Issuu on Google+

THE REPORT CARD PROJECT

This academic project was undertaken by Akshan Ish, a post-graduate student of Graphic Design at the National Institute of Design, under the guidance of Tarun Deep Girdher, Senior Faculty, Graphic Design.

Can the report card serve as a medium that provides information about student performance in an understandable manner to facilitate positive dialogue among teachers, parents and students to assist in their learning process?

PROJECT OBJECTIVE 1. Identify the context of student achievement and the way in which parents, children and teachers perceive and understand the current evaluation system, for classes 6–8 in CBSE schools.

2. Explore the possibility of creating an interface to encourage a meaningful dialogue amongst parents, teachers and students to ensure the student’s growth.

3. Attempt to make evaluation less comparative and focus on identifying the child’s strengths and weaknesses.


RESEARCH FINDINGS continuous & comprehensive evaluation

the report card

CBSE conceptualized the CCE system with an aim to aid in a student’s holistic development1. Research indicated that the stress on students, teachers and eventually parents has increased with the implementation of the CCE system. Students and parents are complacent about the co-scholastic activities, and the mindset has not changed from scholastics to include overall development in assessments.

The report card is the only document that communicates student performance from the school to parents on a regular basis, and hence it serves an extremely sensitive purpose of guiding the way parents look at their child’s performance.

Schools have found it difficult to implement the CCE in its actuality, due to inadequate teacher training and the workload of teachers has increased exponentially. Supporting tools and resources have not been provided to them to adapt to the new teaching and evaluation methodology, which makes evaluation yet another task rather than acting as a continuous feedback mechanism to student learning. Parents have failed to grasp the objective of CCE in its entirety, and the focus still remains on training students to enter the competitive job market, and not building their critical thinking and learning abilities. Students view the co-scholastic indicators in the CCE as a means to improve their overall grades. Due to lack of clarity on how these indicators are evaluated, parents and teachers are also at a loss of what to make out of them—deeming these indicators irrelevant for assessing a student’s development. 1

It needs to act as a diagnostic tool for student performance, which enables parents and teachers to work with students on their weaknesses, and build on their strengths. It needs to provide information on student learning in the broader context of understanding and application of knowledge. The shift in the representation of student performance from marks to grades, the complexities of evaluation criteria and the lack of clarity on the basis for the given grades has made the report card an extremely complicated document to comprehend for parents, by merely creating a sea of alphabets that is difficult to wade across. Given that in today’s age—in most cases, both parents are working professionals—they end up spending very little time with their children at home. In this context, the report card takes on an even more important role of being a medium of communication between parents, teachers and students. It becomes imperative for it to foster positive dialogue to provide insight and aid in student learning.

CCE Manual for Teachers — Classes VI-VIII www.cbse.nic.in/cce/index.html

concerns of the stakeholders w.r.t student evaluation

TEACHERS

PRINCIPALS (school management)

STUDENTS

PARENTS

board unable to cater to training of large numbers

inadequate communication on child learning from school

education seen as a qualification to get a job

assessment is seen inadequate as an after-class teacher training activity also a result of originates from labelling in class school and parents

parents unsure about the need

02 / The Report Card Project

alternative assessment

child’s performance anxiety

child’s seclusion

apprehension of child’s admission to higher colleges

result obsession

eustress

ineffective pedagogy

child’s exam strain

poor coping skills

future of children

assessment & anxiety

extra curricular activities

school’s image

alternative pedagogy

learning impediment

low self esteem

teacher’s strain

no motivation to work or to take responsibility

parent’s seclusion

unable to cater to each student’s individual needs

hardly spend time with children at home

parent’s strain

no time to plan, expected to stay in class all the time, takes work home


ANALYSIS considerations & analysis of existing report card template The increase in the number of attributes being evaluated and feedback being provided across various verticals in scholastic and co-scholastic areas, makes it difficult to comprehend the report card for parents. At this stage, the need to restructure the manner in which complex information is presented was identified. This would make it easy to understand, and further guide the parents in making sense of the progress their child

is making at school, so that eventually, assessment can aid the learning process in its true sense. Other considerations were to seek ways to reduce the burden on teachers while filling the report card, and make sure that the report card is easily accessible without barriers of printing and web technology.

front Space for the student’s photograph can be incorporated.

An alternative to calling *this* a Report Book / Report Card, perhaps? Some schools call it an Achievement Record. Something more positive and forward-looking would help in setting the right tone.

Uneven spacing and hierarchy of information. Board registration number is only applicable for students in class 10. Parent details and residential details can be together.

