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FREE ISSUE 6: SUMMER 2016

DAVID'S SALAD TIPS:

F IV E T O T R Y : SM A L L P L A T E S

MORE THAN JUST LEAVES

WI N : S U N D AY L U N C H F O R T WO FOODIE NEWS. PRODUCE MARKETS. RECIPES SWANSEA ON A PLATE: NEWTON ROAD GREAT FOODS OF CHINA: GONG BAO Cover Photo: Welcome to Town, Llanrhidian (Rob Pheonix - Amber Skye Photography)


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Taste Swansea Magazine Summer 2016

WELCOME

Publisher Taste Swansea Magazine

Chargrilled fish, fresh salads, and cold beer – summer is here! Whether you are a Swansea native, or a visitor to our vibrant city, there’s plenty to eat and enjoy this summer. And this magazine highlights the best we have to offer. To celebrate this bright season we have another excellent article from our resident innovation chef David Llewellyn, who gives us his tips on preparing an array of cool, tasty summer salads (page 10). Executive chef Chris Keenan also returns on page 18, giving us two delicious recipes from his new menu, while Gigi Gao from the Favourite Authentic Chinese takes a look at the history of my favourite Chinese dish – Kung Pao (page 17). On page 27, Mumbles Brewery head brewer Rob Turner explains why bottle conditioning is so important for his award-winning beers, before we look at five places in Swansea to head to for delicious tapas (page 29). Finally, I highlight the best places to eat and drink on Newton Road (page 21), while our regular features like Life in the Kitchen, Foodie News, and Local Produce Markets page also return.

General Enquires & Advertising info@tasteswansea.com Editor Chris Carra Design Steve Homer TasteSwansea.com Twitter: @Taste_Swansea Facebook:

facebook.com/TasteSwansea Disclaimer All effort has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this magazine is accurate at the time of publication. However Taste Swansea Magazine accepts no responsibility for the consequences of errors or omissions. All text, artwork and photographs submitted for publication within this magazine are accepted on the understanding that prior permission has been sought by the subscriber where relevant. Opinions expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor or designer and the magazine is in no way liable for such opinions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.

Remember, we love to hear from businesses and readers alike – send your suggestions for features, competitions and recipes to info@tasteswansea.com. Until next time, buon appetito!

Cover Photo: Welcome to Town

Chris Carra Editor

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

STEVE HOMER

DAVID LLEWELLYN

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

ANTOINETTE MILNE

ROB TURNER

Taste Swansea food magazine is delighted to be associated with:

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

GIGI GAO

CHRIS KEENAN

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FOODIE NEWS

TAPAS

CULTURE

CHANGES AT SOSBAN W O ne of the area's finest foodie destinations Sosban has launched a brand new menu, focusing on flexible, affordable dining that centres around delicious local produce. Although the grand Llanelli restaurant are renown for their fine dining dishes, the new menu is a lot more casual, relaxed and walletfriendly. While the new grill menu we featured in the Spring issue will remain at lunchtimes and evenings, their new main menu will feature everything from hand-cut steaks and roast belly of Welsh pork, to – my personal favourite – a shrimp sandwich with Bloody Mary cocktail dip. Sosban's general manager, Rhys Andrews, said, 'we are absolutely delighted with the new menu – our team have been working hard behind the scenes to develop a new, flexible and social feel and we are excited for everyone to try it.'

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e love eateries that experiment, which is why we applaud places like 1825 Coffee Shop (Dylan Thomas Centre) and the Great Hall Cafe Bar (Swansea University Bay Campus) for trying something a little different at lunchtimes. Both eateries are now offering authentic tapas dishes, which is the perfect lunchtime treat this summer. Check out our Five To Try feature on page 28 for five great tapas venues in Swansea. Salud!


SANDWICH SUCCESS

B

SUMMER AT MOSAIC

I

t's all go at Mosaic this summer, with a new menu and more of their growing indoor markets. The warm weather and a couple of 'research holidays' has inspired a few new zingy dishes including a Watermelon and Halloumi Salad with toasted sesame seeds; Pulled Duck with Mango in a Chilli and Ginger dressing; and South African style meatballs with a BBQ relish to name a few. Meanwhile their new wine list – which launched in June – features seven vegan wines from worldwide producers. Check out the Local Produce Markets page in this issue (page 13) for details of their upcoming summer markets.

ig congratulations are in order to innovation chef and Taste Swansea columnist David Llewellyn for winning a British Sandwich

Designer

of

the

Year

award!

