cow has achieved this goal. We look forward to your participation.

Dam of Merit Roll of Honor Dams of Excellence

Dam must have had 10 consecutive calves, with the first being before her third birthday

4-Ever David & Jo Anne Norwood, Waco, TX

Bell La Squaw Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

CO Barbwire David M. Hillis, Austin, Texas

Cross M Cherokee Miss Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico

Dewlap Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico

F 3F Bevo’s T J Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico

G&L Enchantment Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas

G&L True Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, Texas

High Hope, FD Bo & Dorie Damuth, Magnolia, Texas

Hope’s Secret David & Jo Anne Norwood, Waco, TX

Miss CP Ruler 562 T.M. & Jean Smith, Bar S Ranch, Boyd, Texas

Miss Peppermint Ed & Sheryl Johnson, Molalla, Oregon

Nutmeg 7/4

Picabo Phantom Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Rawhide Lady Pebbles Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

SP Hija Ben Tanksley, Alpine, Texas

US 89076 Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, New Mexico

Westhaven Ranger Reddy Fraser West, Ione, California

WT Miss Mona’s Liberator Pearl Longhorn Ranch, Allen & Suzanne Perry, Evant, Texas

Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Dams of Distinction

Dam must have had 5 consecutive calves, with the first being before her third birthday Almendra Dixie Tierra

Joel & Tamara Kuntz, Bend, OR

Bayou Daisy

Dr. Eugene & Jolie Berry, Baton Rouge, LA

26 | November 2018

Bayou Princess

Dr. Eugene & Jolie Berry, Baton Rouge, LA

BH Mahogany May

Joel & Tamara Kuntz, Bend, OR

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

CO Starlight

Richard Whalen, Galdewater, TX

Cross M Blue Velvet

Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM


Cross M Delta Becca

Jim & Wanda Taylor, Truth or Consequences, NM

Cross M Delta Charisma

Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM

Fandangos Husker

Lizzy’s Splash

Barnard Longhorns, Richard & Janice Barnard, Tekamah, NE

Eagles Nest Ranch, Ben & Ilse Myren, Colville, WA

FCF Honeymoon

Debra Lesyk & Dwight Overlid, Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Lupemitedookay

Cross M Salsa

Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, TX

Cross M Star Spangled

Mitch Bryant, Katy, TX

Charley & Doris Snyder, Elgin, OK

FCF Too Sexy For My Sox

Meadowwood’s Clementine

Jim & Wanda Taylor,Truth or Consequences, NM Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM

FCF 16th Avenue

Meadowwood’s Carmen

Cross M Texas Ruby Red

Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, TX

Cross M Whelming Matrix

Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Cross M Whelming Sandy

Folsom Falls Ranch, Fred & Marijo Balmer,Folsom, NM

Daisy 221

Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM

Delta Amber

Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, TX

Diamond Q Roselyn

Dr. Gene & Lana Hightower, Van, TX

Diamond W 952

Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Dillons Fancy

Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Granite Daisy

3W Legends Country Erin

Dixie Heather

Hayfork Barts BB

Frank & Teresa Locatelli, Santa Cruz, California

3W Pot of Independence

Dolly

Indian Girl 636

Carla Jo Payne, Slidell, TX

Westhavenreddy’sspecks

Double L’s Miss Elegant

Double D Arena, Outlook, SK, Canada

Emperor’s Lucy Creek

Robert & Sheryl Greene, Eureka, MO

Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM 4W Ranch, Gladewater, TX Phillip Bell, Arlington, TX John & Rebecca McCammon, Ponder, TX Meadowwood, Charley & Doris Snyder, Elgin, OK Dr. Fritz & Rebecca Moeller, Socorro, NM 3G Ranch, Loyd &Bettie Gibbs, Gainesville, TX Joel & Shirley Lemley, Blackwell, TX Star Creek Ranch, Somerville, TX

Fiona Moonshine

Folsom Falls Posh GC Little Star

G&L Silver Sage

G&L Star Spangled

Good Knight Plum Coco

JRJ WR 978

Charley & Doris Snyder, Elgin, OK

Meadowwood’s Tango

Brink Longhorns, Frederick, OK

Molly Hunts Best 01

Chris Bandley, St. George, UT

Peekaboo

Dick & Cheryl Curry, Springtown, TX

Rusty Zipper

Frank & Barbara Renfro, Clinton, MO

S-D Sparkle Plenty

Rudy & Marilyn Bowling, Kaufman, TX

Silver Sage

Lazy JP Ranch, Dublin, TX

Dale & Bev Sorem, Nevada, IA

Broadhorn Ranch, Douglas & Katie McDonald, Fernley, NE

Ksanka Lily Belle

Gary Kudrna, Ennis, TX

JOIN THE  ROLL OF HONOR

If you would like to nominate your female for the Dam of Merit Program, please call the TLBAA office for a nomination form. 817-625-6241 Rick Fritsche- rick@tlbaa.org

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 27


Herd Health

Winter Cow Management Starts Now Winter management for the cow herd must start becalved in the fall--needing more nutrition to produce fore cold weather. Assess body condition of pregnant milk and breed back. Some herds do well through wincows when you wean calves, and have a plan for proter on good pasture without any other feed except for viding enough feed or pasture so they can maintain or a salt/mineral supplement, especially if they’re dry and regain moderate to good condition before next calving. not nursing calves. In some instances they may need Cows must be in good condition to handle cold weather, calving and rebreeding. Dr. Robert J. Callan (Colorado State University) says the most important aspect of winter cow management is adequate nutrition that will allow cows or heifers to maintain or achieve moderate body condition score--about 5 to 6 on a scale of 9--throughout winter, as well as meet the demands of pregnancy. In times of severe weather conditions, this means additional nutrients, and in some cases, shelter from inclement weather.” Thin cows can’t handle the stress of bad weather and lose more weight. It takes more feed to put weight back on during cold weather. Thin cows don’t have an insulating layer of fat, and must rob more of their body reserves to create heat energy to Plan ahead to be sure you are ready for winter. keep warm—so they just continue to lose weight and it’s a vicious circle. It often pays to sort protein supplement to utilize low-quality forages. If cows into groups according to age and/or body condisnow covers the grass or weather gets cold, however, tion. Save your higher quality pasture for heifers and they may need hay. thin/old cows and let the majority of the herd winter on If weather is cold or stormy, cattle need more enlesser quality pasture. ergy to maintain body heat. This can be adequately To help cattle maintain health and body condition, supplied by forages, since fermentation breakdown vaccinations should be up to date, and cattle dewormed of roughage in the rumen produces heat. If cattle are and deloused if necessary. Lice can be a serious winnot fed additional energy, they metabolize body fat to ter problem in northern climates. Worms can adversely keep warm, and lose weight. During extremely cold or affect performance whenever cattle are intensely manwindy weather, cows should be given all the hay they’ll aged, grazing the same pastures repeatedly, with the clean up, or a protein supplement on dry pastures to grass contaminated with feces (rather than having the encourage them to eat more. As long as protein level is cattle spread over arid rangelands, for instance). You adequate, cows can process/ferment sufficient roughdon’t want parasites robbing cows of nutrition when age to provide energy and body heat. Good windbreaks they need it most. Check cattle for internal parasites during severe weather are important, to reduce cold (worms, liver flukes) and work with a veterinarian for stress and energy requirements. optimum timing of treatments if control is needed. PAY ATTENTION TO NUTRITIONAL NEEDS – AcIf lice are a winter problem in your herd, the best cording to Shannon Williams, Lemhi County Extentime to delouse cattle is late fall/early winter, before lice sion Educator, University of Idaho, “Most important in start to increase in numbers. Lice thrive in cold weathwinter cow management is to make sure you are meeter and also have thick hair to hide in; cattle can’t reing your cows’ nutritional requirements according to move them as readily with their rough tongues. A good where they are in their gestational stage.” kill on lice in early winter—before these parasites affect Salt should always be provided, since this mineral is cattle performance--will generally keep cattle relatively lacking in forages. In many geographic locations, forfree of these unwanted boarders until spring. age may also be lacking in copper, selenium or zinc. ADJUST FEED FOR COLD WEATHER – How much Know the mineral content of your forages and provide hay or supplement a cow needs will depend on weather, supplements (via salt/mineral mix, bolus, or injectable age and body condition of the cattle, available pasture product) if levels are low. “Trace mineral status of the or crop residue (quality and quantity) whether cows are cow affects all aspects of reproduction and production, still nursing calves or dry, or ready to calve again, or as well as future well-being of her calf,” says Williams. 28 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


