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FO O D AN D DRIN K MAGAZINE I SSUE 1 1 : JULY/AUG 2 0 1 7

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Include

Out A PullWalk Foodie Guide

Culture Unlocked | Life In The Kitchen | BBQ Mackerel Student Eats | Boozy Dude | Worth A Drive | Foodie News


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WELCOME ’m hoping that by the time you read this magazine the weather in Swansea will be baking – because so many of this issue’s features rely on the sun being out! But even if the skies are a little grey, fear not because we still have a big bowl of fantastic foodie content to get stuck in to.

Firstly, for tourists and locals alike, we’ve put together a four-page pull-out supplement, highlighting some of our favourite places to eat and drink across Swansea city centre and the Marina area. Check out the middle page for some international inspiration. We also have some familiar features, including Culture Unlocked, where myself and local arts writer Mark Rees focus on the culture and cuisine of the St Helen’s area (page 12); our innovation and design chef David Llewellyn shows us how best to use mackerel this summer (page 21), while Adam ‘Boozy Dude’ Sillman highlights three tipples

that will almost certainly cool you down when the weather gets too much (page 30). Elsewhere, Monique Djarn gives her tips on making money-saving, no-waste icecream (page 27), Katie Bowman undertakes our first full page cookery book review (page 4), and Gigi Gao gives us a look at one of my personal favourite Chinese traditions: dim sum (page 19). So enjoy this summery issue of Swansea’s only dedicated food and drink magazine – it’ll be autumn before you know it… Buon appetito and see you next issue!

Chris Carra Editor CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

STEVE HOMER

DAVID LLEWELLYN

KATIE BOWMAN

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

GIGI GAO

MONIQUE DJARN

ADAM SILLMAN

Cover Photo: The Swigg, Maritime Quarter

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Taste Swansea is proud to be associated with

Taste Swansea Magazine | July/August 2017 | Publisher Taste Swansea Magazine General Enquires & Advertising info@tasteswansea.com| Editor Chris Carra | Design Steve Homer TasteSwansea.com | Twitter: @Taste_Swansea | Facebook: facebook.com/TasteSwansea Disclaimer All effort has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this magazine is accurate at the time of publication. However Taste Swansea Magazine accepts no responsibility for the consequences of errors or omissions. All text, artwork and photographs submitted for publication within this magazine are accepted on the understanding that prior permission has been sought by the subscriber where relevant. Opinions expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor or designer and the magazine is in no way liable for such opinions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.

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Cookery Book Review: VENETO by Valeria Necchio by food writer, photographer and blogger, Valeria Necchio, Veneto C isreated a recipe book that champions the foods and flavours of North Eastern Italy. Necchio describes it as a memoir of ‘food, family and culture’, drawing attention to the wonderful cuisine of this often overlooked area.

REVIEWED BY KATIE BOWMAN

The book is split in to three sections; the first looks at traditional family recipes, complete with anecdotal tales and beautiful photographs. The methods are very easy to follow and it’s lovely to see the ‘whys’ being incorporated, as well as suggested alternatives. Once I’d torn myself away from looking at pan-roasted rabbit and ‘pick me up pudding’, the second section introduces modern twists on traditional dishes as well as some reinvented ones – the ingredients for prosecco and prawn risotto has been dutifully added to my shopping list. V a l er i a N ec c h i o Both sections contain a mixture of starters, mains, sides and desserts, in effect providing complete menus for gatherings of family and friends. My confident (and rather deluded) self has started making lists of all the people I’m going to invite round for dinner to wow with my culinary expertise. The final section focuses on pantry food – preserves, pickles and jams that use both sweet and savoury seasonal ingredients. You’ve guessed it, I am now feeling rather inspired to become a master pickle preparer too; picture me waving off my fully sated guests each with a jar or two of grappa-soaked cherries. But no, that’s just not realistic, is it? Having been rather transfixed by the photograph for nearly five minutes, we both know the grappa-soaked cherries are not going to be leaving my kitchen with anyone but me. Veneto is a beautiful, informative book, sharing with the reader the delights of this region. I found the format and tone encouraging and inspiring. As for dinner parties? Well, Valeria Necchio may have been kind enough to share these recipes, but frankly I am not. You’ll just have to buy the book and make all the delicious things yourself as I’ll be far too busy eating my own body weight in Tiramisu. 4

Veneto is published by Guardian Faber and available through all good booksellers. ISBN10: 178335108X or ISBN13: 9781783351084 - RRP£17.99


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FOODIE NEWS FRI DAYS I N

F R I D A Y S I N BRYNMILL

CAST I RON GRI LL

T

he popular restaurant at Swansea’s Marriott Hotel has seen a bit of a rebrand recently and is now called the Cast Iron Bar and Grill. With a familiar setting the restaurant now serves a relaxed menu including both bigger grills (think steaks and burgers), lighter snacks, tacos, ribs, and an Odeiga-spiced chicken hoagie. Yum.