The

final

competition took place in May at the Lancaster London hotel and was judged by celebrity chef Theo Randall. David's winning creation was a delicious chicken and tarragon brioche roll, which

featured

bernaise

sauce

and

baby

photo: Rachel Jamison

spinach. He won in three categories in the South West semi-final, so had a very busy day in the final! 'I loved every minute of the competition,'

WHAT'S NEW? If you have any foodie news for

David told us. 'Winning the award was such a

the next issue we'd love to include it - please

proud moment for me and one I will remember

email details to info@tasteswansea.com

for a long time.' Make sure to check out David's summer dining tips on page 10 of this issue! 5


MORE FOODIE NEWS

SUMMER VEGFEST IS HERE! vegan scene in Swansea and South Wales is growing, and we are confident that this is going to be our most successful event yet. We are thrilled to have so many local, independent businesses involved in the festival and we will be showcasing the wide range of products they have to offer – particularly when it comes to food!' Doors open at 11am, with entry costing £1 per person (under 18s free).

T

his summer the Swansea Vegan Festival returns to the city – and it's set to be the biggest and best yet! On Saturday, 16 July the festival will take over the Brangwyn Hall. Around 70 businesses and organisations offering vegan goods will be exhibiting on the day, covering everything from hot and cold food (including Indian, Mexican, Middle Eastern, and pizza); cakes and sweet treats; ethical fashion; health and beauty and animal welfare. There will also be various talks, cooking demonstrations and discussion groups taking place throughout the day. Festival organiser Karen McCloy said, 'The

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EVEN MORE FOODIE NEWS

BEER FESTIVAL RETURNS T

he ever-popular Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival returns to the Brangwyn Hall for its 10th year this summer, running on Thursday to Saturday, 25, 26 and 27 August. There'll be 100 real ales and 60 craft-brewed ciders and perries, with live musical entertainment on all days, as well as a selection of hot food. Festival chairman Chris Radford said, 'The Brangwyn Hall is a terrific venue and not only are we thrilled to have it, this year marks our 10th anniversary there, as well as our 30th anniversary overall. We’ve been growing steadily over recent years so this year is likely to be the biggest ever'. Entry is £3 per day for Camra members and £5 per day for non-Camra members, including a glass and the festival programme. Keep an eye out for Taste Swansea columnist Rob Tuner from the Mumbles Brewery, who will be showing off a range of his delicious brews!

NEW HOME FOR LITTLE VALLEY A

mainstay at local produce markets, Little Valley Bakery are now venturing into an exciting new permanent home at the Gower Heritage Centre in Parkmill. From the start of July, the bakery will take residence in the centre, producing six loaves and a weekly special, including sourdough, rye and spelts. They will also be baking up some lovely cinnamon buns, croissants, and tray bakes on a rolling menu. Bakery owner Alec Merriman told Taste Swansea, 'We’ll be baking everything from here and we’re very excited about the move. It’s been a long time coming and it's great to finally see it come to reality. We can’t wait to serve the people of Gower and Swansea amazing bread and lovely goodies on a Saturday morning.' The bakery will be open every weekend, as well as during school holidays. Opening times will be published on littlevalleybakery.com. 9


MORE THAN JUST LEAVES BY D A V I D L L E W E L L Y N

Salads don't have to be a boring afterthought, and innovation and development chef DAVID LLEWELLYN is out to prove it. This issue he's sharing his tips to make your summer eating a little more adventurous, and give your salads a bit more bite. Summer is without doubt my favourite season – long days, the prospect of sunshine, and fantastic local produce all come together to create a buzz that sparks the imagination and nostalgia of our inner cook. The way we choose to eat also changes, with picnics and al fresco dining, and a generally more casual approach. Salads reflect summer perfectly and they are so much more than just leaves, even though there are some beautiful varieties that grow on our doorstep. With a little love the humble salad can be full of textures, colours and flavours from around the world. They can also be eaten at any time of day, be it breakfast, lunch, dinner, or as a postworkout boost. For the perfect summer breakfast, boil 100g of water

