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COVER STORIES HERD SIRE EDITION 12

Considering Herd Sires There’s more to a herd sire than buying a bull

18

Winter Bull Maintenance For Breeding Success

and turning him out with cows. By Myra Basham

February 2020 Vol. 31 • No. 11

Things you need to know to keep your bull at his best for breeding season. By Heather Smith Thomas

DEPARTMENTS 6

Editor’s Note

8

Board of Directors

22 30

44

Predicting Bull Fertility

Affiliate News

Understanding the Bull Soundness Exam. Courtesy of Virginia Cooperative Extension Services

Body and Background: Photos As A Marketing Tool Elements you need to consider when taking photos that will market your

program. By Myra Basham

45

News On The Trail

46

In The Pen

48

TLBT Page

50

FEATURES

Show Results

36

Beef Committee Expands Reach Via Social Media

38

Opportunities For Everyone To Participate In Longhorn Activities

52

Breeders Guide

55

Index/Just For Grins

56

Calendar

About the Cover: Lynn & Josie Struthoff of Struthoff Ranch are proud to present their herd sire,

a 2016 TLBAA Horn Showcase TTT, Composite Bronze, Superior Award Winner and 2019 TLBAA Horn Showcase Get Of Sire Award Winner, SR Clout 466, along with his award-winning offspring: (top left-bottom right) :

SR Clout’s Adele 725 dob (4/1/2017) – Feb 9, 2018 - San Antonio Stock Show Reserve Grand Champion Non-Haltered and 1st Place Non-Haltered. Feb 23,2018 Winchester Futurity Navasota, TX 1st Place Class 1, Oct 6, 2018 – TLBAA 1st Place Futurity Class 4, Superior Award Winner, May 11, 2019 – Millennium Futurity 1st place Class 14 and Millennium Futurity Grand Champion Heifer. Oct 5, 2019 TLBAA Superior Award winner. SR Three Eights 888 dob (9/6/2018) –Oct 5, 2019 TLBAA Horn Showcase Superior Award Winner; SR Clout’s Isla 800 dob (1/10/2018) – Oct 20, 2018 – Final Four Futurity 1st place Baby Class, Feb 9, 2019 – San Antonio Stock Show – Reserve Grand Champion Jr. Female and Reserve Champion Female, 1st place Class 5 Non-Haltered. May 11, 2019 – Millennium Futurity 1st place Class 11, Oct 5, 2019 – TLBAA Horn Showcase Class Winner TTT, TH & Comp, Superior Award Winner; SR Clout’s Emily 860 dob (7/8/2018) – Oct 5, 2019 TLBAA Horn Showcase TTT Class Winner; SR Clout’s Ellie 796 dob (9/6/2017) – Oct 6, 2018 TLBAA Superior Award Winner, Feb 8, 2019 San Antonio Stock Show Reserve Senior Champion Female and 1st Place Non-Haltered Class 8, May 11, 2019 Millennium Futurity 1st Place Class 12, Oct 5, 2019 TLBAA Horn Showcase Futurity 1st place Class 6 To learn more about their program and see more offspring visit www.struthoff-ranch.com. The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

4 | February 2020

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EDITOR’S NOTES THIS BULL’S FOR YOU

This issue really is a load of bull... bull information that is! Don’t discount the feature article if you have owned herd sires for a while. There’s some interesting insights that you may not have at the front of your mind when selling herd sires to inexperienced or new breeders. And if you are thinking of purchasing your first herds sire... there’s facts that you need to consider before taking the plunge into bull ownership. Thank you to Cody Himmelreich of HI 5 Cattle Co. and Justin Hansen of DBR Longhorns for participating in the article! There’s plenty of other topics relating to your herd sires included this month: fertility, winter maintenance and photography are all addressed in the pages to follow. Be sure as you read through the pages you take time to look at the awesome bulls and programs represented in the ad pages. Thanks to all who chose to promote in this issue. I was very happy to see the subject of safety addressed in the feature article. Being around livestock my whole life, I have felt firsthand the damage an innocent toss of the head or a sudden sidestep or twirl by a horse or cow can inflict. Bulls are awesome, powerful creatures and deserve your respect. I think the innate gentleness of so many of the Longhorn herd sires can lull people into a false sense of safety. Enjoy the handfeeding and the ability to be around them without feeling threatened, but never forget they could react to something you are totally unaware of at any moment. They are first and foremost animals driven by instinct. If you missed the opportunity to promote your sire in this issue, 2020 actually gives you another chance! The July issue will include the A.I. Sire Directory. All bulls certified with the TLBAA by the end of May 2020 can be included free. All we need is a photograph. The directory includes a photo, A.I. number, the pedigree, registration number, date of birth and owner of the animal at time of publication data was pulled. But why settle for that free space alone? Advertising space for the Directory can be reserved by contacting me. The issue will feature lots of helpful information about the A.I. process and related topics. Speaking of opportunities for bulls, keep watching for information about Bull Alley at the Horn Showcase. The early entrants get the most exposure in event advertising and on the web. Okay, enough bull! (I wonder if it’s breaking editorial law to use emojis? This deserves a laughing emoji.) The March issue will contain all the happenings from Texas Longhorn Weekend. That is an issue you don’t want to miss. Meetings, shows, sale, awards... there’s a lot to share with you. See you then. Blessings,

Myra Basham

DEADLINE:

Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

April 2020 Issue:

February 25th

Editor-in-Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 104 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Advertising: Myra Basham • (817) 625-6241 x 104 myra@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Trace Neal • Ext. 103 trace@tlbaa.org

Registrations/Office Manager Rick Fritsche • Ext. 101 rick@tlbaa.org Membership/Registrations Dana Coomer • Ext. 102 dana@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant/DNA Specialist Amelia Gritta • Ext. 107 amelia@tlbaa.org Special Events Pam Robison • Ext. 106 pam@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 105 theresa@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant/Receptionist Lisa Roberts • Ext. 100 lisa@tlbaa.org Printed in the U.S.A. Member

Longhorn Beef

6 | February 2020

(817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org

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Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Keith DuBose • (303) 500-9465

Secretary: Chad Smith • (701) 764-6277

Executive Vice Chairman: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Jim Rombeck • (785) 562-6665

Parliamentarian/Director: David Wars • (936) 404-2116

2nd Vice Chairman: Stephen Head • (979) 549-5270

Director: Kevin Rooker • (817) 692-7843

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck60@gmail.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Tom Smith

John Parmley

Tom Matott

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Region 13 - Director

Deb Lesyk

David Wars

Chad Smith

(306) 867-9427 halters.buckets@yahoo.com

(936) 404-2116 w5longhorns@yahoo.com

(701) 764-6277 smithlonghorns@hotmail.com

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Todd Spaid

Kevin Rooker

Brian Varner

(304) 963-0699 jeremyspaid73@gmail.com

(817) 692-7843 krooker61@gmail.com

(785) 224-1005 longhorncreek@yahoo.com

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Johnny Hicks

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(269) 721-3473 hicksamericanbulldogs@yahoo.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Matt Durkin

(512) 923-9015 mattdurkin1073@aol.com

Sandi Nordhausen

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

Kenny Richardson

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Reid Tolar

Stephen Head

(970) 352-3054 krichardson21@aol.com

Alex Dees

(334) 412-8400 rgtolar@yahoo.com

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Dora Thompson

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(318) 872-6329 echoofambush@aol.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

8 | February 2020

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller* 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016 Tom Matott 2016-2019

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(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net


Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com

Bennett Longhorn Cattle Co.

Micheal Bennett 2159 Country Club RD • Lucas, TX 75002 (214) 383-7400 bennett@lucasfence.com BPT Longhorns Ben & Phyllis Termin Weatherford, TX 817-374-2635 luvmylonghorns@gmail.com Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com (210) 232-1818 Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com Hicks Texas Longhorns Johnny & Missy Hicks 1518 E. Britol Rd. • Dowling, MI 49050 (269) 721-3473 hicksamericanbulldogs@yahoo.com www.michiganmafialonghorns.com/Hicks Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467 Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155 Roberts Longhorns David & Sharon Roberts Comanche, TX 76442 (325) 451-9000 www.robertslonghorns.com Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 • Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 • Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com

Butler Breeder’s Futurity

James K. Turner (936) 689-1914 the5tcorp@yahoo.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com


26 | October 2019

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Feature

Simply put, a herd sire is the bull out in the pasture breeding your females. While it seems like a simple thing, go buy a bull and throw him out with the cows, you may want to read a bit more to see if you’d like to change your approach to taking the plunge into bull ownership

BUYING your first herd sire It’s time for the starter herd and you’re wrapped up in research on finding the best bull you can get within your budget. Research and genetics is important, but evaluation of needs and facilities should come first. Owning a breeding age bull is a step you need to be prepared for. Before you even look at a bull, assess your property. Do you have adequate perimeter fencing? If you plan to have more than one group of females and/or more than one bull, then cross fencing needs to be adequate as well. Cody Himmelreich of Hi5 Cattle Co. suggests a five-strand barbed wire fence, minimum, for bulls. Many breeders also run a hot wire inside their fence, and at times even at the top, to encourage bulls to stay in their pasture. Justin Hansen of DBR Longhorns agrees with the importance of cross fencing and adds that you need 12 | February 2020

a good set of working pens as well. Working pens are something many new owners leave until they grow their herd a bit, but ideally you would have at least one smaller pen and a chute to be able to separate and work your cattle when necessary. Even if a cow or bull will eat from your hand, that doesn’t mean they will allow you to do necessary tasks such as doctor a wound, give vaccinations or draw blood standing out in the pasture. Even if you plan to haul them to a vet for such things, a working pen makes it easier to load cattle into a trailer. As a seller, if you know someone has never had livestock before, let alone a bull on their property, try to have a conversation with them about the requirements of housing a herd sire and things they may not know about bull ownership and management. “I always do my best to evaluate my bulls and to share that information with complete honesty,” said Hansen, adding that he would include specific handling information based on each bull’s personality and characteris-