B

rynmill Coffee House is the place to be on Friday nights this summer, as they mix up their evening foodie offerings by adding a duo of US-style barbecues to the cafe on both Friday, 14 July and Friday, 4 August. Rick will be taking the tongs for those evenings, so you can guarantee it’ll be pretty authentic! The popular cafe are also continuing with their Indian pop-up evenings, which include a set menu of both familiar Indian dishes and a few more exotic specialities, provided by Vanita’s Kitchen. The first pop-up in May was a big success, and another is planned for Friday, 11 August. Meanwhile, their Mexican food evenings will also continue on Friday, 21 July and Friday, 18 August. Most events open 6pm until late, but check brynmillcoffeehouse.co.uk for more details and to book. 6

FRONT ROOM POP-UP

M

umbles is set to see a brand new popup kitchen this summer! The foodie duo Ben and Ken - familiar faces in kitchens across Swansea - will be bringing a contemporary local three-course menu to

The Front Room cafe in Mumbles on Friday, 28 July. Check their Facebook page for more information and to book.


WHAT'S CO O K I N G ?

~ The Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival returns to the Brangwyn Hall from Thursday, 24 to Saturday, 26 August.

~ Don't forget the popular Swansea Vegan Festival will return to the Brangwyn Hall again this summer on Saturday, 15 July, from 10.30am. Entry is ÂŁ2, but free for under 12s. ~ Street Food Fridays (Unit Nineteen on Little Wind Street) will continue this summer, with events on Friday, 14 July and Friday, 11 August.

CWOATCEKRTSAIIDLES ancy sipping a Lychee Martini in Swansea F Marina? This is just one of the many Chinese, Asian and classic cocktails on offer at the brand new lounge and cocktail bar that has just opened on the ground floor of Gigi Gao's Favourite Authentic Chinese. The lounge will soon be serving small plates, including dim sum. Opens daily from 12pm.

~ The popular tapas menu has returned to 1825 Coffee Shop in the Dylan Thomas Centre on Wednesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the summer. ~ The Swansea Street Food Festival will take place over three days in August (18, 19, 20) at Swansea Marina. ~ A brand new Pizzeria and Grill House, SAPORITO, will soon be opening in Killay.

WHAT'S NEW? If you have any foodie news for the next issue we'd love to include it. Please email details to info@tasteswansea.com

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LOCAL PRODUDCATEES

M AR K E T S MARINA MARKET SUN 9 JULY SUN 13 AUG

MORRISTON MARKET SAT 1 JULY SAT 5 AUG

PENCLAWDD LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET SAT 15 JULY SAT 19 AUG

FO R TH E DI ARY

MUMBLES LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET SAT 8 JULY SAT 12 AUG

Whatever the summer weather throws up, Swansea’s regular local produce markets are always on hand to offer some tasty treats – fruit, vegetables, breads, cakes, beers, ciders, meats and veggie/vegan produce are PENNARD LOCAL all available! PRODUCE MARKET

UPLANDS MARKET SAT 29 JULY SAT 26 AUG

SKET TY LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET SAT 1 JULY SAT 5 AUG

The following dates are correct as far as we know, although all are subject to change. Please contact the market organisers directly for more information.

SUN 9 JULY SUN 13 AUG

Are we missing any? Contact us at:

info@tasteswansea.com

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After hanging out in the Dylan Thomas Centre earlier in the summer, Taste Swansea editor CHRIS CARRA and author of The Little Book of Welsh Culture, MARK REES have joined forces once again to explore the food and arts side of one area of Swansea. This issue the guys have taken a walk around St Helen’s, which is curiously brimming with both culture and cuisine.

MARK:

The Brangwyn Hall is one of my regular haunts in Swansea, and when it comes to getting a bite to eat or a quick drink beforehand, you couldn’t ask for a better selection than the array of restaurants that stretch out along St Helen’s Road.

On this occasion, I entrusted Chris with the task of picking out the best places to dine in, while I took responsibility for selecting the entertainment for the evening, opting for one of the regular visits of the always-excellent BBC National Orchestra of Wales.

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I’ve heard everything from hardcore punk to soothing arias at the venue – even an unexpected visit from Morrissey on one occasion – but music aside, what I love about the

confronted by a bust of the man himself by Albert Toft, but the main artistic attraction is, of course, in the hall itself.

Brangwyn are the artistic treasures tucked away inside its unassuming walls; most of which were created, or inspired by, the building’s namesake. In fact, as soon as you walk in you’ll be

be familiar with the vast 18piece British Empire Panels which adorn the concert space, as the backdrop to a graduation, or a ceremony, or a wedding, or a party. But

A lot of people in Swansea will


what they may not know is the story behind them being there – and it’s quite a story. Sir Frank Brangwyn made his name as a wartime artist during the First World War,

and it is said that the Kaiser himself put a price on the artist’s head for one of his more gruesome patriotic posters in which an enemy soldier is graphically bayoneted. At the end of the war, Brangwyn landed the job of creating an epic mural in memory of those who had fallen, to be hung in the House of Lords. But before the project was completed, those who had commissioned him

with the mammoth undertaking had been replaced, and their successors deemed his work – a colourful depiction of all that was good in the world which had been protected by the conflict – to

be wholly inappropriate for the Westminster gallery. A new home had to be found, and luckily for us here in South Wales, that new home was in Swansea.