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and 100g of caster sugar together with a thumbsized piece of thinly sliced ginger for a few minutes, allow to cool, then add the zest and juice of one lime. Spoon this over some fresh ripe peaches and summer berries, and serve with a good dollop of fresh yoghurt, some torn fresh mint and granola for a beautifully zingy, crunchy fruit salad. As a fresh start to a BBQ, a ceviche is perfect. Dice 500g of really fresh salmon (skin and bones removed) add a splash of good olive oil, the juice of two limes and a pinch of salt, then leave to marinade for around 10mins – the lime juice will essentially cook the fish. Add one chopped spring onion, some fresh coriander, one deseeded green chilli, and two sliced avocados. Toss it all together and finish with a small

handful of rocket, and serve with some crusty bread to mop all the lovely juices (don't forget to enjoy with a nice glass of something cold!). Now, to create a wonderful centre-piece salad, dice a watermelon up into chunks, lay them out on a platter, scatter over some crumbled feta cheese, toasted pine nuts and pumpkin seeds. Finish with some baby spinach, and a splash of apple and balsamic dressing (recipe below). This salad is packed full of interesting flavours and is perfect to pass around and get stuck in. You could also replace the watermelon with some roasted aubergine and add a little cooked cous cous to make this salad a real show stopper. Roast your aubergine with some Japanese miso paste rubbed on to it – a perfect match.


These days, pickling is no longer just seen as a method of preserving food, but as a fantastic way to add a kick of flavour and acidity to salads and other dishes. This simple recipe can be used to pickle pretty much anything, although cucumber slices and thinly sliced fennel are a definite must try, and are a great match for cooked meats and fish. Just take 150g of water, 100g of white wine vinegar and 50g sugar, and bring to the boil until the sugar dissolves. When cool, pour over your chosen veg and place in an airtight container in the fridge ready to break out whenever the need arises. You could add herbs to the liquid if you want, a whole red chilli, some fresh bay leaves, or even mint stalks – all are very effective. Finally, salad dressings are just as easy to make and are convenient to keep in the fridge ready to go. Take an empty jam jar, pour in 125ml of apple juice and three table spoons of balsamic vinegar, as well as 65ml of olive oil, and a pinch of salt and pepper. All that's left to do is put the lid on and shake it up, then use it whenever and on whatever you feel like.

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LOCAL PRODUCE DATES FOR THE DIARY MARINA MARKET

SUN 10 JULY, SUN 14 AUGUST, SUN 11 SEPTEMBER

UPLANDS MARKET

SAT 30 JULY, SAT 27 AUGUST, SAT 24 SEPTEMBER

MUMBLES LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET

SAT 9 JULY, SAT 13 AUGUST, SAT 10 SEPTEMBER

SKETTY LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET

SAT 2 JULY, SAT 6 AUGUST, SAT 3 SEPTEMBER @ BISHOP GORE SCHOOL

MOSAIC UNDERCOVER MARKET SUN 7 SEPTEMBER @MOSAIC, ST HELEN'S ROAD

PENCLAWDD LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET

SAT 16 JULY, SAT 20 AUGUST, SAT 17 SEPTEMBER @ PENCLAWDD COMMUNITY CENTRE

PENNARD LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET

SUN 10 JULY, SUN 14 AUGUST, SUN 11 SEPTEMBER @ PENNARD COMMUNITY HALL

PONTYATES LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET

SAT 16 JULY, SAT 20 AUGUST, SAT 17 SEPTEMBER @ PONTYATES WELFARE HALL

PONTYBEREM LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET

SAT 9 JULY, SAT 13 AUGUST, SAT 10 SEPTEMBER @ PONTYBEREM HALL

MORRISTON MARKET

SAT 2 JULY, SAT 6 AUGUST, SAT 3 SEPTEMBER @ WOODFIELD STREET

M ARKETS T

he summer is the perfect time for local produce markets, with nice weather and lots of in season produce. And wherever you are in Swansea – from Mumbles to Marina, Penclawdd to Pontyberem – there's a market for everyone! Don't forget one of the newest markets on the list, the Mosaic Market, held at Mosaic restaurant on St Helen's Road. Their market is taking a little break during the summer but will return in September.

And it's congratulations to the Uplands Market which celebrates its third birthday this summer, while its sister market at the Marina is two years old. A third market by the organisers is planned to launch this July in Morriston, and will follow the same format - featuring a range of Welsh produce from hand-made items to fresh food. Market organiser Tara Tarapetian said, 'Our objective is to support and encourage vitality and footfall, to boost trade and encouraging people to shop locally.'

