Page 1

Fresh Perspectives For the Modern Drumline Ensemble Exercises and Music of the Santa Clara Vanguard

by

Jim Casella and Murray Gusseck

Fresh Perspectives for the Modern Drumline Copyright Š 1998 by Jim Casella and Murray Gusseck. All rights reserved. Printing number 3 Published by: Tap Space Publications, P.O. Box 55753, Portland, OR 97238-5753 www.tapspace.com Various photographs courtesy of Myron Vazquez and Michael Cahill Cover Design by: Jim Casella Notice of Liability: Any duplication, adaptation or arrangement of the compositions contained in this collection requires the written consent of the copyright owners. No part of this book may be photocopied or reproduced in any way without permission. Unauthorized uses are an infringement of the U.S. Copyright Act and are punishable by law. TSPB1


About the Authors Jim Casella is the percussion caption head and arranger for the Santa Clara Vanguard Drum and Bugle Corps of Santa Clara, California. He was a member of the Santa Clara Vanguard percussion section from 1989 through 1991 and then went on to be the percussion arranger for the Vanguard Cadets from 1992-94. In 1995 he was a member of the percussion staff of the Concord Blue Devils and became the caption head and arranger for SCV in 1996, where he is currently working. Educated at San Jose State University and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, Casella maintains an active freelance performing career in the San Francisco Bay area performing with groups such as the San Jose Symphony, California Symphony, Monterey County Symphony, Santa Cruz County Symphony, and many others. Jim Casella is the principal percussionist and assistant timpanist of the Peninsula Symphony from San Mateo, CA. He is also an active clinician for Pearl Corporation, Avedis Zildjian Company, Remo Inc., and Innovative Percussion Inc.

Murray Gusseck is the head percussion instructor for the Santa Clara Vanguard Drum and Bugle Corps of Santa Clara, California. He was a member of the Santa Clara Vanguard percussion section from 1988 through 1992 and began arranging many of the drumline’s warm-up compositions in 1990. Murray served on the staff of the Santa Clara Vanguard Cadets in 1993 and the SCV A-Corps in 1994 and returned to the corps to lead the SCV percussion section to new heights from 1996 to the present. Educated at San Jose State University from 1989 through 1993, Gusseck is currently an active performer in the San Francisco Bay area where he plays drums in several local groups and is a founding member of an innovative fusion group called Merge, who just finished tracking for their debut CD. Also, he is the arranger of the award-winning Amador Valley High School percussion ensemble. Gusseck uses Vic Firth sticks.

ii


Acknowledgements Thanks from Jim to all the following individuals who helped influence my career or this book in some way: JW Koester, who continues to lead SCV to new heights; Ralph Hardimon, who helped shape the way we write; Glen Crosby, for always being right; Tony Cirone, who taught me pure musicianship; Myron Rosander, for being an idol of integrity; Jack Van Geem, for shaping my technique and being a great teacher; Scott Johnson, for taking a red guy to the blue team; Curtis Cooper, for teaching me how to play drums; Galen Lemmon, Murray Gusseck, Kent Cater, Devin Hammer, George Barrett, Scotty Sells, Gary Meegan, Carol Abohatab, Dave Sankus, David Reeves, Robert Chavira, Rick Valenzuela, Chip Webster, Erik Amin, Lalo Davila, Erik Johnson, Steve Santana, and most importantly my family who have supplied endless encouragement and support toward my musical endeavors.

Thanks from Murray to pretty much all of the people that Jim thanks, including myself, for finally getting my act together with this thing. Super special thanks to Ralph Hardimon, Glen Crosby, and Curt Moore, who have been my mentors and friends who are dear to my heart – all the way to 9000! Heartfelt thanks to my close friends Teresa Mather, Erik Amin, Chip Webster, Marty LaFontaine, Dave Flores, Jim Casella, and Mike Apodaca. To Robert Chavira, with much love, for being the “chief” and for showing myself and countless others what energy and music have in common. Thanks to Frank Zappa and all the musicians on his recordings who have given me some of the greater musical moments in my life. Thanks to the Santa Clara Vanguard Drum & Bugle Corps, its staff, and to Gail Royer, whose spirit keeps us on our toes and holds us accountable. Special thanks to Greg Van Winkle for playing “diddle-la-dum, dum-dum” in 1981 and for bringing me to see Santa Clara in 1987, one of the major turning points in my life. Most of all, thanks to all my family for their love and support, but especially my mom, who is the most giving person I know and a role model to me.

iii


Table of Contents About this book Legend

.........................................................................................................

vi

......................................................................................................................

