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T H E TUTTLE COMPANY PRINTERS, PUBLISHERS A N D B O O K B I N D E R S RUTLAND. VERMONT


The Hack, Volume I Price

by Mail, One Dollar and a Half

Address, Harry H. Runyon Hackettstown, N. J.


7-0

.

s e v t aeorge Berry UUlbitrey, DtD.

THIS VOLUME IS

RESPECTFULLY AND

AFFECTIONATELY bEDICATED


Morose a n d moody, evil-eyed, We see ill-nature's foolish pride. One step removed, in willowy grace, S t a n d s Mirth, a smile upon her face, Replete with light and a i r y things, While a l l around the welkin rings. Here her attending retinue Of happy youths a n d maidens too, Met face to face in coy amaze, They to the other bend their gaze. We see amidst the f a i r y t r a i n T h e eyes whose favor we would g a i n ; Those eyes of brown or peerless blue With tresses d a r k or golden hue. And something floating on the wind Tells that our looks have been defined, And intimates in artless glee, T h a t they would please a s well as we. And so this book, a tribute small, But which in spirit covers all,And friendship with i t a s it goes, E a c h to the other now bestows.


Wev* Oeorge lberry Ulbitney, D,D, 1Presldent~Emeritus

T H I S VOLUME IS

,

RESPECTFULLY AND

AFFECTIONATELY BEDICATED


The Hack RUNKING B E T W E E N

T HE C E N T E N A RY C O LLE G I ATE I N S T I T U T E AND T H E

G E N ER A L P u n ~ ~ c CO N TR O LLED UY THE

ATIILETICASSOCIATION, AND

I N G PERSONA1,ITIES

CONTAINIXG I N T E RE S T -

A N D S O M E BAGGAGE, DRI'I'EN

BY

E. R A Y M O N D R I E G E L , Chief

J. C. D A Y, C L A RE N C E WALKLRY,FRANK K. S N Y D E R , E. R . H A N C E H. P. S HE A RM A N , D. C. IJRNER, A. E. FIWLAY, Assistants 13. 13. RUNYON, Business Manager ;!

C. M. D ~ YAsst. , Manager


PREFACE T is often said that a small group of friends is better than a wide circle of acquaintances. In our case we think differently. We prefer a wide circle of acquaintances, because experience has taught us that all who know of us, love us, and become our friends upon meeting us. As a mear~sof increasing this number of acquaintances, this boolc has been prepared. I t is the first of its kind, and therefore has a n historical character. We know the critical eye will detect flaws and shortcomings, but in spite'of them, we offer this, the product of loving toil, to the reader, confident that i t will be received with good will on his part. T o the dissatisfied ones be i t said, " The work will be improved upon next year." We assure all that the articles contained herein have been written in good faith with no thought of malice. If the book serves to make known to many the name of our beloved Prep. School, if it strengthens school-spirit until the students' interests are bound to hers, if it promotes good and retards evil, we shall consider our debt of gratitude to C. C. I. partly paid.

'


1903 January February March April April May May June June June June June June June June June September December December

5 20 20 1 10 23 30 6 12 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 16 7 18

School work resumed. Diokosophian-Whitney Lyceum Anniversary. Peithosophian-Alpha P h i Anniversary. S p r i n g term opens. E a s t e r recess begins. Diolzosophian open meeting. Peithosophian open meeting. Alpha P h i open meeting. Annual musical recital. Whitney Lyceum open meeting. Annual sermons. Wesley Bi-centenary day. Contest in elocution. Class Day-Alumni reunion. President's reception. Commencement. F a l l term opens. Winter term opens. Christmas recess begins.

1904 January February March March April June June June June June June

4 26 21 25 1 10 11 12 13 14 15

School work resumed. Diokosophian-Whitney Lyceum Anniversary. S p r i n g term opens. Peithosophian-Alpha P h i Anniversary. E a s t e r recess begins. Annual musical recital. Athletic Day. Annual sermons. President's reception. Class Day- Alumni reunions. Commencement.


--

Trustees HON. G EORGE J. F ERRY J AMES W. J ACKSON, ESQ. H ON. E DWARD L. D OBBINS

.

Ministers-Term Exp~res 1904

C HARLES M. A NDERSON, D.D. C HARLES S. R YMAN, D.D.

.

,

President Secretary T~easurer

.

Westfield Paterson

Term Exp~res 1905

. .

H ENRY SPELLMEYER, D.D. D.D. A LEXANDER H. TUTTLE, LOUISC. MULLER, D.D. DAVIDG. DOWNEY, D.D. .

Newark Summit Paterson Brooklyn, N. Y.

Term Exp~res 1906

W ILLIAM F. ANDERSON, PH.D. W ALLACE MCMULLEN, D.D. H ENRY A. BUTTZ, D.D., LL.D. G EORGE H. W HITNEY, D.D.

Ossining, N. Y. New York.City . Madison Plainfield

Laymen-Term Explres 1904

H ON. W ILLIAM H. MURPHY . B ENJAMIN H. W HITEHEAD, ESQ.

Term Exp~res~ g o g

H ON. GEORGE J. F ERRY W ILLIAM H. C LARK , ESQ.. MILTON E. B LANCHARD, ESQ. OSCAR S. TEALE, ESQ. .

.

Term Expires 1906

W ALTER M. MCGEE J OHN GRIURELL, ESQ. J AMES W. J ACKSON, ESQ. COL.E DWARD L. DOBBINS

:/

. . .

Newark Newarlc Mendharn Newton Newarlc Newarlc

. Plainfield Philadelphia, Pa. . Plainfield . Morristown


13

VOL. I.

Faculty REV. GEORGE H ENRY 'CYHITNEY, D.D., President Emeritus, Plainfield, N. J. R EV. E UGENE .ALLEN NOBLE, D.D., President, English BibIc Born in Brooklyn, New York. Attended private schools. Alumnus of Cen tenary Collegiate Institute, Wesleyan University, Garrett Biblical Institute (Theological department of Northwestern University). Ordained a s minister of the Methodist F>piscopal church. Pastor of charges i n Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Brooklyn. New Yorlt. Superintendent of Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York. President of Centenary Collegiate Institute.

R EV. A LBERT OVERTON H A M M O N D , A.M., Ancient Languages, Greek and Roman Xistory A.M., Wesleyan University, 1805. n a r y Collegiate Institute, 1878

-.

Cente-


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14

FREDERIC LEROYBROWN, B.S., Dt@ft??W~li' uf M&&awQ'its B.$., s y r a c u s e Uhiaersity, IW, Instructor a t Delaware Academy. M a t b m a t i c a a n d Sciences a t New Y ~ r kMilitary Academy. Centenary Collegiate InstituQ, 1908 --,

G EORGE EDWARDDENPIAN, A.B., House Master, Athletic Dirq.ctor, Elementury Latin A.B., Williams College, 1808. Instructor at Riverview Military Academy. Post-Graduate work, Columbia. Physical Director and Assista n t i n French a n d L a t i n a t Kentucky Central University. Athletic Director a t Michigan Agricultural College. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1903

-.


VOL. I.

15

ROBERT MALCOLM GAY, A.M., English Dgparfment Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1000. A.M., Columbia, 1901. Instructor at Princeton Preparatory School. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1903

-.

C HARLES

MILLS S LOCUM ,

A.B., PH.B.,

Department of Science A.B., Ph.B., Williams College, 1895. State Normal College, 1898. Instructor in New York State High Schools. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1903

-.


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16

F RANK L ESLIE STONE, Department of Music Boston Conservatory of Music, 1806. School of Music Journalism, 1898. Member of National Sinfonia Fraternity of America. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1903

-.

F RANCIS P HILLIPS, Depard/?~entof Commerce Rochester Business University, 1894. Instructor in business schools. Navy and Interior Department at Washington, D. C. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1903

-.


17

VOL. I.

C HARLOTTE JOSEPHINE HOAG, Preceptress Modern Languages

ANNAMAY MIRTEENES . Academic Studies

MARY GRAY a

Paintikg and Drawiep

MRS. G RACE DYER K NIGHT Vocal Music

EVA S OPHIE

FORT;

Modem Languages

KATHERINE WHITE Elocution

CLARA F ARRINGTON Yialk and Mandolin

ALBERT E. MAY Accountanf

Mas. ESTHER MARVELLE Assistunt Matron


VOL. I.

19

History of C . C . I. I1E year 1866 was the centenary year of American Methodism. As a recognition of the fact that the Methodist Church had flourished and grown on the soil of the new continent special celebrations were held during the centenary year. Some of these celebrations were merely temporary-shouts of glory that filled the air ; others were permanently effective-thanlr offerings to God for his continued favor. One of these permanent expressions of centenary gratitude is the Institute a t Haclrettsto.irn, called " The Centenary Collegiate Institute." While it was planned and urged'as early as 1866, it was not opened for students until 1874. The delay in building and opening the school was due to the careful management of a board of trustees who were unwilling to establish a school until it could be done without debt. The high standard of business integrity has been a marked feature of the trustees for thirty years. When the doors were opened for students in the fall of 1874, the building was acknowledged to be well adapted for school purposes, and for many years was described " as the best of its class." It was built of red brick, five stories in height, with n central square tower. From the railroad and from every view-point of the surrounding country it was the most prominent feature of the landscape about Hackettstown. The most remarlrable single fact about the school was its extraordinary success from the beginning of its career. This was due in large measure to the magnetic personality of its president, tlie Rev. Dr. George H. Whitney, who gave distinguished and meritorious service t o the school through a large period of years. He was appointed president in 1869, and spent the first five years in the delicate task of directing and advising the rising school. In 1874 he assqmed the active duties of the


20

THE HACK

position, and continued in charge until 1895. Impaired health con~pelled his resignation, and it may be said without hesitation that no man ever did richer and truer service in the cause of Christian education and good citizenship than the greatly beloved and successful president of the Institute. In 1895 the Rev. Dr. W. P. Ferguson was appointed to the presidency. He served five years. During the fall of 1899 the school building was destroyed by fire. The buildings were completely consumed,

but not a life was lost. Among the heroic happenings of the night of the fire was the exhibition of cool bravery on the part of the preceptress, Miss C. J. Hoag, who called the roll of the young women students from memory, and directed the safe-guarding of each of them. After much discussion it was decided to rebuild, and plans were secured from numerous architects. The successful plans were those of Mr. 0.S. Teele of New Ydrlr City, and the school which now stands, ;I


VOL. I.

21

admirably planned, well built, and superbly equipped, is the result. It cost about $3oo,ooo. During the kime of its construction and for the first year of its opera;ion the president was Dr. Charles W. McCormick. The successful organization of courses, and many of the valuable arrangements of the school, are due to his prudent administration. In July, 1902, Dr. Eugene A. Noble, then superintendent of the Seney Hospital in Brooklyn, N. Y., came to the presidency. He is a graduate of the Institute, is devoted to its history and tradition, believes in its future, and is its enthusiastic advocate and champion. Among the devotedffriends and supporters of the Institute no name stands higher than that af the Hon. George J. Ferry, who has been president of the Board of Trustees for over twenty-five years, and whose gifts of time and money represent unexampled devotion and generosity. A striking fact about the faculty is that Professor 0. 0. Hammond has served for over twenty-five years as teacher of Greek. When the diminishing indebtedness upon the school is paid, and when a liberal endowment fund has been accumulated, the new and beautiful school which is so widely beloved will take its place among the strongest schools in America.


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Editorials CONTRIBUTORS- To all who have contributed time and labor toward the success of this book, the editors hereby express their grateful appreciation. GYMNASIUM-C. C. I. has a fairly well-equipped athletic department; one thing however is lacking, a new boys' gymnasium. During the long winter months, a gymnasium furnishes unique opportunities to develop the body and promote health. School spirit can only gain by systematic gymnasium work; wrestling teams, basketball teams, gymnasium contests, can be organized a t little or no expense. In the football and baseball season the swimming pool would be appreciated. Swimming as an exercise is unexcelled and its practical utility is evident. What is more enjoyable than a plunge in the pool or a dash through the limpid water? In a school of this kind a fine modern gymnasium would be a boon. We hope our desire will soon be realized. KING'S DAUGHTERS- Philanthropic principles, advocated by so many men of note and illustrated by munificent gifts lauded in newspapers, find here a t C. C. I. a humble, beautiful exemplification. Modestly, busily, the " daughters of The King" spy about and seize every opportunity to win with a smiling face something to brighten a sadder one. It is a cheering sight to see young girls apply themselves to manual tasks of all kinds to accumulate the small sums of money generously pledged (all money must be earned). Bound together for tlie purpose of helping, they send out of their circles rays of sympathy-and happiness to the less fortunate. These rays take up various shapes a t different times ; now they appear as a box of clothing ; now as a package of books for poor prisoners ; a t Christmas a box of toys for little folk. Continue, willing workers, send out your sunshine ; it will come back to you a hundredfold. ;/


VOL. I.