Are we missing any? Let us know! Email info@tasteswansea.com

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SWANSEA BAY GOOD FOOD CIRCLE: CHAMPIONS OF LOCAL PRODUCE

Members of Swansea Bay GOOD Food Circle work together to deliver a good food destination; taking pride in offering fresh, seasonal, local produce – SwanseaBayFoodCircle.co.uk Make sure to check out our members ‘Championing Local Produce..!' Restaurants / Bistros / Cafés / Tea Rooms... Three Cliffs Coffee - www.threescliffs.co.uk Fairyhill - www.fairyhill.net Cafe TwoCann - www.Cafetwocann.com Britannia Inn - www.britanniainngower.co.uk Cariad Cafe - www.cariadcafe.com Gower Heritage Centre - www.gowerheritagecentre.co.uk Morgans Hotel - www.morganshotel.co.uk The Kinder Cafe - www.thekindercafe.co.uk Welcome to Town - www.welcometotown.co.uk Le Petit Bulle - www.lepetitbulle.co.uk Garbo’s Cafe Bar - www.garboscafebar.co.uk Dylan Thomas Birth Place - www.dylanthomasbirthplace.com 360 Cafe - www.360swansea.co.uk Bay Bistro - www.thebaybistro.co.uk Gower Wildflower Cafe - www.gowerwildflowers.co.uk Growers and Producers... Cae Tan - www.gowerpower.coop/caetan/ Gower Salt Marsh Lamb - www.gowersaltmarshlamb.co.uk Gower Heritage Centre - www.gowerheritagecentre.co.uk Tuckers Butchers, Penclawdd Estelle’s Gower Goodies - www.estellesgowergoodies.co.uk Gluten Free Baking Company - www.thegluten-freebaking.com JL Occasional Cakes - www.jloccasionalcakes.co.uk Ty Sirol Pork Welsh Pork - www.welshpork.co.uk Gower Sea Salt / Halen Gwyr If you would like to join the Swansea Bay GOOD Food Circle, give us a call on 01792 371441 and a member of the team will contact you. www.swanseabayfoodcircle.co.uk

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GREAT FOODS OF CHINA: Gong Bao If you're trying one new Chinese taste this summer, Gong Bao (or as we tend to call it in the west, Kung Pao) is a delicious dish with an exciting spicy kick. And in this issue, our Chinese food guru GIGI GAO – owner of The Favourite Authentic Chinese on Brynymor Road – explains why it is so popular.

G

BY GIGI GAO

ong Bao, also known as Kung Pao or Kung Po, is a very well known spicy stir-fry dish made with meat, peanuts, vegetables, and chill peppers, and is believed to be named after Ding BaoZhen (1820 - 1886) – a late Qing Dynasty official, and governor of Sichuan Province.

with the crispy peanuts (or sometimes cashew nuts) with a combined sweet, sour, tangy and spicy taste.

It's a classic dish in Chinese cuisine, that originated in the Sichuan Province of southwestern China, and as such includes Sichuan peppercorns, which give the dish its trademark 'numbing' properties. The dish is found throughout China, and there are regional variations that are typically less spicy than the fiery Sichuan serving.

At the Favourite, the Gong Bao Chicken has been one of our most popular dishes for a long time. And along with the introduction of Gong Bao Potatoes, Gong Bao TouFu (Tofu) is now widely accepted and becoming more popular with our customers. We are also excited to be introducing a new Gong Bao King Prawn dish at the restaurant this summer.

The dish can be made either spicy or mild according to how much pepper and chilli sauce is added, but both have unique flavours. The tender taste of the chicken matches very well

We'd also like to take this opportunity to thank our customers for helping us achieve our third successive Trip Advisor Certificate of Excellence, which was awarded to us last month.

These days, you'll find that Gong Bao chicken dishes are widely developed and very popular on Western menus, particularly American.

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EXECUTIVE CHEF CHRIS KEENAN:

CLASSIC RECIPES I've had a really busy time lately, having just joined The Gower Hotel. I've been bringing in new menus, meeting the suppliers, and just making the superb kitchen there feel like mine – finding my comfort zone. It's all coming together nicely and I'm enjoying it immensely. So it gives me pleasure to share with you just two of the dishes on my current dinner menu. The recipes are well worth having a go at yourself, or if you fancy relaxing, you may just decide to pop down to Dylan's at the The Gower Hotel, and have me make it for you. BABY BEEF WELLINGTON Ingredients 4 x 5oz fillet steaks 1 bag of baby spinach leaves, washed and well-drained 6 oz mixed wild mushrooms 1 pack of frozen puff pastry 1 beaten egg 1 crushed clove of garlic 4 oz piece of Perl Las cheese 2 chopped onions Salt and pepper A little oil for cooking What to do You first need to season and seal the steaks in hot oil, then leave to rest. Now, in a saucepan, heat a little oil and cook