CHRIS:

Culture aside, St Helen’s is an area of great foodie significance. For now we’ll stick with the Brangywn Hall – a building that has become the centre for food and drink festivals in the city

over the past few years. Since 2006 the insanely popular Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival has called the Brangwyn home, and pleasured thousands of real ale buffs and craft beer enthusiasts with liberal helpings of the good stuff over the past decade (and upset the same amount of people with awful hangovers the following day). We’ve also seen the Swansea Vegan Festival, German Beer Festival, Prosecco Festival, and Gin Festival all take place in the hall annually. Ultimately, if you like a food and drink festival, the Brangwyn is usually the place to be! Heading slightly further down the road to the Patti Pavilion, the majority of Swansea locals will be aware that – since 2010 – part of the building has been taken over by a contemporary Indian restaurant, the Patti Raj (or ‘The Patti’ as it now seems to be known). A decent curry can be found here, even though to me the menu seems to have reduced in size

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recently. The food is matched by the awesome views across Swansea Bay – providing you can get the right seat! Nearby, on Oystermouth Road, we also have The Bay View, which doubles up as both a traditional seafront pub and popular Thai restaurant – a favourite of David Hasselhoff if I remember correctly, and the place myself and Mark

dined that evening (admittedly not as glamourous as The Hoff). On the subject of Eastern cuisine, as Mark mentioned, while in this area it would be a sin not to head up towards St Helen’s Road, where you will be greeted by a myriad of Indian restaurants – around seven at the last count. These operate alongside a handful of

other cuisines, such as Chinese, Italian, Indonesian and Turkish. I’ve not eaten at every St. Helen’s Road restaurant (although I’ve certainly made a good dent in them!) but I am a fan of The Viceroy, Italian Topo Gigio, Restaurant Istanbul, Mosaic and – for a no-nonsense fry-up – Sam’s Cafe at the very end of Oxford Street.

Delicious pasta dish from Topo Gigio 12


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A FOODIE WALKABOUT: CITY CENTRE SUMMER ROUTE

A Pull-O Pockeut Guidet

While everyone else is stuck in traffic heading for the crowded beaches, this summer take the opportunity to stroll the streets of Swansea City centre and dine out at some of the finest restaurants our city has to offer. This handy pull-out pocket guide highlights some of the best international eateries, including Italian, Chinese, Turkish, Portuguese and modern European to name but a few.

Portuguese Turkish Chinese Italian and more...

TASTE OF WALES Foodie treats from a trip to Swansea Market!

Tapas Type Dining

URBAN COCKTAILS

Tapas seem to be order of the day. We'll guide you the to the very best small plates this summer...

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FOODIE WALKABOUT swansea CITY CENTRE SUMMER ROUTE W AL T ER

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M AS AL A M - BAR KING 'S ED W AR D R OAD

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SHOW THIS ROUTE ENTRY AT RESTAURANT ISTANBUL AND GET 10% OFF!

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THE SWIGG

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TURKISH ST HELEN'S ROAD

MODERN WELSH MARITIME QUARTER

ITALIAN/SEAFOOD MARITIME QUARTER

Sat on St Helen’s Road, Istanbul Restaurant is an authentic Turkish eatery which regularly pleases diners with big servings of grilled meats and vegetables, along with a selection of veggie favourites including halloumi dishes, hummus and breads. Service is very friendly too. Don’t forget to finish your meal with some baklava and Turkish coffee!

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SW M

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Another excellent eatery in the heart of Swansea Marina, right next to the National Waterfront Museum, The Swigg is a modern tapas restaurant and bar, with a heritage feel. They specialise in the unique flavours of Wales with a twist, from light bites to more substantial meals, and also boast a wellstocked bar. Don’t miss their Welsh Tapas menu!

Overlooking the Marina, this long-standing family-run Italian cafe and restaurant specialise in fresh, locally caught fish. They offer a wideranging menu of delicious seafood dishes, including lobster, monkfish and even shark, as well as their popular chargrilled mixed fish platter. Their breads, pastas and sauces are home-made too! Open daily.