1

SeCTioN 1 (exerCiSeS & TeChNique)

....................................................

2

.............................................................................................

4

.................................................................................................

5

.........................................................................................

6

....................................................................................

8

................................................................................

10

Accents & Taps

............................................................................................

12

Thirteen

............................................................................................

13

........................................................................................

16

............................................................................................................

18

Legato Strokes 6-8-7 Syncobeat

Stick Control Timing Exercise

Tap Dance Flams

8th Note Flams Dut-digga-dut Flam Salad Cheezy Poofs

................................................................................

19

..................................................................................

20

......................................................................................

22

..................................................................................

24

Flamus Nondragginus Paradiddles

....................................................................

26

..................................................................................................

30

Megadiddle

......................................................................................

31

...................................................................................

33

............................................................................................................

36

Zappadiddles Rolls

9/8 Rolls iv

............................................................................................

37


Table of Contents (cont.)

SeCTioN 2 (SCV MuSiCAL exCerpTS)

..........................................................

40

SCV 1996 Excerpt #1 from La Mer, 3rd movement

.......................................................

42

Excerpt #2 from La Mer, 3rd movement

......................................................

44

............................................................

46

..............................................................................

48

Excerpt from La Mer, 1st movement Excerpt from 4th Motion

Excerpt #1 from Oceans Opener

..................................................................

50

Excerpt #2 from Oceans Opener

..................................................................

54

SCV 1997 Excerpt #1 from Seven Stages

......................................................................

56

Excerpt #1 from The Epilogue

.....................................................................

58

Excerpt #2 from The Epilogue

.....................................................................

60

............................................................................

62

Excerpt #2 from Seven Stages

......................................................................

66

Excerpt #1 from ‘97 Opener

........................................................................

70

Excerpt #2 from ‘97 Opener

........................................................................

74

Excerpt from The Masque

SCV 1998 Excerpt #1 from ‘98 Opener

........................................................................

78

Excerpt #2 from ‘98 Opener

........................................................................

82

Excerpt from Chorus Girls’ Dance Excerpt #3 from ‘98 Opener

..............................................................

84

......................................................................

88 v


About This Book The drum and bugle corps activity is one with a great amount of tradition. While styles may have changed over the years, the determination to achieve the highest goals as a collective unit will always exist. We, the authors, come from a background which encourages balance in musicianship. We believe that marching percussionists should also explore other avenues in the music world. For this reason, the way we approach technique and the way we approach composition should be viewed as not only rudimental but also “real world.” The book is written in two parts. The first part, written by Murray, supplies unique ensemble exercises with accompanying advice for common technique issues. These are some of the actual exercises used by the Santa Clara Vanguard and may be used not only to develop technique, but to increase understanding of how rhythm works and helps to dictate what the hands do. The second part, written by Jim, contains excerpts of show music written for the Vanguard for their 1996, ‘97, and ‘98 competitive seasons. Along with each excerpt is a brief description of the phrase with any necessary commentary or “points of interest.” These excerpts can act as great musical ensemble exercises and will help the aspiring student or arranger to gain a better understanding of the way music is written for SCV. Now, this book is obviously geared toward the SCV way of doing things. As instructors/ arrangers we have learned certain things about drumming in the activity that we would like to share with you. However, it should be made clear that there are, of course, other methodologies that exist and other trains of thought entirely. It is our hope that the reader will be able to find something within these pages that he/she can benefit from or develop an increased understanding of this art form. We subtitled the book “for the modern drumline” for a reason – styles have changed. Some examples of this would be: changes in equipment (kevlar heads, for example), increased physical/visual demands, more interest in indoor competitions, and an increasing variety of percussion instruments on the field. These aspects have all contributed to a different stylistic approach in the marching percussion activity than, say, 20 years ago. This evolution is exciting since there are now more opportunities to expose percussion students to a wider array of styles, instruments, techniques, and “real world” potential. It all hinges on a collective approach between instructor and student to aim for higher goals than simply playing combinations of rudiments. We hope you find that approach apparent in our music.