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B A B Y B E E F WE L L I N G TO N

the onions and wild mushrooms gently over a medium heat until they soften. Next add the washed and well-drained spinach leaves, and crumble in the Pearl Las. As soon as the cheese begins to melt and the spinach starts to wilt, season and turn out onto a cold plate to stop it cooking any further. In the meantime, roll out the pastry just about as thin as you can. Divide the pastry into four equal parts, place a generous helping of the spinach mixture to the


BABY BEEF WELLINGTON (continued) centre of each. Top each with a sealed steak, brush a little beaten egg around, and wrap in the pastry ensuring you get a good seal. Place onto a baking tray, brush each with a little more beaten egg and cook on the bottom shelf of a hot oven for about 20 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve your Wellingtons with a rich red wine madeira jus, Gratin Dauphinoise, and French beans. And so to dessert...

CLASSIC TARTE TATIN

Cover with the pastry sitting directly onto the apples, trim off any excess pastry and pop into the preheated oven. Allow to cook for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown and the caramel is bubbling up under the edges. Remove tart from the oven, cover with a plate that is larger than the pan itself, then - using a tea towel or oven glove to protect your arm - quickly and carefully turn it over so that the tart is sitting on the plate and has left the pan! At the hotel I serve this ultimate classic French dessert with home-made ice cream, but it's just as good with a scoop of Joes or some crème fraiche. Enjoy!

Ingredients 500g puff pastry 4 dessert apples cut into 8, core removed 50g caster sugar 50g brown sugar 50g cubes of butter What to do First, pre-heat your oven to 190C. Roll out your puff pastry so it's about 5cm thick, and wide enough to cover the oven-proof frying pan you're going to use – whether you're making one large tart or a few individual ones. Place your pan or pans over a medium heat, add the sugars and the butter, leave to melt and dissolve into each other. Once the butter and sugar mixture begins to colour, add the apples, carefully nudging with a palette knife to form a circular formation.

C L A S S I C TA R TE TA TI N Chris Keenan is an award-winning Michelin star chef, a published author, food writer, and a TV and radio broadcaster. He is recently been appointed Executive Chef at The Gower Hotel, Bishopston. Chris can be contacted at: chris@chriskeenanfood.co.uk

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SWANSEA ON A PLATE: NEWTON ROAD By Chris Carra In his new regular column, Taste Swansea editor CHRIS CARRA takes us on a tour of some of Swansea's best foodie areas. This issue he's Mumbles-bound, exploring the culinary delights of the busy Newton Road. Mumbles is renown when it comes to food and drink. And this issue I've decided to focus on the heartbeat of the area – Newton Road, which takes some beating when it comes to foodie choices. While parking is a bit of a problem (driving up the road itself is usually a tough enough task!), when you are on foot it's a great street to browse. When it comes to coffee there are many places to choose from, although I'm a big fan of Mumbles Coffee tucked away inside Castleton Walk arcade, with a bustling and cosy setting, plenty of snack choices, and a good cup of coffee that is well made every time. Across from the arcade we have one of the newer additions to the road, Mad Hatters Café, which has a fresh and stylish Alice in Wonderland theme, making for a unique setting. So far I've only sampled their veggie breakfast, but their evening menu looks great. However my first shopping destination on Newton Road is usually Cheers Wine Merchants, whose wine selection is second to none. However it's their superb collection of local and international craft beers that keeps me coming back (usually with a bit of a hangover…). Next door sits Olives and Oils, which has been a Mumbles staple for ten years now. And even though the shop is about the size of a large cupboard, they offer an unrivalled deli experience and are bursting at the seams with olives, cheeses and chutneys. Down the road there are a few more shops to grab your groceries – The Choice is Yours and Coakley's Fishmonger always have lots of produce to catch the eye. At the other end of Newton Road – separated by some lively nightspots such as Cru 42, Jones Bar and Café Valance – you'll find Ninety Three, which is a friendly café with a big menu, offering everything from BLT Bagels to homemade cakes and coffees. Finally, although it's not technically on Newton Road, the little corner café Ty is close enough to be included (Queens Road). With an eclectic mix of artisan decorations (most of which seem to be for sale), they offer good quality light bites and coffees, in a relaxed, peaceful setting.