By Heather Smith Thomas In a drought, grass may be short on protein and phosphorus. As a general rule, rangeland grasses hold their feed values better through winter than “tame” or irrigated pastures, or crop residues. Tame forages lose nutrient value once they dry up or freeze, and cattle generally need supplemental feed (hay, silage, grain or a protein supplement and mineral mix) to complement that type of forage. If pasture is gone or snowed under and you’re feeding hay, having cattle in several groups is best, since their needs are different. “You don’t want to ‘waste’ hay (or money) by feeding better quality feed than they need. Cows in early or mid-gestation don’t need your best hay. Save it for later when they are calving or feed it to heifers and 2-year-olds. The only way to truly know the nutritional value of hay is to have it analyzed in a lab. I’ve seen some ‘ugly’ hay that was high in protein, and some hay with great color that had very little protein,” says Williams. Weaned calves need the highest quality feed. Next would be pregnant heifers--and 2-year-olds that just weaned off calves. The 2-year-old winter is a critical time; these young cows are still growing and may be pulled down in body condition while nursing their first calves, and pregnant again. If they go into winter thin, they need to catch up in body condition so they can give birth to healthy calves and rebreed on time. Mature, dry cows can get by on lesser-quality forage

until late gestation. They don’t need as much protein or energy because they’re not growing or needing to gain weight. If cattle are in separate groups, you can feed the young or thin ones for growth or weight gain without overfeeding the whole herd. Feeding all cattle the same ration (or using your best pastures too soon with the whole herd) can be costly. Young/thin ones may not get as much as they need; older, bossier cows tend to eat more than their share of any hay or protein supplement. Adequate protein is crucial during the last 60 days of pregnancy for development of the unborn calf, and for the cow’s formulation of colostrum. Timely vaccination with a scour prevention vaccine needs to be administered at this time also, if scours are typically a problem in the herd. SPREAD ‘EM OUT - Having cattle at pasture through winter is healthiest for the cows and for their calves the next spring, rather than congregating them by feeding hay. When spread out over large areas, they are not exposed to as much fecal contamination; their intestinal tracts don’t get much buildup of E. coli and Clostridium perfringens, for instance, both of which can be transmitted later to newborn calves via manure. If you must feed hay, spread it out in large pastures and change feeding areas daily, rather than congregating cattle in small feeding areas or feeding day after day in the same area.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 29


Shows

The TLBAA World Show Steering Committee

Rules Of The Road…To World Show While not always popular, rules exist to try to create a level playing field for all involved. The TLBAA and TLBT are no exception. The TLBAA handbook has rules and guidelines that govern our shows. To keep the competition fair for all participants, it’s important that we know and follow the rules if we are a show chair, volunteer, exhibitor or anyone involved in any role during a TLBAA or TLBT show. Check back here with each issue for rule reminders and any updates. The TLBAA handbook is available as a downloadable pdf on our website: http://www.tlbaa.org/wp-content/ uploads/2016/03/TLBAA-HandbookJan-2015.pdf We would encourage you to go and download a copy right away. The rules for TLBAA and TLBT shows start on page 36. We also encourage you to review them on a regular basis. If there is a rule that you do not understand, or a rule that you think should be changed, please contact Pam Robison the Events and Sales Coordinator for The TLBAA at (817) 625-6241 ext 106, or pam@tlbaa.org. She will forward the questions or suggested changes to The World Show Steering Committee and one of us will get back with you as soon as possible. It is important to understand that any changes to the handbook must be approved by The TLBAA Board of Directors and will not take effect until the following show season, which begins at the conclusion of The TLBAA World Show and TLBT National Show each year. Here are a couple of rules that we will highlight this issue: Acceptance of Rules: “The presentation of a signed entry form by the exhibitor/owner shall be deemed acceptance of the Rules and Regulations and all other rules pertaining to a specific show. In the event of failure to sign an entry form, the first entry into the show ring of an animal owned by the exhibitor shall be deemed to be acceptance of the Rules and Regulations by the exhibitor/owner” (Page 49). This highlights the importance of knowing the rule. In short, it says that once you sign your entry, or enter the ring with an animal, you agree to abide by the rules. Grooming of Animals: “Exhibitors are encouraged to show their animals in a neat and clean condition. Washing, brushing, combing and trimming of excess hair is permitted. Hair must be brushed down and smooth without the use of adhesives, aerosol sprays or 30 | November 2018

agents that deter from the animal’s natural appearance. The tail switch is to be long and full without trimming or docking, and no balling or back combing of the trail switch is allowed. While trimming and clipping of the hair is permissible at shows , specifically prohibited are: (a) the use of grooming chutes and/or generators to aid in the clipping of hair on the premises of show locations; (b) the sanding, oiling and polishing of horns; (c) polishing of hooves; (d) use of neck sweats. Violations of these rules will be grounds for removal from competition by show management and forfeiture of all fees and World Show qualifications. Sprays or concentrates specifically formulated and sold as fly and/ or insect inhibitor or prohibitor are allowed to be applied to the hair. Show sheen administered from a pump spray bottle will be permitted”. Alteration Of Physical Features: “Alteration of an animal’s appearance by cosmetic and/ or surgical changes are deemed unethical and will be grounds for disqualification from the show and revocation of any World Show Qualification. Some examples are, but not limited to, the weighting of horns, banding, surgically altering of navel, dewlap or other skin areas, surgically altering knees or hocks, or injecting any substance under the skin or into any muscle (ie: steroids or growth implants of any kind)” Page 44. It is important to understand that if these rules are not followed at home or at any event – whether it is a TLBAA event or not – your animal could be disqualified from exhibiting at future TLBAA shows. As an example, if you have a neck sweat on your animal at home or at a county FFA type of event, that animal would be no longer eligible to show at a TLBAA or TLBT event Rules are not always fun, but unfortunately are always necessary to keep the competition fair. Enforcement of the Rules is no fun either. So, lets all work on understanding the rules that exist, and following them. If you do not agree with a rule, then get in contact with us to attempt to have it changed. Let’s keep the competition fair, follow the rules and have some fun! Check back each month for more discussion of the TLBAA show rules.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


SHOW RESULTS RODGER DAMROW PROGRESS SHOW July 14, 2018 YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 8: 1. BABY BELLE 929, LUCIE LAUTENSCHLAGER, PALMER, NE CLASS 9: 1. STAR LIGHT 617, GRACE STROMBERG, PALMER, NE 2. ANDERS MAPLE WINDS, Cash Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 10: 1. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE 2. ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 11: 1. SALTILLO SUPER LIZ 606, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE Youth Female Senior Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Grand Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 33: 1. ANDERS SILVER DOLLAR, DALLI ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Steer Grand Champion: ANDERS SILVER DOLLAR, DALLI ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE

20TH ANNUAL NEW MEXICO SHOW September 15, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

HORN, WY 2. FOLSOM FALLS JAYCEE, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM CLASS 19: 1. WINDY POINT SIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. NMFRHM 104 NINO, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Mature Female Champion: WINDY POINT SIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 3: 1. SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO HONEY OIL 811, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE Youth Female Junior Champion: OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 10: 1. TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Gage Burns, CORRALES, NM 2. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 11: 1. SR LADY JAM, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM 2. WYO SILVER, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Senior Champion: TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Gage Burns, CORRALES, NM Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Grand Champion: TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Gage Burns, CORRALES, NM Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SR LADY JAM, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO HONEY OIL 811, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

CLASS 19: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 20: 1. TH HAWK’S COMET, Andrew Montgomery, OCATE, NM

Haltered Female Junior Champion: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

Youth Bull Grand Champion: TH HAWK’S COMET, Andrew Montgomery, OCATE, NM Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 8: 1. LAREDO’S RED VICTORY, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM 2. BLC CLASSY, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM CLASS 10: 1. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 11: 1. BONNIE M-Z, Steven Zunker, DALE, TX 2. LAREDO’S DIAMOND JET, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM

CLASS 31: 1. PRINCE ROWDY MUDBERRY, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM CLASS 32: 1. FOLSOM FALLS NELSON, Rowan Bingham, ALBUQUERQUE, NM 2. THE PIANO MAN, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 33: 1. LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, CJ Lopez-Bailey, ALBUQUERQUE, NM

Haltered Female Senior Champion: LAREDO’S RED VICTORY, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Female Grand Champion: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 17: 1. AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. TH MISS CHA-VERRO, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: TH MISS CHA-VERRO, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION CLASS 23: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 24: 1. TH HAWK’S COMET, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: TH HAWK’S COMET, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 28: 1. LAREDO’S AWESOME WATSON, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Bull Senior Champion: LAREDO’S AWESOME WATSON, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Bull Grand Champion: LAREDO’S AWESOME WATSON, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TH HAWK’S COMET, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX

FREE FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 4: 1. WINDY POINT ANNIKA BUDDY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. RAFTER J2 RED RIVER ROSE, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX CLASS 5: 1. RAFTER J2 DATIL GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX 2. BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