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


By Myra Basham

tics. “I expect the same from my buyers. If I thought there (Including neighbor’s females). 3. A way to provide was any danger to my animal or the buyer, I would hold company for the bull. onto the animal until the customer made the appropriate While you may have planned on females as compachanges to transport and house my bull properly.” ny for the bull, what do you do when you need to sepaA mistake some first-time buyers make is starting rate him from the herd? There are many approaches to with the bull. As one who made that mistake himself, the separate housing of bulls. Suggestions for keeping Himmelreich stresses not starting with just a bull. “In my him company while allowing him to rest include putopinion,” he explains, “I think you have to have enough ting him in a pasture with already bred females or uscows to even warrant the purchase of a bull. The fencing ing steers or other bulls for companions. Himmelreich is secondary to having something to keep the bull busy.” happens to have pens at his house, away from the cows, How many cows does it take to keep a bull busy? so he pulls the bulls up into the pens for a rest. Putting a Himmelreich suggests 5 to 10 cows, adding that every- companion in with them seems to help deter them from one’s acreage and situation is different, so that number tearing up fences or trying to get out. is not set in stone. “With first time buyers or random people stopping by wanting to buy, I don’t want to sell your own herd sire them one animal. Cattle are herd animals and they need to start with more than one animal. But if they are dead If you have calves hitting the ground, then you most set on buying just one animal I definitely would not sell likely will have some bulls. But as those bull calves start them a bull. Or I would at least talk to them to see if they to mature, how do you know whether they are potential were buying more animals in the very near future.” herd sire material, need to be steered or simply need to Another important aspect to consider before you get be fed out for beef? your property ready to bring home a breeding age bull The answer not only varies based on your ability is whether or not you are going to do controlled breed- and willingness to house bulls, but what your program ing seasons to have calves at optimum times of the year focuses on. The show side was addressed by Himmelor will the bull simply be on a herd of females all year. reich. “We might keep one a little longer than we should There is not a right or wrong just to keep showing it. If they answer, simply what you think are successful on the show cirWHAT ARE CHUTES AND PENS? works best for your program. cuit we’ll keep feeding them “For us,” explains HimmelChute: A device, usually involving two and hauling them around and reich, “it is better to pull the bulls then we’ll see how they are in panels that swing together and latch off. Since we show our animals, July after World Show that year. shut, to hold livestock safely while you it helps to control calving times If they aren’t competitive we’ll perform necessary tasks. to coincide with age requirequit hauling them around and ments of certain classes, giving Pens: Fenced areas used to separate or they’ll go on feed to get butchan advantage in the show ring. ered.” hold animals apart from the main pasI think it also benefits the bull What age tends to be deciture. Pens can range from grassy acre more to not be out on pasture sion time for Himmelreich? lots down to a small area used to aid in chasing cows 12 months out of “Usually around 6 or 8 months trailer loading or leading to a chute. the year. They need a little break is when we’ll decide if we’re goto recover their conditioning.” Both are an important part of properly ing to keep one as a bull or steer Hansen previously left his it. If we keep one any longer handling cattle. herd sires in with females year than that and we decide we’re For more information on Chutes and pens refer round, but now takes a more not going to use it for breedto the November 2018 edition of Trails Magacontrolled approach. “Recently ing they’ll just get fed out and zine, pg. 16 (also available online). we have relocated and going butchered.” forward will be taking bulls out Hansen takes a little longer to strategically allow for spring and fall calving to ensure to decide on herd sire potential. “I keep all the bull calves our babies are being born in the best conditions. I will that I feel are the total package (conformation, color, geselect certain bred females to keep the bulls company in netics, disposition, etc.). Around 12-16 months is when their down time. I will have cross fenced breeding pens I make the decision whether they have potential to be a for this purpose. These will also serve as natural breed- herd sire going forward. I would then make further cuts ing pens for other customers for a 100% conception rate as they got closer to 24 months. If they make it to that vs AI.” point, I would consider them herd sire quality. We very Why make that decision before purchasing the bull? closely monitor our animals’ potential and I am always In order to keep a bull separate from females you need forthright when buyers are considering a younger anithree things: 1. Adequate cross fencing and/or pens 2. mal for the future. Anything that carries my brand must Distance between the bull and potential females in heat be up to my standards.”

RAISING

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Feature

While it’s all fun and games when they’re young, playing with a bull calf can lead to a herd sire that is dangerous to be around. Head butting isn’t cute when the bull weighs 1,500 lbs. When raising a bull calf to show, or to eventually become someone’s herd sire, how you handle the calf now can lead to problems down the road, and may even cause them to be unsafe as a herd sire. Himmelreich warns, “People tend to think when you’re halter breaking them and they’re young ‘oh they’re fun and you can play with them’ almost like they’re dogs, but bulls outgrow you really quick. I’ve been taught that from day one. You’ve got to respect the fact that they will outgrow you. We’ve bought several bulls that we’ve had to get rid of because someone taught them to head butt you when they were babies because they thought it was fun, and now they’re 1500 - 1600 pounds and it’s not really fun anymore. “It’s a good thing to be able to get hands on with them, because not everyone’s situation is the same. You may not have a chute that’s convenient to get them into and, if you can get your hands on them in the pasture if something’s wrong with them and it’s an emergency you don’t want them running away from you. However, I think there’s a fine line between hand feeding and still being a bull and trying to turn them into a lap dog. Especially in our experience with show bulls, people try to treat them like dogs and when they get to a certain age then the people say ‘I don’t know what’s wrong with him’ …Well you babied him as a calf and now he thinks it’s the same. “I’ve seen some bulls that are just straight up mean. But I think ultimately, it’s often an owners fault on how a bull turns out attitude wise. I would say 90% of the time a bull’s attitude is because of the way it is handled as a calf.”

MANAGING Herd Sires SAFETY FIRST No matter the breed of bull, safety should be a concern. Longhorn breeders tend to breed for gentle disposition and Longhorns, by other cattle standards, can be remarkably gentle – even the bulls. They are still bulls, however, with all the instincts nature instilled to pro14 | February 2020

tect the herd from threats. A problem arises when a bull perceives the people in his pasture as threats. A bigger problem is, people do not always have a way to know what, in a bull’s perception, constitutes a threat. “I wouldn’t trust any animal further than I can throw it,” cautions Hansen. “As tame as any animal may seem to be, there are always circumstances where they may not behave in the manner you are accustomed to. An overly aggressive disposition towards people and other animals would be the characteristic that would cause me to sale barn a top producing bull. I have been fortunate, as I breed for disposition as well, to not have had an issue with this.” Himmelreich concurs, “If they’re at all aggressive toward you in the pasture or working them, get rid of them. I want to be able to walk out into the pasture or pen with them and not have worry ‘Where’s the bull at’. There’s no reason for a bull to be aggressive towards you.” Please note that when they say get rid of, they mean take out of the gene pool. Aggressive bulls should not be sold to other breeders. There is no single trait that outweighs the danger of an aggressive bull. NUTRITION The need for special nutrition for a herd sire is dependent on what you normally feed your Longhorns. If they are on quality pasture or receiving supplements along with the rest of the herd when needed, then unless he gets drawn down following a busy breeding season he should be fine. Hansen’s feeding routine is the same for all. “I feed all of our cows exceptionally well. At our new ranch in Malakoff, TX, we are also now growing a Jiggs Bermuda for optimal nutrition in the winter. This hay is known for its higher protein levels. We have recently added 24% cubes and a 30% liquid supplement to our daily feeding routine.” While they are not fed differently than the females, Himmelreich tends to give extra feed to the bulls when

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Feature

they are pulled off the herd and put in pens at his house, eration of genetics – a herd sire generally breeds your but not due to any special requirements. entire herd. If you don’t want to gamble with results of HEALTH CARE a young bull on a whole season’s calf crop, acquiring or For optimum health, bulls require the same vaccina- keeping a bull who’s production you’ve seen allows you tions and health care attention given to the females. The to know what impact he will have on the offspring of only differences being male-specific breeding issues or your females. If you have the facilities to do so, many deformities. The biggest bull related risk is the potential breeders keep a proven bull and a rising star as well, alfor a bull to pass a disease to a whole herd. lowing the younger bull to breed a few females to see Just being cautious about incoming females is not what the results are while the proven bull breeds the enough. Longhorn bulls can be leased, shared by part- majority of the herd. nerships or even come to your place to use for pasture Another consideration when deciding on a bull is to breeding. This opens up new concerns for health. Han- realize that within the Longhorn breed there are charsen has his own bulls on a vaccine regimen along with acteristics that some may keep a bull for, such as flashy his cow herd, but “when we start bringing in outside color or extreme horn, while overlooking potential animals for breeding, we will have a strict health re- shortcomings. quirement to ensure no cross contamination with my Himmelreich feels strongly on this point. “People animals.” need to be a lot more particular on their bulls. There are For more specifics on health and nutrition specifics, a lot of bulls being promoted that probably shouldn’t see the other articles in this issue. have been kept as bulls. You have people keeping one LONGEVITY IN THE HERD because of horn or color. People get a flashy one and How long it is possible to breed a bull and how long think I’m going to breed this one and get some flashy you should keep one in your herd are topics that could colors. I think people just need to be a lot more picky garner pages of discussion. when selecting bulls, don’t just Longhorns are touted for longevbuy one because you got a good THE KEY TO LONGEVITY ity. Hansen himself used Crown deal or you think it is pretty. The productive years of a bull can be Royal 007 in his herd until the “In my opinion there are too bull was 19. “I sold him, but who many up and coming bulls. I effected by environmental as well as knows how long he could have understand we’ve always got to genetic factors. Key to extended usewent. As long as you’re successbe improving things and lookful years is proper care and nutrition, fully getting the appropriate coving toward the future. But, I’ve along with a reasonable breeding load. erage on your females, there is had this argument with a lot of no reason to not use a great herd people, I think that overall the sire. The only reason to replace a bull is to upgrade your Longhorn breed was better off 10-15 years ago. I think genetics.” a lot of those older genetics are still very beneficial and Those with smaller operations, like Himmelreich, can be beneficial to a lot of breeders nowadays. change bulls out frequently to keep the genetic pool “There are bulls that haven’t been alive in 10 or 20 fresh, so he couldn’t recall a top age for ability to breed. years that I think are still very beneficial to the breed. I He did add an important note though, “I think longevity know on the show side of it there has been a resurgence of breeding goes back to how you treated them, man- of older genetics and those calves are being very sucaged them, when they were younger. If you put them on cessful on the show circuit from some of these older 50 or 60 cows every year, they’re going to break down or bulls that are no longer around.” wear out sooner. The longevity depends on how they’re After speaking with breeders for years, a good sumcared for.” mation for anyone looking to purchase a herd sire ESTABLISHED SIRES VS. RISING STARS would be to look at the entire animal and how he will There is a lot of discussion within the industry over improve on the cows you have. That scrutiny should inusing the new “improved” genetics of the up and com- clude his physical structure (conformation and reproing bulls versus using an older proven bull or stored se- ductive soundness), his disposition, his genetics, and men from proven producers who are no longer living. the offspring he has produced, if any. On a younger sire, The answer is….there is no one answer that fits every productivity potential would be judged by offspring of situation and program. his parents. Then consider the secondary traits of color Hansen’s response, “It’s always great to stay current and horn. Even for those that look at horn qualities first, with the industry, but I would always advise going with the importance of the other basic characteristics cannot the genetics that would accelerate the qualities that you be ignored for long-term improvement in their herd. are looking to produce in your herd, new or old. Yes, If you have read through this wondering why A.I. there is always value to using genetics that have been and selling semen is not a discussion here, tune in to proven to produce.” the July 2020 issue. It will be dedicated to A.I. sires and Part of the hesitance in only using the newest gen- the topics specific to those bulls and the process. 16 | February 2020

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Health

By Heather Smith Thomas

Winter Bull Maintenance

For Breeding Success It’s important to make sure bulls are fertile, healthy and sound, and in good body condition through winter. Young bulls are still growing and need adequate energy and protein to meet their needs for growth as well as maintenance and body condition, and tp provide body heat on a cold winter day.