23

LEAGUES-The HACKETTSTONIAN has often advocated a general athletic league with other schools,-Blair Hall, Easton High and Pennington. The matter should be looked into during the summer and be settled by September. Last year a league for the promotion of oratory was arranged, a constitution drawn up ; meetings were to be held a t Trenton a t stated times, and a contest once a year a t one of the six schools concerned, the first to be at, Hackettstown. That the matter was not pushed is to be deplored ; the outgoing president had left the work in charge of the other officers. Let us understand C. C. I.'s interests arid take them to heart, and, while providing for diversion and pleasure, make good our claim for good speaking. LIBRARY.-Our public men a t Washington have a marvelous collection of books a t their disposal. The nation has ordered it so because to act and rule rightly men must know other men's opinions and experiences. Of the innumerable thoughts of men the spoken ones have left no trace; the written ones alone can guide and enrich us "Les paroles s'envoknf, Zds F'cri'ts resdent." Before the fire of 1899 the school owned a good library ; it was destroyed, and we have now but the beginning of a book collection. There are two ways open to increase it : alan~niwho have prospered ought to think of their Prep. School days and be generous ; sdzldents should pledge themselves to contribute each year one book (or its equivalent in money) towarcjs the enlarging of the library. A committee could be entrusted with the selection, and soon an ample source of information would enable us to pursue serious research in literature and science. MUSIC.-The school is prominent in music. Its recitals and other musical events always offer instrumental and vocal music of high order. Aside from the regular department work, the students show a great liking for music. At evening a good song with "banjo accompaniment" charms the listener's ear in the distance, while others "fill our eyes with tears." It is clear that with this love for music a series of lectures having for its purpose the broadening of our understanding and appreciation of good music, would be highly profitable. How often is the exhibition of talent a t a Friday Rhetoricals wasted on the impatient listener because the theme of the composition is unseen, or, if


24

THE HACK

seen, remains meaningless. While teaching what music expresses, a knowledge of the existing great works would certainly add to the education of the students. (The majority of us had never heard of " Carmen " when it was performed here last March !) This art goes hand in hand with the others-drawing, elocution, acting, etc., all of which tend to refine our nature and develop a cultured mind. SCHOOL FLOWER.-Writing poetry reveals most clearly how small our vocabulary is ; it also is the best means of increasing it. Each student should make it a rule to compose one short poem a week. T o encourage writing poetry inspired by C. C. I., it would be advantageous to have a school flower, which would be a symbol of our gratitude and devotion. We have fine school colors, well-sung and cherished ; let us have a school flower. Not only the poet, but the artist will be thankful. above all others ; this is partly TENNIS.-The sport of tennis is because there is no team work (every one plays as he wishes), partly because df the vigorous exercise it furnishes. This year there is much interest shown in tennis ; why not increase it still and make it permanent by organizing tournaments with other schools? Hackettstown could easily be made a tennis centre which, we are sure, would be supported by the neighboring schools. We h a w a friend in town who wouldgladly supply a cup, and we have a friend in. school who, unless we are greatly mistaken, will make athletics a t C. C. I. famous (we mean our coach, who, by the way, has started and encouraged the H AC K Board). Therefore let us be far-sighted and make use of our opportunity.


In memoriam

B O R N JULY 12TH. 1883 D l E D A U G U S T 1 5 ~ 1903 ~ .


VOL. I.

25

Alma Mater (Tune:

" Scott's

wha' h a e wi' Wallace bled")

Grim, defying Winter's horn, Age-scarred g u a r d s a n d battle-torn, Snow-clad hills a l l weather worn, . Form protectors true; Verdant heralds to her name, Silvery dells behold her fame, L a u d the shrine where wisdom'.; fame, Nurtured, lived a n d grew. Noble spirits of her care, S p i r i t s strong to do and dare, Extol their Alma Mater f a i r ; S t a r s in azure sky; Bound in love throughout a l l days, Hand in hand a l l join to praise; Swelling chords loud tribute raise; Songs of C. C. 1.1

.


VOL. I.

29

Senior History EN, according to the calendar, the class of '04 was to have come into existence, no merry school-song charmed the echoes of the Musconetcong Valley ; the thriving institution existed but in name; just a few former students, hoping for better days, held together under the faithful Professor Hammond. A year later the unfinished school buildings were opened for students, and soon the outloolc for the class brightened. Alas ! scarcely had we been gathered a few months when another interruption caused a new loss in membership. But those who returned in the same year to make up for lost time were ready to assume the duties of Juniors in the following fall. In September, 1902, a goodly host reinforced our band and from then on no more misfortunes blocked the path of the class. With one spirit, true to the blue and gray, they formed an energetic and clever class of 28 in number. Our relations to the '03 class were pleasant. Some tricks were played on either side, and we like to think that ours were ever successful, while theirs were generally thwarted by our vigilance. As a definition of our sentiments we gave the '03 class a solemn, sincere farewell a t the banquet held in their honor on June 16th, 1903. Many honors were won and many positions of trust held by members of this class. A Junior was awarded the " all around " medal on Field Day ; a Junior was captain of the football team, six members of This year which were his classmates; another edited the HACKETTSTONIAN. again the class has loyally served C. C. I.; six out of eight members of staff are Seniors ; eight football players belong to the HACKETTSTONIAN the class ; a Senior edits the " HACK." With sadness a t heart we see the year draw to a close ; for three years we have cultivated an esprit de corps, and common aims have created strong ties which time cannot break. When the day to leave arrives, to leave the generous home where we learned much, both in books and hearts, the fragrant memories will enable us to guide our, bargqpright over the sea of life.


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30

Senior Class Class Colors

;

Blue and Gray

Class Yell Rippity, rack, co-ack, co-ack, Hadlabaloo, k i -i x , ki-ox, N@pty-ix, rah, roar, C. C. I. nineteen-four!

SUSAN B ROOMHALL A SHLEY Diokosophian Hackettstown, N. J. Anniversary Editor (4).


VOL. I.

31

ELIMA J A N E B ENNETT Peithosophian Cheshire, Conn. Vice-president Missionary Society (4).

ident

he King's ~ a & b t e r s(4); Vice-president

Y.W. C. A. (4); Basketball Team (2, 3); Junior Class K e p r e s e n t a t i ~ e(3).


32

THE HACK

B ELL E LIZABETH C ADY Diokosoph ian Brooklyn, N. Y. ~ r e n i hC l u b (4).

L EON H ILLIARD CURTICE '4lpha Phi New Rochelle, N. Y.

R AYMOND SCOFIBLD CURTICE Alpha Phi New Rochelle, N. Y. Editor Hackettstonian (4).


33

VOL. I

F ANNIE ELIZABETH D AY Diokosophian Port Morris, N. J.

Alpha Phi

J OHN C RANE DAY Morr~stown,N. J.

A A n ; Anniversary President (4); President Y. M.. C , A. (4); President Athletic Association (4); President F a c t a n d Fiction Club (4); President Junior Class; Vice-president Y. M. C. A. (3); Varsity Football Team (2. 3, 4 ) ; Captain Varsity Football Team (3); Varsity Baseball Team (2, 3, 4); Captain Varsity Baseball Team (4); Captain T r a c k Team (2); All Around Athlete Medal (2, 3); Hack Board (4).

C ORNELIUS L OUIS DUBOIS Alpha Phi Palenville, N. Y. Varsity Football Team (2, 3, 4).


-. 34

.

--

THE

E D WA RD RIVENSG RAY Alpha Phi

-

A-

BACK

.

Port Murry, N. J.

Anniversary Secretary (4); Varsity Fwtball Team (4).

EDITH GRAYDOH Peithosophian

BiQewood, N, J.

PNT; Anniversary Pre?piam.e(4); President Y. W. C. A. (4); Vice-presld.ent Y. W. C. A. (3); Baaleetbsll Tesm (8, 3); Qarketbtopian' Board (4).


ADALENE ROGERS HILL East Orange, N. J. Peithosophian

EDM~JN DD URYEA J OHNSTONE Alpha Phi 13acl<etlstomrn,N. J. A n n i v e r s a r y Vice-president (4); Football Team (8, 4).

E LIZABETH J UDD KENNEDY Diokasophian Hackettstown, N. J.'

Varsity


30

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AG NES SCOTT I<ENT Peithosophian

Passaic, N. J.

Anniversary Editor (4)s President Current Topic Club (4); President German Club (4); Secretary Y. W. c.'A. (4);Hackettstonian Board (4).

Diokosophian

EMVIA E LVIRA L ITTLE Diokosophian Hacliettstomm, N. J


I

37

VOL. I.

C L ARE NC E AUGUSTUS MUNSON Whitney Lyceum

JOHN

E P HR A IM DEYOE N AUGHRIGHT Naughright, N. J.

i

Amityville, L.


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38

E M IL E R AYMOND R IE GEL New York, N. Y. Whitney Lyceum Anniversary President (4); Vice-president Athletic Association (4); Secretary and Treasurer Y. M. C. A. (4); French Club; German Club; School Warden (3); Business Manager Hackettstonian (4); Editor Hack (4). Y

ALMALILLIANSMITM Mauch Chunk, Pa.

Diokosophiw

&XI'; Anai~ersarySar&cy [4); Pre'eridkk Camera Club (4); President Travel Cfab (4); Secretary The Hiw'e Dnughtms (4); BaskeC ball Team (3).

F RAN K K ER S W ILL S NYDER Alpha Phi Brooklyn, N. Y. A A n ; Anniversary Editor (4): Secretary and Treasurer Athletic Association (4); Hack Board (4).


VOL. I.

30

E LLA R A R R I S V AN ATTA Peithosophian Hackettstown, N. J. Anniversary Vice-president (4); Basketball Team (3).

I,:

A L V A H L L OY D VAN SYCKLE Whitney Lyceum Hackettstown, N. J. Anniversary Second Vice-president (4); Varsity Football Team (3).

.

CAROLYN B. W ELLS Diokosophian Bloomfield, N. J. Secretary Missionary Society (3); Basketball Team (2, 3).


40

THE H A C K

NELLIE LIVINGSTONE WITT Diokosophian

Uniontown, Pa.

Secretary Current Topic Club (4); German Club.

H ELE N M ARTHA 1 Diokosophian

4 r ~ ~ ~ Westfield, W. J.

ANT; Anniversary President (4); President Missionary Society (4); Secretary Y. W. C. A. (3); Hackettstonian Board (4).

CLARZREE E, W A ~ K L E Y Brooklyn, N. Y.

Ann ; "Varsity gall

Team ($ 4) 5 G a p

tain Vamfty Track -Team ( 4 1 8

~

~


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VOL. I.

Class of 1903 3W use doth breed a habit in a man, says Shakespeare. The constant thinking of the past may easily become habitual. We are nearing the end of a successful school year and as members of the graduating class we have some idea of the tender ambitions and hopes the members of previous classes have harbored for C. C. I. The class of 1903 labored under difficulties, not the least of which was the amount of work to be done after the stirring events of 18991901. The practically new school was to stand where C. C. I. had stood after twenty-six years of steady efforts. We feel that the class honorably discharged her trust. With grateful hearts do we turn now for a moment to the brave group of 1903, and while singling out each one, we wish to all such success in their various careers as they have had during their stay with us. A. Francis Chamberlain, the gymnast, known as " Prof. Stunts " or "Rig Chambee," is president of the Freshman class at New York University. The vice-president of that same class is our end man, Clarence Blake, the future lawyer. Brilliant Herbert Chamberlain ["Little Chambee") is a t Wesleyan, where Frank Dickisson and Henry McLean join him in the enjoyment of Freshman experiences. Emily Muller, Pearl Norton and Ruby Xorton were entered at the Woman's College in Baltimore ; Ruth Pipher is a t the Latin school in the same city. The valedictorian, Ellen Cook, and her chum, Sophy Smith, are a t Miss Hunter's, in New York, studying kindergarten methods. Annie Shields is also in New York a t the Normal school. Frank Kinsey, our promising twirler, is a t Lafayette, following a course in science. Cornell Medical College has George Kanouse as our representative. J. Miller Welsh, everybody's friend, is busy a t the Coleman National


42

THE HACK

Business College in Newark, and John Poppe a t Drew Seminary. Two of the girls are devoting themselves to the arts : Mary Wade a t Cooper Union and Carrie Shields a t the Boston National School of Oratory. The next group have entered the business world. Frank Conwell is with the Brooklyn Business Institute, Walter Vernon with a firm in New York, Elwyn Wintermute with W. S. Matthews and Sons in New York, Benjamin Pearce with the Prudential Insurance Company in Newark, and Joseph Cummins with his father a t Washington, N: J. Still another group have chosen the experiences of home life. They are Jean Redheffer at Jersey City; Grace Marlatt a t Port Murray; . Caroline Bell, Elizabeth Lamson and Amy Fox a t Hacl<ettstown; Mabel Fullerton a t Ridgewood and Virginia Gerken a t New York City. Of the thirty members of the class, eighteen are pursuing studies, five are in business and seven a t home. '04

Alma Mater, C.C. I. (Tune: Austrian Hymn) 'Mid the silent hills surrounded, Ripened by the flight of time, And with honors still attaining I n her strong and lusty prime, A l m a Mater, s i n g her praises, S i n g them long a n d s i n g them loud, Alma Mater, s i n g her praises, S i n g them long a n d bing them loud. Forever s h a l l thy sons uphold thee, F o r thy sons, a noble band, S h a l l forever wave thy colors F a r a n d wide to every land. L e t u s laud her colors true, Loyal to the Blue a n d Black, L e t us laud her colors true, L o y a l to the Blue a n d Black. And when a g e a t l a s t o'ertakes us, Softly, like the sinking sun, Will the visions come before us, Visions of thy noble sons. When our lives have told their story F a i l i n g lips s h a l l move to cry: Alma Mater, live thy glory, Alma Mater, C. C. I.


45

VOL. I.

Diokosopnlan Society dULTANEOUS1,Y with the founding of C. C. I., a girls' local organization for the development of literary talent was established and called the "Diokosophian Society. " T o bring, in a larger degree, culture and refinement into the lives of young women, t o create "a home within a home," where the close fellowship arising from the pursuit of common aims should be enjoyed, t o furnish opportunities for self-sacrifice ; thus it was that the members interpreted their duty. Except for the conflagration which destroyed the old hall, the history of the society is a tale of prosperity. Many of the souvenirs of Diokosotwenty-four years' labor had been lost in 1899, but not all. phian ideals were not such as fire could touch. " Sisters in wisdom, " their name means ; events have justified the title. The members recognized early that faithfulness alone wins the day. An exhibition of this quality is furnished by the records in scholarship. Out of the twentyeight valedictorian honors awarded by the school since its existence, twenty-five have been held by Diokosophian girls. During all the years of her history, the society has been prominent in school life. Perhaps the dearest memory to a Diokosophian girl is the farewell given jointly with the Whitney Lyceum in 1895 to the retiring president, Dr. Whitney. A series of exercises was given consisting of a program rendered in the chapel, a public reception and a banquet presided over by the Rev. Dr. J. M. Buckley. Thus the members strive on for the constant improvement of society and C. C. I. in the pursuitlof "wisdom" and true to their colors.


47

VOL. I.

Diokosophians


VOL. I.