Youth Steer Senior Champion: LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, CJ Lopez-Bailey, ALBUQUERQUE, NM Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS NELSON, Rowan Bingham, ALBUQUERQUE, NM Youth Steer Grand Champion: LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, CJ Lopez-Bailey, ALBUQUERQUE, NM Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS NELSON, Rowan Bingham, ALBUQUERQUE, NM

TROPHY STEER DIVISION CLASS 1: 1. LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM 2. BJM TOMAHAWK, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM CLASS 2: 1. FOLSOMS BIG ED, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM 2. KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM Steer Junior Champion: LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM Steer Junior Champion Reserve: FOLSOMS BIG ED, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM CLASS 5: 1. BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. DARK ROAST, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM CLASS 6: 1. FOLSOM FALLS BOB, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. PRL DOMINGO, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM Steer Senior Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Senior Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS BOB, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM Steer Grand Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Grand Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS BOB, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM

20TH ANNUAL NEW MEXICO SHOW #2 September 16, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 3: 1. SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SR BEACH GIRL, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX

Free Female Junior Champion: RAFTER J2 DATIL GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

Haltered Female Junior Champion: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: SR BEACH GIRL, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX

CLASS 8: 1. WINDY POINT DEMI BORIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 9: 1. FOLSOM FALLS SAMI 17, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. WINDY POINT LYNDA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 10: 1. TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX 2. BLC BUTTERCUP, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM CLASS 11: 1. WYO SILVER, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SR LADY JAM, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX

CLASS 8: 1. LAREDO’S RED VICTORY, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM 2. BLC CLASSY, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM CLASS 10: 1. TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX 2. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 11: 1. SR LADY JAM, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX 2. BONNIE M-Z, Steven Zunker, DALE, TX

Free Female Senior Champion: TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS SAMI 17, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM

Haltered Female Senior Champion: SR LADY JAM, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: LAREDO’S RED VICTORY, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Female Grand Champion: SR LADY JAM, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

Free Female Grand Champion: RAFTER J2 DATIL GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 17: 1. AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 16: 1. DIAMOND DOLLAR, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. WINDY POINT SANTUZZA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 17: 1. MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

Haltered Mature Female Champion: AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 23: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803,

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 31


SHOW RESULTS Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 24: 1. TH HAWK’S COMET, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: TH HAWK’S COMET, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 28: 1. LAREDO’S AWESOME WATSON, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Bull Senior Champion: LAREDO’S AWESOME WATSON, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Bull Grand Champion: LAREDO’S AWESOME WATSON, Denette Johnson, LOGAN, NM Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TH HAWK’S COMET, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX

FREE FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 4: 1. WINDY POINT ANNIKA BUDDY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. RAFTER J2 RED RIVER ROSE, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX CLASS 5: 1. BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. RAFTER J2 DATIL GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Female Junior Champion: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: RAFTER J2 DATIL GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX CLASS 8: 1. WINDY POINT DEMI BORIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 9: 1. FOLSOM FALLS SAMI 17, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. WINDY POINT LYNDA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 10: 1. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. BLC BUTTERCUP, Dustin & Candice Brewer, STANLEY, NM CLASS 11: 1. WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. WYO SILVER, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Senior Champion: WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Grand Champion: WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 16: 1. WINDY POINT SANTUZZA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 17: 1. MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SUPER SHERI 30, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 18: 1. TH MISS CHA-VERRO, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX CLASS 19: 1. WINDY POINT SIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. RVR LETTY ROSE, Steven Zunker, DALE, TX Free Mature Female Champion: MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: TH MISS CHA-VERRO, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 3: 1. SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO HONEY OIL 811, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Junior Champion: OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO FRECKLED AGIE, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE CLASS 10: 1. TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Andrew Montgomery, OCATE, NM 2. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE CLASS 11: 1. SR LADY JAM, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM 2. WYO SILVER, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Senior Champion: SR LADY JAM, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: TH SANGRIA EXPRESS, Andrew Montgomery, OCATE, NM Youth Female Grand Champion: SR LADY JAM, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH BULL DIVISION CLASS 19: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 20: 1. TH HAWK’S COMET, Andrew Montgomery, OCATE, NM Youth Bull Grand Champion: TH HAWK’S COMET, Andrew Montgomery, OCATE, NM Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH STEER DIVISION CLASS 31: 1. PRINCE ROWDY MUDBERRY, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM CLASS 32: 1. FOLSOM FALLS NELSON, Rowan Bingham, ALBUQUERQUE, NM 2. THE PIANO MAN, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 33: 1. LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, CJ Lopez-Bailey, ALBUQUERQUE, NM Youth Steer Grand Champion: LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, CJ Lopez-Bailey, ALBUQUERQUE, NM Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: PRINCE ROWDY MUDBERRY, Zoey Tompkins, TORREON, NM

TROPHY STEER DIVISION CLASS 1: 1. BJM TOMAHAWK, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM 2. LOREDOS AWESOME FRECKLES, Clay Bailey, Albaquerque, NM CLASS 2: 1. KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM 2. PREMIER CHIZM RQR, Mari and Mickey Quillman, RIBERA, NM Steer Junior Champion: KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM

32 | November 2018

Steer Junior Champion Reserve: PREMIER CHIZM RQR, Mari and Mickey Quillman, RIBERA, NM CLASS 5: 1. BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. DARK ROAST, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM CLASS 6: 1. FOLSOM FALLS DANDI, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM 2. FOLSOM FALLS BOB, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM Steer Senior Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Senior Champion Reserve: FOLSOM FALLS DANDI, Folsom Falls Ranch, MOUNTAINAIR, NM Steer Grand Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Grand Champion Reserve: KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM

TULSA STATE FAIR September 27, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 4: 1. ML FBG 81, Meers Longhorns, LAWTON, OK 2. DIAMOND Q NORA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 5: 1. DIAMOND Q CIANNA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. TLS ELVIRA, TL Longhorns, CLEBURNE, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: ML FBG 81, Meers Longhorns, LAWTON, OK Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q NORA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 8: 1. KINDA SWEET COWGIRL CPL, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK 2. BUBBAS SASSY CHEX, Tom & Jennifer Teel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 9: 1. BUENA VIDA’S CASABLANCA, Kalli Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX 2. MELODY OF A COWGIRL CPL, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 10: 1. DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. DIAMOND Q ZENA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 11: 1. DIAMOND Q LILLY MAE, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Female Senior Champion: BUENA VIDA’S CASABLANCA, Kalli Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: BUENA VIDA’S CASABLANCA, Kalli Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 16: 1. DIAMOND Q ZOEY, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 17: 1. DIAMOND Q DELILA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Mature Female Champion: DIAMOND Q ZOEY, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q DELILA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION CLASS 23: 1. ML MESSY 82, Meers Longhorns, LAWTON, OK 2. DIAMOND Q DAKOTA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Bull Junior Champion: ML MESSY 82, Meers Longhorns, LAWTON, OK Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q DAKOTA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 27: 1. TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, TL Longhorns, CLEBURNE, TX CLASS 28: 1. TIGER SUN, Hal Vogt, SPERRY, OK CLASS 29: 1. RCC CONCHO, Kourtis Family Farms, LLC, OWASSO, OK Haltered Bull Senior Champion: RCC CONCHO, Kourtis Family Farms, LLC, OWASSO, OK Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, TL Longhorns, CLEBURNE, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: RCC CONCHO, Kourtis Family Farms, LLC, OWASSO, OK Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, TL Longhorns, CLEBURNE, TX

FREE FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 4: 1. LRR BUBBAS MAGIC DIVA, Kylie Stowers, STILLWATER, OK 2. DIAMOND Q CHLOE, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Free Female Junior Champion: LRR BUBBAS MAGIC DIVA, Kylie Stowers, STILLWATER, OK Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q CHLOE, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 8: 1. SBL TWO TONE, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK CLASS 9: 1. LR MISS ROSEY, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK 2. SBL BROKE AND LONELY, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK CLASS 10: 1. DIAMOND Q SANDRIANNA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. SSRR DEEANNA, Tom & Jennifer Teel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 11: 1. SBL DIPSTICK, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK 2. AHEAVY CASANOVA, Walker Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Free Female Senior Champion: SBL DIPSTICK, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: LR MISS ROSEY, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK Free Female Grand Champion: SBL DIPSTICK, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: LR MISS ROSEY, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK CLASS 16: 1. MAGIC NIGHT OUT, Kylie Stowers, STILLWATER, OK 2. LR PRINCESS, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK CLASS 17: 1. DIAMOND Q WAKINA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. PROMISES BCB, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 18: 1. OCC BLACKMAIL, Walker Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK CLASS 19: 1. SBL DORY, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK 2. PCC MYSTERIOUS, Walker Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Free Mature Female Champion: DIAMOND Q WAKINA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: SBL DORY, Peter Grimm, TULSA, OK