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WANSEA MARKET

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1825 DYLAN THOMAS CENTRE

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GIGI GAO'S FAVOURITE AUTHENTIC CHINESE

GA L L I N I ' S

SAFI'S

GIGI GAO'S FAVOURITE

M-BAR

MOROCCAN/LEBANESE MARITIME QUARTER

AUTHENTIC CHINESE MARITIME QUARTER

MODERN EUROPEAN KINGSWAY

Another hidden gem of Swansea! For a taste of the middle east in the Marina, head to Safi’s. Specialising in Lebanese and Moroccan cuisine that won’t break the bank, this pleasant little restaurant offers a good menu of classics including tagine dishes, falafel and cold mezze platters, as well as speciality Moroccan sweet pastries and fresh fruit juices.

This very delightful Chinese restaurant has just made a new and impressive home in the Marina’s iconic ribcage building. Gigi and her friendly team offer an extensive menu of authentic Chinese dishes, including a new dim sum menu and all-you-can-eat hotpot stations, with plenty of meat, fish, veggie and vegan options. All food is free-from MSG, but big on flavour!

Tucked away upstairs inside the Kingsway fashion store Moda, M-Bar is the definition of a hidden gem. Open for lunches from Monday to Saturday (until 5pm), the food served offers seriously good value and excellent quality. The menu changes regularly, but try the pan-fried salmon with crushed potatoes, and a watercress and fennel cream sauce for just £6.95!

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1825 COFFEE SHOP TAPAS MARITIME QUARTER

While not a dedicated tapas restaurant, the quiet little cafe set inside Swansea’s historic Dylan Thomas Centre serves up a tasty menu of traditional Spanish favourites – including escalibada, tortilla, and chorizo and halloumi skewers, on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, through the summer months only. The barista Rosa makes a great coffee too!

BUON APPETITO ITALIAN HIGH STREET

About halfway up Swansea’s High Street – fast becoming the arts district of the city – sits Buon Appetito; a relaxed family-run Italian cafe that’s perfect for a casual Italian lunch. A big selection of pizza and pasta dishes sit alongside British classics, and their tasty lunch menu offers great value. It’s also an ideal pre/post-train journey coffee stop!

TRUFFLE MODERN EUROPEAN KING EDWARD'S ROAD

Under new management, Truffle is a popular little restaurant on the outskirts of the city centre, with a relaxed but intimate atmosphere. The talented chef whips up a varied menu full of creative and classic dishes, using locally-sourced ingredients. Well worth a visit in the evenings, with a Bring Your Own policy when it comes to alcohol.

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FOODIE DESTINATION SWANSEA MARKET

I f y o u ’ r e b o t h a f o o d i e an d a v i s i t o r t o S w an s e a d o n ’ t m i s s S w an s e a M a r k e t , w h i c h i s t h e l ar g e s t i n d o o r m ar k e t i n W al e s . I t o p e n e d i n 1 8 9 7 an d w as h i s t o r i c al l y s i g n i f i c an t a s i t s r o o f w as t h e l ar g e s t s t r u c t u r e o f g l a s s an d w r o u g h t i r o n w o r k i n t h e U K at t h e t i m e .

T h e m ar k e t c o n t i n u e d t o e x p an d an d b y 1 9 2 0 i t w as h o m e t o 6 7 0 s t a l l s . S ad l y , t h e m ar k e t w a s d e s t r o y e d d u ri n g th e S e c o n d W o rl d W ar , b u t r e b u i l t i n 1 9 6 1 . W i th th e ro o f h av i n g e n j o y e d a r e f u r b i sh m e n t i n 2 0 1 5 , t h e m ar k e t r e m ai n s a f o c al p o i n t f o r r e s i d e n t s o f S w an s e a a n d i s s t i l l a b u stl i n g h u b i n th e c i ty c e n t r e . O p e n s i x d ay s a w e e k t h e r e ar e m o r e t h an

MADEIRA PORTUGUESE KINGSWAY

If tasty grilled fish and juicy espetada skewers are on the menu, then the cosy Portuguese restaurant Madeira on Swansea’s Kingsway is your destination! As well as traditional Portuguese dishes, the extensive menu is full of tempting Mediterranean classics – perfect for a quick lunch or a more relaxed evening meal.

1 0 0 s t al l s , s h o w i n g o f f f ood ie g ood s in clu d in g f r e s h f r u i t a n d v e g , f i s h an d s e af o o d , m e at , b ak e d g o o d s , g r o c e r i e s , v e g an p ro d u c e , h e al t h f o o d s, i n t e r n at i o n al f o o d s an d s w e e t t r e at s . Y o u ’ l l al s o f i n d a g o o d r an g e o f p l ac e s t o s i t d o w n an d e a t , i n c l u d i n g S an d y ’ s L u n c h b o x , w h i c h i s a g r e at e x am p l e o f h o m e - c o o k e d W e l s h f o o d . I f i t ’ s an au t h e n t i c t as t e o f W al e s y o u ’ r e l o o k i n g f o r , h e ad t o t h e c e n t r e o f t h e m ar k e t t o t h e ‘ c o c k l e r o t u n d a’ , w h e r e t r ad e r s d i s p l ay t r a d i t i o n al W e l sh f ar e in clu d in g c o c k l e s , l a v e r b r e ad , j e l l i e d e e l s , m u s s e l s an d m o r e . C ar o l W at t s i s a h i g h l i g h t – m ak e s u r e t o c h e c k o u t h e r h o m e m ad e s e af o o d m i x .