I

51

Whitney Lyceum N September, 1874, a band of fifteen young men, after considering a plan to found a chapter of the Alpha Omega Fraternity, decided to organize in a n independent literary society. The use of Rev. Dr. George H. Whitney's name was granted on the condition that only first-class students should be admitted. Ever since the endeavor of the society has been to remain true to the pledge. The preparations for the formal organization oE the " Whitney Lyceum " were quicltly terminated, and on February 26, 1875, the school and its friends assembled in the chapel to witness the first public rendering of a literary program a t C. C. I. The president and vice-president a t the inaugural exercises were Rev. William Trumbotver and L. A. Van Syckle, M. D., respectively. Once a week, after school-tasks had been honorably discharged, a secret meeting filled the few hours left, which to many meant as much as the class-drill of the school. Literary ability was developed, independent t h o ~ ~ g encouraged ht by the constant observance of parliamentary law ; but better still, the " brothers," whether in the hall or outside of it, cultivated thq highest type of unselfish love. True to their motto, they found strength in love ; on love they built ; in love they prospered. This flourishing condition was abruptly brought to a stop on account of tlie well-known calamity. However, C. C. I. soon rose from its ashes, and with i t the " Purple and Gold." Truly the blow had been a hard one : the tangible proofs of consistent work were gone ; the membeis scattered (with one exception, not one of the present active members was in the society two years ago). But spirit is a mighty power : the old standards are revived ; the lively interest of former members, the inspiration that comes in toiling for noble ends, the endearing memories of the past, all point onward t a the bright light-success.


53

VOL. I.

Whitney Lyceum


1 C O ~ O I ~ S :BLUE & G O L b I


VOL. I.

55

Peithosophian Society 'TER several years of the existence of the Diokosaphian Society, the number of students increased in such a manner that it was deemed advisable to create a sec. ond girls' organization on a similar plan. Accordingly, in the year 1880 the Peithosophian Society was founded and soon the excellent effects competition produces on literary work were clearly shown. T o Miss Emma J. Morrow and other promoters of the new enterprise, much of the future success of the society was due. The purpose and aim of the Peithosophian Society is to inspire the individual to nobler and higher ambitions in life, to bring out tlie talents of each, and encourage them in the fulfillment of the duties of school life. The growth of the Peithosophian Society was rapid; to reflect honor upon her was, and is, the ambition governing the actions of each member. Prospects were a t their best when, in 1899, everytliing came to a standstill. In that same school-year (March, 1900) however, in spite of difficulties, the society presented one of tlie finest anniversaries on record. Then for a whole year, work was discontinued, and many students never returned. Still with C. C. I. life started anew ; the present society is able and vigorous. The secrecy enforced concerning all matters pertaining to the society furnishes a wide field for the exercise of self-control. This wise provision gives importance to the smallest detail, while it adds dignity to the conduct of the members. The standard of the society has been kept higli, to work in purity and justice, for the greater glory of the hall is the solemn pledge of each member.


57

VOL. I.

Peithosophians


Program P A R T I. MARCH

.

From A i d a Misses Bennett, Vollmer, B'lorey Messrs. M. Bauman and Cregar

INVOCATION Rer. Eugene A. Noble WELCOME Miss Oraydon A i r Varik Vieuxtemps

VIOLIN SOLO Miss K. Scranton

Theodore Roosevelt

ORATION Mr. J. C. Day

.

P I A N O A N D ORGAN D U O Miss E. Van Atta, Mr. Cregar METEOR AND JOURNAL Mr. Snyder

William Tell Editors


P A R T 11. S C E N E S FROM T W E L F T H N I G H T

.

.

. s hpkesgear4

Scene 1.-A room itz Duke Orszno's Palact., SC&DF 3.-4 room h,0&7n'a?s+?v~sq;, Scene 3.-Dining rotmt in Olivin'a House. Scene 4.-A hhll in Orsixo's Pa(ace!, Scene 5.-Olivia's Garden. Scene g,-Olivia's Horcse,, ~ c e n 3e The Duel, DRAMATIS P B R S 0 N ~ A . E Duke Orsino S i r Toby Belch S i r Andrew Aguecheelz Malvolio Fabian Clown Countess Olivia Viola Maria

. .

.

.

.

Mr. 0. Bauman Mr. Finlay Mr., Wilding , Mr. Snyder Mr. Johnstone Mr. G r a y Miss Hill Miss Ford Miss Kent

.

. .

.

P A R T 111. S E L E C T E n S C E N E S F R O M CARMEN

.

Bizet

DRAMATIS P E R S O N B Carmen Prasquita

.

.

.

::::::: I .

Remendado Dancairo Escamillo Morales Don Jose

.

. .

. Worlzmen.

Factory Girls.

OFFICERS Piethosophian Society President Miss Edith Graydon Miss E l l a Van Atta Vice-president Miss Mabel McCraclzen Secretary Editor . Miss Agnes Kent

.

.

miss Carlock

.

.

.

Miss A. Van Atta Miss E. Van Atta Miss Florev Miss Sitley Mr. 0.Bauman Mr. Bryant Mr. M. Bauman Mr. C. Cook Mr. Wilding

Soldiers.

Alpha P h i Fraternity Mr. John C. Day Mr. E. Duryea Johnstone Mr. Edward G r a y Mr. Frank K. Snyder


VOL. I.

61

Alpha Phi Fraternity-Zeta Chapter


62

THE HACK

Alpha Phi E literary society kno~vnas the Hackettstorvri Chapter of the Philomathean Fraternity was establisked in the first year of the school's history-1874. For several years excellent work was done in the society. The members took their trust seriously. In 1885, for various reasons, a change became necesary. The Chapter resigned from the Philomathean Fraternity and sought a new home. A charter was granted by the Alpha Phi Fraternity, and the Society became its Zeta Chapter. The name was changed, but the solid foundation laid by the sturdy "Philos" was not shaken. The Alpha Phi boys to this day think with grateful hearts of the brave pioneers who made the path smooth for the present Fraternity. The hall was destroyed by fire in 1899. The loss of many fine and precious souvenirs was irreparable. The members quickly rallied a t the opening of school in 1901, and encouraged by the support of the other chapters succeeded in continuing the work done before the fire. A credit to the Alpha Phi Fraternity, a source of strength and joy for the school, the Zeta Chapter ended each year with some new success on its record. Today the Chapter is one of the strongest in the Fraternity, while it occupies a prominent rank among the literary organizations in the school. In closing, a few words as to what the Fraternity means to her members. They wish to become as perfect as possible in literary work and public speaking ; but there is more. "Harmony and Love" is the motto. Each member seeks to be in perfect harmony with his fellowmember, and to do all in his power to help him be honest and straightforward, to have every virtue a t its highest and every fault, if possible, crushed. Appovih IiaTipzhztw


VOL. I.

63

Alpha Phi Founded 1876 at Colgate Academy.

Colors :

Ruby, Cold and Blue

Fraternity Journal : THEA L PH A P HI QUARTERLY

Roll of Active Chapters Alpha Gamma Zeta Eta Theta Iota Kappa Lambda Mu Nu . Xi Omicron

.

.

.

.

Colgate Academy, Hamilton, N. Y. Delaware L i t e r a r y Institute, Franklin, N. Y. . Centenary Collegiate Institute, Hackettstown, N. J. . Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Penn. Peddie Institute, Hightstown, N. J. Adelphi Academy, Broolrlyn,' N. Y. Polytechnic Institute, Broolrlyn, N. Y. Susquehanna L i t e r a r y Institute, Towanda, Penn. L a t i n School, Brooklyn, N. Y. Coburn Classical Institute, Waterville, Maine . Hudson River Institute, Claverack, N. Y. Hudson River Military Academy, Nyack-on-Hudson, N. Y.

.

.

.

.

.


THE HACK

64

A Chapel Speech (Di)versified Doctor s a y s t h a t in the s p r i n g Strive to make the old school ring, ]every one should be in trim, Do our best, get in the swim. Do not linger in the h a l l Wasting time will mean your fall, You're no exception to the rule, There a r e other " pebbles " in the school. Go to classes right on time, T o the top you'll surely climb, L e a r n your lessons d a y by day, From exams don't fly away. When you h e a r the breakfast bell Do not t a r r y in your " cell," Promptness is a virtue r a r e T h a t with no other can compare. Co-operation for u s all, S i n g our songs a n d yell our call, Boom the scllool a w a y up high, Always shout for C. C. I.


Constitution Athletic Association A R T I C L E I. NAME. T h e name of the Association s h a l l be called the " Centenary Collegiate Institute Athletic Association." A R T . 11. O B J E C T . T h e object of this Association s h a l l be to advance a n d to control a l l athletic interests of the school. A R T . 111. M E M B E R S H I P . All members of the Centenary Collegiate Institute may be members of the Associa tion. A R T . IV. O F F I C E R S - T H E I R D U T I E S . Section 1. T h e officers of the Association s h a l l be a president, a vicepresident a n d a secretary-treasurer. T h e head of the Athletic Department s h a l l be honorary president. Sec. 2. T h e president, vice-president, and secretary-treasurer a r e to be elected a t the beginning of each school y e a r by the Association. T h e president and vice-president must be members of the Senior or Junior classes. Sec. 3. T h e president s h a l l preside a t a l l meetings of the Association and s h a l l perforin a l l duties pertaining to his office. The vice-president s h a l l perform a l l duties of the president in the latter's absence. T h e secretary-treasurer s h a l l keep the minutes of each meeting of the Association, a n d s h a l l handle and keep account of a l l funds coming into his hands. A R T . V. D I V I S I O N S . Section 1. The Association s h a l l consist of five (5) divisions, viz.: A football division, a baseball division, a basketball division, a tennis division, a n d a track division. Sec. 2. Each division s h a l l have one officer, a manager. T h e manager shall be a member of either the Junior or Senior class. No man s h a l l hold the position of manager twice. Sec. 3. T h e manager of the division s h a l l a r r a n g e a l l game schedules for the division, subject to the advice of the Advisory Board. Sec. 4. Any vacancies a r i s i n g among o a c e r s s h a l l be filled by a majority vote of the Association from candidates nominated by the Association.


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68

A R T . VI. A D V I S O R Y BOARD. Section 1. T h e authority and responsibility of the Association s h a l l be vested i n a n Athletic Advisory Board of three (3) members: T h e head of the Athletic Department, the president a n d the secretary-treasurer. Sec. 2. I t s h a l l be the duty of the Association Advisory Roard to decide a l l questions referred to i t by the Association; to enforce a l l rules as set down by this constitution a n d by-laws; a n d to promofe the general athletic interests of the school.

ART. VII. A M E N D M E N T S . Amendments to this constitution or by-laws may be made by a two-thirds vote of the Association after the proposed amendment h a s been sanctioned by the Association Advisory Board. A R T . VIII. C A P T A I N S . Captains of teams s h a l l be elected by the members of the team who win their letters.

By-Laws A R T . I. E L I G I B I L I T Y . No student s h a l l be' allowed to represent the school in public athletic contests unless he i s regularly enrolled a s a member on the books of the *school a n d pursuing studies requiring a t least twelve (12) periods, classroom or laboratory work, per week. A R T . 11. U N I F O R M S O F T E A M S . Section 1. The football, baseball a n d basketball teams s h a l l wear the regulation school uniforms: stockings and Jerseys striped peacoclc blue a n d black. Sec. 2. T h e track uniform s h a l l consist of white running pants with black stripes and peacock blue sleeveless Jerseys. Sec. 3. Tennis uniform shall consist of white duck trousers with black Jerseys. A R T . 1x1. THE S C H O O L L E T T E R S . Section 1. T h e football letters s h a l l be given to a l l men who p l a y i n either the l a s t Blair H a l l or Pennington games. Sec. 2. T h e baseball letters s h a l l be given to those playing i n Pennington a n d l a s t Blair H a l l game. Sec. 3. T h e letter for track s h a l l be given to the three men winning the highest number of points i n the school field day. Sec. 4.' T h e Advisory Board s h a l l have the power of withdrawing the right to wear the letter a s awarded in sections 1, 2, 3. Sec, 5. No letter s h a l l be worn by a n y man unless awarded according to sections I, 2, 3.

;/


69

VOL. I.

A R T . J.V. T H E L E T T E R S . Section 1. All the c a p monograms s h a l l be the C. C. I. monogram. Sec. 2. T h e football emblem shaIl be the eight-inch C. C. I. monogram. Sec. 3. T h e baseball emblem s h a l l be C. C. I., not in monogram, i n five-inch letters. Sec. 4. T r a c k a n d basketball emblem s h a l l be C. C. I., not i n monog r a m , i n three-inch letters. Sec. 5. Football and baseball sweaters or Jerseys s h a l l be black with monogram or letters in peacock blue. Section 1. A meeting of the Association s h a l l be held the first Tuesday after the first Monday of each month. Sec. 2. Special meetings may be called a t the request of three members. Sec. 3. T h e first meeting of the year shall be called by the honorary president and shall be for the purpose of electing the Association officers. A notice of this meeting must be posted a t least one week previously. A R T . VI. E L E C T I O N O F MANAGERS. Section 1. T h e football manager s h a l l be elected a t the first regular meeting after the l a s t scheduled game. Sec. 2. T h e basketball manager s h a l l be elected a t the first regular meeting following the l a s t scheduled game. A R T . VII. D U T I E S O F MANAGERS. Section 1. T h e manager must give a written statement of a l l money received or expended, to the president of the school or to some person duly appointed. Sec. 2. At the expiration of his term of office the manager must submit a written financial report of a l l money spent and received d u r i n g said term of office. A R T . VIII. E X P E N S E S . All necessary expenses incurred by secretary-treasurer and approved of by Advisory Board must be met by a t a x levied upon the Association.

Amendments Amendment to Article V, Section 2 of the Constitution 1. No man may be manager of a team unless he be a regular boarding student.