Health Status is usually checked by the Physical Education teacher or the school doctor. It might be a better idea to club this section with the Physical / Health Education section later in the report card. Also, since height, weight and blood group are 3-5 characters long. They need not take as much space. Perhaps, this space could be utilized to make the student reflect upon the term’s progress / write about his/her aspirations and goals or any resolve.

inside

The current division of the report card into different parts (scholastic, co-scholastic areas, co-scholastic activities) is confusing and unclear. The grading system for each is different, both in terms of representation as well as value in terms of grade points. Using alphabets as section signifiers gets even more confusing since the grades are also signified by alphabets.

Each of these indicators might need a grade for itself. Clubbing them all together leaves a lot of room for biases and inaccurate interpretation of grading.

Formative Assessment (FA) and Summative Assessment (SA)—carry different weightages for arriving at the overall grade but this is not explicitly clear here.

Basis of grading for these skills is unclear. Only justification can be provided with appropriate descriptive indicators carefully written by the class teacher.

Activities specific to the student can be shown.

The Report Card Project / 03


inside

An overall grade does not serve any purpose for students (up to class 8) since all of them have to be promoted in any case2 . It does not truly indicate their overall performance, instead categorizes students into different groups. Performance in each subject needs to be focused on, rather than the overall. 2

Right to Education, 2009

back

While trying to make sense of the sea of alphabets that floods the inner pages of the report cards, it is extremely cumbersome to keep flipping the page to refer to the grading system guide given on the last page. The sections are divided in alpha numeric parts in the inner pages while there is no reference to that system in the legend.

The different proportions of weightage of FA and SA are explained here in a confusing manner. This needs to be simplified and put in context.

The grading scales for different sections are different. When a parent is going through the report card, it is difficult to comprehend the meaning of the grades since they might not remember that the scales are different.

This legend can be clubbed with the legend for the other sections of the report card, or could be placed near the section itself for easy reference.

CBSE Report Card Template taken from www.cbse.nic.in/cce/index.html

04 / The Report Card Project


DESIGN PROPOSAL design strategy Most schools use MS-Excel to maintain student records and their performance data. To make sure that the proposed system does not add to the burden for teachers, the template was designed on MS-Excel for ease of access and data handling.

Sample data was used to print prototypes which were once again validated with a few parets and teachers. The progress card can be printed back to back on an A3 sheet in black and white. Its low cost of production makes it viable for schools across the country.

editable excel file template

printed prototype

The Report Card Project / 05


TIVE  FEEDBACK EDBACK

modifications in visual representation Following is an illustration of the modifications made to the visual representation of information in the progress card. front

Telephone  No. Telephone  No.

School Logo

nt

School  Name School  Name Complete   Complete   Address  Aoddress   f  School of  School

ACTIVITIES

CO-­‐SCHOLASTIC   ACTIVITIES

3A Email  IDEmail  ID

Progress  Card Progress  Card

A

B

C

3

2

1

SKILL

GRADE TERM 1

TERM 2

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

Scientific  Skills

Grading  Scale

Session  Session   2013-­‐14 2013-­‐14

1

TIVE  FEEDBACK EDBACK

Percentage ndance  Percentage

back

Performing  Art

HEALTH  &  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION

CO-­‐SCHOLASTIC   ACTIVITIES

3B

Class  Class   VIII VIII

A

B

C

3

2

1

GRADE TERM 1

TERM 2

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

Sports

Grading  Scale

STUDENT  PROFILE STUDENT  PROFILE

ACTIVITY

NCC

Student's   Student's   Name Name

Student  Photograph Student  Photograph

Date  of  BDate   irth of  Birth

Section Section Roll  No. Roll  No. House House

HEALTH  STATUS Height

Mother's  Mother's   Name Name

Father's  Father's   Name Name

Contact  Contact   No.  (1) No.  (1)

Contact  Contact   No.  (2) No.  (2)

3

ft

ATTENDANCE Total  attendance  of  the  student

Weight kg

TEACHER'S  MESSAGE

Blood  Group

Admission   Admission   No. No.

Total  number  of  working  days

Attendance  Percentage

2 Admission  No.

Residential   Residential   Address Address Oral  Hygiene Vision [L]

SELF  AWARENESS SELF  AWARENESS

/

Specific  ailment,  if  any

[R] Class  Teacher

Principal

Parent

My  GoalsMy  Goals My  Strengths My  Strengths

Date /                                              /

My  Interests My  Interests

PROMOTION  POLICY The  qualifying  grade  in  all  the  five  subjects  in  section  1A  is  D.