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 4: 1. KF SALOON GIRL, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK 2. KF SHEZA BIZI BODY, Eliza Truel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 5: 1. DIAMOND Q CIANNA, Simon Lee Teel, SPERRY, OK 2. ANCHOR T AQUARIUS, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: KF SALOON GIRL, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: KF SHEZA BIZI BODY, Eliza Truel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 8: 1. FHR ANGEL JOY, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX 2. BUBBAS SASSY CHEX, Simon Lee Teel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 9: 1. JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. JCG ROXANNE, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 10: 1. DIAMOND Q CLORINDA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. DIAMOND Q ZENA, Simon Lee Teel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 11: 1. JCG SWEET CAROLINE, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. RS TIGER, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: JCG SWEET CAROLINE, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

Youth Steer Grand Champion: JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION CLASS 1: 1. WR DONALD, White Ranch, BLANCHARD, OK 2. D/O RAINEY, Simon Lee Teel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 2: 1. LR MOUSE, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK 2. LRR RESPECT ME MORE, Kylie Stowers, STILLWATER, OK Steer Junior Champion: LR MOUSE, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK Steer Junior Champion Reserve: LRR RESPECT ME MORE, Kylie Stowers, STILLWATER, OK CLASS 5: 1. D/O BLAZZIN SUNFIRE, Kasi & Justin Sifford, CLAREMORE, OK Steer Senior Champion: D/O BLAZZIN SUNFIRE, Kasi & Justin Sifford, CLAREMORE, OK Steer Grand Champion: D/O BLAZZIN SUNFIRE, Kasi & Justin Sifford, CLAREMORE, OK Steer Grand Champion Reserve: LR MOUSE, Locke Ranch, BRISTOW, OK

Youth Female Grand Champion: JCG SWEET CAROLINE, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

Attention Show Chairs!

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. ML MESSY 82, David J Hood, INDIAHOMA, OK 2. DIAMOND Q DAKOTA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 20: 1. DAUNTLESS SUMMER SAM, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. BZB TUFF MAN, Eliza Truel, SPERRY, OK CLASS 21: 1. TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ML MESSY 82, David J Hood, INDIAHOMA, OK

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. MCWOOZY CPL, Wyatt Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK 2. TWELVE VOLT COWBOY CPL, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 27: 1. VF SHORES OF TRIPOLI, Alissa Butler, DECATUR, TX 2. TTT S’MOORE, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: VF SHORES OF TRIPOLI, Alissa Butler, DECATUR, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: TTT S’MOORE, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 30: 1. TEXICAN ECR, Harrison Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX CLASS 31: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. BEDROCK ECR, Kalli Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX CLASS 32: 1. DG HAPPY POSSUM, Colton Wood, DECATUR, TX CLASS 33: 1. JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. JP FULL METAL JACKET, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX

Results are published once official results are received and verified as correct in the HORNS show management system. Please submit your official results to the TLBAA office as soon as possible to avoid a delay in being published in Trails Magazine and to ensure points are kept current. Please feel free to submit champion/Reserve Champion photos as well. Candids may be submitted to myra@tlbaa.org and may be used based on space available.

How Can I Get My Child Started Showing Longhorns? STEP 1 Unlike most other forms of showing livestock, showing Registered Texas Longhorns does not require a youth to own the animal that it shows. In order to prepare your child to walk into the show ring, first that child must be a junior member of the TLBAA (see membership form at left). Parents are not required to be members unless they choose to become Longhorn owners and be a part of the whole Longhorn experience.

If you already own your own Longhorns, there are camps and workshops you can attend, or maybe some private one-on-one with a Longhorn show person, to show you the ropes of halter breaking and working with your animal. If you are fortunate enough to purchase a halterbroken animal, maybe even one that has already shown, then talk to someone to understand the process of entering and attending a show to be prepared to make your debut.

STEP 2

STEP 4

Find a TLBAA Affiliate in your area. You can find a list of affiliates and their contacts on www.tlbaa.org. You may also look at the schedule of events page in the back of Trails Magazine or the calendar tab on the website to find a show near you to visit and meet Longhorn members.

Take advantage of information in Trails Magazine, www.tlbaa.org, affiliate activities and showmanship camps to broaden your knowledge and gain experience. Try to enter as many shows as you can, even if you don’t think you are doing well. Nothing can be done well without learning and practice.

STEP 3

STEP 5

Many breeders have animals that they would love to allow a youth to show. It may be possible for you to arrange to work with a breeder who shows and see if arrangements can be made for your child to learn from them and get their first show experience working with someone already familiar with the experience.

During all the steps above and beyond, have fun! Enjoy making new friends and watching your child build character, learn life lessons and develop skills that will help them throughout the rest of their life! Aim for the trophies but focus on the rewards of the journey.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 33


Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow

Presidents

Message

Hello TLBAA members! Winter is just right around the corner and what does that mean? It means Longhorn Weekend at the Fort Worth Stock Show is only two months away.   Also, our TLBT and TLBAA Longhorn show will take place the first weekend of the Fort Worth Stock Show. Anyone counting down? I definitely am! The Fort Worth Stock is my favorite show. The Watt Arena holds so many memories that fill my heart with so much joy. Now you all know what my favorite show is, but what is yours? Does anyone have that show they count down to? Or is it just me?   Well, TLBT members I hope to see you all there at the Fort Worth Stock Show. We will be holding one of our Annual Meetings there. I hope to hear all of y’all’s creative ideas!   Before I round this up, I have one question. Since Thanksgiving is coming up, what are you thankful for? What one thing makes you happier than anything else? I have something. That something is a breed, an association, and a family. That is the TLBT. TLBT members and breeders who support us kids, I am so thankful for such a loving group of people. There is never a time when I am anything less than excited to see you all at a show. I have no idea what I would do without all of you amazing people in my life! 

Gabby Curtis

[

FUN FACT

]

Did you know Lana Hightower field dresses and butchers her own game?

TLBT MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: 1.)How old are you? I am 17 years old. 2.)How long have you been in the TLBT? This is my second year in the TLBT. 3.)Why did you join the TLBT? I joined the TLBT because a friend of ours wanted to get me involved in something she loved so much! 4.) What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be an Agricultural Technician or work in ag retail sales so I can work directly with the farmers. 5.) What is your favorite show and why? My favorite show is Edna’s Winterfest! Last year this was the first time my heifer, Speckles, won her class, won reserve Junior Female, and I met some of the most amazing people! This is the show that made me fall in love with the TLBT! 6.)What is your favorite Longhorns name and why is he/she your favorite? My favorite Longhorns name is my heifer Speckles, she was the first cow that I

34 | November 2018

HANNAH SMITH got, so we have a strong bond! 7.) What do you think is the most important trait in a Longhorn and why? I like a female with a lot of volume and milk that has the ability to produce a beef market valued carcass through feeding and growth ability. 8.) What other things do you do besides showing Longhorns? Other than showing Longhorns, I show pigs and turkeys, I am the Vice President of Rouse FFA, I work at my local feed store, Hill Country feed, and I am the head of “GSD,” which is a leadership program within my youth group! 9.) Who is your role model? I have many role models in my life that all have taught me different things although, my parents are definitely at the top of that list. 10.) What is your favorite color and pattern on a Longhorn? My favorite color pattern is definitely the black and white speckled, but I also love the tricolor! 11.) What is your favorite food?  My favorite food is my moms meatloaf, but everything she makes is amazing.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

ASHLYN HOLSON

TLBT Office: Teen Director Age: 12 1.) Why did you join the TLBT? I joined the TLBT so I could start getting into knowing more about Longhorns and meeting more people. 2.) What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? My favorite Longhorn show is Autobahn because there is so much extra activities besides just showing Longhorns. 3.) What is your favorite Longhorn color and pattern? My favorite Longhorn colors are Gruella and the pattern brindle. 4.) Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? I earned my first award in the Abilene 2013 when I placed first in showmanship. 5.) What is your funniest TLBT moment? The funniest TLBT moment would be when Caroline, Clara, and I went into the cookie room and ate a lot of cookies at Autobahn. 6.) What has been your biggest challenge showing Longhorns? My biggest challenge with showing Longhorns would be striving to be the best in showmanship and working hard to get there. 7.) What is your favorite movie? The Miracle Season 8.) Do you enjoy showing Longhorns? Why? Yes, I really love showing Longhorns. There so many reasons, such as the friends you make and the bond you make with your Longhorns.