A. R. GARRISON. S. I. DARNBLL G. E. DENMAN .

Cnptrlin Manager . Coach

. Varsity Eleven 1903

Rz$At End

L t f t End

E. D. J OHNSTONE

0. S. BREWSTER L. H. CURTICE

R y h t Tackle

L r f t Tackle

R. W . H ART

L). C . U RNER L e f t Guard

Center

-4. R. G ARRISON

C. L. DuBols

R k h t Guard

S. I. DARNELL

Quarterback

Full Back

H . C . B RYANT E. D. G RAY

G. A. P ALMER I. W. HAWHS

L e f t Halfback

C . E. WALKLEY

Right Nalfback

J . C. DAY


72

THE HACK

FOOTBALL Ip - zoo - rah - zoo! loh~nieblow your bazoo! Ip - sipy - iki, That's what we cry! Right through we break, Touchdowns we make We t n h the cake, C. C. I. !

HE FOOTBALI, season for 1903 did not look very promising a t the opening of the fall term. There were six vacancies in the previous year's team, and but few new men seemed to have football ability. This, however, did not discourage our coach Denman, who immediately set to work with the determination to develop a good team. He succeeded, and although the defeats by Blair Hall seemed enormous, yet the work of the team in general was successful. The season started off with a surprising, and, it seemed, discouraging deEeat by the Easton High School eleven. The Easton boys played " snappy," and had little difficulty in running up a score of 35 to o against a comparatively new team which had been playing together for about one week. The defeat was turned to profit. The boys were

T


VOL. I.

73

found promptly every day on the field ready for hard practice. T h e Easton High game had shown our weak points, and the coach found it easy to drill a willing eleven. As the season progressed the team gradually improved : they succeeded in defeating Pennington and Erasmus Hall by good scores and did equally well against Lafayette Sophomores and Bethlehem Prep. On the whole the 1903 football season was saticfactory. We ran up I 58 points against 119of our opponents. l'he fact is due chiefly to the effective coaching of Prof. Denman and the work of the faithful scrub.


74

THE HACK

Wearers of the C. O LIN How L~oh S. I R JOHN C. LC

C A P T A I N GARRISON

C.I.


THE HACK

76

Record of Games October 3 October 14 October 17 October 24 October 31 November 7 November 14 November 21

At Hackettstown:

Easton High School 30 Lafayette Sophomores 0 Newton A. C. 0 Blair H a l l 22 Pennington Seminary 0 E r a s m u s Hall 0 Bethlehem P r e p . 6 Blair H a l l '71

A t Hackettstown A t Hackettstown At Hackettstown At Pennington At Hackettstown At Hackettstown At Blairstown

SAM


Baseball, 1903 .

Captain Manager

Varsity Nine, 1903

Record of Games March April April April May May May May June

29 22 25 29 2 8

16 23 6

Ashley Silk-Mill 0 C. C . I. 24; At Hackettstown C . C . I. 12; Pastime A. C. 3 At Hackettstown C. C. I. 8; Easton Academy 4 At Hackettstown C . C . I. 5 : Easton High School 5 At Hackettstown C. C. I. 4; Blair H a l l 9 At Blairstown C. C. I. 1; Peddie Institute 11 At Hackettstown C . C . I. 7 ; Tower Club of Princeton 4 At Hackettstown C . C. I. 4; Lafayette Sophomores 3 At Hackettstow~l C . C. I. 3; Pennington Seminarv 5 A t Pennington C. C. I. 68; Opponents 44


Baseball

INE'TEEN hundred and three's baseball team started off well. A good captain and hard-working fellows were material which seemed promising. "Kinsey will line the ball in, John Day won't muff, Zimmy can stop a trolley, Bennie's the stuff, short stop is full of ginger third's full of fire ; fielders can cover acres, each one's a flyer," was a song which we sang last year, and which summed up well the characteristics of the players. We lost the two games we were most desirous of winning-Blair Hall and Pennington. However, no one had cause to be dissatisfied, for, as we look back, we find that the team did fairly good work, not superlative, but good enough to uphold the standard of C. C. I. \Ve had a famous pitcher, and his men supported him well, especially the excellent catcher, who seldom ~ d a ne error. The batting was defective. Welsh, Day and Kinsey were always to be depended upon, however. Considering that the team had no coaching whatever, but what experience had taught them five games won, three lost, one tied is a record not to be ashamed of. In this branch, as in any other branch of athletics, the handicap resulting from the break in the regular course of events made itself felt. Conditions are improved now. A devoted coach gets every ounce of ability out of the players, and with the enthusiasm characteristic to C. C. I., much success may be expected in ;,the future.


ACK Athletics a t C. C. I. in the past years have been a somewhat dormant branch of the general athletics, not because of the lack of material and interest in this particular branch, but on account of the lack of x convenient track for daily practice, and of outside meets to encourage the men. The Athletic Association holds a n annual field-day. Every man has the privilege OF contesting for the prizes given for the first three places in every event, besides an " all-around" prize given to the man winning the greatest numb* of points. These annual field-day events are interesting. The contest generally consists of fifteen or sixteen events, such as running, jumping, hurdling and all those peculiar to track meets. This year we are looking forward to a successful and prosperous season in track work : the Association now has a one-fifth mile cinder track on the back campus ; a manager and captain are preparing the work, while our coach lool<s hopeful in regard to the several meets scheduled with neighboring schools, and a team will be sent to two or threeidnterscholastic contests.


C.C.I.Y.M.C.A.

I O%cers J OHN C. D AY E DWARD R. H ANCE . E. R AYMOND RIEGEL

President F7ice Yrtsident Sccrttary- Treclsurtr

.

President . Vice President . Secrclary Tr~asurer

The King's Daughters Circles T h e Willing Workers J. MAREL B ROWN

.

. Sunshine Circle

Presidetrt


Officers President Serrez'ury . ,Tpeaker

Fact and Fiction Club Oficers

J OHN C. DAY O SCAR G. BAUMAN C HARLOTTE J . H OAG

President Sccretnly Speaker


.

President Ve'se-President

Travel Club ALMAL. S MITH

.

President

Weekly Parlor Talks

MISSC HARLOTTE J. HOAGpresides


Winter Term

AGNES KENT

Sprlng Term

.

.

President

.

LOUISF ERRY

Members

MIL'TONB AUMAN OSCAR B AUMAN JOSEPH F ERRY Lours F ERRY E VA FORT^ G RACE G ARDNER W ALTER GROSSENBACH

AGNES K ENT RAYJVIOND R IEGEL K ATHERINE S CRANTON M ARION S CRANTON H ARRY S HOENING BEATRICE VOLL~IER N ELLIE WITT

Cercle Francais 9

President

Members

R AYMOND R IEGEL KATHERINE S CRANTON M A RI O N SCRANTON R OBERT L YNN


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86

,

Quartets Girls' Quartet

. F~rstSoprano

Second Soprano M A R G A RE T L. POCKMAN

MAHELR. MCCORXIICK First Alto C AROLYN B. WELLS

Second Alto B ERTHA L. F LOREY Mixed Quartet

S~prano MABEL R. MCCORMICP~ Tenor MILTON Ei. BAU~IAN

Alto C AROLYN B. W ELLS Bass O SCAR G. B AUMAN

Male Quartet First Tendr M ILTON F. B A U ~ I A N F~rstBass OLINW. BREWSTER

Second Tenor O SCAR BAUMAX Second Baa A LFRED E. FINLAY


VOL.

87

(I.

Mandolin-Ban jo Club ,V

,BD

B RYANT

Flrst Mandolin H AROLD SLOAN

HAROLDDAVIS

Second Mandol~n F I ~ A NSINYDER C Banjos

Violins Lours F ERRY

R AYMOND R I EG E L


ESTABLISHED :

Frater in Facultate

P ROP . G EORGE E.

I)EKI\IAN

F r a t ~ e sin Scholio

ASAHEL B. G ARRISON ROBERT 13. L INN G EORGE E. ROGERS FRANK K. S NYDER H AROLD S. SLOAN D ON C. U RNER C LARENCE E. WALKLEY

OSCAR G. B AUMAN CHARLES 'r. B ENJAMIN O LIN S. BREWSTER JOHNC. DAY C LARENCE M. DAY ALFRED E. FINLAY J. MARSHALL G ORHAM Fratres in Alumnio

J. F. CONWELL J. B. C UMMINS

W. C. B I ~ N J A ~ I I N C. S. B LAKE F. H. KINSEY


89

VOL. I.

A N T Members

BESSIE LIBBY MARGARET POCKMAN ALMA SMITH H ELEN W RI G H T


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VOL. I

01

The Hackettstonian Board Editor Assistant Editor Assistant Editor School Notes Alumni Exchanges Business Manager Asst. Business Man. *Resigned March, 1904.

Raymond A. Curtice elected.


VOL. I.

93

The Hack Board E. R AYMOND R IEGEL . H ARRY H. RUNYON. C LARENCE M. DAY . J O H N C. DAY . . C LARENCE E. WALKLEY . F RANK I<. S NYDER E DWARD R. H ANCE H. P ERCY SHEARMAN . . DON C. U RNER A. E. FINLAY

. Editor-in-Chief .

. Business Manager Assistant Business Manager . Associate Editor . Associate Editor . Associate Editor . Associate Editor Associate Editor . Associate Editor Associate Editor


THE HACK

9a

Wesleyan Alumni C l u b Middletown. Conn. C HARLES H. G ARRISON Lours D. DAY .

.

. President Vice-president

. Members

H ERBERT C. C HAMBERLAIN B ENJAMIN F. I)ICKISSON CLARENCE P. MCCLXLLAXD

2+A % q p i p Tir&,$$ L OUIS D. BAY CHARLES H. G ARRISON HENRY T. %LEAN '---%

Woman's College of Baltimore Alumni Club

.%-

yfrm--

- r~pi;+ ?!\+ ;-!&'&,$? m

Bdtimore, ~ d - ; : , ) I-5&w7 ---&.-a L - WINIFRED KBMPER. A NNE COUCH . &Any MAXIM .

,

.

.

v

J

Pesidmt Secretary Treasw

Members

ADRA F ITTS WINIFRED KEMPER RUBYN ORTON


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96

Commencement Exercises June Organ- Concert Overture

17, 1903

.

Faulkes

Prof. F. W. Schlieder Prayer L a t i n Salutatory, Herbert Clayton Chamberlain, New Yorlr City Oration- " Statesmanship a n d College Training," John Diedrich Poppe, Cassville Oration-" T h e North American Indian, " Henry Trumbower McLean, Hackettstown Piano- " Berdga "-" Legende "-" Norska " Signe Lund-Skabo Miss Grace Darnel1 Oration-" Should the Monroe Doctrine be Abandoned ? " F r a n k Herbert Kinsey, Hackettstown Oration-" Was John Brown a F a n a t i c ? " Benjamin F r a n k l i n Dickisson, E a s t Stroudsburg, P a . Essay- " T h e Legend of the Wandering Jew," J a n e Byler Redheffer, Jersey City Hawley Quartet- " Song of Seasons " Misses McCormick, VanAtta, Wells a n d Martin Essay- " Industrial T r a i n i n g of the Negro," Caroline Wack Bell, Hackettstown E s s a y and Valedictory- " Margaret Fuller," Ellen Elizabeth Cook, Chester Vocal--" Song of Thanksgiving " , Allisten Mrs. G. D. Knight Awarding Prizes . Lalo Overture-" L e Roi d ' Y s " Misses Merrell, Smith, a n d Gardiner Prof. Schlieder Address to Graduating Class . President Eugene A. Noble Conferring D ~ p l o m a s Benediction . Relative positions of Speakers a r e fixed by lot

.

.

a


Prizes Awarded Prize for Rhetoricals

B. F RANKLIN D ICKISSON Kerswill Commencement Prize

B. F R A N I ~DICKISSON N Jackson Prize in Elocution and Oratory

First Prize in Elocution Second Prize in Elocution First Prize in Oratory Second Prize in Oratory C.

TVoman's College . Wesleyan . New York University

.

.

.

.

.

CARRIER. S HIELD . J ESSIE L. G ETSINGER H ERBERT C. CHAMBTZRLAIN

. S ALEM E. MUXYER

C, I. College Scholarships

.

JEANB. REDHEFFER

. H K R R E RC. T C HAMBERLAIN A. F RANCIS C HAMBERLAIN


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98

Diplomas Conferred Classical Course

Latin Scientific Course

Scientific Course

J OSEPH B IRD CUMMINS

J. M ILLER

F RANK H ERBERT K INSEY WELSH

Belles-Lettres Course

V IRGINIA A NGELINE G ERKEN C AROLINE W ACK B ELL E LIZABETH B OWERS LAMSON Musical Course

Course In Banking and Flnance


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Class Day, June

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Class O i c e r s

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J. M. W ELSH E. E. Caox . . G EORGE KAXOUSE F R A N K CONWELL . JOSEPH S. CUMMINS .

President

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Secretary Treasurer . Sergeant-at-Arms

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MABEL B ROWN, Representative of Junior Class . . F. W. SCHLEIDER. :;-I3 : ..- . Organist

JPIASNIE

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Programme March Invoca tion Welcome History Solo Poem Prophecy LWk,y~ration ' ~ d d r e s s to Junior Class Mementos

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F. W. Schleider Rev. Eugene Allen Noble. D. D. J. M. UCl'elsh , M a r y E. Wade Mabel J. Fullertoll R u b y Norton Caroline Bell . A. F r a n k Chamberlain 7 , Herbert C. Chamberlain --- + ' - A . Sophy Smith , +. L . ..6 3 ,'f< -+,n'n. -2 ,I,'+< <:Class Song # : ~ f,.:-*%:.$,-#i-, ,.* ,: ?Yells

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THE HACK

Bi-Centenary of the Birth of John Wesley, A. M. Under the Auspices of the Newark Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, June

15, 1903

His Excellency F R A N K LI N M U RPHY , LL.D., Governor of the State of New Jersey, will preside.

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March-" L a Reine de Seba " Gounod-Steiger Hymn . John Wesley Rev. George H. Whitney, D. D., President-Emeritus, C. C. I. Prayer Inauguratiun of the President of InstitutePresentation by the Hon. George J. F e r r y , President of the Board of Trustees Response by Rev. Eugene A. Noble, D. D., President Centenary Collegiate Institute Miss Farrington, P e r t h Amboy, N. J. Violin Solo Wesley Bi-Centeilary AdclressT h e Rev. Bishop E d w a r d G. Andrews, L L . D., New York C ~ t y Chorus-"He, watching over Israel," from "Elijah" Benediction-Rev. Henry A. Buttz, D. D., President of Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J.