MASALA INDIAN WALTER ROAD

This contemporary family-run Indian restaurant is a short walk from the city centre and makes a great place for a relaxed curry. Their varied menu covers the classics, but also journeys through the different regions of India, and includes some colourful Goan dishes. A good place for a final evening curry following a boozy night in the Uplands, as Masala stays open late.


GREAT FOODS OF CHINA: DIM SUM This issue GIGI GAO – owner of Gigi Gao’s Favourite Authentic Chinese – gives us the low-down on one of China’s favourite pastimes: dim sum. As she explains, whether as part of a relaxing family brunch or a late night snack, there is no hole that a good dim sum cannot fill!

I term,

n China, dim sum is actually quite a broad referring to a big range of bite-sized dishes, prepared in many different ways – these can be boiled, steamed or griddled dumplings, steamed buns, or a variety of wraps and rolls. The words dim sum literally translates to ‘touch the heart’ and it is said to have originated through the Royal Court many centuries ago, created to ‘touch the heart’ of Chinese emperors. Today in China, dim sum is usually associated with yum cha, which is a relaxing Chinese brunch tradition. Dim sum is very popular in China, both Hong Kong and mainland, and you will find people enjoying it at any time of the day, even early in the morning. When I am in China we go for dim sum, in the middle of the night, especially after a few drinks or a party, when you are feeling hungry!

BY GIGI GAO

drink tea – you could enjoy them with a glass of wine or beer! At my restaurant we have just finalised our brand new dim sum menu, which includes prawn dumplings, meat dumplings and vegetable dumplings, as well as a special fishcake, and mushroom cake that you cannot get in any other restaurant in this area. There are also sweet dumplings, like a custard bun, lotus bun, and red bean paste bun, like we serve here at the Favourite. My favourite dim sum is the fishcakes and the steamed prawn dumpling, because it visually very appealing and tastes great, especially when dipped in soy sauce or Chinese vinegar. But I also love the sweet buns – I could eat them every day!

Most Chinese will combine their dim sum with drinking tea, like chrysanthemum, oolong or green teas. But in the UK you don’t have to

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If you are a barbecue enthusiast, tentatively waiting for the sun to be out long enough to fire up, make sure you have some mackerel nearby - just one of the ways to serve this beautiful fish, as innovation and development chef DAVID LLEWELLYN explains.

G broewauintgy oufpoubresciodaesttlhinee swehaehnaesvearlwI aamys ahweaayv.ilByuitniftluisenncoetdjumstet. hIe csocnetnineruyouasnldy smerisesnitthy eI mi s s – i t ’ s t h e g l o r i o u s l i s t o f f r e s h s e a f o o d i t pr o v i de s . F r e s h f i s h o n di s pl a y i s a t r u e s pe c t a c l e , a n d n o n e h o l ds t h e s a me s t r i k i n g be a u t y a s ma c k e r e l . A me mbe r o f t h e t u n a f a mi l y , t h e s e be a u t i f u l f i s h a r e pa c k e d f u l l o f g o o dn e s s a n d be i n g c a u g h t j u s t o f f o u r s h o r e s th e y a r r i v e to o u r l o c a l ma r k e ts i n s tu n n i n g c o n di t i o n . M a c k e r e l a r e n a t u r a l l y a n o i l y f i s h , s o l o v e a c i di c a n d s mo k e y f l a v o u r s . S i mpl y r u b a l l o v e r i n o l i v e o i l a n d s e a s a l t , a n d pu t s t r a i g h t o n t h e B B Q f o r a f e w mi n u t e s e a c h s i de u n t i l t h e f l e s h j u s t f a l l s a w a y f r o m t h e b o n e . S q u e e ze o v e r p l e n t y o f f r e s h l e mo n j u i c e a n d s e r v e w i th a l i g h t f r e s h w a te r c r e s s s a l a d f o r a s i mpl e g o r g e o u s s u ppe r .