Where's next on my journey? Find out in the Autumn issue of Taste Swansea. In the meantime, feel free to send me your suggestions: info@tasteswansea.com

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OU T AN D AB OU T

LI R, LLAN EL IN SWAN SE A, GO WE .A out eat we ea At Taste Swans

're lot. And usually - when we not being too greedy - we of remember to take a photo of ple cou a are our food. Here en eat 've we our favourite dishes over the past few months:

d c oc k l e s f rom C r i s p y b at t e r e , P e n c l aw d d ! r a R o ma F i sh B

H o m e m ad e h al l o u m i b u rg e r an d s al ad at 1 8 2 5 C o f f e e Sh o p

B ak e d s t u f f e d re d p f rom K ri s t y ' s B ak e p p e r s e ry

ston e d at B r e w n t f u l s al a e v e y r e v A 22

(Above) A hearty Govinda's lunchtime special


E AT YO U R WAY AR O U N D G O WE R T h i s i s s u e w e h a v e a f ood i e t ou r of G ow e r w r i t t e n e s p e c i a l l y f or t ou r i s t s t o t h i s f i n e a r e a , f r om t h e c r e a t or of E a t Y ou r W a y A r ou n d G ow e r – a n i n d e p e n d e n t p r om ot i on a l F a c e b ook p a g e e s t a b l i s h e d t o h e l p e n c ou r a g e f ood t ou r i s m i n t h e a r e a .

to the stunning beaches, fabulous In addition rural countryside, coastal walks, and a rich history, Gower businesses have established the area as a venue for quality dining experiences. Long may they continue! But my starting point may surprise you. Those who know their beers will be familiar with The Railway Inn in Killay. I can only describe the premises as 'quirky 1950s' (a gastro-pub it isn't!) but there is a great range of local brews on offer and far too many to list. Pop in and make this the start of your journey. You won't find food served here, but if you are so inclined take along a chunk of good cheese and biscuits on a Sunday afternoon around 4pm and you'll find other locals have done the same for a cheese and beer share-fest. A great way to meet locals and make friends. Take a circular trip out on the Llanrhidian road to any one of the many interesting dining venues, from Welcome To Town and The Purple Badger (Llanrhidian), The Britannia Inn, (Llanmadoc) or onto the King's Head Inn (Llangennith). All offer great food and some wonderful views to match. Cut back through Reynoldston and you can take in the popular King Arthur Hotel or enjoy a true five-star meal at the elegant Fairyhill Hotel. The first stage of this trip is the more rural side of Gower with less beach access – but it makes up for it with fantastic food and fabulous countryside. If you don't choose to cut across the Peninsula at Reynoldston you can do so via Bury Green and head to the beaches, taking in

The Ship Inn (Port Eynon) or diverting to Rhossili and dining at The Bay Bistro and Coffee House. All equally interesting menus suitable for all pockets, and stunning views across the Peninsula. Returning from the beaches, follow the main road over to Fairwood and sample the delights of Gower Wildflower Cafe, on Blackhills Lane, offering good healthy cuisine and served with a smile. Failing that, head towards Pennard Stores – Three Cliffs Coffee Shop and Restaurant at Southgate. Whatever your dining preference you'll be sure to find something for your palate on Gower. Follow us on our Facebook page and read more about my Gower food odyssey, together with interesting foodie ideas and news. You can contact me and discover details of other food activities via sabordealmeria.com

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LIFE IN THE KITCHEN MATT LEUNG: CAFE TWOCANN In our regular feature we get to speak with some of the finest chefs in and around Swansea. And in this summery issue we have had a chat with Matt Leung, head chef at SA1 favourite Cafe TwoCann. Matt's kept busy with a large, varied and ever-changing menu, but spills the beans on what really makes a life in the kitchen. When you are not working, where else in the area do you enjoy eating out? Having a one-year-old now we don’t have that much time to go out and enjoy dining in nice restaurants. But when we do, we go to the Vesuvios quite a lot as it’s my girlfriend's favourite restaurant and I’m a big lover of pasta – so it’s a win-win! We also love to dine at Hanson at the Chelsea, as we are big lovers of seafood. What was the first meal you ever cooked? The first meal I ever cooked was poached egg on toast with hollandaise, which makes for a delicious breakfast! What's your favourite meal to cook for yourself? Being a chef takes up a lot of my day so there’s not a lot of time to cook at home for myself. But when I can get the chance, I love cooking pasta dishes. Your favourite ingredient to cook with? Fresh langoustines, crab and a little bit of chilli from the market are my favourite! What's the most popular item on your menu? We have lots of new dishes on our menu as well as a new a la carte menu, but I would say our fish pie is our most popular dish, which includes fresh salmon, crayfish and local cockles from the Gower. Our Sunday lunches are also proving to be very popular.