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15, 1903

June

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Piano-" Valse Impromptu " Lillie Smith

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Von Wilm

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. Margaret S t u a r t Briscoe Jessie Ludlow Getsinger

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Crossing the Lines " . George W. Cable Mabel Josephine Fullerton

Vocal Duet-"Amore " . . . Pinsuti M a r y L . Cook and Oscar G. Bauman

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Ned

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" Little Lizy

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Helen Louise Rogers

'<The Haunted Crust " Catherine Saunders

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America

Carrie Ramsey Shields

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Valse . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - ( S y .l p t. ~ e . E l l a B. Van Atta

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Lord Chatham

Salem E d w a r d Munyer

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" Sparticus to the Roman Envoys i n -E t r u r i a "

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Herbert Clayton Chamberlain Vocal- "Nymphs and F a w n s

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Bemberg

Mabel J. Fullerton " John Brown a t Harper's Ferry" . . Benjamin F r a n k l i n Diclcisson

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" New England Civilization

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Wendell Phillips William Pierce F r y e

William Reberger

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Piano-"AuMatin".

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Godard

Samuel K. .Trimmer

Prizes 1st Prize i n Eloc~ltion 2nd Prize in Elocution

1st Prize in Oratory 2nd Prize i n Oratory

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Carrie Ramsey Shields Jessie Ludlow Getzinger

Herbert Clayton Chamberlain Salem E d w a r d Munyer

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Civen Annually by the Students of the Musical Department Fr~day. June 12. 1903

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Organ- " G r a n d Choeur " Salome Mr. Don C. Urner, S p r i n g City, P a . Chopin Piano--" Valse in E minor " Miss Fannie Day, P o r t Morris Thomas Vocal-" Mon Conosci il be1 suol " (from Mignon) Miss E l l a B. V a n Atta, Haclzettstown Linding Piano- (a) " Rustle of S p r i n g " Chaminade ( b ) " A i r de Ballet " Miss Tillie Smith, Hackettstown . . . . . . Raff P i a n o Duet-" Tarantelle." Op. 82, No. 12. Miss Carrie B. Wells, Bloomfield Miss Fannie Day, P o r t Morris Quartelte-"PersianGarden,"LongCycle. Lehmen Miss Mabel Fullerton, Ridgewood MissqElla B. Van Atta, Haclzettstown Mr. Louis H. Cooke, Hackettstown Mr. Oscar Bauman, S t . Joseph, Mo. Schuett Piano- " Etude Mignon " Miss May Comstock, New Canaan, Conn. Arditi . . . . . . . . . . . Vocal-" P a r l a " Miss Mabel McCormick, Uniontown, P a . . . . Grieg P i a n o Duo-Romanza, with Variations Miss Fullerton a n d Mr. F. W. ~ c h l i e d e r . . . . . . Rubenstein Quartette-"VoicesoftheWoods". Misses McCogmick, Van Atta, Wells, Miss Olga Martin, Hackettstown Piano- Valse No. 4 . Godard ~ i s s ' v a nAtta Vocal- Toreador Song Bizet - (from Carmen) Mr. Bauman Chopin Piano- Scherzo 11, Op. 31 Miss Mae F. Randolph, Washington

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Colors: Blue and

Gray

Tendered by the 1904 Class to the Members of the Senlor Class on June 26, 1903, in the C. C I. Banquet Hall

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Toastmaster

Speakers J OHN C. DAY, '04 J EAN B. R EDHEFFER, '03 A. F RANCIS C HAMBERLAIN, '03

E LLA VAN ATTA, '04 A LFRED B. D ARLING , A. M. R EV . DR. G EORGE H. WHITNEY


Entertainment For the Benefit of the Current To p ic and Fact and Fiction Clubs February 6, 1904

Besides various musical numbers and recitations, the German club presented a scene from " T;liilhelm Tell ; " two young ladies sang some French melodies with guitar accompaniment ; and 1 1 students, thanks to the faithful drill by Miss .K. White, gave an excellent presentation of the "Sleeping Car " by TV. D. Iiowells. The details were as follows :

PART I Music-"Our Director" C. C. I. Concert Band Selection- "Marriage of the Blowers"-(S. H. M. Byers) Miss Adalene Hill Music Male Ouartette Selections from Wilhelm Tell- (Shiller) Mr. L. K. F e r r y a "Melodie des Kuhreigens und Variations" b Scene-Hof vor Tells H a u s Wilhelm Tell Mr. Riegel Miss Vollmer Hedwig seine F r a u Die Kinder: Walther , N r . J. R. P e r r y Wilhelm Mr. Grossenbach Music-French Melodies a " L a Pimpolaise" 6 " Hate-Toi, Marial" G " Le Gondolier de Venice" - Misses Scranton Miss Cady Selection-"Adieux de Marie Stuart v - (Beranger) . Miss Mabel McCormick Solo-"The Bumble Bee"-(Combs) y Selection-"Aunt Hitty S e w s a t the F a r m House '- (K. D. Wiggins) -Miss J. Mabel Brown Male Quartette Music

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P A R T I1 Comedy -"The Sleeping Cdr"-(W. D. Howells) Cast:The Californian . Mr. Hance Mr. Roberts Mr. Finlay Mr. Willis Campbell (Brother of Mrs. Roberts, just returning from California) . . Mr. Foster The Conductor Mr. Oscar Bauman The Porter Mr. Snyder Mr. F. S. Gorham Man in the IJpper Berth , . Miss Kent Mrs. Roberts Aunt Mary Miss Rogers Messrs. Reed, Weaver and Wilding Voices . C. C. I. Concert Band Music-"Hiawatha"

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THE HACK

Lectures Oct. 17, 1902. Lecture : " How to Hit the Target. " Rev. Dr. J. 0. Wilson, St. Andrew's M. E. church, New York City. Oct. 31, 1902. Lecture : " How We Made the Weather. " Rev. Dr. Edward Grier Fullerton, jvashington Park Congregational church, Bridgeport, Conn. Dec. 12, 1902. Lecture : " John Brown. " Rev. Dr. Wm. V. Icelley, editor of The Methodist Review, New York City. March 6, 1903. Lecture : " Shakespeare's Lunatics. " Rev. Dr. James M. Buckley, editor of The Christian .4dvocate, New York City. March 27, 1903. Lecture : " A Blade of Grass. " Rev. Dr. J. Wesley Johnston, Old John Street M. E. church, New York City. May 22, 1903. Lecture : Some Men, Places, and Things. " Rev. Dr. Geo. H. Whitney, President Em'eritus, Centenary Collegiate Institute. May 29, 1903. Lecture : Rev: Dr. TVm. F. McDowell, Secretary of the Board of Education of the Methodist Episcopal church, New York City. Dec. 4, 1903. Lecture : boken, N,J.

" The Black

Knight. " Dr. C. L. Meade, Ho-

Feb. 12, 1904. Lecture : " Our Friend the Microbe. " Dr. H. W. Conn, Professor of Biulogy, Wesleyan University. March 18, 1904. Lecture : " Ascent of Mt. Hood. Wilding, Elizabeth, N. J.

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Dr. George C.


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THE HACK

Peithosophian Society Open Meeting, May 30t6, 1903 Decorations : Green and White, Grecian style. P A R T I. Misses Fullerton, Bennett, V a n Atta, McCracken March-"Albert Carola" Welcome President Trio-"Rest thee on this Mossy Pillo\v." Misses Fullerton, Van Atta, Southard Miss McClure Recitation-"The Lotus Eaters" Vocal Solo-Selected . Miss Mary Coolr Debate-Resolved: " T h e culture of Greece surpasses that of modern times." Affirmative: Misses Kent, Graydon Negative: . Misses Pipher, Eschelman P A R T 11. Piano-"Con Amore" Scene-"Henry Fifth's Wooing" King Henry . Katherine Alice (interpreter) Essay Vocal Solo- Lullaby Meteor . Chorus

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Miss McCracken I

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Miss Alpaugh Miss Knowlton Miss Sitley . Miss Gerken Miss V a n Atta Editor Society

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VOL. I.

Members of the Diokosophian Societ y October 24, 1903

Reception t o the Faculty and the

Harvest decorations of cornstalks, sheaves of wheat, pumpkins and jack-o'-lanterns transformed the society hall into a bower of beauty The idea of decoration was carried out to the smallest detail. The souvenirs were straw hats tied with blue and gold ribbon.

A Washington Evening in Honor of Faculty February 20, 1904

TWgLFTH NIGHT G R Q t J P


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THE HACK

Diokosophian Society Open Meeting. May

zg 1903

YE COLONIAL EVENING Y E FIRSTE PARTE

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Ye greeting songe by a l l ye yonge ladies

Address Songe Recitation Music Paper Violine

Ye President Mistress Wright Mistress M. Ashley Mistress Wells Mistress D a y , Mistress G. Brown Mistress Fox ,

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Debate-Resolved: " That ye men of yesterday were more chivalrous than ye men of to-day." Y e Affirmative Major-Mistress S. Ashley Minor-Mistress P. Norton

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Songe Recitation Poem Music . Scroll Songe

Ye Negative Major- Mistress M. Brown Minor-PIistress A. Shields

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Mistress McCormick Mistress Johnstone Mistress R. Norton Mistress Wells . Editor Ye Glee Club

Reception and Tea in Honor of the Faculty October

9, 1903


Valentine Party Guests : The Facult y , the Members of the Peithosophian Societ y

,4 multitude of red hearts hanging from the ceiling gave a charming suggestion o f Cupid's Realm. Grecian poses were enacted, valentines distributed, refreshments served. The evening was pleasant and successful.


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THE HACK

Alphi Phi Open Meeting, Zeta

Hall, June 5, 1903

F E R S T AGONIES

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Hello ! ~argiret." Mail ~ o r t e t - " w h e n ~ ' i r s It ~ i s s e d "He Wouldn't Wear H i s Trousers Creased." Reeding Impromptew Speach (Not memerized)VoBle Solow Cheer u p ! T h e worst is yet to come.

wek kt

By our Prezadent

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Bruther Benjamin

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Bruther Bauman

SECOND AGONIES

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Speach . Bruther Poppe Kompozishun Bruthcr TamaoBi P i a n e r Solow . Bruther J. C. D a y Took from " The RivalsV(with varyashuns)Seen I. Captain Absolute's apartments. Seen 11. A street. Captain Absolute Bruther Snyder S l r Anthony Absolute . Bruther Finlay Fag Bruther Flower . By our Edditer Our Journal . "The Bee" Mail Qortet Sumpintew eat.- -By the Committee

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Alpha Phi

Convention

T h e 27th annual convention of Alpha Phi Fraternity was held a t Hackettstown on December 4th and 5th in Zeta Hall. The celebration consisted of following events: December 4th-7 p, m.: Supper in the C. C. I. banquet hall. 8 p. m.: Convention address by the Rev. Dr. Charles L. Meade, a former member of Zeta Chapter. Reception to delegates in the school parlors. g:30 : December 5th-Convention proper. First session : g:30 to 12 a. nl. Second session : 1:30 to 4 P: m.


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VOL. I.

Whitney Lyceum Open Meeting, June 13, 1903

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Salutation P i a n o Solo Essay- "The North American Indian" Poem-"The story a brook could tell ,- , "Of dear old W. L." . -- c k . Jahr" Vocal Solo-"ITber's Humoro~isReading

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Miller Welsh, President DonC.Urner Henry McLean

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G: - ym2! H a r r y Schoening '>"

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Eranlr Chamberlain Salem Munyer

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Debate-Resolved: ' L T h a t patriotism a s comlnonly understood i s but a synonym of selfishness and h a s been the cause of much woe." Affirmative Negative Brent Foster F r a n k Dickisson Lloyd Van Syckle Raymond Riegel (Decision in favor of negative.) P i a n o Solo-â&#x20AC;&#x153;Au Matin" " The Lancet" Quartet-"Wesleyana"

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Samuel Trimmer E d w a r d Hance, Editor Messrs. Riegel, Brokaw, Pierce, Chamberlain

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111

Address to Whitney Lyceum A l l h a i l t h y h a l l s a n d memories d e a r , M a y they e x i s t for ever! W h e r e we c a n every p a s s i n g y e a r B r i n g tributes of endeavor. T o thee we owe o u r teachings true, T h a t gave us i n o u r youth, T h e buoy of hoae, the morning dew Of Irnowledge, love, a n d truth. Thou s t a n d e s t liBe a g i a n t oak, F i r m rooted in the soil Of high ideals,which s h a l l evoke Success from honest toil. Beneath t h y branches a r e displayed I n living jets of flame, T o a l l who g a t h e r in thy s h a d e , T h e s t e p s to l a s t i n g fame. O r l i k e a mighty s h i p a r t thou, Which, s t a n d i n g out to s e a , F i n d s e b b i n g round i t s noble prow E t e r n a l destiny. L o n g m a y t h y voyage o'er the wave Influences define, A s p a t h w a y s to the youthful brave Who follow in thy line. When g l e a m i n g through p a s t hopes a n d f e a r s , A son of thine sul-veys H i s progress through the l a p s e of y e a r s , H i s e a r l y , toilsome w a y s ; When he beholds thy g u i d i n g p a r t Directing him to fame, M a y h e in fullness of his h e a r t B u r s t forth this g l a d acclaim: A l l h a i l t h y h a l l s a n d memories d e a r . M a y they exist for ever! Where w e c a n every p a s s i n g y e a r B r i n g t r i b u t e s of endeavor. T o thee we owe our teachings true, T h a t gave u s in o u r youth T h e buoy of hope, the morning dew Of ltnowledge, love a n d truth.