9.) What person has influenced you the most? Mrs. Betty Baker and Mr. John T Baker 10.) If you were going to be turned into a mythical creature, what would you want to be? I would want to be a Yeti. 11.) What is your favorite season? Why? Winter, because it sometimes snows, it’s Christmas, and it’s my birthday month. 12.) What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a surgical oncologist, so I can help people with cancer. 13.) What is the best part about being a TLBT member? The best part of being in the TLBT is making new friends and learning more about Longhorns. 14.) What is favorite quote? “Make your life a masterpiece; imagine no limitations on what you can be, have or do.” -Brian Tracy 15.) What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? I would say never give up on your goals when times get hard, to just keep going.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018| 35


Membership Matters

We LOVE To Give Promotional Memberships! On behalf of our members, the TLBAA offers a 90-day promotional membership to new Longhorn owners that also includes the Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine. When our members sell to new buyers, we send the new buyers a welcome packet with literature that will help them get started as a Longhorn Breeder. When offering a promotional membership, please let the new buyer know that we need these three things to accompany the transfers or registration applications.

1. NEW MEMBER’S NAME OR RANCH NAME (This will be the name printed on the Certificate of Registration). If it is a husband and wife, we need both names. Accurate spelling of names or ranch name is needed as many new members contact us to correct the spelling of their name.

HUMANE BLOODLESS DRUG FREE HORN L A REMOV

DELAYED CASTRATION

CALL FOR A DISTRIBUTOR NEAR YOU.

2. Accurate address, telephone & email information. 3. Payment must accompany the applications for Registrations & Transfers. At the end of the 90-day promotional membership period, an invitation will be sent to encourage the new breeder to join the TLBAA. Thanks to our great members, the TLBAA membership continues to grow! For questions, please contact Dana at (817) 625-6241 or dana@tlbaa.org.

36 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

EARLY CASTRATION

“THE CALLICRATE WEE BANDER IS WELL WORTH THE INVESTMENT.”

JOHN BLEVINS CALIFORNIA

800-858-5974

www.CallicrateBanders.com


Sale Results

FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS LONGHORN AUCTION RESULTS September 14 & 15, 2018 • Fort Worth, TX Sale Hosts: Hudson/Valentine Auctions Auctioneer: Bruce McCarty Sale Commentator: Dale Hunt Results submitted by H/V Auctions • Photos by Gary & Kristin Davis and Trace Neal

HIGHLIGHTS

1

2

3

4

Total Gross Sales:$968,925 • Selling 100 Head of Cattle

Volume Buyers: Bill and Judy Meridith Rex and Sherese Glendenning Richard and Jeanne Filip Bill and Elizabeth Hudson Larry and Toni Stegemoller

Tyson Leonard Karen Allen Bill and Suzanne Torkildsen Debbie Bowman Mike and Holly Davis

TOP SELLING FEMALES: 52,000

$

WPR DREAMCATCHER Consignor: Richard & Elizabeth Hudson • Buyer: Bill & Judy Meridith

44,500

$

RJF GOLDBRICKER Consignor: Richard & Jeanne Filip • Buyer: Bill & Judy Meridith

38,000

$

5

RJF DREAMMAKER Consignor: Richard & Jeanne Filip • Buyer: Bill & Judy Meridith

6

35,000

$

TCC DESIGNING LADY Consignor: Bill & Judy Meridith • Buyer: Richard & Jeanne Filip

30,000

$

HELM MISSY Consignor: Richard & Elizabeth Hudson • Buyer: Larry & Toni Stegemoller

9

13

10

14

7

11

15

8

12

16

1. John & Debra Helm, Helm Cattle Co. 2. 2018 Sale Catalog. 3. Sale Hosts Lorinda Valentine, Bill & Elizabeth Hudson with Sale Sponsors Richard & Jeanne Filip, Bentwood Ranch. 4. Friday’s Informative Cattle Seminar. 5. Joe & Mary Ann Cunningham, XC Longhorns. 6. Sale Hosts with Sale Sponsors and High Selling Lot Buyers Bill & Judy Meridith. 7. Ron Bailey, FMB Land & Cattle; Phil Norwood, R3 Hilltop Ranch. 8. Full house on sale day. 9. Keith Hagler, Debra & Edwin Stojanik and Dale Metz. 10. Devin Graves & Jen Cunningham, GFT Longhorns. 11. Fun for the whole family. 12. Don & Kori Goodwin, D&K Cattle Co; Cheyenne Phillips & Clint Hatch. 13. Derick & Claudia Schaefer, Grün Ranch. 14. Remy Broussard & Lauren Hawkins, Bar79. 15. Graham Pierce, Ardor Wood Farm, Karen Knight, Katy & Charlie Nolen, Rafter N Ranch. 16. Jim & Barb Steffler, Shamrock Valley Ranch.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 37


Membership Matters

TLBAA Brands And Private Herd Numbers The TLBAA requires that each animal registered have a private herd number and a holding brand. Your registration certificate application contains a space for these brands as well as the location of the brands on the animal, i.e. right hip, left hip, left shoulder, etc. The TLBAA does not require that your holding brand  be  registered with your state agency; however, we recommend that you check with your state to be sure you area in accordance with the laws there in. Registering your brand with the TLBAA does not get your brand registered in your state. Registration of brands varies from state to state. In  Texas,  you must register your brand at your county clerk’s office. In Mississippi, brands should be registered with the Brands Registrar with the Bureau of the Highway Patrol. Check with your local veterinarian, state cattleman’s association or your county extension agent to locate the agency that registers brands. Also ask them how often your brand must be renewed. The Private Herd number, or PH number, as it is more commonly called, is often misunderstood. While it is required for all registered animals, the TLBAA office does not assign these numbers. The PH number is your own personal  identification system to assist you in keeping each individual animal’s records. Any system can be used. A common practice is the

“Three Numeral System”. The first number is usually the last numeral of the year (9 for 2009, for example). The next two numbers are usually in sequence of the arrival of the offspring. For instance, the first calf born in the year 2009 could be numbered 901. With a simple odd/even number modification, a breeder can add more information to his PH numbering system. A common method is to assign bull calves odd numbers and heifer calves even numbers. For instance, a PH number of 903 could tell a breeder that the animal number he is referring to is the third  offspring bull calf born in 2009. The third female offspring would  be  904. Roman numerals or letters of the alphabet are not accepted for use as private herd numbers. The PH number is the animal’s permanent number and cannot be changed. The number must be branded on the animal, along with the breeder’s holding brand, before application is submitted to the TLBAA office for registration. A breeder is not allowed to duplicate the same number on two different animals within the same herd. Anyone requiring assistance with a PH numbering system should contact the TLBAA office for assistance. If you have made an error in assigning a PH number, you can get assistance from the office in correcting the problem.

HUSKY BRANDING IRONS BRANDIN

If yo your electric brand w not stay hot in will cold or windy weather, get a Husky.

We Guarantee Ours O Will Stay Hot

1 Letter/Figure_____120.00 2 Letter/Figure_____130.00 3 Letter/Figure_____140.00 Plus shipping * All Electric Brands Shipped in 24 Hours.

P.O. Box 460 • Knoxville, AR 72845 800/222-9628 • Fax 800/267-4055 • Text# 479/647-0381 www.huskybrandingirons.com huskybrandingirons@yahoo.com

We hope to see you in January for Longhorn Weekend! See inside front cover for details or go to www.tlbaa.org 38 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Sale Results

PINEYWOODS MARKETING LONGHORN SALE September 22, 2018 • West, TX Sale Hosts: Keith Du Bose & Russell Fairchild Auctioneer: Joel Lemley Sale Commentator: Russell Fairchild Submitted by Keith DuBose Photos by Rick Fritsche

This kind of marketing sale had been discussed through the industry for some time now and has always been felt as needed for the breeders. That is why we brought about a sale to help all Longhorn breeders market their cattle and present them several different avenues and options for marketing their longhorn cattle. We were able to tap into several markets: • • • • • •

New buyers who got some starter cattle to start their herds People who are wanted to put different bloodlines and new cattle in their existing programs Breeders that were looking for recip cattle for their Embryo program, wanting to have calves born and raised by Longhorn mothers Beef program breeders to purchase some Longhorns for their grass fed, lean beef programs Recreational buyers who were looking for roping stock Commercial buyers

We tried to make this sale one that helped breeders market their cattle, at low consignment fees to the sellers, to try and bring fair prices to the buyers and sellers, and a unique opportunity for all breeders to get together and “Swap some Stock” in West, Texas. We would have liked to see higher prices on the cattle, but felt we had achieved the goals of getting more options for breeders to market their cattle. The cattle, including ropers, sold from $225.00 to $1,900.00, and considering the drought, no grass, high prices and shortages on hay and the outbreak of armyworms, we felt the sale was a success. We had lots of positive feedback and have scheduled the second sale at a new venue, Will Rogers in Fort Worth on March 23, 2019. Mark your calendars for a fun filed and exciting weekend in the spring.