GUIDE  T GUIDE   O  UNDERSTANDING   TO  UNDERSTANDING   THE  REPORT   THE  REPORT   CARD CARD

The  qualifying  grade  in  section  1B  is  B.

ACADEMIC  PERFORMANCE ACADEMIC  PERFORMANCE

For  weightage  of  co-­‐scholastic  areas,  grades  are  to  be  converted  into   grade  points  according  to  given  scale.

Formative   Formative   assessment   assessment   aids  learning   aids  lbearning   y  generating   by  generating   feedback   feedback   on  performance,   on  performance,   in  class  oin   r  ocn   lass  or  on   assignments.  It   assignments.   enables   It  setudents   nables  sttudents   o  restructure   to  restructure   their  understanding   their  understanding   and  build   and   more   build   powerful   more  powerful   ideas  and   ideas   capabilities. and  capabilities. Summative   assessment   arried   out   at  othe   of  ao  cf  ourse   of  learning.   It  mheasures   how  much   Summative   assessment   is  carried  is  ocut   at  the   end   f  a  ecnd   ourse   learning.   It  measures   ow  much   a  hstudent   has  flrom   earned   the  Ict  ourse.   It  is  au  gsually   raded   i.e.,   it  is  amccording   arked  according   to   a  student   as  learned   the  from   course.   is  usually   raded  at  gest,   i.e.,  test,   it  is  m arked   to   cale   set  of  grades. a  scale  oa   r  set   of  ogr  rades.

If  the  grade  point  range  is  30-­‐42,  the  student  gets  the  benefit  of  upscaling   the  grade  to  next  higher  grade  in  two  subjects. If  the  grade  point  range  is  17-­‐29,  the  student  gets  the  benefit  of  upscaling   the  grade  to  next  higher  grade  in  one  subject. Asterisk  or  Star  (*)  beside  the  grade  reflects  an  upscaled  grade.

GRADING   GRADING   SCALE SCALE The  grading   The  sgcales   rading   have   scales   been   have   given   been   next   given   to  enach   ext  ctorresponding   o  each  corresponding   section  osf  ection   the  report   of  the   card.   report  card.   G    -­‐  M  Grade      M  -­‐  P  Marks      P  -­‐  Grade  Points G  -­‐  Grade    -­‐  Marks    -­‐  Grade  Points PROGRESS PROGRESS The  progress   The  plrogress   ines  show   lines   an  sihow   ncrease   an  io ncrease   r  decrease   or  diecrease   n  performance   in  performance   for  each  fsor   ubject   each  osver   ubject   2  terms. over  2  terms.

1 Change the name of the report card to Progress Card

2 Addition of a teacher’s message at the back of the re-

to shift the focus from reporting to assessing progress of the student’s learning.

port card which is to be filled by the class teacher. This would personalize the feedback given to the student, and is more credible than the descriptive indicators generated by the system.

3 Health Status taken to the back of the report card near the Physical Education indicators since this section is usually filled by the Physical Education or Sports teacher; and it is secondary information that need not be given as much importance in the progress card.

06 / The Report Card Project

Student  Photog

in


inside

1A

TERM 1

4SCHOLASTIC  

ACADEMIC  PERFORMANCE FORMATIVE SUBJECT

AREAS

FA1 (10%)

Grading  Scale G A1 M 91-100 P 10 G B2 M 61-70 P 7 G D M 33-40 P 4

5

A2

B1

81-90

71-80

FA2 (10%)

SA1 (20%)

FA1 + FA2 + SA1 (40%)

SUBJECT

Language-­‐1

Language-­‐1

Language-­‐2

Language-­‐2

8

Language-­‐3

Language-­‐3

C2

51-60

41-50

Mathematics

Mathematics

6

5

Science

Science

E1

E2

21-32

0-20

Social  Science

Social  Science

3

2

9

Grading  Scale A+

A

B+

B

C

5

4

3

2

1

CO-­‐SCHOLASTIC   AREAS

2A

6

TOTAL

C1

SCHOLASTIC   AREAS

1B

TERM 2

Grading  Scale

GRADE

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

SUBJECT

Work  Experience

Work  Experience

Art  Education

Art  Education

Health  Education

Health  Education

A+      Most  indicators  in  a  skill

LIFE  SKILLS SKILL

GRADE

A      Many  indicators  in  a  skill

B+      Some  indicators  in  a  skill

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

LIFE  SKILLS SKILL

Problem  Solving

Decision  Making

Decision  Making

5

4

3

2

1

Creative  Thinking

Creative  Thinking

Critical  Thinking

Critical  Thinking

Grading  Scale

Social  Skills

Social  Skills

Relationships

Relationships

Communication

Communication

Empathy

Empathy

Emotional  Skills

Emotional  Skills

Handling  Stress

Handling  Stress

Managing  Emotions

Managing  Emotions

ATTITUDES  &  VALUES ATTITUDE GRADE

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

Teachers

Teachers

School  Mates

School  Mates

School  Programmes

B+

B

C

4

3

2

1

PROGRESS

8

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

C      Very  few  indicators  in  a  skill

School  Programmes

Environment

VALUES

FA3 + FA4 + SA2 (60%)