Photo by Missy Hicks

According to Dr. John McKinnon (Saskatchewan Beef Industry Chair, University of Saskatchewan), a bull’s nutrient requirements during winter depend on his age, body condition after coming off pasture and going into winter, and his target weight for the next breeding season. Yearling bulls should reach puberty at least 2 to 4 months before breeding season, and be at least 50% of their projected mature body weight (preferably 60 to 65% of mature weight) by then. “Two-year-olds should be 80 to 85% of their mature weight,” he says. “Yearlings and 2-year-olds are still growing, and mature bulls that lost condition over breeding season would also have a target weight that’s ideal for their breed and frame size. Thus the starting point, or condition of bulls coming off pasture in the fall or coming out of breeding season enables you to estimate how much weight that bull might need to gain (or maintain) over winter to meet appropriate target weight for next breeding season. This sets up the management pro18 | February 2020

gram for winter nutrition,” says McKinnon. This may include putting on lost condition, or additional growth for yearlings and 2-year-olds. During winter, monitor body condition to make sure young bulls continue to grow while staying in good flesh, and monitor older bulls to make sure they are not losing weight. Bulls must carry an adequate amount of fat cover to provide insulation during cold weather and supply energy reserves, but you don’t want bulls too fat or this can interfere with fertility next breeding season. Overfat bulls usually have poor semen quality, reduced semen production, reduced conception rates, and fewer cows bred (lack of libido). They may fall apart during breeding season—losing too much weight. For a winter feeding program, separate younger bulls from the older ones because their nutritional needs are different. You may also need to separate bulls according to body condition and feed them accordingly. McKinnon says it’s also important to have your feed analyzed, to know whether your forages are meeting expectations or if you need to add protein or energy to the diet. You may also need to provide mineral supplementation and perhaps vitamins if forages are deficient. It’s also crucial to increase energy levels during cold weather, and provide enough protein to enable rumen microbes to process and create heat energy from forages. One breeder in northwestern Montana runs his coming 3-year-olds and older bulls together and keeps them on good hay and a mineral program. “The younger bulls—coming 2-year-olds—are in a different group and we give them either some protein tubs along with their hay or feed them a little bit of a high-energy pellet. Our young bulls get a few pounds of high-energy feed per day, or a 12% protein supplement that contains a little energy,” he says. “All our bulls have windbreak protection and bedding, to help prevent cold stress and scrotal frostbite. In cold weather they also need more feed, just to generate body heat. Some of the bigger, older bulls may eat 50 pounds of hay per day in cold weather. If you shortchange cattle on feed they’ll lose weight.”

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Health – continued from pg. 18 After last winter many producers had bulls with frosted scrotums, according to another Montana breeder. “A bull stands with his hind end to the wind and his head away from the wind, and this doesn’t give any protection for his testicles. Bulls need adequate bedding and windbreaks,” he explains. Some people don’t think about the fact that semen is developed for 60 days prior to when it is mature and ready for breeding a cow. “You are depositing semen in the bank for several weeks before you turn the bull out; if you breed cows in May, the bull is still developing that semen in late winter, before there’s green grass.

You need to be taking good care of him nutritionally, or you won’t have good semen in the bank.”

Adequate wind breaks and bedding help prevent scrotal frostbite.

For body condition, he likes to have bulls in a score 6 before breeding season. This provides some reserve and they are not too thin or too fat. An overly fat bull has too much fat (insulation) in the scrotum. For viable sperm, temperature of the testicles must be 4 degrees lower than body temperature, or the extra heat will kill sperm. “Likewise, if a bull is too thin, he may be in trouble. Nutritionally, bulls need an adequate balanced diet, and adequate exercise. We always feed them where they have to walk a ways between feed and water. We want them to be well-conditioned athletes so their muscles are toned, and have them walking a lot so their feet are hard. If they are Owned by the Payne/OBryan Partnership standing around in mud in a feedCS Traveler 178/8 X SD Redemptions Angel lot they may end up with bad feet.” DOB: 06/21/2013 You start preparing for next year’s breeding season the day you pull the bulls from the cows. Some See several daughters and progeny at need to regain lost weight. The bull www.cplonghorns.com needs a diet with adequate protein, energy and balanced nutrients. “I figure that a mature bull needs See females expecting 2020 calves at a diet that is 10 to 12% protein and www.haywirecattle.com 60 to 70% TDN. Yearling bulls need 14% protein. To have good semen quality, the vitamins and minerals are also important—especially viHis Production Matches tamins A and E. In terms of minThe “Who’s Who” Pedigree erals, calcium and phosphorus in feeds can vary from region to region. In our area we are deficient in phosphorus. You need to know the mineral content in your feeds. Some minerals tie up availability of others,” he says. Good quality hay may be enough, if it has adequate nutrients. “You are not trying to fatten your bulls like feedlot cattle; they just need something a little extra to keep them growing and in good shape. If they are efficient cattle they will do this very well on a little extra feed. Just monitor and make sure they are doing well; don’t just turn them out somewhere and forget about them,” he says.

Discovery

Sanddollar

SALTGRASS

SUNRISE REDEMPTION 4K

SF CATSY

HAWKEYE KNIGHT MK

20 | February 2020

CS

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Breeding

By Virginia Cooperative Extension Services

PREDICTING BULL FERTILITY Reproductive efficiency

is a major determinant of cow-calf profitability. The bull’s contribution to pregnancy rates is often overlooked. Breeding a large number of cows in a short breeding season requires fertile bulls. Fertility of the male is a major contributor to overall reproductive performance in mating systems that use natural service. Since beef cattle reproduction depends so heavily on natural service, assuring high bull fertility is crucial to successful breeding seasons with high pregnancy rates. Predicting the fertility of bulls is an area of research that has been active for some time and which is ongoing. Research and experience have identified a number of factors that influence bull fertility. The following is a list of factors that influence bull success in impregnating cows during limited breeding seasons: • Sperm cell output (frequently estimated by measuring scrotal circumference) • Percent normal sperm cells produced, also termed normal morphology • Motility or ability for forward progressive movement of sperm cells • A normal male reproductive tract • Physical normality of the bull, general health and structural soundness • Ability of the bull to complete an insemination successfully or mating ability • Libido or sex drive of the bull • Social interactions between bulls • Age of the bull • Body condition of the bull

To allow trained professionals to assess the potential for the reproductive success of a bull, a systematic approach to bull evaluation has been developed. This evaluation involves an assessment, performed in as objective a manner as possible, providing for the predic-

tion of bull fertility. This procedure is termed the Breeding Soundness Examination (BSE) and has been formalized by the Society for Theriogenology(the study of reproduction in domestic animals) (SFT), whose members have standardized the bull evaluation. Studies evaluating the value of breeding soundness examinations are difficult to perform because large numbers of cows and bulls must be used. Table 1 is a summary of a study done on a very large ranch looking at the value of selecting bulls based on a scrotal circumference minimum and 80% or greater normal sperm cells. All of the bulls that were not controls had a scrotal circumference of at least 30cm. Note that in the first year of this trial conception rates were 7% higher and in a second year conception rates were 5% higher when bulls that were selected for fertility were compared with unselected control bulls. The BSE is performed at a single examination, although repeated examinations may be required in some cases. It requires that bulls be restrained. It can, however, be performed with equipment that is relatively portable so that veterinarians often perform the evaluation on the farm. The BSE consists of the following procedures:

Table 1. Bulls Selected for semen quality at King Ranch Number Exposed Pregnant

Multiple Sire Year 1 Multiple Sire Year 2 Control 80% or > Control 80% or > 70% or > 572 656 1,179 522 769 86% 93% 85% 90% 91%

Taken From Wiltbank, N.J. (1983)

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Breeding Physical examination - The bull is examined in a systematic way for any problem that would hamper his ability to impregnate cows. This examination may be rather brief or more detailed if there is a reason to suspect that there is a problem with any body system. Common areas for problems are abnormalities of the feet and legs or the eyes. A bull cannot locate and mate cows unless his feet and legs are sound. Structural faults, such as sickle hocks and post legs, can cause sore feet and stresses on tendons and joints that affect the bull’s mobility. Legs and joints should be free from any swelling or old injuries. Cracked hooves, corns and long hooves also slow the breeding ability of bulls. Long hooves and corns should be dealt with four to six weeks prior to the breeding season. This will give the bull time to recover and have sound feet before he is turned out for breeding. Eyes should be clear and free of injuries or diseases. Pink eye or cancer eye may hinder a bull’s vision and reduce his breeding effectiveness. Such problems may also allow him to be dominated by other bulls and diminish his ability to cover the desired number of cows. Any other tendency toward disease or sickness should be evaluated prior to turning bulls out for the breeding season. Lumpy jaw, poor teeth, or other factors that affect a bull’s ability to eat greatly reduce his breeding potential. Respiratory problems also have a negative effect on breeding ability. Table 2 Internal Genital Organs Enlarged seminal vesicles Seminal vesiculitis Scrotal hernia Enlarged inguinal rings Testicular Defects Reduced size and hypoplasia Soft Abnormal shape Fibrosis Cryptorchid

% of all bulls 3.10 1.70 .15 .10

Defects of Penis and Prepuce Deviation Neoplasms including warts Persistent penile frenulum Lacerations

% of all bulls 1.70 .91 .52 .24

Defects of the Epididymis Tumors, abscesses & granulomas Epididymitis Segmental aplasia and/or hypoplasia Defects of the Locomotor System Hoof trim needed Interdigital fibroma (corns) Nonspecific lameness Foot rot Arthritis Luxations 24 | February 2020

8.80 7.40 .95 .43 .13

.47 .36 .18 3.10 .84 .56 .34 .32 .15

Figure 1. The technique for measuring circumference in the bull. Note that the hand restraining the testicles is placed behind the scrotum rather than to the side of it.