vi


Legend

Snare

^ ÷‹

Rimshot

Tenor

^ ÷‹

Rimshot

Bass

÷Û

Unison

¿

µ œ

Rim

Crush

¨ ‹

ˆ

Muted Rimshot

¿ Rim

µ œ

Sustained Crush

¿

Cross–over

Rim

Å

µ œ

Unison Rim

Crush

œz

Buzz Roll

¥

Neighbor's Drum

œ.

Muffled

Cymbals: See page 41 for details on cymbal notation and how it applies to the musical excerpts in Section 2.

Note: Some of the special symbols in one section might also be applied in other sections. For instance, buzz rolls (notated on the snare staff above) can obviously be applied on tenor or bass drums as well. Grace Note: In the creation of this book, we tried to be as detailed in the notation of the music and exercises as possible. “R” = right hand, “L” = left hand, and “B” = both hands. On the subject of stick heights, we decided to use letter case to infer two-height passages. Anytime you see stickings with different case (i.e. RlrrLrll), this indicates a two-height approach. Otherwise, the sticking will be all up, which would indicate that the heights are at the mercy of the dynamic level.

1


Section 1 exercises & Technique Before we take an inside look at the core exercises of SCV’s percussion program, I feel it is necessary to explain a few things about the program in general. From day one, what drew me to the Vanguard drumline was the writing and the way the drummers realized the music through their playing. Another way to put it would be to say that the drumline’s overall technique was merely a vehicle - a means to an end - and the vehicle is what allowed that musical expression to take place. The older I get, the more I realize that when making music is the ultimate goal, the technical aspects of playing are simplified and tend to reveal themselves to you. As an example, let’s say that the music your drumline is playing is soft, delicate, and at a moderately slow tempo. In most cases the last thing you’d want to do is play with a staccato approach. On the other hand, if the music is dark, driving, and fast, a more staccato approach may be called for. It’s a conscious choice we all should make for the sake of the music if we want to communicate effectively to our audience. This is the foundation of SCV’s approach – to play in such a way as to uniformly convey our musical ideas to the listener. I’m going to take a moment to discuss some key words and phrases that we frequently use and that you will encounter as you go through this book. Flow – Flowing while playing is extremely important for a number of reasons. It minimizes mental and physical fatigue. It helps create a sense of phrasing. It especially helps tenor drummers move around the drums. It facilitates more breathing while playing, which is a very overlooked aspect of rudimental drumming, in my opinion. If you watch any great professional—musician, athlete, whatever—they make it look easy. Flow is an integral factor. rebound – In order to flow on a drum, it is necessary to harness the drum’s energy. You push, and the drum pushes back. The power of two is greater than the power of one. Of course, the stronger you are as a player, the more you’ll add to (and receive from) this “relationship.” There are people who would think I’m crazy for saying this in a marching context. “You’ve got to have chops, man. Chops is where it’s at. Don’t let the stick bounce, dude. The only way to get chops is to hold on to the stick real tight and force everything. Show that drum who’s boss!” I’m not suggesting that an aggressive approach is wrong. I think an aggressive approach is helpful, most of the time. But I know that using rebound helps me achieve more with less effort. To me, playing without rebound is sort of like trying to ice skate on concrete…with an ice rink ten feet away.