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

Self  Awareness

Problem  Solving C

A

TOTAL

SA2 (40%)

ATTITUDES  &  VALUES ATTITUDE GRADE

Self  Awareness B

5

SUMMATIVE

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

Thinking  Skills

B+

A+

FA4 (10%)

GRADE

Thinking  Skills

A

CO-­‐SCHOLASTIC   AREAS

GRADE

B      Few  indicators  in  a  skill

A+

2B

FORMATIVE FA3 (10%)

Elective

Elective

SUBJECT

7

ACADEMIC  PERFORMANCE SUMMATIVE

Environment

GRADE

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

VALUES

Indicator  1

Indicator  1

Indicator  2

Indicator  2

GRADE

DESCRIPTIVE  FEEDBACK

4 Clearly demarcate the different sections and label

7 Align the indicators for the two terms horizontally, to

them for easy identification.

enable viewing of progress and compare performance for the same subjects between terms.

5 Place the grading scale next to the corresponding section of the report card for quick reference and to put the grades for each subject in context.

8 Addition of a column for progress bars which indicate increase or decrease in performance for a particular subject over the two terms.

6 Clearly specify the weightages given to formative and summative assessment for each term.

The Report Card Project / 07


SYSTEMIC CONSIDERATIONS content of the report card

beyond the report card

These are issues and considerations that were discovered during our research which call for a larger debate, initiated by the CBSE.

The report card is only a small but critical part of student evaluation, which itself is only a component of student education. Factors that curtail an effective evaluation of student learning in India are discussed below.

Our research showed that most parents, students and teachers do not consider the co-scholastic indicators helpful, as there is no transparency in how these are measured. Instructions given to the teachers limit their ability to truly assess a student’s thinking ability and emotional IQ. To grade these indicators without providing a substantial basis is not convincing for the parents, and could do more harm than good to students. The overall grade given to students of classes 6–8 sums up their performance for a given year. However, this does not provide any insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the student, nor does it help identify the areas in which they need to put in more effort. The overall grade labels students, and it tends to become the prime focus of the report card for parents and students—reducing the importance of assessing individual subjects. Hence, it has been removed from our proposed design of the report card. However, parents, teachers and students in the validation stage asserted that it must be retained, as it provides motivation for students to achieve a higher grade as well as makes it easier for teachers to understand the overall performance of their class.

With a fairly large number of students in each class, continuous evaluation has increased the burden on teachers. Some argue that the focus also shifts from teaching to evaluating. This has increased the frustration with their profession. Assistive tools and methods, with appropriate training need to be devised to increase their efficiency. As the global landscape is changing rapidly, it is imperative that the education system aims to facilitate critical thinkers, entrepreneurs, do-ers and teach students to identify and create opportunities. In this light, it is required to bring back the joy of learning that was lost during the colonial times. This requires a shift from the tiffin dabba system—a compartmentalized, one size fits all approach to education where the student is unable to find relevant connections between what he/she is studying and the real world; to the thaali system—a flexible and trans-disciplinary system allowing for cross connections to be made between what is being taught in schools and the world outside.

COLOPHON our sincere appeal

online resources

This project is essentially an attempt to contribute to building a better education system in India. We hope that you will go through our proposed design of the report card, and share your feedback and thoughts with us. Hopefully, this would act as a trigger for more discussion and debate, research and suitable action.

This project has been documented chronologically here - thereportcardproject.wordpress.com

A copy of the ‘new’ progress card is attached with this document.

An online copy of this document - issuu.com/akshanish/docs/rc_pitch - issuu.com/tarundg/docs/rc_pitch

Student Akshan Ish Post-Graduate Graphic Design akshan.ish@gmail.com

The redesigned progress card can be viewed at - issuu.com/akshanish/docs/rc_issuu - issuu.com/akshanish/docs/rc_filled

Faculty Guide Tarun Deep Girdher Senior Faculty, Graphic Design tarundg@nid.edu

Paldi, Ahmedabad 380 007 Autonomous Institute under the DIPP

Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Govt. of India

19th December, 2013 08 / The Report Card Project


Proposal for CBSE Report Cards