What's the best thing about being a chef? The best thing about being a chef is being given the task to create new dishes using seasonal produce and sourcing local ingredients. It’s great to see the final product and to get good feedback makes it all worthwhile! And the worst? I’d say the unsociable hours, and I miss out on a lot of the family time with my son. But I make up for it on my days off and it’s all worth it in the end. Finally, if you weren't a chef, what would you be doing? I’ve always worked in this industry so it’s the only thing I know, it would still have to be something to do with food and drink. When I was younger I did have a big passion for football… but cheffing is a lot more challenging, wouldn’t we all agree?!

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BEHIND THE BREW:

BOTTLE CONDITIONING

Yeast is a vital ingredient in all beers, converting fermentable sugars from malted barley grains into alcohol. Once the brewing process has been completed, beer that comes into contact with oxygen will deteriorate within a few days. There are two common ways of preventing this from happening to bottled beer: Most bottled ales have the yeast completely removed by either chemicals, pasteurization, filtering or a combination of the three, CO2 is then injected into the beer. This modern process of “artificial conditioning” is used for consistency and preservation. With bottle conditioning, a small amount of yeast is left in the ale, converting fermentable sugars into alcohol inside the sealed bottle. This creates CO2 as a natural by-product, the level of conditioning varying with the amount of CO2 in the beer. The yeast compacts under the pressure created by CO2, so that people who prefer their beer clear can leave the bottle upright and still for a while before pouring gently. I believe that bottled Oystermouth Stout is at its best with a greater level of conditioning than other styles of ale, creating a natural 'reverse Guinness effect' – on pouring, creamy bubbles rise to the surface. The bottle conditioning of Oystermouth Stout with our new hand bottling equipment was a key factor in the ale becoming outright winner of the Speciality Beers category at The Society of Independent Brewers, Wales and West Competition at Ludlow Castle in May. The Gold Award means it will go on to the UK finals. Two of my recent ales, Hopkick and Triple Hop Pale, are bottled without any finings – a fish byproduct. This increasingly popular style of craft ale has a slight natural haze, complex yeasty flavours and is suitable for vegetarians and vegans. Keep an eye out for more unfined beers from the brewery over the summer months. Rob Turner Head Brewer, Mumbles Brewery 27


WINE & DINE: Summer With Antoinette Milne Sparkling wine used to be synonymous with special celebrations, however it has now become a wine style in its own right. The popularity of sparkling wine has increased considerably, and why not? The appeal of sipping beautiful bubbles on a warm summer’s day is very welcoming. Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, Cremant, New World sparkling and – on our doorstep – fabulous Welsh sparkling? Take your pick! It can be said that Champagne is considered to be the

Cremant is sparkling wine from the many regions in

best and most prestigious sparkling wine of all. It

France and is generally made by the traditional method

certainly seems the most expensive, although that is not

(like Champagne). It is not very well known and is often

necessarily the case. The grapes are grown in a cool

excellent value, particularly Cremant from the Loire

climate (in Champagne) and the wine is made following

which, when made with the Chenin Blanc grape varietal,

the traditional method, the hallmark of which the

can be spectacular.

second fermentation takes place in the bottle. The style reflects this in many ways. It tends to be delicate with

Sparkling wine from the New World, such as

high acidity and quite racy. Vintage Champagne, which

Australia, New Zealand, California, Chile, Canada and

has been aged for a longer time, is richer and fuller.

other places, can be astonishingly captivating. Usually quite fruity and zesty, they can rival some of the best

Prosecco

continues

unabatingly

to

seduce.

It’s

sparkling wines in the world.

gentleness and creamy texture is hard to resist. Usually, fresh and zesty flavours of ripe peach and green apple

And finally, there's Welsh sparkling wine, which is

abound. If you find a label that includes “Conigliano

gaining tremendous popularity. Ancre Hill Estates is

Valdobbiadene”, you will have to pay a bit more but it

leading the way with their very elegant Pinot Noir

should be worth it. These are the hills around Prosecco

Chardonnay Rose Sparkling and the Blanc de Noirs

where the grapes are grown. These Proseccos are worth

sparkling. They are beautifully crafted and, if you haven’t

seeking out as they will reward you with more defined

tried them yet, you won’t be disappointed!

flavours, more concentration and a longer finish. Have fun experimenting with the various types of Cava’s reputation, on the other hand, has unfortunately

sparkling wine available at both independent wine

suffered due to heavy supermarket discounting. All Cava

merchants and supermarkets.

by law must be made by the traditional method (just like Champagne). Much Cava is made with three native grape varieties, however many are now made with the same grapes used in Champagne, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Premium Cava is well worth seeking out.