2


quality of sound – This is a phrase we use when talking about good sound production. The drum should speak, not just the drummer. Although tuning is obviously vital to this concept, the way in which the drum is being hit can directly influence the tone production of that drum. The tighter the grip, the smaller the sound, and vice versa. Certainly there are ways to go to an unhelpful extreme with either, so there has to be a balance, as with anything else. A related word that deals with this concept is “touch,” and we refer to it occasionally. I like to remember this: Play to get as much sound as possible at any given dynamic. Groove – Most music played by a marching drumline has some kind of groove, at least on paper anyway. It could be any kind of groove: swing, latin, funk, New Orleans, or something original written to go with Shostakovich’s 10th. Whatever the case, that groove has a settling point at its desired tempo, meaning it has to feel comfortable. This is where timing skills come into play. It’s vital that the whole drumline be able to keep consistent time. Because when that groove is rushed, it makes the listener feel anxious and uneasy, especially if it’s meant to be a moderate or slow tempo. When the groove drags, it causes the listener to feel lazy and bored. These things have a subtle, but powerful, effect on an audience, not to mention the other musicians on the field. Good timekeeping can also have miraculous effects on the cohesiveness of the ensemble, which helps keep the judges happy! One more thing: “Chops” (referring to speed, endurance, coordination, control, etc.) are crucial for rudimental drumming. There are many successful methods for increasing chops. Try different things until you find one that works for you. A teacher could help you with this. A word of caution: There are many chop-building methods that work great for that purpose alone but shouldn’t be viewed as an absolute way to play. In other words, try not to bring the “pillow” touch to the drum. I’ll let the rest of this section do the work of explaining more specific technical issues that we use with SCV. The exercises contained herein are some (not all) of those that are currently in use by the corps. The “nuts and bolts” stuff is shown first, followed by some others that are more challenging. You’ll probably notice that most of the exercises are rather long. That is because most of the exercises explore some kind of rhythmic idea that is stated and then developed. These are miniature compositions. Many of the bass drum parts are melodic. They call upon more than one or two skills at a time to play correctly. They tend to require more concentration than “hugga-digga-burr.” I hope you find that they keep you from getting bored easily and that they are fun to play as well as listen to. Once learned, you’ll discover that many of these (particularly the flam exercises) can be augmented to incorporate the “food innuendo” rudiment of your choice. Sorry, but there are no three-stroke roll exercises, inverted flam-house rat cheese, or chuz-ra-duk studies in this particular book. I stuck with the basic ‘57 Chevy rudiments on this trip. Enjoy! MARK TIME, HUT… 3


Legato Strokes And so we begin with the concept of legato strokes. This word seems to conjure feelings of wimp-ness in many young marching percussionists. Fear not, for it is simple: There is a right way and a wrong way to hit a drum, marching or otherwise. The right way would be to hit the drum in such a way as to bring out the maximum tone of the drum and of the stick itself. Most great professionals exemplify this. The wrong way would be to grip the stick too tightly and try to force the strokes at any particular dynamic level. This may help your chops, but not your sound. The fastest (and even the loudest) players know how to balance the two in order to have an extreme sense of fluidity, utilizing the drum’s natural bounce to their advantage. There is something to be learned from this. Key points:

• Don’t grip the stick or mallet any harder than necessary (a function of what you are playing). • Use only the wrist, unless speed dictates the use of fingers. • Don’t squeeze the stick at the moment of contact with the head, for this introduces a “stop” in the motion. Rather, concentrate on keeping the wrists relaxed and in motion.

The Exercises 6-8-7 I believe this was originally made up by Mike French in 1990. The eighth notes are all played at the same speed by each section, so that the drumline starts and ends together. The purpose of the different numbers and varying order of those numbers is for the sake of variety. The infamous “8 on a hand” can be a little monotonous. We also utilize different variations (crescendo/decrescendo each hand, two-height patterns, etc.), again for variety’s sake. Syncobeat Your standard double-beat-type exercise. I left it in 4/4 but changed the rhythms in such a way as to put more emphasis ON the rhythms, as opposed to just pounding out some doubles that are too closed and don’t sound good. If you like, split this exercise between sections (having one section start with triples instead of doubles) to create a nice challenge. Stick Control This is a basic exercise inspired by patterns similar to ones in George Stone’s famous Stick Control book. The whole thing is composed of 16th notes with different sticking patterns. The idea is that one should not be able to hear the patterns; one should only be able to see the patterns. All tenor drummers should master this concept on one drum before applying it around. This has consistently been one of SCV’s primary exercises for working on sound and the concepts that apply to flow.