As part of the physical examination a body condition score is assessed. The system used is the 9-point-scale system. Bulls that are either overconditioned or underconditioned would be expected to have lower fertility. Reproductive tract examination - The bull reproductive tract consists of the scrotum, testicles, penis, prepuce and their associated structures. These structures can be examined externally both visually and by manual palpation. However, examination of the penis and entire prepuce typically requires the extension of the penis using an electroejaculator. There are also a number of internal portions of the reproductive tract which require an exam per rectum. The arm of the examiner is inserted through the anus of the bull into the rectum. Because of the flexibility of the rectum the internal portions of the penis, the internal parts of the vas deferens, and the accessory sex glands (the prostate and seminal vessicles) can be manually examined. Table 2 lists abnormalities and their numbers in field observations of 10,940 bulls. (Modified from Carroll et all. 1963.) Measurement of Scrotal Circumference (SC) - Measuring scrotal circumference is a crucial part of the BSE. Scrotal circumference has been determined to be the measurement that best predicts the output of sperm cells for bulls when multiple collections by artificial vagina are not available. The measurement technique involves the use of a circular tape. This measure is useful because there is a correlation between the scrotal circumference and the volume of semen-producing tissue that the bull possesses. Since SC increases with the age and weight of the bull the circumference must be interpreted in light of the bull’s age. Table 3 shows the minimum circumference that the bull must possess to be classified as a satisfactory potential breeder according to SFT guidelines. It should be remembered that these are minimums and producers of bulls will generally

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Breeding want to produce bulls with scrotum that exceed these head of the sperm cell. Secondary abnormalities are minimums. Figure 1 shows that technique for measur- slight defects of the tails of the sperm cells, such as proxing SC. It is very important that the testicles be confined imal and distal protoplasmic droplets (Figure 2). Table 3 closely in the bottom of the scrotum for the measure- shows the Society for Theriogenology cut off for perment to be accurate. It is also important that the tape centage of normal sperm cells for a Satisfactory Potenbe closed tightly, creating a small waist on the scrotum tial Breeder classification which is 70%. for measurements to be consistent between Bulls exhibiting normal physical capabilities may evaluators. Scrotal Circumference has been determined to be the one of the best predicstill be incapable of settling cows because of tors of bull fertility.

poor quality semen.

Volume: Volume is important, but it varies with the age, size and breed of the animal, and with the collection methods.

Color: Color also is an indication of semen quality. The semen should be milky in appearance and free of contaminates such as blood, urine, dirt or pus. Motility: Motility can be estimated by observing the mass movement of a concentrated sample of semen. Semen graded as very good has vigorous swirls; that graded good has slow swirls. Poor semen motility indicates limited or no motility (see Table 3 for the Society of Theriogenology scoring system for motility). Semen should have a minimum of 30 percent vigorous, motile sperm when diluted and viewed through the microscope. It is important that motility is not hindered prior to the motility score observation. Temperature, shock and other factors can greatly interfere with motility scores. Morphology: There is considerable evidence that increased abnormalities of sperm cells are associated with poor conception rates. Abnormalities are classified as primary and secondary conditions. Primary abnormalities are generally defects of the

Semen collection and examination - Although semen could theoretically be collected using an artificial vagina, in most cases the difficulty in training bulls to use this system makes it impractical. Instead, the semen sample is collected using a device called an electroejaculator. This device employs a probe that is inserted rectally into the bull. The probe has electrodes that conduct tiny amounts of electricity to the nerves that run through the bottom of the bull’s pelvis. This stimulation results in the bull achieving an erection and finally ejaculating semen. An experienced veterinarian or reproductive physiologist should determine semen quality. An examination of the reproductive tract may indicate possible abnormalities in semen quality. Bulls exhibiting normal physical capabilities may still be incapable of settling cows because of poor quality semen.

Interpreting the results of the BSE

There are a number of other factors that influence bull fertility that are not easily measured in a single examination. Three of these include libido (sex drive), mating ability and reproductive diseases. These must be dealt with by each bull owner: Libido - Tests for sex drive have been attempted for many years but no test has proven satisfactory for widespread usage. Owners must observe bulls to be sure that they follow cows that are in heat and show other signs

Table 3 Requirements for being classified as a satisfactory potential breeder bull by the Breeding Soundness Examination system of the Society for Theriogenology.

Minimum Recommended Scrotal Circumference

Minimum Recommended Motility is 30% of Fair (F)

Age < 15 Mo. >15 < 18 Mo. >18 <21 Mo. >21 < 24 Mo. > 24 Mo. 34

SC (CM) 30 31 32 33

Rating Very Good (VG) Good (G) Fair (F) Poor (P)

Mass Activity (Gross) Rapid Swirling Slower Swirling Generalized Oscillation Sporadic Oscillation

Individual > 70% 50-69% 30-49% < 30%

Minimum Recommended Morphology is 70% Normal Cells. To be classified as a Satisfactory Potential Breeder requires a satisfactory Physical Examination and minimum values for Scrotal Circumference, Motility and Morphology. Any bull not meeting minimums is classified as either an Unsatisfactory Potential Breeder or classification may be deferred at the discretion of the evaluator. 26 | February 2020

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Breeding of interest and activity indicating interest in breeding cows. Mating ability - Since semen is collected using an electroejaculator for the BSE there is no opportunity to see a bull actually complete the breeding act. Some bulls have physical problems that prevent them from successfully mating. Some of these problems may develop as a result of an injury that has occurred during the breeding season. Bulls should be constantly observed to be sure that they are able to successfully breed cows. Any abnormality (swelling, bleeding, etc.) seen near the sheath opening should be investigated as these are frequently associated with an inability to mate. Likewise lameness often interferes with successful breeding.

Bulls who fail the BSE at one point may later be capable of passing. Evaluators usually attempt to predict such outcomes and thus classify bulls as Unsatisfactory or a Deferred status. Reproductive diseases - Of particular importance are the venereal diseases. These can be tested for but are not routinely tested for during the BSE. If bulls are purchased as virgins and not allowed to breed in a herd of unknown status, the likelihood of contracting a venereal disease is essentially nil. Otherwise, a specific examination for venereal disease may be requested from a veterinarian. Bulls which fail to pass the BSE are assumed to be subfertile. Certainly they may sire some calves but would not be expected to perform well in a typical breeding setting. Bulls who fail the BSE at one point may later be capable of passing. Evaluators usually attempt to predict such outcomes and thus classify bulls as Unsatisfactory or a Deferred status.

Summary

The Breeding Soundness Examination is a system, based on extensive research, for predicting whether bulls will be fertile. While there are limitations to the system, it is a very valuable tool that should be used on a routine basis in beef herds to increase herd reproductive performance. W. Dee Whittier, Extension Veterinarian, Cattle, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech Thomas Bailey, Extension Veterinarian, Cattle, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2009

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Marketing

By Myra Basham

Body and Background: Photos As A Marketing Tool Gone are the days of buying special lenses, filters and various film speeds to handle your livestock photography needs. Now almost everyone has a phone capable of at least producing photos fit for online marketing. The instant ease of whipping a phone out of your pocket at an opportune moment should mean that the overall quality of cattle photos has improved as well, right? Not necessarily so. It’s a fact that people often run cattle in pastures that are not immaculately clean of debris and that the easiest place to catch them standing still is where a food source, such as a round bale, is located. While there is always the ability to remove the background and insert an idyllic one, any photo manipulation comes at a price. The biggest cost of an obviously retouched photo is the questions it can bring to a buyer’s mind, such as: • Did they clean up defects on the animal? • What environment are the cattle being raised in? • If the cattle are worth my investment, why can’t the seller invest in good photos to sell the animals? That third question encompasses several other issues that arise in cattle photography. A terribly blurry or digitized photo, a very unflattering position of the animal or photos of cattle urinating or with a mouth full of hay all call into question the lack of willingness to invest time in marketing efforts. Another, even more critical aspect of marketing photographs is body condition. Taking spur of the moment photographs when your bull is drawn down from fulfilling his breeding duties or a young female who hasn’t quite recovered her normal condition after a stressful first calf portrays the animal in a light that does not highlight its potential value. If you are hoping to draw in potential new Longhorn owners or get fellow breeders to invest in your program, keep your animals fit. Prepare ahead for the leaner winter months by taking photos of your Longhorns in the spring and summer months to use in any marketing efforts. If your Longhorns maintain a consistent healthy weight year-round, then by all means take a few when their winter hair is on. It highlights their ability to thrive anywhere. There are bloodlines that hark back to earlier days when Longhorns had a bit gaunter look, but there is a difference in body shape and a poorly maintained 30 | February 2020

The stance of the bull is good, showing his body and horn well. The near-leg is back. However the fence distracts from his horns and his top line. As the photographer, I was unfamiliar with the bull and I did not have assistance to move him to a different spot. I knew I could remove the fence for the sale catalog via Photoshop. Given different circumstances I would have requested he be moved further from the fence. I had adequate zoom on a good camera to stay at a safe distance and remained close enough to the fence to get out if necessary. Safety first, always.

TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING BULLS 1. SAFETY. If you are photographing anything other than a haltered bull with a handler, then please have a second person around. Whenever possible separate him from the females, or at the very least, make sure there are not females in standing heat in his pasture at that time. While many Longhorn bulls are very laid back, they are still driven by instincts that can potentially override their respect for you. This could lead to unexpected protectiveness when you are changing your normal stance crouching to take a photo or if your camera or phone makes an unfamiliar noise. The presence of calves in the pasture can increase the likelihood of protective behavior. If you are nervous about being in the vicinity of the bull, find someone who is not uncomfortable. Animals are sensitive to your mood, and if you convey fear or nervousness it can put the animal on high alert. 2. TIMING. If it is breeding season, the your bull’s body condition will not be at it’s peak if he is a hard worker and doing his job. Also, if he’s performing as he should you may have trouble separating him form the females to get a good shot. 3. STANCE. The most important thing about a bull photo is the second a person looks at it there should be no doubt that he is a bull, This means catching him with his near-side leg slightly back so you can see that he is not a steer. A good angle also shows off his depth of body, and as with all Longhorns, the head slightly towards the camera to show off the horns. If you want your bull to appear bigger, get at a lower angle. Taking a photo standing straight up or from the top of a fence or pickup result in bulls that look smaller than they really are. If you look at a photo for more than a full second before you know that it is a bull, you may want to re-take it. (The exception being young calves)

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Marketing cow. Body position and lighting can play a factor in highlighting body faults, but nothing can hide poor management. While sale catalogs often try to level the playing field by putting fresh backgrounds on photos, a very nice professional touch, the actual quality of the photo of the animal cannot be helped. So what can you do to get better photos of your animals for marketing purposes? WALK YOUR PROPERTY. Find the most ideal places that you can have your animals to get photos on a pleasant background. At the very least don’t have items in the photos that detract such as hay piles, compost piles, junk, falling down buildings or tree limbs interfering with horns. A day spent de-cluttering the pasture not only helps with your photography, it can help the safety and welfare of your animals as well. INVEST TIME. Have a camera or good quality smartphone with you at all times. Take photos in early morning or late afternoon and never into the sun. You may need to have a helper to calmly separate animals out from the herd a bit or direct them to a better spot. Position yourself with the sun at your back and crouch to take from a lower angle. (Please keep in mind that the process of photographing animals is a behavior that

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BEWARE THE WATERCOLOR EFFECT Using zoom on some models of smartphone loses detail and creates a “painting” effect on a photo. The photo on left shows the result. The photo on the right was taken with a digital camera with adequate zoom capability. The difference is more noticeable in high resolution printed material such as magazines or flyers. can alarm some cattle, especially overprotective mothers or bulls. Try not to let animals behind you and when possible have a “spotter” who can help watch for potential issues). Take lots of photos and discard the bad ones. It takes a lot of shots for some animals to catch them at a flattering angle, with feet and head the way you want them. DON’T FORGET SCENIC PHOTOS. Take multiple scenic shots of the herd when you have the opportunity as well. People appreciate seeing what your operation looks like and it helps sell the whole idea notion of a

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Marketing lifestyle that include livestock. They work well as an enticement in print ads, social media posts and on your website to get people to want to visit your ranch. Only seeing single photos and hearing a sales pitch may keep those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet know they want to buy a Longhorn at bay. Scenic photos coupled with an invitation to visit the ranch and meet Longhorns in person can draw in some unintentional customers. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T SACRIFICE ONE ELEMENT TO HIGHLIGHT ANOTHER. If you love horns above all else or you only care about that perfect show stance, beware. The key to Longhorn photographs is balance. A side or 3/4 angle shot on level ground or slightly uphill in front with the head turned slightly toward the camera will usually flatter both horn and body. If you do a full side shot with head facing forward, the horns will not be showcased. If you take a head on shot to showcase the horns, the body of the animal will be lost. If you have a beautiful background but the animals is humped up or stretched out or twisted at an awkward angle, then the photo does more harm than good. You emotional attachment and belief in the quality of the animal does not convey to the viewer of a photo. Make sure that when you present photos of your animals to the public in any fashion that they do justice to the animal and to your breeding program.