RETURN OF THE MACKEREL BY D AV ID L L E W E L L YN

T o e l e v a te i t, a s k y o u r f i s h mo n g e r to f i l l e t th e f i s h f o r y o u th e n mi x t o g e t h e r s o me c h o ppe d t i n n e d a n c h o v i e s , di c e d s u n - dr i e d t o ma t o e s , f l a t l e a f p a r s l e y , f r e s h b r e a d c r u m b s a n d l e m o n ze s t . P l a c e o n e f i l l e t s k i n s i de do w n , t h e n s po o n y o u r s t u f f i n g mi x o n t o p. P l a c e a n o t h e r f i l l e t o n t o p s o t h e f i l l i n g i s e n c a s e d a n d t h e s k i n i s o n bo t h s i de s . T i e w i t h s o m e b u t c h e r s s t r i n g t o s t o p t h e f i l l i n g e s c a p i n g a n d d r i zzl e o v e r s o me o l i v e o i l a n d h e a d ba c k t o t h e B B Q ! P i c k l i n g i s o n c e a g a i n o n t h e f o r e f r o n t o f c o o k ’ s mi n ds a n d s o me pi c k l e d c u c u mbe r , s l i c e d f r e s h r e d c h i l l i a n d s pr i n g o n i o n ma k e s a n e x c e l l e n t a ddi t i o n t o s mo k e d ma c k e r e l o n t o a s t . C o n t i n u i n g o n t h e t h e me o f t o a s t , a pa t e i s a l w a y s a c r o w d pl e a s e r a n d g r e a t t o s h a r e . F o r a s u pe r t a s t y ma c k e r e l pa t e , t a k e t w o s mo k e d ma c k e r e l f i l l e t s a n d t w o s ma l l f i l l e t s o f f r e s h f i l l e t e d ma c k e r e l . W r a p t h e f r e s h f i l l e t s i n f o i l a n d ba k e i n t h e o v e n o r B B Q f o r a r o u n d 8 - 1 0 mi n u t e s u n t i l t h e f l e s h f l a k e s a w a y f r o m t h e s k i n . S e t a s i de t o c o o l , bu t k e e p a l l t h e j u i c e s . I n a l a r g e mi x i n g bo w l a dd a h e a pe d t a bl e s po o n o f s o f t u n s a l t e d bu t t e r a n d mi x u n t i l l i g h t i n c o l o u r , t h e n f l a k e i n t h e f i s h ( bo t h s mo k e d a n d c o o k e d f r e s h ) , a n d a l l t h e l o v e l y c o o k i n g j u i c e s . A dd t w o t a bl e s po o n s o f G r e e k y o g u r t o r c r è me f r a i c h e a n d a t e a s po o n o f c r e a me d h o r s e r a d i s h . S e a s o n w i t h s a l t a n d p e p p e r , a s q u e e ze o f l e m o n j u i c e , a n d s o m e f i n e l y c h o p p e d h e r bs ( c h i v e s , di l l a n d c h e r v i l a r e a l l f a n t a s t i c ) . O n c e mi x e d t a s t e a n d s e a s o n t o y o u r p r e f e r e n c e . S e r v e w i t h f r e s h b r e a d a n d a c i t r u s y I P A f r o m o n e o f T a s t e S w a n s e a ’ s B o o zy D u d e r e c o mme n da t i o n s , f o r a l i g h t l u n c h o r pa r t y pl e a s e r . 21


Es t 1 9 3 5

KRISTY' S BAKE RY Ev e r s l e y R o a d , Sw a n s e a | 0 1 7 9 2 2 0 1 4 7 9

Sp e c i a l i s t I t a l i a n c r a f t b a k e r y i n Sk e t t y Delicious home­made sourdough sold by the slice!

K r i s t y s B a k e r y Sw a n s e a . c o m

f a c e b o o k/ K r i s t ys Ba ke r y

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@ K r i s t ys Ba ke r y


FI VE TO TRY:

WORTH A DRI VE

Eating in the city centre, SA1 or the Uplands is always a pleasure – mainly because it’s so easy to find a good restaurant. However, sometimes it’s equally as nice to find a place that’s slightly off the beaten track. Somewhere tasty to greet you at the end of a drive. Here are five that are worth driving out to.

THE FOUNTAIN INN

MORUZZI & CO

Steeped in history and around 20 minutes drive from Swansea sits The Fountain Inn, on Bolgoed Road, Pontarddulais. This relaxed and cosy restaurant offers an extensive menu of classic dishes and a wellstocked bar. They’re also very considerate of diners with special diets, with plenty of veggie dishes and a dedicated gluten-free menu. Plus they have rooms if you have one too many over dinner!

This delightful family-run Italian cafe/restaurant sits on Neath’s busy Croft Road and is another that’s swimming in history. Established in around 1928, Moruzzi & Co offer a lovely menu of Italian classics - which will soon include a brand new pizza menu - as well as burgers and daily specials, with a good wine and cocktail list to wash it all down with. But their proper coffees – made the Italian way – are worth a visit alone.

Driving through North Gower you’d be forgiven for missing The Crofty Inn, as it’s tucked away on Pencaerfenni Lane in the heart of Crofty. However this traditional Gower pub prides itself on a cosy atmosphere, good service and – most importantly – great food, so is well worth the detour. The menu often changes, but each dish is delightfully presented, tasty and a little different.

PLOUGH & HARROW

WORTH A DRIVE

MACSEN'S

Since head chef Nick Jones took over at the Plough and Harrow, Murton, he’s injected real quality and flair into the dining experience, with the pub truly earning its gastropub reputation. The menu changes regularly, but you can always expect locallysourced, flavourful dishes in a rustic but contemporary country pub atmosphere. Sunday lunches are a highlight and worth the relatively short drive from Swansea.