Wine For Life Learning with FINE WINES DIRECT UK run WSET qualifications in Swansea and all over Wales. For details of upcoming qualifications, tastings and any questions, please call Antoinette on 07399 578833.

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FIVE TO TRY: SMALL PLATES What's a small plate? By itself, maybe not much more than a snack – but combine it with another couple of dishes and you suddenly have a light but satisfying meal that encapsulates the spirit of the summer. Here are five of the best places in Swansea to enjoy small plates/tapas this summer.

GREAT HALL CAFE BAR This stylish addition to Swansea University's Bay Campus offers a special summer tapas menu, featuring six dishes including Chorizo al Vino (spicy sausage in red wine) and Paella de Verduras (seasonal vegetarian paella). Two tapas plus a serving of crispy Barra Gallega is a bargain at £5.95. And, with the sun out, the view from the balcony takes some beating!

1825 COFFEE SHOP

MOSAIC

Inspired by their authentic Spanish barista, 1825 Coffee Shop, inside the Dylan Thomas Centre, serve a full tapas menu every Wed, Thurs, and Friday lunchtime. For £10, choose three dishes from a long list of Spanish classics, including Pan Catalana (bread with fresh tomato, garlic and olive oil paste), Spanish Tortilla, Garlic Mushrooms, and spicy Patatas Bravas.

This little gem is a restaurant that loves small plates. While their varied menu offers a huge marriage of tastes, their trusty sharing platter (£20 per head) involves an antipasti plate along with five small dishes of everything from red thai curry prawns to zingy peaches with goat’s cheese. Three tapas dishes are just £10 on Fri and Sat lunchtimes.

NO SIGN BAR

BREWSTONE

The rustic Wind Street bar offers an array of fish, meat, veg and cold tapas dishes including Grilled Halloumi with Red Peppers, Albondigas (meatballs in spicy tomato sauce), and Gambas Pil Pil (king prawns in a spicy chilli, garlic and lime sauce). All are individually priced, but you can get any three for £10 on Thursdays, from 5-8pm. Delicious!

The stylish Uplands coffee bar has always proved a relaxed place to drink and dine, and they make small plates a big part of their menu. All dishes are £4 each and there's a huge range of 24 'small pots' to choose from – mixed olives, hand-carved salami, Lilliput capers, hummus, garlic mushrooms, and marinated halloumi all feature.

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WIN: SUNDAY LUNCH FOR TWO AT CAFÉ TWOCANN The highlight of a Sunday is - of course - your Sunday lunch! And SA1 staple, Café TwoCann offer a delicious dinner with some creative dishes that break the norm. As well as a traditional main course, TwoCann starters include Wye Valley Asparagus with Pea Risotto, Toasted Hazelnuts and White Truffle Oil, while you can finish with Chocolate Tart with Honeycomb, Salted Caramel Ice Cream and Raspberries. Mmmm. To be in with a chance of winning a two-course Sunday lunch for two at Café TwoCann, head to TasteSwansea.com, go to the 'Competitions' page, and enter your name and email address. It's that simple!

Competition closes Friday, 19 August with winners selected at random and notified soon after. No cash alternative to the prize will be offered. The prize is not transferable, and subject to availability. We reserve the right to withdraw any prize without giving notice. Taste Swansea is not responsible for inaccurate prize details supplied to any entrant by any third party connected with this competition. Terms and conditions apply.

Est 1935

KRISTY'S BAKERY Eversley Road, Swansea | 01792 201479 Specialist Italian bakery in Sketty

Baking today like we've done for 80 years.

KristysBakerySwansea.com

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@KristysBakery


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Taste Swansea - Issue 6  

Taste Swansea - Summer 2016 (Issue 6) Here's the sixth issue of Taste Swansea - the Summer Edition! Enjoy 32 pages of foodie news, expert op...

Taste Swansea - Issue 6  

Taste Swansea - Summer 2016 (Issue 6) Here's the sixth issue of Taste Swansea - the Summer Edition! Enjoy 32 pages of foodie news, expert op...

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