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PERSISTANCE This female did not want anything to do with my picture-taking efforts. I was on foot in a large pasture of Longhorns and I as I moved to try and get a better angle she moved to avoid me, even though I was well outside the flight zone and putting no pressure on her. It took calmly walking quite a distance to take multiple photos. (Fight the urge to run to get ahead of an animal to try for a better shot.) The tree is in the way, but the last is still by far the best photo and I did not want to stress her any further. One stressed cow can put the rest of your subjects on high alert and I had a lot more to photograph that day.

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Longhorn Beef

Beef Committee Expands Reach Via Social Media You may have seen some ads touting Longhorn beef popping up on Facebook lately. Over the past six months, the social media outlet has been used to promote Registered Texas Longhorn Beef to both Longhorn owners and the general public with targeted ads. If you are unfamiliar with Facebook advertising, it not only allows you to target specific demographics such as those interested in healthy lifestyles or agriculture, it has endless opportunities to gather data on who responds to the ad and what they do after they click on it. With the assistance of Jason Hartline, of Hartline & Partners based in Dallas, TX, the amount of traffic to the beef information page of the TLBAA website has increased dramatically since the first Facebook ads went out. For instance, in December 2018, before Facebook ads were implemented, the Registered Texas Longhorn Beef page had 143 unique views. In December 2019, after several ads ran over two months, the beef page had 1030 unique page views. That’s a 620% increase in people visiting the page! “We are introducing a national campaign to reach the right people with the right message at the right time” explains Hartline. “We achieve this by placing

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well-crafted digital advertisements in front of potential consumers where they are most likely to receive their content - through Google and social media. “When a potential consumer interacts with our ads (by clicking, commenting, liking, et cetera), we can continue to track their online behavior and remind them of the benefits of Longhorn beef and ultimately where it can be purchased from their closest producer by continuously placing a variety of ads in front of them on sites in which they frequent. “For example, have you ever looked at a product on the internet and later saw that same product in a Facebook ad? It’s not a coincidence. That is exactly what we will be doing with the Longhorn beef industry. “This strategy achieves two things: continued education and awareness, and keeping our local producers top of mind when our target consumer is ready to purchase. “By doing so, we achieve the creation of a nationwide presence and continue to further the exposure of the longhorn breed. We look forward to working alongside everyone and continuing to build a consumer demand that allows producers to grow in a healthy market.”

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Events

Opportunities For Everyone To Participate In The Longhorn Industry Now that you own Longhorns, or you have a child that shows Longhorns, you may be wondering how you can become active in the industry, have fun and meet fellow Longhorn breeders. You are in luck. The Longhorn industry is not only fun-loving and friendly, there are lots of events each year that you can be a part of. Our calendar of events on the last page of each Trails Magazine, and online under the calendar tab, is a good place to locate happenings you may want to take part in. We will take a quick look at each category of event, including shows, sales, futurities, affiliate events and horn measuring and how you can participate.

SHOWS There are many adults who became owners after their youth showed a breeder’s Longhorns. Longhorns do not require a youth to own the animal they show, so it is a good way to let them experience the breed before you take the plunge into ownership. It is also a great way, once you are an owner, to teach your child life skills and enjoy a family centered activity together. Shows usually offer classes for adults as well as youth.

The basic requirement to show on TLBAA World Qualifying Show Circuit is a halter broke, TLBAA registered Longhorn, a membership for the person who is showing the animal and completing a show entry form and submitting it along with applicable entry fees to the entity hosting the show. Requirements for things such as health certificates, rules of the show and other details can vary so it is good to read everything available on the show website or contact someone affiliated with the show to make sure you’ve met all requirements and know what you need to do and when. If you are interested in showing and really have no idea where to start, give us a call at the TLBAA office and speak to our event department. They can answer questions you may have as well as direct you to those 38 | February 2020

experienced with shows in your area to help with more specific questions.

SALES As A Buyer: You can find most registered Texas Longhorn sales by looking at the calendar on the last page of Trails Magazine or on the TLBAA website. Many sales offer internet bidding, so location may not be a concern if you find an animal that you really want. If internet bidding is available, make sure you follow the rules of early registration to be approved to bid, as well as be familiar with how it works. If you are going to the sale in person, your first stop needs to be the sale office to register to bid. The sale catalog should have a terms and conditions page that tells you payment options, and other buyer obligations. The catalogs are often posted online well before the sale day so you can view the terms and study the sale lots beforehand. Feel free to reach out to sellers to ask questions about animals you are interested in. There will be bid spotters there to catch your raised hand or head nod. If you are in doubt as to whether or not the bid is yours, ask the bid spotter, also called a ring man. The first time trying to follow a rapid-fire bidding increase can be daunting. If you will be in need of someone to haul your purchases, make contact with haulers at the sale prior to bidding to ensure you have a ride home for the animal if you win the bid. As A First Time Seller: There are many Longhorn auctions that occur at about the same time each year. If dates aren’t on the calendar yet for this year, contact the number for last year’s sale to see if it will be offered. Consignment deadlines for a cataloged sale are usually two to three months before the sale, so you will have to look ahead several months to see what you may be able to consign to. Before making a decision to consign, call the sale host or auctioneer listed on the ads. They can tell you more about that sale and whether or not it

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Events the other three. The entire animal is taken into account and it’s a good way to see how the type of Longhorn you are raising stacks up in the eyes of fellow breeders. Just like shows and sales, each event has it’s own set of rules and requirements, so read their ads or call and talk to the hosts. Entry fees, health papers and registrations are the basic requirements. Futurities typically give part of the entry fees back as prize money and some offer added money to increase the prizes.

AFFILIATES would be a good spot to market your Longhorn. They can also explain the requirements of that specific sale, as they can vary greatly in process, selection criteria and cost to participate.

FUTURITIES Today, futurities are a common event and still growing in popularity. Longhorns (cows & bulls only) can be shown in a futurity without halter breaking and unless you just want to hose them off, they can come straight out of the pasture. The animals enter the ring one at a time, grouped in classes by age, and are scored according to how close they are to the judge’s ideal of a perfect, marketable Longhorn. Most futurities use five judges, discarding the highest and lowest score and then adding

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TLBAA Affiliates can be found around the world and are a way to connect and participate with breeder in your area. Affiliates offer membership meetings, field days, ranch visits, Longhorn shows and many other fun activities. The TLBAA website has a list of affiliates and their contact information. It’s a good way to become active with a great group of people that gather regularly each year, thus making networking and participation more fun and easy.

HORN MEASURING EVENTS Currently, the only official horn measuring event in the Longhorn industry is the TLBAA Horn Showcase held each October. Affiliates or individuals can offer measuring events, but they do not count in the TLBAA record of horn measurements, which goes back to the event’s beginning in 2000. The measuring contest records mea-

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Events surements, either at the event or one of the satellite locations across the country and the world, for tip-to-tip, total horn and composite horn. There is a special division for twisty horn cattle to compete in as well. Each animal competes in a class determined by age. Biggest measurement wins the class. Bull and Embryo alley is a popular part of the event as well. It’s a showcase of bulls whose semen is available for purchase during the event, often at reduced pricing, and females who have embryos available for sale. For bulls, TLBAA A.I. Certification is required. There is also a futurity and an auction at the event. An animal participating in the futurity can potentially be a class winner, an overall winner and a Superior Award winner. It’s a weekend packed with activity that draws a large crowd.

TRAILS MAGAZINE While it’s not something to attend, the magazine has opportunities for you to participate in many areas. Photography: We can always use photos for editorial use and potential covers for Trails Magazine. The great-

42 | February 2020

est need is everyday life with Longhorns, including feeding, vaccinating, working in chute, etc. Once submitted we reserve the right to use the photos when needed and photo credit to the photographer. They must be at least 3 x 5 at 300 dpi for print, preferably larger - especially for potential cover shots. Any cover photo, other than sold covers, will receive photo credit but no information about the animal or the breeder. Writing: We not only enjoy receiving ideas for stories, but will also accept articles you’ve written on a Longhorn-related subject, especially if it is educational or historical. All writing submissions are subject to editing and will be published at the discretion of Trails Magazine. If you feel like there is a topic that needs to be covered in the pages of Trails, let us know. You can email myra@tlbaa with submissions or suggestions.

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Affiliate News

AFFILIATE UPDATES Now that we are well into 2020, it’s time to focus on the Longhorn events scheduled in the Upper Midwest. New breeders in the Upper Midwest have made this an exciting, NEW and GROWING market! The Central States Fair has GORDON HOWIE become home to our Longhorn PRESIDENT GKHOWIE@YAHOO.COM Events. Over 130,000 people are expected to visit the Fair in 2020. Again this year, we have scheduled THREE days of Longhorn Events: August 21, 2nd Annual Horn Measurement Competition August 22, 2nd Annual Top Hand Invitational Longhorn Sale August 23, 5th Annual World Qualifying Longhorn Show There are LOTS of reasons to visit South Dakota: We hope you will join us for the fun… And while you are at it, sell some Longhorns & promote your program in this exciting, NEW and GROWING market! The GPTLA is determined to promote Texas Longhorn Cattle in the Upper Midwest. The goal is simple… expand our market and help producers become more profitable. It would be great to have you join us (everyone can join). Annual membership dues are $ 25.00 for Active, $ 5.00 for Jr., or Lifetime membership $250.00 Please send a check for your membership, along with your name, address, phone and email address to Great Plains Texas Longhorn Association, 15372 Antelope Creek Rd, Rapid City, SD, 57703

GREAT PLAINS TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

AFFILIATES: Please submit your news to myra@tlbaa.org each month. You may include photos. If you wish for names to be included under photos, please supply those captions. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month prior to publication date.

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NEWS On the Trail...