Do you receive our weekly E-Trails newsletter? No? Then simply go to www.tlbaa.org to sign up today. Having trouble with the sign up? Just call Myra at 817.625.6241 x 104

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 39


AFFILIATE NEWS

AFFILIATE UPDATES The NTLA’s 38th annual sale will be held in the spring, May 18, 2019 at the Beatrice Livestock Auction in Beatrice, NE. Beatrice is located about 25 miles north of the Kansas state line. The sale barn is easy to find, directly off of Hwy 77. Our sale will be featured live on Hired Hand this year. Accepting consignments now at a reasonable price. Consign early for extra PAUL SCHLECHT advertising. Sale Contacts: President-Paul Schlecht (402)719-7317, Justin PRESIDENT 402-719-7317 Georges (402)580-0209, Consignments-Bonnie Damrow (402-580-3673 brdamrow6@aol.com. The first year of the “From the Mountains to the Plains Circuit” has come to an end of its season. Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico Affiliates joined together in 2018 at their respective State Fair longhorn world qualifying shows to make this a success. They compiled points at each show and awards were received to the high placings in Halter and Open Shows. If you would like to be a part of this in 2019 feel free to contact Presidents from these Affiliates or Nebraska’s poc-Justin Georges-(402) 580-0209. Check out the NTLA website for past and future events of our association: www.nebraskatla.com.

NEBRASKA TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

It’s show season for the South Texas Longhorn Association! The STLA is getting geared up for this year shows starting with a brand-new venue. This will be the first Longhorn Show to ever be produced in Beautiful Llano Texas. The STLA is proud to be a part of this new venue and not only will it be an outstanding show, it comes complete with a Chuck JEREMY JOHNSON Wagon Cook-off, a PRCA bull riding event, an art show, and BBQ cook-off. PRESIDENT The Western Weekend kicks off on October 19th and runs through the 21st DOSNINOSRANCH@GMAIL.COM at the John L Kuykendall Arena located at 2200 W Ranch Rd 152, Llano, Texas. That Friday night will be a youth points only show. The following morning will be an open haltered show followed by a non-haltered show and a miniature longhorn show. During the day there will be a cookie judging contest and best Halloween mask contest. After the non-haltered show get your boots dusted off and grab a good seat for the Extreme Bull Riding competition. Tickets will be available on site. The next morning (Sunday) will be another youth show for prize money and awards. Contact Bubba Bollier at 325-247-6249 or Sandi Nordhausen at 512-750-1350 for more information. You can also visit the Llano Chamber of Commerce website at llanochamber.org for other events around town that weekend. Next on schedule will be the STLA Winterfest Weekend and Futurity. This continued event will take place on December 7th and run through the 9th in Edna Texas. this also will be a points only event on that Friday night follow the next day be an open show, another youth show, miniature Longhorn show, and a non-haltered show. There will be an ugly sweater contest during the day. Sunday will be our third year to host a futurity. This event is different from a regular show because each animal that is entered will be judged by five judges. Once the animal is judged, then the high score and low score is thrown out. Then awards and cash are given at the end of the event for the most points for each animal in each class. For more information on this event you can contact Merrilou Russell at 361-781-4221 or Jeremy Johnson for the futurity at 210-413-2105. Rolling on down the road will be the STLA San Antonio Stock Show. This year the show dates are February 8th and 9th. This show usually has an early deadline of about December 9th. So if your interested in getting entered in this show you can look up San Antonio Stock Show on the web and get more current information there. Because this is a much bigger venue and the STLA is only involved in the Longhorn Show, everything has to be entered by internet and through the San Antonio web site. We as the STLA have very little involvement in the entry level. But if you do have questions about this event you can contact Jeremy Johnson at 210-413-2105. The STLA will also be hosting the Austin show in March. Kathy Bruner is the chairperson for this show. Her contact is 512-689-8624. Deadline for this show will be February 1, 2019. The show will be held on March 19, 2019. This show includes a youth show, open haltered show, miniature longhorn show, and a non-haltered show. Our final show of the season will be the Rockdale show. This show always brings a lot of cattle out for show. Sandi has done this show for a long time and each year it gets better and bigger. Those dates will be April 26, 27, and 28th. If you have questions you can contact Sandi Nordhausen at 512-750-1350. All information here or questions about any of these events you can check us out at stla.org.

SOUTH TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

40 | November 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


The 20th Annual TLBAA World Qualifying Texas Longhorn Show was held at the NM State Fair in Albuquerque, NM, held on September 15 & 16, 2018. These were two separate qualifying shows and they were both a great success. This year’s show tripled in size and there were a few challenges but THANKS to all the hard work of our Show Chairman and TLBNM President, DUSTIN BREWER Dustin Brewer, and ALL the volunteers who helped in the arena, the alley and PRESIDENT 505-660-3061 at the judge’s table, we made it through. Show Chairman, Dustin Brewer; Show Secretary, Terry Whalen; Youth Secretary, Judy Urbantke Saturday, the judge was Ryan Cullpeper and Sunday, the judge was Russell Fairchild. Each were wonderful judges and gave particular attention to our youth exhibitors and it was much appreciated both by the youth and the parents. Their dedication to the breed and the exhibitors was evident and we were fortunate to have them. Both shows were a big success and the youth shows were fantastic. We had six from NM, three from NE and one from WY. None of the NM youth had ever shown in an Official Youth Show and three of them had never handled a longhorn on halter. Most of the youth had their own longhorns but the three new members didn’t. Had it not been for Dennis and Judy Urbantke and Steven & Ruby Retaloff, both from San Angelo, TX, some of our youth would not have had the opportunity to show. They graciously provided the halter animals and on Friday before the show the kids were introduced to the longhorns and allowed to work with and choose which one they would show. Not having any experience in youth shows I needed help. Judy Urbantke graciously volunteered and we couldn’t have done it without her. Thank you all for being there for the youth exhibitors.

TEXAS LONGHORN BREEDERS OF NEW MEXICO

The Grand Champion Results:

Haltered Female: Saturday – Old Faithful shown by Toby Johnson from Big Horn, WY Sunday – SR Lady Jam shown by Steven & Judy Retzloff from San Angelo, TX Haltered Mature Female: Saturday & Sunday – Aunt Jemima shown by Ryan Johnson from Big Horn, WY Haltered Bull: Saturday & Sunday – Aunt Jemima shown by Denette Johnson from Logan, NM Non-Haltered Female: Saturday – Rafter J2 Datil Girl shown by Sylvia Johnson from Anthony, NM Sunday – Windy Point Anna Jamin shown by Lana Pearson from Fowler, CO Non-Haltered Mature Female: Saturday – Windy Point Sis shown by Lana Pearson from Fowler, CO Sunday – Mandolin Rain shown by Kris Johnson from Big Horn, WY Trophy Steer: Saturday & Sunday – Jim Reeves shown by Toby Johnson from Big Horn, WY

Youth Grand Champion Results: Haltered Female: Saturday – TH Sangria Express, owned by Dennis & Judy Urbantke and shown by Gage Burns from Corrales, NM Sunday – TH Sangria Express, owned by Dennis & Judy Urbantke and shown by Andrew Montgomery from Ocate, NM Haltered Bull: Saturday & Sunday – TH Hawk’s Comet, owned by Dennis & Judy Urbantke and shown by Andrew Montgomery from Ocate, NM Trophy Steer: Saturday & Sunday – Laredo’s Awesome Freckles owned by Clay & Raina Bailey and shown by CJ Bailey from Albuquerque, NM This was the last show in the Mountains to the Plains circuit and we had exhibitors from Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Texas and New Mexico. It was awesome to have all these states represented. It is always great to meet new longhorn enthusiasts and see old friends. Everyone was amazing and so were their longhorns. Toby Johnson of Big Horn, WY took Premier Halter, Bull, Trophy Steer and Breeder. Lana Pearson of Fowler, CO took Premier NonHalter. NOT TO BE OVERLOOKED, we all owe a Special THANK YOU to Fred & Marijo Balmer and Clay & Raina Bailey for having their riding steers, 16-year-old Bob, 11-yearold Festus, 9-year-old Domingo and 3 ½-year-old Bart and 3-year-old Domino in the Dairy Barn for the full 11 days of the fair. This is what you call going that extra mile for the breed. This not only promotes and educates but it brought a lot of spectators back to the fair to see the shows. We would also like to THANK all the Exhibitors for bringing their magnificent longhorns, the Sponsors for their support and to Spectators for their enthusiasm and appreciation.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 41


NEWS On the Trail...