S O M E T R A V E L E R S A N D S O M E LIJGGAGE


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THE HACK

The Greatest School in Ameriky " Yis, me dear," said Mr. McCarthy, " 'tis a great school to be sure. Phwin I arrived indoors it was rainin' thot harrd outside it's a xvondher the roof didn't leak. Doctber Noble met me in the hall. ' This is not Hackettstown weather,' says he. ' I hope not,' says I ; ' I prefer me weather undiluted.' 'Diluted is it ? ' says he, 'an' phwat could be betther than wather for dilutin' ? In New Yorlc yure weather is diluted wid dust and n~icrobes.' ' I doan't mind thot,' says I ; ' it's 011 in the way yure brought up.' " W e was in the Administhration Buildin', whose chief use is in kapin' the other two apart. The Docther introjuced me to a tall solemn-loolrin' mon wid glasses named Slocum. 'An' jist phwat is the precise nacher a v coeducation?' says I. ' Coeducation,' says Slocum, ' consists in the seperation a v the sexes. You see,' says he, ' over there is the byes' dormitory, an' over there is the gurrls' dormitory, an' this buildin', 'manin' the Administhration Buildin', ' is phrvare the faculty stays together to ltape the byes and gurrls apart.' 'An' do they succeed ? ' says I. ' Beautiful,' says he, growin' eloquent. ' They meet only undher the eyes a v their insthructors, and the natheral uproariousness an' blatherskitin' av the byes is subjected to the softenin', shwatenin', and mollifyin' influence a v the gurrls.' ' Sure, 'tis a gret system, indade,' says I. " T h e Docther came back a t thot moment from separatin' a bye and gurrl thot was tallzin' down the hall. ' T h e greatest school in Ameriliy, me dear sir,' says he. ' We are the people, and no mishtalie. No wan else is in our class a t 011, a t 011.' ' Thot's the place for Mary and Dinnis,' says I, ' only, bein' brother an' sisther, they've been ust to 'seein' each other wanst in a phwile.' ' Thot can be aisily arranged, we hov receptions Friday noights,' says he. " We wint into the byes' dormitory. ' Can the taychers see around a corner? ' says I ; for yez must Itnow, me darlint, thot the dormitories ;/


VOL. I.

11'7

is circular wid wan half av thj'e circle cut off. 'No,' says he, ' but we hov a house-masther, howsomever, as is ubiquito~s.' ' Ubiquitous,' thot's the worrd, an' phwat it manes I dunno. 'Phwin the taychers doan't catch a boy the house-masther does,' says he. " From upstairs came floatin' the sthrains av a brass band, ivery but yez know the rest av the mon playin' for himself and the --, sayin'. 'Sure,' says I, ' and are they practisin' for a wake ? ' I t was jist such harmony we was discoorsin' a t a wake wanst in the owld counthry, phwin the corpse sat up in his coffin an' said, ' I protest in the name av the law against this unsalnely dishturbance.' We wanted to kill him for shpoilin' the wake. " The Docther laughed. ' No,' says he, ' thot's only the future successor to P a t GiImore and Johnny Susa leadin' the band. Sint Pathrick's Day's acomin', an' they're agoin' to hov their picters talrin in uniform.' " ' Do the gurrls make music loike thot ? ' I asked. ' Oh no,' sags he, 'ye2 could hear a pin dhrop in anny part av the house a t anny toime.' We wint into the gurrls' dormitory next. At wan place in the hall I could hear the sound av three pianas, an organ, and three fiddles 011 playin' different chunes. I was wondherin' if the Docther had referred to the couplin'-pin av a locomotive, phwin he read me thoughts,-he's a sharp mon, the Doctlzer is. ' Thim gurrls is practisin' for the annyuersary,' says he ; ' i t is usually as silent as the grave.' ' And phwat's the annyversary ? ' says I. ' The annyversary, av which there are two,' says he, ' is a social function peculiar to us, It is a t that time that we show the wondherin' public ph&at we can do phwen we really thry. The young min and womin put on their Sunday-go-to-meetin' clothes, and the young min send invitations to the young womin, invitin' thim to hov the pleasure av takin' thim to the annyversary. Av coorse, they doan't take then a t 011, a t ol1,'says he. ' Thot wud never do. But they hov the pleasure av invitin' thim an' the gurrls .av acceptin' the invitation.' "Tis a remarkable system indade,' says 'I. ' Thot's the furrst I iver hearrd av a bye invitin' a gurrl not to go wid him to a party.' ' You misapprehind me,' says he. ' They doan't ask them not to go ; it's merely understood that they wan:t go.' ' An,' says I, ' does ivery bye invite a gun1 ? ' ' Oh no,' says he. 'You see, we hov a recep-

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THE HACK

118

tion after the show, and another next mornin'. It's then the byes and gurrls can associate and converse. Some av the byes know that they can't converse for five hours widout repaytin' their sintimints, so they doan't send anny invitation. They can then talk to all the gurrls for a little time apiece an' say the same thing to each wan.' ' Sure, an' there's more'n wan way av gettin' over a fence, as my frind said phwin a bull tossed him over wan,' says I. 'Well, Docther, I'm obliged to ye. This is the place for Mary ahd Dinnis, I'm sure av thot. I'll send t h i n down as soon as I can. Good day to yez.' "

Professional Cards A. B. G ARRISON : Automatic waste receptacle and ice cream paralyzer. secured for picnics, church fairs, etc. Room 85.

Can be

C. C. I. CONCERT B AND : Composed of Institute students. For rates, etc., consult Mr. FRANK I<.SNYDER, Manager, Room 65. Can be secured for parades, dances, etc.

G REAT A L M I G HTY P ALMER : Dust Paralyzer. Testimonial, New Yorli Journal, Dec. "Mushhead is a wonderful chap, T o clean out his room is a s n a p ; He opens his maw, And waggles his jaw, Dirt flies from the sound of his yap."

For further information, Room 89. :l

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C. LQUISDCBOIS : ~ o Ibs. o Troy.

Can be secured for exhibition, and side shows.

FREDERICK S. G ORHAM : " The best living skeleton now on exhibition."-N. Y. Times.

GORHA~C-Duno~s : Combination, if so desired. For further particulars inquire Bissell, Mgr.

Don't be a weakling !

Weakness is a crime !

Send a two cent stamp for my system of physical development. Guaranteed to make you feel like a new woman within a week. My magnificent development is the result of faithful adherence to my system. Write a t once. K ENNETH T. REED,Room qg.

The champion Gastronomer. Eats eggs, dogs, glass, peanuts, pie - well we might say anything. He is very fond of children. Bring the little ones for a treat. 100-Other Attractions-IOO I


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THE HACK

The Waiters' Board L e t history's page relate of mighty w a r s , Of states' dissentions and their settled scores; T h e noise of conquest and the battle's song, How empires westward sweep their way along, Of g r e a t inventions,- greater yet to be; How a e r i a l ships shall s a i l the a e r i a l sea, Perform the work that's now performed by cars, And take u s for a S u n d a y call to MarsWe much prefer to take a hlgher berth; I n lowly s t r a i n s to s i n g of noble worth Which, rather t h a n to s l a y a brother human, Will feed his brother man and sister woman. ' T i s understood to whom we have referred: Our loved a n d truly honored Waiter's Board. Permit the poet, though but a beginner, T o just portray the simple scene of dinner. There's E d w a r d Hance who's seated a t the end, He's blessed with size of feet a n d size of head; But what outmeasures both and back again, Is his abnormal storage room for bread. And Foster takes his seat the next in line; His thoughts a l l fondly center round success, Though why this pleases him we can't define TJnless it is because it rhymes with " Bess." On Hance's left a chair is filled by Fretz; H e in his turn doth fill himself with meat. A goodly sort of fellow- pays his debts, Eclipses Hance entirely with his feet. Right next to Foster sits a parody; Who's sometimes called in jest the "missing link;" A synonym for which i s F a r a d a y , Of course this a l l i s told behind a wink.


VOL. I.

121 T h e center of our line i s lrindly graced B y one who claims descent from Johnny Bull; Romance i n his career i s clearly traced, Also success,-he h a s a n al-Wright pull. But Bancker quite defies analysis, Although a bid " for " Ann " he did produce. And since he almost had p a r a l y s i s When he lost t h a t address in Syracuse. The world we know h a s e'er been slow T o recognise true merit; T o give its name t h e noble fame Deserved by i t s spirit. Not so with u s : if there's a fuss O'er Washington and SchilJer, W\e claim the right to show our light, T h e g r e a t a n d noble Miller. I n him we find a l l things c o m b i ~ e d T h a t go to make t r u e greatness; A breadth.of view, a thought or TWO, A " silver-tongned " completeness. Geography, Orthography, H e irnows them a l l by heart. T h e r i i e r Nile did for a while R i g h t through the Alps depart. T h e fortress dome of ancient Rome, When he w a s on his mettle, With conscious pride and knowledge wide H e classified a " Kittle?" Throughout the y e a r we never f e a r T h e 'lectric s p a r k to pass; I n such a case he'd i n its place , S ~ ~ p p ul sy a l l with gas. T h a t he is here from year to year's T h e greatest of surprises; For sciences teach in simple speech T h a t hot a i r a l w a y s rises. And Rodney occupies the other end; R e h a s the r'ower half within his charge They for their stomachs' s a k e on him depend, But happily his serving spoon i s large.


122

THE HACK

Our next man's highly pleased with evolution; H i s interest w a s awakened by a look For this he's made a mighty revolution To cliange the trade of Cooper to a Cook. We scarce'can keep our pen restrained When Taylor floats before us; T h e thoughts of what the world h a s gained I n him come s u r g i n g o'er us. Old nature ne'er gave from her hand, In such a n ample measure, T h e qualities which take their stand T o show forth o'er a smiling land A son of mirth a n d pleasure. Rut still a shabby trick s h e played, A trick somewhat malicious, For he i n form of man w a s made With woman traits capricioos. T h i s fact accounts for that s t r a n g e truth Of name that did befall him; Although a strong-appearing youth " O u r Maggy " "s what we call him. T h r e e times a d a y these characters a r e seen; I t seems a force of hablt to convene. Behold them now a s each i s in his place, What smiles of expectations on each face, A g r i n that's full enough i n its extensions, T o swallow apple pies of a l l dimensions, A s h a d e of quietness there seems a t first, A s often leads the storms t h a t a r e the worst; O r often almost stops the youthful heart E r e he the final question c a n impart. An instant a n d this a l l i s brushed aside, O r deep engulfed in a convivial tide. F u n reigns supreme. H e with his staunch lieutenants Of jokes and bon mots comes with flying pennants; Sweeps o'er the board and screeches when he's passed His visit, though 'tis breath, i s not the last.


VOL. I.

123

Sacred Songs Tuned To School Life " Hallelujah ! tis Done " " Come ye Disconsolate . " Abide with Me " . " Nothing but Leaves " .

" T h e Hack" Bafln Bay Delegation

"

.

.

" Blest be the Tie " " Oh, to be Nothing "

" Hackettstonian "

. m e r and m e r

.

" A Charge to Keep I Have " (Well) " Had I the Gift of Tongues " . " Wait and Murmur Not .

No71i Nominrs

.

' P . Cook

{

. Wilson Leon Cz~rtice chrke '03 YarjiQ

.

Matthews

.

"

" Courage, Brothers, do not Fumble " "

My P o n y

.

Hail the Day that sees him Rise " (For Breakfast)

Wants WANTED.-A bottle of Dr. Greene's Nervura

.

WANTED.-Two and three-quarter ounces optimism WANTED.-A hair restorer that will restore hair . WANTED a t once.-Some one to salt me down WANTED.-A new pun WANTED.-A N E W girl

. . .

Ebstzr

B u Bois Prof. Brown

.

.

Binguman

.

.

WANTED.-Something to reduce the excessive swelling of my head .

Snyder

.

Clarke

-


Sad! Sad! Sad l (Voice of departing Shade.)

" Fellows, leave me here forever, leave me here for time to come ; " If ' Dock ' should send me notice tell him that I cannot come. "

Tell him that Matthews will to meals and chapel go no more,

" But that I'll gladly greet him when he strikes the other shore." (.Rep& of mourning students.)

" Sleep on ! sleep on ! young Matthews, don't think the earth will mourn Because so fresh a kid as you to th' other world has gone. We still have Bingaman, who, we think, is just as fresh and gay " As you were when on earth you did your nerve display I " "

"


VOL. I.

125

A Letter From Jimmie to T e d H ACKETTSTOWN, N. J., March 28, 1904 Bear Ten':-I suppose that, being a very faithful and studious sort of chap, the first thing that would interest you about our school is the curriculum. I confess that I was myself somewhat surprised a t the peculiar modes of teaching, especially that of Grecian history, and for your enjoyment if not your edification I am going to outline this particular work. In the first place we do not go back to prehistoric times and dig up characters to study, but rather fit the history to characters in our midst ; and we have a choice lot of heroes and tyrants to pick from. In writing of Greece and her triumphs historians always associate the names of those who were together responsible for the facts ; but in our department we care nothing about the order of time, for we believe that Draco might have done just as much good in the time of Philip as in his own time. When we came to associate the name of Demosthenes we found difficulty, but you can judge of our success as you read this description of our friend Mr. Wilding, the modern Demosthenes. " Demosthenes was a slender, sallow youth who never enjoyed sport, always stayed with his mother, defective in voice, awkward and weak in body ; but these defects were redeemed by his power of oratory and strength of soul." We expect great things of Mr. Wilding in the future. The next one we study is Hippocleides, that ardent wooer of Agariste, who in a fit of carelessness danced his chances of her away. The portrayal of this character was quite acceptably given by ou friend L. Brent Foster, who has assumed all the ardent affections o Hippocleides. 3


THE HACK

126

" Philip of Macedon," history says, " was a half barbarian, with a voracious appetite for learning, an incessant toiler, willing to sacrifice any part of his body for honor." The likeness of Mr. Faraday fills this place, with a few slight corrections which were shown in our notebooks ; for instance, the voracious appetite for learning was changed to a voracious appetite for food, this being as near as he could approach to it. We puzzled about his losing a part of his body for honor, but were pleased to hear that Mr. Faraday had lost the entire contents of his bread basket in looking for running honors. In connection with " running " the name of Pheidippides comes to mind, and the palm of Pheidippides the runner went to Mr. Will Miller, who as a distance runner they say has no equal. "

Over the hills, under the dales, Down pits and up Peaks, "

Mr. Miller ought to go, but unfortunately, unlike Pheidippides, he never finishes a race. . Turning from sport we seek the circles of art, and placing Pindar in the front we find his worthy equal in Oscar G. Bauman. Turned towards the past and filling his mind with myths and religious lore, loving the heaven-born nobility; but willing to write or sing for the coin, this description fits either one acceptably. Soaring into another realm we seek Pythagoras, the man of figures, fitly portrayed by Prof. Brown, numbers being to him the prop and staff of life, the primary idea and cause of all things. One exception in the case of Pythagoras versus Brown, was the suspicion that Prof. Brown could not live a n austere life, abstain from animal food, and perform rituals with enjoyment to himself; however we gave him the benefit of the doubt. The shoes of Aristophanes the Greek comic writer were filled by Samuel Quackenbush, who will undertake to write anything that looks like poetry, but steers clear of the real thing. In the same room with Aristophanes we found Epaminondas--we call him Munson-a harmless dreamer, thought to be, but one who will


VOL. I.