Wamplers Donate 6th Steer to the Fort Worth Herd John and Rebecca Wampler of T Bar W Ranch were in Fort Worth recently to add another member to the Fort Worth Herd. Their generous support has gone beyond donating their Texas Longhorn steers to include being table sponsors at the American Cowboy Gala, donations to the Herdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20th event and monetary contributions. Their support began in 2013 with Imperial Chex, the first steer donated by the couple. The Fort Worth Herd has a goal this year to extend the cattle drive and they are in the preliminary fund-raising stage. The newest steer is participating in the fund-raising efforts by being a part of a name contest. (see ad at right) Everyone is welcome to participate.

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In The Pen

We thank these folks for kindly droppin’ in at the TLBAA office.

1

2 3 1. Blake Fanning, 4F Longhorns, Cleburne, TX 2. Dan Hall, Montague, TX; Terry Davis, Aubrey, TX 3. James Farr, Farr Cross Longhorns, Terrell, TX

The next time you visit Fort Worth, Texas, be sure to check out the historic Fort Worth Stockyards District. While you’re here, stop by 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210. The TLBAA staff always enjoys seeing members!

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www.tlbaa.org 46 | February 2020

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Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow

Presidents

Message

Hey TLBAA! I hope everyone is doing well and enjoyed the Fort Worth Stock Show. One of my favorite shows takes place in the month of February and that happens to be the San Angelo Stock Show. Nothing beats how laid back it is and the location! Yes, I LOVE west Texas and if you want me to be honest with you it’s my dream place to live. That may seem a bit odd. You would think something more like Hawaii or France, but me..... West Texas! It’s something about the flat land, no trees, and dry weather that I absolutely love. My dream place to live might seem much smaller and less interesting than other people’s, but it means the same to me. I believe we can relate this to our personal goals. Some people have goals to win Showmanship at a major or to win Grand Champion with their Show animal. While some have goals to place top five in class or to go in the show ring and not get dragged (I can relate). Often times we find ourselves comparing our steps and our goals to other people’s and that leaves us feeling unhappy with ourselves. And this might not even occur in the show ring for you. If your goal is to wake up in the morning and keep a smile on your face all day and you do that, I applaud you. Our goals are ours for a reason. If your goal was to play top five in the class or to win showmanship an achievement is an achievement and let me tell you, they hold the same value. Do not compare your steps to other people’s because we all happen to be facing different battles. You got this. I believe in you and your goals. You are so valued and you have so much potential!

Gabby Curtis

TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

MAYLI MORELAND

TLBT Officer Position: Junior Director Age: 8 1.) Why did you join the TLBT? To show Longhorns. 2.) What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? Fort Worth Stockshow. I like to be able to see other animals. 3.) What is your favorite Longhorn color and

7.) What person has influenced you the most? Cade Nolen!!! 8.) What is the best part about being a TLBT member? I’ve made good friends. 9.) What is your favorite quote? “Can’t is a bad word” 10.) What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? Always look at the judge 11.) What would you like your future career to be? Dentist or Vet 12.) Who is your role model? My Daddy 13.) If you could be any mythical creature, what would it be and why? A unicorn because I love unicorns so much!

pattern? Grulla 4.) Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? My first showmanship win was in Sulphur Springs. I won a pretty wooden belt buckle box. 5.) What is your funniest TLBT moment? When Libby said “Hi, my name is Libby Butterfinger”.  I always laugh about it. 6.) Do you enjoy showing Longhorns? Why? Yes, because it’s fun and I get to spend time with my family.

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TLBT MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: 1.) How old are you? 9 years old 2.) How long have you been in the TLBT? A year and a half 3.) What is your favorite Longhorn show? Kaufman, because they have pizza and dancing on Friday night. 4.) What is your favorite Longhorns name and why is he/she your favorite? My favorite Longhorn is my TLBGCA donation steer LAR Gravity Storm because I won him and I like how he looks.

CODY ABEL 5.) Who is your role model? My role model is Caden Grace. He inspires me to keep going because he shows those big steers. 6.) What is your favorite color and pattern on a Longhorn? My favorite color pattern is brindle and white, like my steer CTA Five O’Clock Special. 7.) What do you do outside of showing Longhorns? I am a Cub Scout and compete in UIL. I like to play video games. 8.) What is your favorite Disney show? Big Hero 6 9.) Do you like Marvel or DC more? I’m not into superheros, so I don’t know.

Special Thanks Thank you to Sarah Danley (Danley Cattle Company) for donating 1 heifer and 3 steers and the Thompson Family (Bull & Barrel Longhorns) for donating a steer to the NTLBA Holiday Extravaganza. People like you give these youth so many opportunities! We appreciate you.

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Show Results November 25, 2019 OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 30: 1. RHL G ROLLIE, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. JUSTICE OF THE PEACE BCB, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX CLASS 31: 1. DC VEGAS, Hailey Mann, WAXAHACHIE, TX 2. BRR HOT WINGS, Alissa Butler, DECATUR, TX CLASS 32: 1. CACTUS JACK PLR, Adriana Fabela, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. FL IRON SPIRIT, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 33: 1. DISCOVERY CASH C P, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX

Haltered Bull Junior Champion: DANCES FOR THE LADIES 69, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK

Youth Steer Senior Champion: DISCOVERY CASH C P, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: DC VEGAS, Hailey Mann, WAXAHACHIE, TX

CANADIAN NATIONAL TEXAS LONGHORN SHOW CLASS 22: 1. DANCES FOR THE LADIES 69, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK 2. OT WYOMING WIN, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB CLASS 23: 2. MAGIC MIKE 19, Gus Joyes, ATHABASCA, AB CLASS 29: 1. OT WIN KING WIN, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB Haltered Bull Senior Champion: OT WIN KING WIN, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB Haltered Bull Grand Champion: DANCES FOR THE LADIES 69, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: OT WIN KING WIN, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. SWEET BUT ROWDY 59, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK CLASS 4: 1. OT RATTLING BONNIE, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB 2. FAIRY DUST, Pete and Leann Hildebrand, HANLEY, SK Free Female Junior Champion: SWEET BUT ROWDY 59, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: OT RATTLING BONNIE, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB CLASS 9: 1. SUCCESS ON THE LINE 98, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK 2. TULSA TIME 28, Gus Joyes, ATHABASCA, AB CLASS 11: 1. DANCING BELINDA 27, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK Free Female Senior Champion: DANCING BELINDA 27, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: SUCCESS ON THE LINE 98, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK CLASS 16: 1. DANCING TO SUCCESS 66, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK CLASS 17: 1. OT BONNIE B, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB 2. SHOW ME TO SUCCESS 43, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK CLASS 18: 1. OT ANNIE DE, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB CLASS 19: 1. NUTMEG 7/4, Double D Arena, OUTLOOK, SK Free Mature Female Champion: OT ANNIE DE, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: OT BONNIE B, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. OT WHITE LIGHTNING, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB Steer Junior Champion: OT WHITE LIGHTNING, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB Steer Grand Champion: OT WHITE LIGHTNING, One Tree Ranching Co. LTD, PATRICIA, AB

NTLBA HOLIDAY XTRAVAAGANZA POINTS ONLY #1 YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

December 6, 2019

CLASS 2: 1. TWISTED W’S LADY LIBERTY, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX CLASS 3: 1. ML BABY BLUE, Kaylee Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX 2. OL VEGA, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 4: 1. STRIKIN’ R TIME TO SHINE, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. T-REX MOS EISLEY, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 5: 1. HIGH CLASS CP, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. HD ZSA ZSA, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: HIGH CLASS CP, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: HD ZSA ZSA, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX CLASS 8: 1. JCG RUBY TUESDAY, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR LADY JC, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX CLASS 9: 1. TB LOLA THE SHOWGIRL, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. RCC PEACHES N CREAM 23, Denise Roberson, RED OAK, TX CLASS 10: 1. HAYWIRE SUGAR BOOMBOOM, Bonnie Welborn, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 11: 1. HD SAMSONITE’S STEFFY, Taylor Trahern, CLEBURNE, TX 2. RAFTER J2 LIBERTY HILL, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: HAYWIRE SUGAR BOOMBOOM, Bonnie Welborn, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: JCG RUBY TUESDAY, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: HIGH CLASS CP, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: HAYWIRE SUGAR BOOMBOOM, Bonnie Welborn, WEATHERFORD, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 17: 1. OCC CLEAR SHOT, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK CLASS 18: 1. SHY’S STARBURST, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX 2. TB MAXIMUS, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 19: 1. ANCHOR T SHIPWRECK, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. OL PROVIDER, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 20: 1. HD FIREBALL, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX 2. MAGIC DRAGON C4, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 21: 1. TL REVIVAL, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Youth Bull Grand Champion: TL REVIVAL, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: HD FIREBALL, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. TB LUCKY SHOT, Sydney Stiles, GRAPEVINE, TX 2. HI 5’S TIME OUT, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK CLASS 27: 1. 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. OL DUSTY ROAD, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: TB LUCKY SHOT, Sydney Stiles, GRAPEVINE, TX

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Youth Steer Grand Champion: 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TB LUCKY SHOT, Sydney Stiles, GRAPEVINE, TX

NTLBA HOLIDAY XTRAVAAGANZA December 7, 2019 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. AMAZING GRACE CP, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. TB MCKINLEY, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 4: 1. FLOSSY TENBAR, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX 2. MEDUSA 3/19, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 5: 1. HIGH CLASS CP, Robertson Cattle Co., LUBBOCK, TX 2. HD BIRDIE, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: HIGH CLASS CP, Robertson Cattle Co., LUBBOCK, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: FLOSSY TENBAR, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 8: 1. SANDDOLLAR SKYWAY, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. SUNRISE SCARLET, Jerry Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 9: 1. MONA LISA 11/18, Danley Cattle, Inc, SEMINOLE, TX 2. TH REISLING BEACH, Jerry Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 10: 1. HD VIOLET 68, Michael & Valerie Cannaday, ARGYLE, TX 2. ROCKY ROSE C4, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 11: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. CN SUMMERTIME SHANDY, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: HD VIOLET 68, Michael & Valerie Cannaday, ARGYLE, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: HIGH CLASS CP, Robertson Cattle Co., LUBBOCK, TX CLASS 16: 1. LW AMARILLO’S ON MY MIND, Kevin and Laury Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX 2. DIAMOND Q ZOEY, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 17: 1. DIAMOND Q DELILA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. COOKIE 111, 5 G Farm, BOYD, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: DIAMOND Q DELILA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: COOKIE 111, 5 G Farm, BOYD, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 21: 1. OCC CLEAR SHOT, Walker Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK CLASS 22: 1. COUGAR BAIT, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. TB MAXIMUS, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 23: 1. DIAMOND Q ZANTANA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. SLEEPY JOE 1/19, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 24: 1. HIGH REDEMPTION CP, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. RAFTER M PATRIOT STORM, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: HIGH REDEMPTION CP, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q ZANTANA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 27: 1. TL REVIVAL, Walker Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK 2. EL CHAPO TENBAR, Danley Cattle, Inc, SEMINOLE, TX CLASS 28: 1. DOMINION C P, Sharer Family Longhorns, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. KF AIN’T NO COWBOY, Kourtis Family Farms, LLC, OWASSO, OK CLASS 29: 1. TL TANMAN, Adalyn Hamilton, WEATHERFORD, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: DOMINION C P, Sharer Family Longhorns, WEATHERFORD, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: KF AIN’T NO COWBOY, Kourtis Family Farms, LLC, OWASSO, OK Haltered Bull Grand Champion: DOMINION C P, Sharer Family Longhorns, WEATHERFORD, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: HIGH REDEMPTION CP, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX

PRODUCE OF DAM

CLASS 34: 1. CHAPARRAL ASIAN DANCER, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX

GET OF SIRE

CLASS 35: 1. TC3 BULLETT HOLE, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. TL BULLETPROOF, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. TWISTED W’S LADY LIBERTY, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX CLASS 3: 1. ML BABY BLUE, Kaylee Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX 2. OL VEGA, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 4: 1. MEDUSA 3/19, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. NOBODY’S FOOL, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX CLASS 5: 1. HIGH CLASS CP, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX 2. HD ZSA ZSA, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: HIGH CLASS CP, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: HD ZSA ZSA, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX CLASS 8: 1. JCG RUBY TUESDAY, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR LADY JC, Zoe Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX CLASS 9: 1. MONA LISA 11/18, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX 2. LV TENBAR, Tessa Tronzano, RICHARDSON, TX CLASS 10: 1. HAYWIRE SUGAR BOOMBOOM, Bonnie Welborn, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 11: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. CN SUMMERTIME SHANDY, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Youth Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: JCG RUBY TUESDAY, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX

CLASS 5: 1. HHR FRECKLES PRIDE, Kathleen and Jeff Hoffman, PARADISE, TX 2. NEON ROW CP, Kevin and Laury Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX

Youth Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: HIGH CLASS CP, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX

Steer Senior Champion: HHR FRECKLES PRIDE, Kathleen and Jeff Hoffman, PARADISE, TX Steer Senior Champion Reserve: NEON ROW CP, Kevin and Laury Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

Steer Grand Champion: HHR FRECKLES PRIDE, Kathleen and Jeff Hoffman, PARADISE, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: NEON ROW CP, Kevin and Laury Rooker, POOLVILLE, TX

CLASS 17: 1. OCC CLEAR SHOT, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK CLASS 18: 1. COUGAR BAIT, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. SHY’S STARBURST, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX CLASS 19: 1. SLEEPY JOE 1/19, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. ANCHOR T SHIPWRECK, Kyden Garrett, BLANCHARD, OK CLASS 20: 1. HIGH REDEMPTION CP, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. 5R ROCKETMAN, Levi Sosebee, RED OAK, TX CLASS 21: 1. EL CHAPO TENBAR, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX 2. TL REVIVAL, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Youth Bull Grand Champion: HIGH REDEMPTION CP, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: COUGAR BAIT, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. TL PHREEK, Benjamin Sosebee, RED OAK, TX 2. TB LUCKY SHOT, Emily Gray, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 27: 1. 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. OL DUSTY ROAD, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: OL DUSTY ROAD, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 30: 1. HX3 WHEELER, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. DUSTY CP, Annika Lindt, SUNSET, TX CLASS 31: 1. HERCULES 10/18, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. BLACK PEARL LP, Danalee Abel, PARADISE, TX CLASS 32: 1. HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. FL IRON SPIRIT, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 33: 1. DISCOVERY CASH C P, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX

NTLBA HOLIDAY XTRAVAAGANZA POINTS ONLY #2 YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

December 8, 2019

CLASS 2: 1. TWISTED W’S LADY LIBERTY, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX CLASS 3: 1. OL VEGA, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. AMAZING GRACE CP, Levi Sosebee, RED OAK, TX CLASS 4: 1. MEDUSA 3/19, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. NOBODY’S FOOL, Levi Sosebee, RED OAK, TX CLASS 5: 1. HIGH CLASS CP, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX 2. R4 HIGH HOPES, Adalyn Hamilton, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: HIGH CLASS CP, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: R4 HIGH HOPES, Adalyn Hamilton, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 8: 1. SUNRISE SANDRA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. JCG RUBY TUESDAY, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 9: 1. SANDDOLLAR ANNIEOAKLEY, Kassidy Schwarz, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. MONA LISA 11/18, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX CLASS 10: 1. DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 11: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR DREAM GIRL, Levi Sosebee, RED OAK, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX

Youth Steer Senior Champion: HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: DISCOVERY CASH C P, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX

Youth Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: HIGH CLASS CP, Cole Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX

Youth Steer Grand Champion: 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. WO DRAGLINE, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. ML CURIOUS GEORGE, Adalyn Hamilton, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 2: 1. TOMMIE TUCKER PLR, Sierra Skidmore, BURLESON, TX 2. LW KING GEORGE, Veteran’s Heritage Farm, RHOME, TX Steer Junior Champion: TOMMIE TUCKER PLR, Sierra Skidmore, BURLESON, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: WO DRAGLINE, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX

CLASS 17: 1. OCC CLEAR SHOT, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK CLASS 18: 1. COUGAR BAIT, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. RAFTER M HUNK OF COAL, Kassidy Schwarz, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 19: 1. OL PROVIDER, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. ANCHOR T SHIPWRECK, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 20: 1. HD FIREBALL, Zoe Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX 2. 5R ROCKETMAN, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 21: 1. EL CHAPO TENBAR, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX 2. TL REVIVAL, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK Youth Bull Grand Champion: HD FIREBALL, Zoe Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: COUGAR BAIT, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. HI 5’S TIME OUT, Halle Hance, COLLINSVILLE, OK 2. TL PHREEK, Benjamin Sosebee, RED OAK, TX CLASS 27: 1. 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. OL DUSTY ROAD, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: OL DUSTY ROAD, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 30: 1. HX3 WHEELER, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. DUSTY CP, Annika Lindt, SUNSET, TX CLASS 31: 1. HERCULES 10/18, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. JCG KAMINARI, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 32: 1. HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. TOP DECK 87, Tessa Tronzano, RICHARDSON, TX CLASS 33: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. RAFTER J2 TRAVELER, Megan Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: 41 LUKA LIKA SANDDOLLAR, Kingsley Dickey, WEATHERFORD, TX

Attention Show Chairs! Results are published once official results are received and verified as correct in the HORNS show management system. Please submit your official results to the TLBAA office as soon as possible to avoid a delay in being published in Trails Magazine and to ensure points are kept current. Please feel free to submit champion/Reserve Champion photos as well. Candids may be submitted to myra@tlbaa.org and may be used based on space available.

See upcoming show dates on pg.56

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February 2020 | 51


ALABAMA

CALIFORNIA

FLORIDA

MISSOURI

INDIANA

MONTANA

IOWA

KANSAS

NORTH CAROLINA

OKLAHOMA

COLORADO

52 | February 2020

LOUISIANA

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


OKLAHOMA

PENNSYLVANIA

NORTH TEXAS

NORTH TEXAS Find all the information and forms you need at

www.tlbaa.org

OREGON

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February 2020 | 53


SOUTH TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

Classifieds Auctioneers

Cattle For Sale

BUTLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR BIG-HORNED BUTLER CATTLE.

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

UTAH

WEST TEXAS

BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS - Est. 1995. Conformation, color, disposition, pedigree and HORNS.  Reasonable prices.  Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK.  580 765-9961 (calls only) or email cmuchmor@ poncacity.net. www.beavercreeklonghorns.com YOUR CATTLE COULD BE FOR SALE HERE - The classified are an economical way to let people know what you have for sale or services you offer. For more than just breeding stock - beef, transporttion, ranch supplies - anything can have a category here!

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

CANADA ALBERTA

www.lonewolfranch.net Trade & Barter TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380.

Advertising options everyone can afford! Breeders Guide Ads: $365 for one year (That’s just $1 a day!) Classified Ads: $15/month - Standard text $25/month - Boxed 54 | February 2020

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Advertising Index —A— AA Longhorns....................................... 37, 52 A & S Land & Cattle.....................................53 Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...........................9 Arch Acres.....................................................52 Astera Meadows..........................................54 —B— Bar H Ranch........................................... 41, 52 Beadle Land & Cattle............................. 9, 52 Bennett Longhorn Cattle Co......................9 Big Valley Longhorns..................................52 Bentwood Ranch.................................. 31, 54 BPT Longhorns..............................................9 Buckhorn Cattle Co.............................40, 52 Bull Creek Longhorns.................................19 Butler Breeders..............................................9 Butler Museum..............................................9 —C— Cattle Baron’s Premier Longhorn Sale........... 21 Caballo Bravo Longhorns..........................52 Cedar View Ranch.......................................52 Champion Genetics................................... 46 Christa Cattle Co...........................................9 Circle Double C Ranch..............................39 CP Longhorns............................................. 20 Crazy Cattle Co...........................................53 —D— Dalgood Longhorns......................................9 Danley Enterprises, Inc............................... 15 DCCI Equipment........................................ 46 Diamond C Ranch.......................................52 Diamond Q Longhorns..............................53 Dickinson Cattle Co...................................BC DK Longhorn Ranch...................................52 Double A Longhorns........................... 37, 52 Doug Hunt Longhorns...............................54 —E— El Coyote Ranch...................................... 1, 17 —F— Farr Cross Longhorns...............................IBC FHR Longhorns................................... IFC, 43 Flying D Ranch.............................................53 Flying Diamond Ranch...............................52 Four Color Press......................................... 46 Fritz Longhorns............................................23 —G— G&G Longhorns............................................. 7 —H— Harrell Ranch...............................................33 Haywire Cattle............................................ 20 Helm Cattle Co.....................................43, 53 Hicks Longhorns...........................................9 Hickman Longhorns...................................54 Hubbell Longhorns.......................... 5, 37, 43

— I— ITTLA Futurity...............................................32 —H— Hudson Longhorns.......................................2 Hudson/Valentine Auctions........................3 Hughes, Scott...............................................37 Husky Branding Irons................................ 46 —J— Jack Mountain Ranch.................................54 J.M.R. Cattle Co...........................................53 J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................54 —K— Khaos Longhorns........................................37 King, Terry.............................................. 25, 52 Kourtis Family Farms LLC...........................53 —L— Legacy Sale.................................................. 10, 11 Legends Longhorn Sale & Futurity..............35 Lemley Auction Services............................29 Lightning Longhorns..................................54 Little Ace Cattle Co.......................................9 Lodge Creek Longhorns............................52 Lone Wolf Ranch.........................................53 Loomis Ranch..............................................25 Lucas Ranch.................................................52 —M— McLeod Ranch...............................................9 Middlecreek Farms......................................25 Moose Willow Longhorns.........................52 Moriah Farms...............................................53 —N— Northbrook Cattle Company....................53 —O— Oliver Longhorns.........................................53 —P— Pineywoods Longhorn Sale......................36 —R— R 3 Hilltop Ranch.........................................42 Rio Vista Ranch..............................................9 Roberts Longhorns.......................................9 Rockin H Longhorns...................................27 Rockin Hil Longhorns.................................52 Rockin I Longhorns.....................................54 Rocking P Longhorns...................................9 Rocky Mountain Longhorns.....................52 Rolling D Ranch...........................................52 Ross Ranch Horns.......................................53 Running Arrow Longhorns........................42 —S— Safari B Ranch..............................................52 Sand Hills Ranch..........................................52 Silver T Ranch...............................................34 Singing Coyote Ranch...............................54 SS Longhorns...............................................53