Dickinson Publishes New Book Submitted by Darol Dickinson Barnesville, OH -- HORN STEW, the book, contains 42 moving histories about people who loved their cattle and horses way beyond normal sensibility — enough that a level-headed psychotherapist could go bonkers trying to straighten them out. You will find personalities with bold enchantment and die-for devotion to breed extraordinary genetics — folks like Walter Merrick, Carl Miles, Hank Wiescamp, Frank Vessels, Johnny Cash, Sam Partlow, F.M. Graves, Audie Murphy, Sid Vail, Charlie Dees, Cecil Dobbin, Frank Doherty, and Fennel “Impressive” Brown. Savor the testimony of Michael Mulberger who gave up a $36,000,000 fortune to be a street preacher in Arizona. HORN STEW is exactly like the earlier Dickinson book FILLET OF HORN, except totally different. HORN STEW doesn’t have a semi-load of cattle rustlers and crooks, but replaces them with some bigger-than-life, colorful, business tycoons. These interesting actors had certain things in common: drive-your-wife-crazy chance-taking , the $317 bull that sold for $1,000,000, and such a love for great livestock that multi-millionaires even slept in the barn for years, with their livestock, to protect their investments. You will picture the excitement of finding semi-coherent, famished swamp cattle with million-dollar genetics -- unknowingly wanting to be rescued, become pampered and highly appreciated. Sense the thrill as they are acquired by risk and stealth. Watch them step off the truck, at home, forever admired, and soon to be highly valuable. Study the inner workings of a conniving Tulsa police detective apply his most devious brilliance to win Quarter Horse Championships at the highest levels. Watch my dad fulfill his dreams, from a little boy picking cotton on a sharecropper’s farm to building the first railroad tracks across the Mojave desert, to breeding and exhibiting a pasture full of World Champions. Learn to understand the legendary horseman Henry J. Wiescamp, a personal side combined with an energetic business mind of unbelievable depth and chicanery. In the end, learn the three ingenious common denominators of every great and highly successful livestock producer — by just reading on to the next chapter. Watch famous business men make good and bad decisions which is solid information for everyone. HORN STEW, 215 pages, 152 illustrations, available from Fillet Of Horn Publishing, 35000 Muskrat Pike, Barnesville, OH 43713. Mail orders $24.95 plus $3 for postage. On line click https://head2tail.com/product/horn-stew/. Cooked horn will make your bifocals steam over -- come and get it.

Children’s Book Inspired by World’s Longest Horned Bull

The anti-bullying book written by Author Tracy Blom after seeing Guiness World Record holder Cowboy Tuff Chex.

42 | November 2018

Children’s author Tracy Blom was inspired to write her anti-bullying story “One Big Bully” featuring horned cattle after seeing the Guinness world record holding Cowboy Tuff Chex. She approached Richard & Jeanne Filip of Bentwood Ranch for permission to feature their bull in the book and they were delighted. She appeared recently at the Hudson-Valentine Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction to promote the book. During an interview about the process in choosing Longhorns, it was agreed that the use of the bull was fitting as an example since despite his large horns he is really a sweetheart. How do long horns play into the story? For that you’ll have to read the book. The book can be ordered on Amazon.com.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


ALABAMA

ARKANSAS

COLORADO

KANSAS

FLORIDA

LOUISIANA CALIFORNIA

INDIANA

MISSOURI

44 | November 2018

IOWA

MONTANA

KANSAS

NORTH CAROLINA

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


OKLAHOMA

PENNSYLVANIA

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

WEST TEXAS SOUTHEAST TEXAS CANADA ALBERTA

OREGON

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 45


Classifieds Auctioneers

NOVEMBER

TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

Herd Management Guide

SPRING Calving:

Cattle For Sale BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS - Est. 1995. Conformation, color, disposition, pedigree and HORNS.  Reasonable prices.  Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK.  580 765-9961 (calls only) or email cmuchmor@ poncacity.net. www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

This Fall Will Be Filled With Excitement at Both Flying D Locations!

At the ranch, excellent show prospects are ready to begin prepping for the new show season. Great selection! Meanwhile, be assured the same big, gentle trophy steers, bulls, cows and heifers will be available at both ranches.

For information or to schedule a tour at either of our ranch locations, please call: Dorie Damuth - Flying D Longhorn Ranch 40206 Community Rd. • Magnolia, TX 77354 281-356-8167 • fax: 281-356-2751 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com Scott Damuth, Legal Counsel • Shery Damuth, Vineyard Consultant sdamuth@damuthlaw.com • Gun Barrel City, TX Law office: 903-887-0088 • Fax: 903-887-2925 Scott Cell: 214-546-3681 • Shery Cell: 940-393-0991

BUTLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR BIG-HORNED BUTLER CATTLE.

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

www.lonewolfranch.net Trade & Barter TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380. 46 | November 2018

1. As fall approaches and warm season grasses become dormant, realize that the protein and energy values of your pastures will decrease below levels necessary to satisfy nutritional requirements of pregnant females entering the last third of their pregnancy. Feed pregnant mature females to consume adequate energy, protein, minerals and vitamins prior to calving. If pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing or poor rainfall during the summer, then energy is your first concern. Feeding a medium (8-10 percent crude protein) to high quality (15-17 percent crude protein) hay free choice will provide an excellent source of energy for the females. If pasture grass is plentiful, but dormant and poor in quality, then protein is generally your first concern. Assuming that your cows are in good body condition, feeding low levels of a high crude protein supplement (32-40 percent crude protein) is your best alternative. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20 percent crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. If winter pasture or cool season variety grasses are available, then the females should not need additional energy or protein supplementation. A source of salt as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. 2. Evaluate the growth of your bred heifers. The goal should be to have your bred heifers weigh 85 percent of their mature weight, including the weight of the fetus, prior to calving at 23-25 months of age. Because of this threshold weight, bred heifers should be fed to gain a minimum of one pound per day. 3. Consider controlling internal and external parasites. Treating internal parasites as well as lice infestations are important management decisions.

FALL Calving: 1. Continue the feeding program begun in October. The nutrient requirements for energy, protein, minerals and vitamins of lactating females increase substantially. During the first 3-4 months of lactation, a 1000 pound cow with average milking ability (producing 10 pounds of milk daily) requires 11.5 pounds of energy, 2 lbs. of protein, 0.06 pounds of cal-

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

cium, 0.05 pounds of phosphorus and 36,000 international units of vitamin A per day. Make sure that your females are receiving adequate nutrition so that they will cycle at the first of the breeding season. Feeding 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent CP supplement, 4-6 pounds of a 30 percent CP supplement or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement per head per day should be adequate to meet most protein and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement (20 percent CP, 30 percent CP or 40 percent CP) should be based upon cheapest source of protein. Price per pound of protein may be determined by dividing the cost per pound of protein supplement by the percentage of crude protein in the supplement. A source of salt as well as a good commercial calcium: phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A should be available on a free choice basis. If your cows are thin in body condition, then feeding supplemental hay plus higher levels of a low crude protein, high energy range cube (20 percent crude protein) will provide increased intake of vital nutrients. Young, lactating females have 20-25 percent greater supplemental needs than mature cows. 2. Provide supplemental feed for bulls grazing dry, dormant range grass according to age and condition of the bulls: (a) feed mature bulls 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent crude protein range cube daily; (b) feed young bulls 8-10 pounds of a high energy, 20 percent crude protein cattle cube daily, and (c) supplement additional feed as necessary to keep bulls in good body condition as breeding season approaches. 3. If not already completed, conduct breeding soundness exams and fertility checks on all bulls prior to the breeding season. 4. Typically first calving females require 20 to 30 days longer to return to estrus or heat after calving than mature cows. As a result, begin breeding your replacement heifers 20 to 30 days before the rest of the cow herd. This management practice will allow the first-calf heifers additional time to return to estrus so that they can be bred following calving next year with the remainder of the cow herd. 5. Consider controlling internal and external parasites. Treating internal parasites as well as lice infestations are important management decisions.