THE CROF TY INN

Another fine Pontarddulais eatery, Macsen’s is a quirky, friendly family-run cafe. It may be small but their portions are anything but, with fresh home-made dishes including superb sandwiches toasties and baguettes, with many fillings to choose from. Everything comes in large, including the coffee cups. Enormous! Whether you’re passing, or you just want somewhere unpretentious and relaxing, Macsen’s is worth the drive.

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LI FE I N TH E KI TCH EN :

WENDY McCARTHY THE CROFTY INN

This issue we’ve headed to The Crofty Inn near Penclawdd, to speak with the cosy pub’s owner and head chef, Wendy McCarthy. Wendy gave us some time to talk about her thoughts on life behind the kitchen doors – including pancakes, roast dinners and burnt pizzas!

What was the first meal you ever cooked? It would have to be when I was very young, about 11ish. Every Sunday I used to help my mum cook the Sunday dinner. I loved making the gravy – hers is still better than mine! What’s your favourite meal to cook for yourself? I have four children and two of them have moved out, but when I cook a chicken dinner they always pop in for tea. You can’t beat a wellcooked chicken dinner with all the trimmings, creamy mash and lots of fresh veg.

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Do you have a favourite ingredient to cook with? I’ve thought about this, and I have to say it’s butter! Strange I know, but it’s amazing at transforming the plainest food into something amazing. I also love cooking fresh fish and decorating all the dishes with the edible flowers and herbs that we grow ourselves. My mum has a wonderful herb garden growing outside, so we try to use all our own fresh herbs. Anything you really dislike cooking, or cooking with? There nothing I really dislike cooking, but I really


cannot cook a pizza to save my life. Ask anyone in the family, I always, always burn them. I think it’s probably because I don’t really like them myself.

What’s the best and worst thing about being a chef? The best thing is making new exciting dishes, and getting positive feedback from your customers. I panic over every dish I send out –

What’s the most popular item on your menu at the moment? I would say our speciality pancakes are popular. They come with a variety of fillings, from seafood to chicken and leek, pork and wild mushroom, vegetarian and vegan (which is served in a tortilla). The ingredients are all cooked fresh, then wrapped in a pancake, topped with sauce and grilled with cheese. They look quite impressive on the plate, and customers love them!

is it going to be alright? And when they say they have really enjoyed, it just feels great. This isn’t always the case, and then I feel so bad – that’s probably the worst part about it, when someone’s not happy with something, it does really upset me. Also, the hours spent in the kitchen means missing out on family time. Two of my children still live at home, and some weeks, when we are very busy, I don’t get to spend much time with them.

When you are not working, where else in Swansea do you enjoy eating out? We don’t get much time to go out to eat, but if I was going somewhere special it would have to be Bouchon de Rossi, in Swansea city centre. I love it there. Bernard is an amazing chef, and his wife Lisa always makes you feel very welcome.

Finally, if you weren’t a chef, what would you be doing? If I wasn’t a chef I would love to have a small bed and breakfast somewhere. I love the hospitality trade, and love meeting new people. I was also a school cook for 13 years, in Crwys School, when my children were first born. That was one of the best jobs I had, I loved working with the children, so if I wanted to leave the chef trade I’d go back to doing that! 25


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STU DEN T EATS: I CE CREAM S T

Th(oerreco’sonpoetdhiunpg iqnudioteorlsikwe aeintijnogyifnograthdeerliaciinoutso ipcae-scsr)e. aHmopienfuthlley situ’sn t h e f o r m e r t h i s s u m m e r , b e c au s e o u r r e s i d e n t D an i s h f o o d i e a n d S w a n s e a U n i v e r s i t y s t u d e n t M O NI Q U E D J A R N r e t u r n s t o g i v e u s s o m e s i m p l e i c e c r e am t i p s !

According to the calendar, summer is here. For me this always means ice cream! I tend to use every possible occasion to make it okay for me to have ice cream. I did well on my paper – celebration ice cream. I did terrible on my paper – cheer-up ice cream. The sun is out – cool down ice cream. It is Wednesday – mid-week ice cream. And so on… This ice cream obsession sometimes challenges a student budget. So I have come up with a student-friendly recipe (even though non-students are very welcome to try it!), allowing us to have ice cream for these occasions without going bankrupt. Here I talk about two versions, but it’s really only your own imagination setting the boundaries. For the first recipe, take three bananas, peel them and chop them into pieces. The more ripe they are, the better – so instead of tossing out your squidgy old bananas, make ice cream! Win-win. Put these bananas in a freezer bag and leave them in the freezer overnight. The next day, put the frozen bananas in a blender; add half a cup of frozen strawberries, half a cup of milk (or almond milk if you want it vegan style), and one teaspoon of vanilla (either powder, seeds or essence). Blend this all together, then put the mixture in a container and leave it in the freezer for an hour, before taking out to enjoy. The second version has the same base of three bananas, half a cup of milk and a teaspoon of vanilla, but instead of strawberries I added two tablespoons of peanut butter and one tablespoon of raw cocoa. Put the mixture in a container and leave it in the freezer for an hour. Delicious! Psst… If you do not have the time or patience to wait for it to turn into proper ice cream, I speak from experience when saying that they are really good as milkshakes too. Enjoy!