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

JUST FOR GRINS HAVE A CUTE PIC? Send us your photo with a funny caption included! Send your photo with caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 6030 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Photo may be used in a future issue due to number of responses

“Be sure to get my good side!” Thanks to Cheri Oakes of Roberts, MT for the submission. Star Creek Ranch.........................................54 Struthoff Ranch.................................... FC, 54 —T— Talley Longhorns.........................................37 Thate Cattle Co.............................................9 Thurmond Longhorns................................54 TLBAA Beef Producers...............................47 Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9 Triple S Bar Ranch.......................................53 TS Adcock Longhorns................................54 —W— Walkers U7-..................................................54 WB Longhorns.............................................53 Westfarms Inc................................................9 Westhaven Longhorns...............................52 Wichita Fence Company...........................42

UPCOMING ISSUES: March: Longhorn Weekend Wrap-Up April: Longhorn Beef May: Brood Cow Edition February 2020 | 55


SAVE THE DATE FEBRUARY 2020

TEXAS LONGHORN

Coming Events

MAY 2020

FEBRUARY 6-8 • STLA Longhorn Show at The San Antonio Stock Show, AT&T Center, San Antonio, TX. Bubba Bollier, bollier7572@yahoo.com or 325-247-6249. Qualify Haltered, Free, Trophy Steers, & Youth. FEBRUARY 14-16 • San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo, San Angelo Fairgrounds, San Angelo, TX. Contact Dennis Urbantke 325-656-9321, dennis@thlonghorns.com. Qualifying Haltered, Youth & Youth Points Only. FEBRUARY 22 • Matagorda County Fair, Matagorda County Fairgrounds, Bay City, TX. Entry Deadline February 7th. Stephen Head 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail. com. Qualifying Youth.

MARCH 2020 MARCH 6-7 • Cattle Baron Premier Longhorn Sale & Winchester Futurity, Navasota, Texas. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259, Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com or www. TLBGCA.com. MARCH 13-15 • NTLBA Spring Show, Hopkins County Civic Center, Sulphur Springs, TX. Entry deadline 2/26/20. Contact John Oliver 972-268-0083, joliver210@yahoo.com or Brenda Oliver 972-268-0031, boliver84@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Youth Points Only, Miniatures & Trophy Steers. MARCH 14 • Pineywoods Marketing Longhorn Sale, West Auction Barn, West, TX. Contacts: Keith DuBose (979) 277-2161 or kwdubose@gmail.com; Russell Fairchild (254) 485-3434 or fairchildranch@yahoo.com; Joel Lemley (325) 668-3552 or jlem@camalott. com. MARCH 14 • Rodeo Austin, Travis County Expo Center, Austin, TX. Contact Kathy Bruner, kathy@therockingbranch.com or 512-689-8624. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Miniatures & Trophy Steers. MARCH 20-21 • Texas Longhorn Legacy Sale, Grapevine, TX. Contact Chase Vasut, chasevasut@yahoo.com or Bear Davidson, beardavidson@ymail.com. MARCH 27-29 • OTLA Spring Shoot-Out, Payne County Expo Center, Stillwater, OK. Entry Deadline March 8, 2019. Contact David Edwards at 918-557-0364 or dledwards. texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Trophy Steers, & Youth. MARCH 28 • 42nd B&C Spring Sale, Grand River Livestock Barn, Tina, MO. Sale auctioneers: Shawn & Bill Sayre. Contact: Shawn 660-734-8782 MARCH 27 • YMBL South Texas State Fair, Ford Arena, Beaumont, TX. Contact Jessica Wade at 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. MARCH 28 • Texoma Spring Classic, Overbrook Stockyards, Overbrook, OK. Sale hosts: Bob & Pam Loomis, Dale Hunt & Sherrill Caddel, and Chris & Christina Clark. Contact Dale Hunt at 402-214-4851.

MAY 22-23 • Hudson-Valentine Bluegrass Classic Sale & Futurity, Lexington, KY. Lorinda Valentine (270) 996-2046 or panthercreekranch@att.net. For more info, visit www.hudsonvalentineauctions.com

JUNE 2020 JUNE 12-13 • The Oregon Trail Sale, Dundee, Oregon. Scott Picker 503-572-5656, Scott@aspencreeklandscaping.com. JUNE 19 • Great Northern Cheesehead Longhorn Futurity, 5D Ranch, Gresham, WI. Dan Huntington (715) 853-7608 or Ali Mast (715) 495-4369. JUNE 20 • Great Northern Longhorn Classic Sale, 5D Ranch, Gresham, WI. Dan Huntington (715) 853-7608 or Ali Mast (715) 495-4369.

AUGUST 2020 AUGUST 7-9 • The Source Summer Showdown, presented by Kubota and Pinnacle Logistics. Will Rogers Memorial Complex, Fort Worth, TX. www.TheSourceCattle.com TheSourceCattle@gmail.com, Ryan Culpepper - 940-577-1753 AUGUST 21 • Regional Horn Measurement Competition, Central States Fair, Rapid City, SD. Scot O’Bryan (605) 344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605) 381-3998. AUGUST 22 • 2nd Annual Top Hand Invitational Longhorn Sale, Central States Fair, Rapid City, SD. Scot O’Bryan (605)344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605) 381-3998. AUGUST 23 • 5th Annual World Qualifying Longhorn Show, Central States Fair, Rapid City, SD. Scot O’Bryan (605) 344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605) 381-3998.

SEPTEMBER 2020 SEPTEMBER 5 • 23rd Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale, Lockhart, TX. Kaso Kety 985674-6492 or Michael McLeod (361) 771-5355. SEPTEMBER 11-12 • East Coast Longhorn Futurity and Sale, Culpepper, VA. Bear Davidson (540) 687-0050/beardavidson@ymail.com or Chase Vasut (512) 917-8654 SEPTEMBER 11-12 • Struthoff Deep In The Heart Of Texas Sale, San Antonio, TX. Lynn Struthoff (219) 473-7768, Josie Struthoff (210) 601-3464 or Lori McCarty (817) 991-8825. SEPTEMBER 18-19 • Hudson-Valentine Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction, Fort Worth, TX. Lorinda Valentine (270) 996-2046 or panthercreekranch@att.net. For more info, visit www.hudsonvalentineauctions.com SEPTEMBER 26 • 42nd B&C Fall Sale, Grand River Livestock Barn, Tina, MO. Sale auctioneers: Shawn & Bill Sayre. Contact: Shawn 660-734-8782.

APRIL 2020

OCTOBER 2020

APRIL 4 • Longhorn Opportunities Spotlight Sale, Contact Justin Rombeck 816-5361083 or justinthelonghornman@gmail.com or Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@ camalott.com. APRIL 10-11 • 7th Annual Blue Ridge Longhorn Sale, Contact Bubba Bollier at bollier7572@yahoo.com or 325-247-6249. APRIL 17-18 • Cherry Blossom Sale, Culpepper, VA. Bear Davidson (540) 687-0050/ beardavidson@ymail.com or Chase Vasut (512) 917-8654. APRIL 24-26 • Great Western Trail Days, Goree Expo Center, Coleman, TX. Contact Ashlee Miller, slickrockdesigns@gmail.com, (325) 669-2292 or Catherine Morris, morriscatran@taylortel.net, (325) 829-9219. Qualifying Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Youth Points Only. APRIL 24-26 • STLA Spring Show, Rockdale show moved to LLANO in 2020! – John L. Kuykendal Event Center, Llano, TX. Sandi Nordhausen, 512-750-1350, sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com or or Merrilou Russell, 361-781-4221, crose@ cactusroselonghorns.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth (x2) & Points Only Youth. Haltered Trophy Steers. Miniatures. APRIL 25 • Midwest 25th Anniversary Sale, Winfield, KS. Sale Host Debbie Bowman. Contact Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com.

OCTOBER 1-3 • Tulsa State Fair, OK Ford Dealers Arena, Tulsa, OK. Contact David Edwards at 918-557-0364 or dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth & Trophy Steers. OCTOBER 2-4 • East Texas State Fair, Tyler, TX. Entry Deadline Aug. 27th. Enter online at etstatefair.com. John & Brenda Oliver 972-268-0083 or joliver210@yahoo. com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Trophy Steers. OCTOBER 16-18 • STLA Llano Longhorn Show, Llano, TX. Entry Deadline Oct. 9. Sandi Nordhausen 512-750-1350 / sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com or Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, & Youth. Trophy Steers, Miniatures. OCTOBER 17 • Loomis / Hunt Longhorn Production Sale, Overbrook Stockyards, Overbrook, OK. Contact Dale Hunt at 402-214-4851 OCTOBER 30-NOV. 1 • Ark-La-Tex Annual Fall Show, George H. Henderson Jr. Exposition Center, Lufkin ,TX. Contact Jessica Wade, 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Miniatures.

MAY 2020 MAY 1-2 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale, Johnson City, TX. Alan & Teresa Sparger 210445-8798 or dodgeram52@yahoo.com. www.redmccombslonghorns.com MAY 1-3 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Entry Deadline April 22nd. Stephen Head 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth, Trophy Steers, Miniatures. MAY 7-9 • Millennium Futurity, Somervell Expo Center, Glen Rose, TX. Entry forms available at www.millenniumfuturity.com. Christy Randolph 713-703-8458 or lpinesranch@aol.com

56 | February 2020

NOVEMBER 2020 NOVEMBER 14 • Texas Longhorn & Ranch Horse Fall Select Sale, Crossroads Centre, Oyen, AB. Ron Walker, 403-548-6684, Cell 403-528-0200, walkersu7texaslonghorns@gmail.com, www.walkerslonghorns.com NOVEMBER 14 • State Fair of Louisiana, Fairgrounds, Shreveport, LA. Entry deadline 10/10/20. Contact Jessica Wade at 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Trophy Steers. NOVEMBER 20-22 • Kaufman Police Association Longhorn Show, Henderson County Fairgrounds, Kaufman, TX. Entry deadline Oct. 31st. Joel Norris, (972) 533-4945 or joel1983@embarqmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. Trophy Steers & Miniatures. Affiliates: Please submit a completed show application to pam@tlbaa. org in order to have your TLBAA World Qualifying show listed. All other events, sales, field days or other activities may email your information directly to myra@tlbaa.org.

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Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

February 2020 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

February 2020 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America