Advertising Index —A—

—J—

AA Longhorns............................................. 44

Joe Chute..................................................... 21

A & S Land & Cattle.....................................45

J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................45

American Livestock.....................................34

—K—

Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...........................9

King, Terry & Tammy.................................. 44

Arch Acres.................................................... 44

Kourtis Family Farms LLC...........................45

Astera Meadows..........................................45

—L—

—B— Bar H Ranch................................................. 44 Beadle Land & Cattle............................. 9, 44 Big Valley Longhorns................................. 44 BPT Longhorns..............................................9 Bright Futures........................................35, 43 Broken Spur Ranch.................................... 44 Buckhorn Cattle Co....................................45 Butler Listings.................................................9 Butler Longhorn Museum...........................9

Lemley Auction Services............................ 11 Lightning Longhorns..................................45

Longhorn Sale Pen......................................36 Lucas Ranch................................................ 44 — M— McLeod Ranch...............................................9

Northbrook Cattle Company....................45

Callicrate Banders.......................................36

— P—

Cattle Baron’s Premier Longhorn Sale..... 7

P&C Cattle Pens..........................................19

CedarView Ranch....................................... 44

Pineywoods Longhorn Sale......................22

Champion Genetics................................... 38

—R—

Christa Cattle Co...........................................9

R 3 Hilltop Ranch........................................ 38

Circle Double J Ranch...............................23

Rio Vista Ranch..............................................9

—D—

Rockin Hil Longhorns................................ 44

Dalgood Longhorns......................................9

Rockin I Longhorns.....................................45

DCCI Equipment.........................................18

Rocking P Longhorns...................................9

Double A Longhorns................................. 44 Dube Chutes............................................... 20 —E— El Coyote Ranch............................................ 1 —F— Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction.....3 Four Color Press......................................... 38

Send your photo with caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 6030 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Photo may be used in a future issue due to number of responses

Lone Wolf Ranch.........................................45

Caballo Bravo Longhorns......................... 44

DK Longhorn Ranch.................................. 44

Send us your photo with a funny caption included!

Lodge Creek Longhorns........................... 44

— N—

Dickinson Cattle Co...................................BC

HAVE A CUTE PIC?

Little Ace Cattle Co...................................... 9

—C—

Diamond Q Longhorns..............................45

JUST FOR GRINS

“Hey Ma, could I sweet talk you into standing up?” Thanks to John Stein, Bulverde, TX, for the submission.

—V — Varner Farms, LLC...................................... 44 —W — Walker, Ron...................................................45

Rocky Mountain Longhorns.................... 44

Westfarms Inc................................................9

Rolling D Ranch.......................................... 44

WI Longhorns & Leather............................45

Running Arrow Longhorns........................36

Wichita Fence Company...........................18

—S— Safari B Ranch..............................................45 Sand Hills Ranch......................................... 44 Singing Coyote Ranch...............................45 SS Longhorns...............................................45 Star Creek Ranch.................................... 5, 45

Flying Diamond Ranch.............................. 44

Struthoff Ranch............................................45

—G—

—T—

Grün Ranch..................................................23

Thate Cattle Co.............................................9

—H—

TLBAA Longhorn Weekend..................... IFC

Helm Cattle Co............................................45

Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9

Hickman Longhorns...................................45

Triple S Bar Ranch.......................................45

Hired Hand Software..................................29

TS Adcock Longhorns................................45

UPCOMING ISSUES: December: TLBAA Horn Showcase January: Cash Cows February: Herd Sire Edition

Husky Branding Irons................................ 38

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 47


SAVE THE DATE NOVEMBER 2018 NOVEMBER 2-4 • Heart of Texas Fall Show & Sale, Circle T Resort & Arena, Hamilton, TX. Entry deadline October 12th. Contact Cori Garcia at rafter-mranch@hughes.net or 479-381-8331. Qualifying Haltered, & Youth. Trophy Steers. Miniatures. Go For The Purple Show Sale, Nov. 2 at 5 pm. For more info go to www.heartoftexaslonghorns.com NOVEMBER 10 • Texas Longhorn Fall Select Production, Consignment & Ranch Horse Sale, Crossroads Centre, Oyen, AB. Ron Walker, 403-548-6684, Cell 403528-0200, walkersu7texaslonghorns@gmail.com, www.walkerslonghorns.com NOVEMBER 10-11 • State Fair of Louisiana, Fairgrounds, Shreveport, LA. Entry deadline TBA. Contact Jessica Wade at 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo. com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Trophy Steers. NOVEMBER 16-18 • Kaufman Police Association Longhorn Show, Henderson County Fairgrounds, Athens, TX. Entry Deadline Novemeber 2, 2018. Joel Norris (972) 533-4945 or joel1983@embarqmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Trophy Steers. Miniatures.

DECEMBER 2018 DECEMBER 7-9 • Edna Winterfest Weekend & Futurity, Breckenridge Event Center, Edna, TX. Merrilou Russell 361-781-4221 or crose@cactusroselonghorns. com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, and Youth. Trophy Steers. Miniatures. DECEMBER 14-16 • NTLBA Holiday Longhorn Extravaganza, Wise County Fair Grounds, Decator, TX. Entry Deadline November 26, 2018. Dr. Justin Sabio 940902-3244 or drjustinsabio@gmail.com. Youth Points Only, Haltered & Youth.

JANUARY 2019 JANUARY 18-22 • TLBAA Longhorn Weekend, Fort Worth, TX. Pam Robison (817) 625-6241 x 106 or pam@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org • January 18 - Affiliate Meeting, TLBAA General Membership Meeting, TLBAA Board Meeting & Election of Officers, TLBF Hall of Fame & TLBAA Year-End Awards Banquet • January 19 - Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale • January 20 - TLBT Meeting

TEXAS LONGHORN

Coming Events

MARCH 16 • STLA Rodeo Austin, Austin, TX. Entry Deadline February 1, 2019. Kathy Bruner 512-689-8624 or kathy@therockingbranch.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, Trophy Steers & Miniatures. MARCH 22-24 • OTLA Spring Shoot-Out, Payne County Expo Center, Stillwater, OK. Entry Deadline March 8, 2019. Submit entries to Mary Fowler, 345328 E. 1070 Rd., Meeker, OK 74855.. Contact David Edwards at 918-557-0364 or dledwards. texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Trophy Steers, & Youth. MARCH 23 • Pineywoods Marketing Texas Longhorn Sale,Will Rogers Memorial Center, West Sales Arena, Fort Worth, TX. Contact: Russell Fairchild 254-4853434 , Keith DuBose 979-277-2161 or Joel Lemley 325-668-3552. MARCH 28-31 • Texoma Spring Classic,Red River Sale Barn, Overbrook, OK. Sale hosts: Bob & Pam Loomis, Dale Hunt & Sherrill Caddell, and Chris & Christina Clark. Contact: Dale Hunt 402-214-4851 or Chase Vasut 512-917-8654.

APRIL 2019 APRIL 12-14 • Heart Of Texas Dash For Cash Spring Show, Circle T Resort & Arena, Hamilton, TX. Entry Deadline March 29th. Send entries to Cori Garcia 12439 County Rd. 209, Hico, TX, 76457. Contact Cori Garcia at rafter-m-ranch@ hughes.net or 479-381-8331. Qualifying Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Miniatures. APRIL 27 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com

MAY 2019 MAY 3-5 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Entry Deadline April 23, 2019. Stephen Head 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Miniatures. MAY 10-11 • Millennium Futurity, Glen Rose, TX. Entry forms available at www.millenniumfuturity.com. Christy Randolph 713-703-8458 or lpinesranch@aol.com MAY 18 • Nebraska Texas Longhorn Association Sale, Beatrice, NE. Contacts: Pres. Paul Schlecht 402-719-7317 / Justin Georges 402-580-0209. Consignments: brdamrow6@aol.com MAY 24-27 • Blue Grass Classic Sale & Futurity, Lexington, Kentucky. Bruce McCarty Promotions, www.brucemccarty.com

• January 21 - Fort Worth Stock Show Youth Show • January 22 - Fort Worth Stock Show Open Longhorn Show

SEPTEMBER 2019

JANUARY 25-26 • National Western Stock Show, Stock Show Complex, Denver, CO. Kenny Richardson 970-352-3054 or krichardson@aol.com.Qualifying Free, Haltered and Youth.

SEPTEMBER 20-21 • Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction, Fort Worth, TX. Contact Lorinda Valentine, panthercreekranch@att.net or 270-996-7046.

FEBRUARY 2019 FEBRUARY 15-17 • San Angelo Stock Show, San Angelo Fairgrounds, San Angelo, TX. Entry Deeadline January 10, 2019. Dennis Urbantke (325) 656-9321 or dennis @ thlonghorns.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth, Youth Points Only, Trophy Steers. FEBRUARY 22-23 • Cattle Baron Premier Longhorn Sale & Winchester Futurity, Navasota, Texas. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259, Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com or www.TLBGCA.com

MARCH 2019 MARCH 8-10 • Sulphur Spring “Premium” Spring Show, Hopkins County Civic Center, Sulpjur Springs, TX. John & Brenda Oliver, 972-268-0083, joliver210@ yahoo.com or brenda@olivermfg.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Youth Points Only, Trophy Steers.

48 | November 2018

Affiliates: Please submit a completed show application to pam@tlbaa.org in order to have your TLBAA World Qualifying show listed. All other events, sales, field days or other activities may email your information directly to myra@tlbaa.org.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

November 2018 | 1


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27

Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

November 2018 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

November 2018 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America