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TASTE OF HOME: FARMERS' MARKETS This month, Taste of Home participated in the recent Swansea University Students’ Union Farmers' Market, which got Chloe Aspland thinking about whether more-expensive artisan products found at these markets are worth the extra cash. ur recent Students’ Union Farmers' Market, O much like its counterparts in Uplands and Morriston, showcased a range of tasty local produce and their uses, in both traditional and innovative recipes. Taking a stroll around the stalls selling organic, gluten-free and artisan produce got us thinking: ‘Food Markets – pretentious sales or potential savings?’ We are a nation of wasters. Around 4.4 million tonnes of household food – food that could have been eaten – is wasted in the UK each year, amounting to around £13 billion. Why? One reason could be because we have become so used to convenience shopping that the joy of food has left us. Of course we are going to waste food we have no pleasure in eating! Convenience shopping is undeniably necessary, but we should not let the giant conglomerates fool us into thinking it is the only way to save money on food. When we buy something of quality and superior taste, we take pleasure from it, so inevitably we get as much use out of it as possible. Consider this – you go to your local discount supermarket and buy a loaf of bread for 30p. You forget about the bread (it only cost 30p after all) and instead go to McDonalds, spending seven quid. The bread goes off and you chuck it. Alternatively, you go to your local food market, you decide to buy a loaf of artisan bread costing you £1.50. This bread lasts you three days – not only because it cost you that little bit more so you feel less inclined to waste it, but you also do not want to

waste it because of its quality deliciousness! A saving of £5.80.

and

total

Buying so-called ‘luxury’ items needn’t be seen as an unnecessary indulgence. When you buy something of quality, you have essentially invested in it and from that you will find yourself more open to learning about how to use, prepare and cook it. And how better to save money than enjoying learning about the produce we buy through eating it, rather than flinging a cardboard-tasting ready meal in the microwave? So go ahead, enjoy the odd pretentious sale… you may just find it saves you money! Swansea University’s Money@CampusLife team offer advice and guidance on all things student money related. For more details visit the Taste of Home website: tasteofhomeswansea.co.uk

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BO O ZY DU DE: HeatwaveLifesavers!

We bemoan the rain and miserable grey sky all year round, praying for a few blazing hot days, but as soon as they arrive we panic and begin to meltdown. Fear not, because our expert drinks writer ADAM SILLMAN gives us three of his ice cold favourites to help remedy whatever a Welsh summer can throw at us!

Tiny Rebel Clwb Tropicana Newport’s Tiny Rebel brewery have no shortage of fantastic and original brews in their back catalogue, from the dark and heavy Dirty Stop Out smoked oat stout, to the refreshing and majorly sessionable Fubar pale ale. But when the sun is blazing and I need a beer there’s one I always find myself reaching for – their Clwb Tropicana! Described by the brewery as ‘a grown-up fruit salad’ this tropical IPA has heaps of mango, pineapple, peach, papaya and citrus. Its refreshment level is way off the charts. Available in cask or can, I recommend keeping a steady supply of the 330ml cans in the back of the fridge for inevitable pool parties and impromptu beach trips.

Pink 47 London Dry Gin A great London dry gin – distinctive, delicious and won’t break the bank. The distillery is located in Warrington, Cheshire, and takes its water from the River Dee in midWales. Using a blend of 12 botanicals, including citrus 30

fruit from Spain, Italian juniper berries and two varieties of coriander, this gin is surprisingly smooth, but also strong and complex. Bottled at 47% (hence the name) it’s amazing in a G&T or Negroni, and superbly invigorating on its own with a giant chunk of ice.

Graham’s Fine White Port I know what you’re thinking – ‘Port in the summer!?’. But I assure you I’ve not lost my mind. Graham’s Fine White Port leans towards the sweet side of the white port spectrum, and has a delicious freshness and sweet citrus notes. If you want to elevate this drink to another level on a scorching hot day, take a pitcher, mix one part white port to three parts tonic water, then add a thinly sliced orange, and as much ice as you can fit. Garnish with a sprig of mint and thank me later.

For more excellent drinks recommendations and advice, follow Adam on Twitter: @BoozyDude


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Taste Swansea - Issue 11 (July/August 2017)  

It's time for another delicious summery edition of Swansea's only food and drink magazine! Issue #11 of Taste Swansea is 32 pages full of fo...