127

some day become a strong leader if he will only stop trying to puzzle out phenomena. Theseus, the valiant hero who fought savage beasts, was taken by Charlie Benjamin, he being accomplished in that art, having a wild one as his room-mate. Socrafes, called the ugliest of ugly men, with a large bald head, protruding eyes, flat nose and thick lips, and bandy-legged, but with a rare soul, was a hard character to place, but we finally settled on Mr. Reberger as the nearest approach. We anticipate the missing link, a bald head, will be in Mr. Reberger's possession in a few years. The somewhat varied character of Eylon seemed to fit our brother Walkley. You know history tells us that Eylon was an ambitious young man, who won a victory in the Olympic games; he was also a usurper of the government. Now Mr. Walkley is a very ambitious youth (in certain lines) and he has also won a victory in the C. C. I. field-day sports, and we find that he is making a large attempt to usurp all honors in the sprinting line. Perhaps the student picked out to portray Themistocles does not fill the bill as acceptably as he should ; but we believe Mr. Snyder to contain all the energy and intelligence, a s well as brilliancy of Themistocles, along with a few accomplishments or failings that Themistocles did not possess. Themistocles died by a dose of poison. Our advice to Mr. Snyder is, " Go thou and do likewise. " In thinking of Draco, we could not help but associate the person of Prof. Phillips with his. Draco was a great lawyer. Prof. Phillips hopes to be some day, even though he is nearing the sunny slope of life. We have a student in our school who might acceptably fill a number of places ; but we finally settled him in the guise OF Pericles. Pericles was a young man, but recognized as a leader ; he controlled the multitude, and led them, rather than was led by them. Kenneth Thurston Reed, whom you have heard of as " Thermop, " is a young man recognized by all as the leader in anything that can ;I


128

THE HACK

mean deviltry. He is controlled and led by the crowd rather than leading them. Cyrus, king of Persia, was a great man with large possessions, but he wanted more. Mr. DuBois is a great boy with large possessions of avoirdupois ; but he wants more, and we honestly believe he will attain to his desire. There was a great man in Grecian history called Solon, one of the seven Sages, a general as well as a thinker, a writer and an orator. We have a boy in the school, by name Hance, who, coming of good stoclr, the seventh son, has managed to inculcate these principles of Solon in his life, and so we gave the place of Solon to him, and he is keeping up bravely under the great honor. We could not think of studying this subject without somewhere placing our beloved friend, Geo. blaggie Taylor, in the list of heroes. And, in coursing over the array, we fitted the character of Alcibiades to his. Alcibiades was a young man of high birth, of fascinating personality, but violent in some things, seeking for self-indulgence, self-interest. George Taylor we understand comes from Maryland, therefore he must be of high birth among the colored folk. He is of a fascinating personality, as any of the fair sex will tell you, but unfortunate state for him, he is a t times violent with affection for others, and seeks to engulf his friends with smiles, laughter and I-' risses. There is another character in our school that deserves a passing thought in this historical data, and as nothing in the Greek could fit him, we made a character for him, and called him in the Latin, Viscor, for he is unable to recognize a Greek name. Yes, I mean Wilson ; you know him then? The only redeeming feature about him is the fact that he can finish any eatables you have left over. 9nd now, tho' I have not told you all, I fear I may tire your brain, so mi11 bid thee farewell with the promise to write you again and let you know of our success with the new style of teaching. Affectionately Yours,

'' J I M M I E

"


VOL. I.

129

Mercury Drops Have you ever heard of Mercury? for brevity called "Merc," T h e messenger of Jupiter,- whose sole Olympian work Was simply to hurl bolts of wrath At everyone who crossed his path: A wretched cruel practice, unlike deity, more like T u r k . Well, Mercury w a s out one day, a'speeding down the wind, When he r a n across a strange device, of sui-generis kind; An auto-motor kite machine, Marked "Langley9'-painted blue and green, And the puzzle how to run the thing possessed his youthful mind. He straddled over sundry ribs, then grabbed a handle-bar, T o which he gave a vicious jerk, and that propelled the car. H e got it going good a n d fast, Soon reached speed limit, then got past, But he didn't mind the warning wheeze, the a n g r y creak and jar. Now Mercury could go afoot a n d beat the Empire State; He didn't need a modern trick to amplify his gait. H i s curiosity got giddy; T h e c a r became unsteady (sic) And when the thing erupted it knocked him out quite straight. His winghd foot was badly wrenched where Achilles got some whacks, His head was loosely jointed where the chicken got the axe; From toe to top he felt quite sore, If he'd "lost his head" he might have swore. But he used Olympian Alpha Oil, which I think will cure weak backs. T h e moral I would point to you, my courteous reading friend I s to keep yourself where you belong, and your own affairs attend. If you t r y to act like a giraffe You'll find your neck not built to laugh; E'en the gods of Mount Olympus, when they're nosey, need to mend.


130,

THE HACK

A Queer Experiment "

I11

the Musconetcong Valley

" Dwelt two maidens f a r renown8d.

" One

had sltill in y ~ e l d i n gbrushes, Sketches made in water color; " Chose her paints a s i f by magic, " Making harmony of chaos. '' Charming, too, the other maiden; " She with music did bewitch men, " P l a y e d on instruments of sweetness, " Yes, her very step was music; " Music, too, her cheery smile was. '' But these two far-famed damsels " H a d another a r t in common. " Mounted each on curious structures, " They outstripped the fleetest runner; " Flew so fast, rods l a y behind them '' E r e the lazy d u s t had risen. " Many miles they rode together " On the tow-path of the river," " Known i n terms more unpoetic " A s the lazy c a n a l Morris. " One mild afternom of autumn " They were swiftly wheeling homeward '' Through the golden I n d i a n summer. " A s they breathed the a i r of Heaven " They were feeling most fantastic, Twining bittersweet in g a r l a n d s " Round their necks i n wild profusion, '' When, without a moment's warning," S h e who teaches g r a c e to others, " Bids them d i e or be artistic, '' Plunged head first into the river, " Quite regardless that G r a y matter " After diving should be upright! ' I 'Preached,' YOU s a y , ' but did not practice.' '' Ah1 YOU little know the sequel: "


131

VOL. I.

Though her head w a s under water H e r artistic sole ' was stranded " Safely still among the grasses. " First s h e tried to pose as Neptune, " Then the Gladiator dying; " But each time s h e found the water ' I Not conducive to the classic. ' I SO she scrambled for her footing, " On the bank a t l a s t she landed, I ' T h e n the young and f a i r musician " Felt t h a t s h e had missed her calling, " Longed her soul to paint a portrait " T h a t would fill the world with rapture. ' I Muddy was the snowy shirt-waist " Of the soused and dripping maiden, I ' Most Medusa-like her locks were. " R i l l s a n d rivulets a n d rivers I' Slowly trickled through her shoe-strings; " But her ever-buoyant spirit " Could not yet be downed with ducking. " Slowly plodding C. C. I.-ward '' Brightly smiled s h e on t h e landscape. " Should you chance to meet this maiden " I implore you to remember " Though she paints in water colar "She prefers d r y jokes to wet ones." "

"

Professor Leroy Brown, teaching Physics : "The polarization of light, just as we said before,-now some one has been asking for this, I think Mr. Trimmer, possibly some others,well, anyway, as the book says-you find it in some text-books different but it is perfectly correct that . . . (after a pause) you go through a lot of unnecessary work. What good does it do you? You ought to have no trouble understanding that, what's bothering some of you is how we get the light in one direction. Now take tourmaline plates and perform Experiment No. 210, and what does it show ? Simply this, the light passes through, but can't get any further. Any questions you may have on this subject ask outside. Now some of you better get to work at this ! Excused." :I


The May Queen You must wake and call me early, call me early, Bauman dear; To-marrow '11 tie the happiest d a y of all the dear school year: Of a l l the dear school year, Bauman, the maddest, merriest day, For I'm to be Queen o' the May, Bauman, I'm to be Queen of the May. I work so hard a l l day, Bauman, that I shall never wake, Unless you call me loudly, when the d a y begins to break; But I must gather knots of flowers, with buds and garlands gay, For I'm to be Queen o' the May, Bauman, I'm to be Queen 'o the May.

The Upperclassmen will take me, Baum, down on the campus green, And there they'll dance till late a t night around their chosen Queen, They'll stand m'e on a barrel, where I'll have to speak and sing, And with my Aphrodite songs, I'll make the campus ring. They'll deck me out in long-trained dress, a n d black my pretty face, And on my head a n old s t r a w h a t in honor will they place; And a l l the Freshmen who that night around the campus stray, Will be brought down, when I a m crowned, to kiss the Queen o' May. But hark1 the clack i s striking twelve; the night will soon be gone, And wlth its happy joyous tune will come the May D a y morn: Ohl sweet and strange i t seems to me that I shall be crowned Queen Beneath the morrow's waning light, down on the campus green. S o don't fororffetto wake a n d call me early, Bauman dear; To-morrow'll be the happiest d a y of a l l this year; Of a l l the dear school year, Bauman, the maddest, merriest day, For I'm to be Queen o' the May, Bauman, I am to be Queen o' the May. :J


1 33

VOL. I.

Sub Rosa [Some inside infornzation on methods of markiq- papers. ]

Dr. Noble " flunlts every thirteenth one," although he denies having any tendency toward superstition. Being superstitious Professor Brown PASSES every thirteenth one. Professor Gay uses the " water-pitcher method." He throws the papers a t the pitcher, inclined a t an angle of thirty degrees ; those which go in the pitcher pass, the others flunk. Professor Slocum uses the French system, marking the student what he O U G HT to have got. Professor Stone keeps on giving examinations until somebody passes. With Miss White i t is purely a matter of temperament, but she doesn't say whose. Professor Denman " lets Mrs. Denman mark the papers for exercise after brealrfast." Miss Fort6 taltes the marks from the calendar, arranging them alphabetically. Mrs. Knight says she puts down the first thing that enters lier head. If nothing enters, the pupil flunks. Miss Gray is " controlled entirely by atmospheric conditions. " Professor Phillips-still undecided.


134

THE HACK

Testimonial N o b k Sirs:

b

I Wood like to testify to the beneficent effects I have experienced through the application of your cereal food. I tried Fort6 other foods without success ; from the first Knight I ate Grape Nuts I have not been able to eat anything else. I sleep like a Stone and am always Gay. Your food is satisfying and can Phillip a person as beefsteak Wood. My hair, once Brown, speckled with Gray and Slocum-ing out, is now \Vhite. It has had other good effects. Our family first tried Grape-Nuts ; Denman-y of our neighbors followed our example. Now Mir-teenies-t little one is as fat as a Cherub. Sirs, I wish you success in your Noble cause. (Name furnished on application.)


135

VOL. I.

To the Point BAND. -" Yet hark ! what discords now of every kind." F LORENCE BEETON.-" Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw." BECK.-His hair : " This is a forest primeval." BINCAMAN.--"What fluent nonsense trickles from his mouth." BROWN.-" A man of mighty sarcasm but very little hair." E LIZABETH CADY.-" I put my umbrella to bed and stood myself up in the corner-for I sometimes forget." CHERUB.-" One vast, substantial smile."

P ARKER COOK.-" If thy mind were as brilliant as thy socks, A smart man thou would'st be."

THE TWINS.-Mary Comstock and Beatrice Vo1mer.-"And both were young and neither were beautiful." BESSCOOKE.--" Sighed and looked unutterable things." DARNELL.-" Verily this is a thoughtful man, I can .tell i t by the furrows in his brow." H AROLD DAVIS.-" Men of few words are the best men." DENMAN.--" He knows their ways o' thinkin' and just what's in their minds."

T HE FACULTY.-"Ye favored, ye enlightened few." FARADAY.--" A man of unbounded stomach." BERTHA FLOREY.-" Take her up tenderly, Lift her with care ; Fashioned so slenderly, Young and so fair." FLOWER.--" He was yoost a leettle poy not bigger than a doll." 2


THE HACK

136

BEATRICE F RANKLIN.--" Her clothes proclaim her presence."

FRETZ.--"Who seldom says what he thinks, but always thinks what he says." GAY.-"A neat, sweet little duck of a chap." AMELIA GIBSON.-"B~ to her virtues very kind, Be to her faults a little blind." F RED GORHAM.-"Why then do you walk as if you had swallowed a ramrod ? " E DITH GRAYDON.-"S O stands the statue that enchants the world." G YM . DRILLS.-" Behold what a weariness i t is." HACK.-" Within that awful volume lies the mystery of mysteries." H ACE BOARD. -" Great thoughts, great fee!ings came to them like instincts unaware." HAMMOND.-('OldHomer taught us thus to speak, if 'tis not sense a t least 'tis Greek." ADALENE HILL.--" S O coldly sweet, so deadly fair. We start ; for soul is wanting there." MCDAVITT.--" Dost thou love life, then do not squander time, for that is the stuff that life is made of." B EATRICE MCCORMICK.--"AS pale as the Easter lily, and as sweet."

l3'.H. MILLER.-" I was elevated with the co~isciousnessof my intellectual superiority." MUNSON.--"Blame not Nature, she has done her work." L ILLIAN NoE.-" dream."

There's nothing half so sweet in life as love's young

PALMER.--" Friends, professors, and janitors, 1 am no ordinary man." PHILI.IPS.--" Gee, but ain't he got an appetite." MADGE POCKMAN.-" She whose eyes have maddened many." QUACKENBUSH.-" The great I am."


VOL. I.

137

REED.--"Muc~study is a weariness of the flesh." E LIZABETH RITTENHOUSE.-" Ah! impudent! regardful of thine own ; Whose thoughts are centered on thyself alone." RODNEY.-" My life is one long, horrid grind." S CHOOL LIFE.-" This life has joys for you and I, And joy that riches ne'er can buy, And joys the very best." MARION SCRANTON.-" A little learning is a dangerous thing." SHERMAN.-" Here's a pretty good bit of an Englishman." SLOCUM.-"Rare compound of oddity, frolic, and fun, Who relished a joke and rejoiced in a pun." ALMA SMITH.--" IS she not more than painting can express ? " STONE.-" There's them that's 'ot and 'aughty." T HREE M I N U TE SPEECH.-" Tall oaks from little acorns grow, Great aches from little toe corns grow." URNER.-" ' Tis better to have loved and lost, Than never to have loved a t all." WALKLEY'S MOTTO.-'( In luck I trust." N ELLIE VTITT.-" Full many a flower is born to blush unseen and waste its sweetness on the desert air."


138

THE HACK


139

VOL. I.

C. C.I. Concert h n d

I

PZdy ~f3 4 " ~ ~ ~s ~W; B ~ ~ co7t~entyafed W B ha~wtwyo f g d d.wdbZe gw4lig~. Always available for feasts, banquets, and war dances. Impromptu work for parades, serenades, atc. (all strictly evening dress affairs), a spcialty, Ewrpl nicder Am Hs p&Me i~1the Rgaws' GdZery. hcrddr ~ 0 a% IeCae&e~ me#& azl &e Pepis 2 3 3 ~ sS~h w , R E P ERT O I RE :--LBuda-&~~Z;aiDisk, 6. C. I. X@cA, O w DDirecCor, a d Hi&wfAe--(all subjkt to change an the spur of the moment and welleamned with artistic variations),


141

VOL. I.

Baggage Directory

Dedication Presentation Hack Board - Preface - - Calendar Trustees Faculty - History of C. C. I. Editorials - - InMemoriam - Song, "Alma Mater" Senior History Members of Senior Class T h e Class of 1903 Song "Alma Mater C. C. L i t e r a r y Societies Diolrosophian Anniversary 1904 -

-

-

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5 6 - - 8 - 9 - - 10 11 13-17 - - 19-21 22-24 - 26 - 27 - 2.9 30-40 - 41-42 I." - 42 - 43 44-47 - - 48-49

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Diokosophian-Whitney Lyceum 48-53 WhitneyLyceum - - 50-53 Peithosophian - - - 54-57 Peithosopbian- Alpha P h i 58-63 Anniversary 1904 - - 58-50 Alpha P h i - - - 60-63 A Chapel Speech (Di)versified ; 64 Athletics - - - - - 65-79 Athletic Association - 66-69 Football - - - 70-76 Baseball - - 77-78 Track - 79 Organized Bodies - - 81-94 School Events - - - - 95-106 OtherEvents - - - 107-114 Hacklets - - - 115 Advertisements i-xii

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Not having room to store all the baggage needed in this trip of the "Hack", we have made arrangements for storage of same with the business firms represented herein, to whom we respectfully refer our patrons, especially the student body.


May.

2.5, '07.-

Twefcty-one you ti,^ ladies attended a nzidni,c/zt ddnce i n their zync.

T h e BrooKlyn Business Institute 870 Willoughby Avenue

A Newly Equipped and Modern School of Commerce and Finance. Eight Complete Courses of Instruction. Every convenience for a practical training. A liberal education for the business man. C O U R S E S OF I N S T R U C T I O N E n g l i s h Preparatory S e c r e t a r y Course Modern L a n g u a g e s T e a c h e r s ' Course

il

Commerce a n d A c c o u n t s BanRing and F i n a n c e A c c o u n t i n g Course S t e n o g r a p h y Course

A BUSINESS T R A I N I N G in The Brooltlyn Business Institute is the best recommendation for immediate employment. Students enrolled a t any time. EXPENSES M ODERATE. For full information, address

WILLIAM H. VERNON, Principal

T h e eating Apparatus

T h e Baldwin Engineering Co. HEATING AND VENTILATION 107 West 17th Street TRY THEM ;,I

M a r . 26, '03.- Twe?cty-one yotbt~g Ladies on ca~np~bs. I1

N e w Yorlr


Oct. 5 , '03-Freshmen refuse lo mark thefietd.

Harvard University Dental Department

OMITTAG 6 VOLGER PARK RIDGE, N .

B O S T O N , MASS.

WORLD PRODUCERS

The 36th year of this school begins Septelnber 29,1904. Three years' cozbrse. Instruction i s given throughouf the academic year by lectures, clinics, and pmctical exercises uniformly distribuled. I t s iq5rmaries are opened daiZy, oflering to students excellentfaczlities for acquiring practical knowledge and manipulative d e x k fi t y . For imformation address

Typewriter Ribbon and Carbon Papers FOR ALL PURPOSES

Dr. Eugene H. Smith, Dean 283 Dartmouth Street

J.

Goods Guaranteed Highest Standard

Boston, Mass.

I ESTABLISHED 1674

J. D. F L O C K D r y G o p d s -a n d C a r p e t H o u s e Fancy Notions and Trimmings

Wall P a p e r Upholstery Sewing Machines Men's F u r n i s h i n g s

Goods not in Stoch Procured at Short Notice C. C. I. F L A G S A N D B A N N E R S

H A q K E T T S T O W N ,

NEW JERSEY

I 1

Oct. 6, 'o3.-F~eshjnen ducked i n the canal. I11


Oct. 7 , ' 0 3 . - f i e s h ~ ~ z e nmarked t h e j e l d .

BUELL PHOTOGRAPHER PICTURE FRAMES MADE TO ORDER

HIGH STREET

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

Klotz & Ackley

J. H. Vescelus

DEALERS IN

Dry Goods a n d Carpet House

BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON, PORK. ETC. .*. :.

:. :.

A Full Line of Embroidery Silks, Doilies, Fancy Pillow Tops, Draperies, Society Pilo low Tops

:. :. :. :. :.

Hackettstown, N. J.

C. C. I. BANNERS, Etc.

:I

Oct.

21,'03.-

Miss Gray endeavors to co~rcbinebicycli~tg-zuilh swimming. IV


Oct. 31, '03.

(12).

m.)-Hcap

big fire, back campus.

T H E CELEBRATED

Heads the List o f the HighestSGrade Pianos A n d are t h e favorite of t h e Artist and the refined Musical p u b l i c

S O H M E R 8 CO. N e w Yorh W a r e r o o m s

SOHMER BUILDING

Fifth Ave., Cor. 22nd St.

15 Sohme?-Pianos are now i n daily use a2 the Hackettstown Collegiate Inslitate.

DR. J. W. CURTIS

E. M. OSMUN & S O N

Dentist

Dealers in

Kitchen Furniture Stoves and Ranges PLUMBING, STEAM and HOT AIR HEATING Sanitary Plumbing our Specialty-

FIVE A N D T E N C E N T C O U N T E R

M A I N S TRE ET , H A C KE TT S T O W N

I

I WM. LANTERMAN SHOES CLOTHING HATS Opposite Hackettstown Bank

E!

Nov. 23, '03.-Kiegel

atte7ripts to help Prof. Hatnvzond read the selection, i n ckapeb.


Dee. 1, '03. -Miss P. (InPrayer Meeting-) Please sing No. roy (Tneed thee every hour).

Hackettstown National Bank

REA'S PHARMACY

- - - -

Capital, $150,000 Surplus and Undivided Profits, 115,000

SUNDAES

S E Y M O U R R.S M I T H , President M A T N I A S T. W E L S H , Vice-Prest. R O B E R T A. COLE, Cashier

Drugs- Medicines-Chemicals

Direclors

Seymour R. Smith Robert A. Cole W i l l i a n ~M. Everett Andrew J. Cummins

Prescriptions A Specialty

Wilberforce G. Sutphin IIolloway W. H u n t Mathias T. Welsh Elias M. Bartles

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT

T H E NEW KIND OF PENS

I

TELEPHONE

195A

W.. C . & L. C.PARKER

Photographers MORRISTOWN. N. J. S p e c i a l T o introduce our NEW KIND OF

offer

P E K S and have you try them we will send you, upon receipt of r o cents, 15 assorted popular "styles postpaid,-and a handsome PENHOLDER F R E E

C,/HOWARD H U N T PEN C O . Camden, N. J .

Mail Orders for and films promptly $[led and returned.

I

I

Dec.

12, '03.-Prof.

PlcilLips missed breakfast. VI


Dec. 17, ' o j . - B a . ? ~ 6 1 ~Concert y i n R o o ~ nNo. 35. I

R. S. McCracken

Lamont D. Guerin

DICKINSON

AMERICAN HOUSE

FOUNDED 1783

121st Year will Open September, 1904

H A C K E T T S T O W N , N. J.

DEPARTMENTS : STEAM HEATED

I. C O L L E G E .

THOROUGHLY RENOVATED MODERN IMPROVEMENTS

I

McCracken 6 Guerin

Classical, ~ n t i n - ~ c i e n ~ i j c a?td Medical Preparatory Co?~?ses, ench of four years. 1% ,SCHOOL OP LAW. One of the Oldest zf~ the CounLry. 111. C O L L E G E PREPA R A TOR Y . Does only Collegiate Pqbamlory Work t~ntier E-v$erie?~cedTeachers. F O catalogue ~ and further idormation, address

GEO. E D W A R D R E E D . President PROPRIETORS

CARLISLE, PA.

ISAAC RICHMAM I HOWELL

BOOT A N D SHOE REPAIR S H O P

THE CATERER

Cheapest place in the county for strictly firstclass work. I make my price 10 per cent cheaper than any place in town. Only the best material used

APPRECIATES

:. :. :. :. :. :.

Hope Street,

YOUR

TRADE

Hackettstown

Harvey Building

I

Dec. IS, 'oj.-Bg@n

Bay delegation i n the S ~ u d yKoonz. VII


WILL PILOT YOU THROUGH 1 I ALL DIFFICULTIES

EMBLEMS and SPOONS Special Attention Given to the

EYE

1

,

I

MATTISON 6 BARKER THE CASH GROCERS

PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED

T. G . PLATE I Leafling Jeweler and Optician

II

I

Jan. zo, '04.- The organfully recovered. vIIi


Feb. 4, '04.- Billy B r y a n t homesick a d decides to leaue school.

I

W. G . SUTPHIN Druggist and

I

HACKETTSTOWN, N. 1.

.

For 1804

Re resent the latest word i n designing and embogy the most Lried principhs of consbruction.

FIVE N E W MODELS.

Pharmaceutist Cor. Main and Centre Streets

Horsman Tennis Rackets

The "Ccataur " Cane and Ash Frame, New bouble Mesh. The "Climax Expert " "Maltese Cross" stringiGg. The "Horsman Expcrt," Cane Handle. The "Cavendish," New Stringing. The "Paragon," Narrow Ovsl.

I

-

E. I. HORSMAN CO., 364 B R O A D WA Y ,

N E W YOQK.

Illustrated Catalogue, with OfEcial Laws of Tennis. Free on a~plioation.

Sole Agents in the Uniled Slates tor the hmons

ESTABLISHED 1566

F. H. ~ y r e s ' L a w nTennis Ball approved by the National Lawn Tennis Association

Louis A. Burkhardt THE POPULAR

7 A FRIEND

I

BARBER WILL GIVE Y O U

A Clean and Easy Shave A Stylish Hair Cut or Sharpen your Razor Singe your Hair or A Cleansing Shampoo

NEXT DOOR AMERICAN HOUSE. I

Feb. 5 , '04.- Billy and baggage Left f o ~ l n a i m eon the 1.09 train (never to return)? IX


Mar. 17, '04.- "Billy" a?.rives at C. C. I. fully recovered, and thinking more of C. C. T. than he ever d i d .

1 RICE'S-

W. F. DAY

11 New Cash Grocery

CATERER CONFECT10 N E R BAKER

IN TEE

TRIMMER BLDG.

MAIN ST.

Our New Cash Grocery is now open with the choicest and freshest line of staple groceries and provisions. Our prices are only those which can be implied rightfully to a strictly cash grocery. W W e invite your inspection to a fine line of Confectionery.

Wedding4 and Receptions supplied in distant locations. Ice Cream, Sherbets, Frozen Puddings. All of superior quality, served promptly, in good style, conforming to the latest city methods.

C . J. R I C E

MORRISTOWN

HACKETTSTOWN

W. A. H O F F M A N

A S ~ U R YP A R K

N. J.

N. J .

1

DEALER IN

Hardware Iron and Steel Builder's Hardware, Seeds Paints, Oils, Glass

Compliments of

mew Vork aity

Wheelwright and Blacksmiths' Supplies HACKETTSTOWN, N. J. ;/ Feb. 6 , '04.-C. C. I. Concert Band gives

Hiawatha at t h "Sleeping Car" Farce.


April 15, '04.- T h e ''Hack" gone lo press.

I

pk mittenbouse Dress P R I N T E R S and PUBLISHERS

School and Society Work a Specialty UNION STREET and THIRD AVENUE Publishers of The Hachettstonian The Official Publication of C. C. I.

Brooklyn, N. Y.

HACKETT S TOWN, N . J .


L

T H E T UTTLE C O M P A N Y , RUTLAND, VERMONT, Print and Bind this Annual Write for Prices and Samples and References if you plan

r

to issue a similar book....... --ESTABLISHED

;/

T H E END. XI1

1832

1



1904 Hack Yearbook