4


6-8-7 ÷ 68 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 88 R ... L ... R ... L ...

Snare

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷ 88 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78

Tenor

R ...

R

T

T

...

L

...

L

÷ 68 Û Û Û Û Û Û

...

...

R

...

L

...

...

R

Û Û Û Û Û Û

...

L

...

...

L

Û Û Û Û Û Û R

...

...

Û Û Û Û Û Û L

...

88

÷ 78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 44 œ Œ R ... L ... R ... L ... R œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4œ ÷ 68 œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 Œ Ó œ œ œ œ R

B

L

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 6 ÷ 78 œ œ œ œ œ 8 œ œ œ œ

R

S

R ...

÷ 88 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 R ... L ... R ... L ...

R

B

...

÷ 78 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 68

Bass

S

L

...

L

...

R

...

L

...

R

÷ 88 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 44 Û Œ R ...

L ...

R ...

L ...

R

5


Syncobeat ÷c œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ

Snare

R

R

÷c

Bass

T

L

...

œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ ÷c œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ

Tenor

S

...

...

L

...

œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ Û Û Û ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ Û Û R

L

L

R

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ R ...

L ...

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ ÷œ œ œœ≈ œ œ ≈ œ œ≈œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ≈œ œœ R ...

B

S

T

÷

œœ

L ...

œœ œœ≈Û ÛÛ ÛÛ ≈Û ÛÛ ÛÛ≈œœ Û Û œœ œœ œœ≈œœ ÛÛ Û R

R L

R L

R ...

R L

R L

R

R

R L

L

L ...

œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ≈œœ œ œ ÷≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ ≈ ≈ œœ œ œ L ...

œœ œœ ÷≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ÛÛ œœ œœ ≈Û ÛÛ ÛÛ ≈Û ÛÛ ÛÛ≈œœ Û Û R L

6

R

÷≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ

R ...

B

L

R

R L

R L

R

R L

R L

R

R


Syncobeat (cont.)

S

T

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R ...

L ...

œœ œœœ œ œ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R ...

B

S

T

R ...

÷

L ...

R ...

œœœ œœœ œœœ œ ÛÛ Û ≈œœœ≈œœœ≈œœœ≈ÛÛ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ R L

L

R L

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ L ...

R ...

œœ œœ œ œœœ œœœ œœ ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ ≈ ≈ œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œ≈ L ...

B

S

T

÷

œœ œœœ œœœ ÛÛ Û œœœ œœœ œœœ ÛÛ Û ≈œœœ≈œœœ≈œœœ≈ÛÛ R L

R

R L

L

R L

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û Û

Û

L

L

B

R ...

÷

...

...

R

L

R

R

R

R

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

7


Stick Control

Snare

÷c œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

Tenor

÷c œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

Bass

R L R L ...

÷c

R L R L ...

R R R L ...

œœœœ

œœœœœœœ

œœœœœœœœœœœœ

R L R L ...

R L R L ...

œœœœœœœœœ

œœœœ

œœœœœœœœœœœœ

S

÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

T

÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

R L L L ...

R L L L ...

B

S

T

B

R L R L ...

R L R L ...

R R R R L L L L ...

R R R R L L L L ...

œ œœ œ œ ÷ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ ^ ^ ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ‹œœœœœœœ‹œœœ R L R L ...

R R L L ...

R L R L R ...

R

^ ^ ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ‹œœœœœœœ‹œœœ R L R L ...

8

R R R L ...

÷œœœœ

œœœœœœœœœœ

R R L L ...

œœ œ œœœ œ œ ≈ ≈ œœ œœœ

R L R L R ...

> Û R

R

>> > > Å. Û Û Û Å. Û L

L R

R

L

R


Stick Control (cont.)

S

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

Ó

T

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

R R R L R R R L R L L L R L L L

R R R L R R R L R L L L R L L L

B

÷

R R R R L L L L R R L

R R R R L L L L R R L

œœœœœœœ œ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ

œœœ œ R

L

L

R

R

R

R

L

L

L

L

R

R

R L R L R L R L R L R L

œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ Û R

R

R

L

L

next... Timing exercise All the appropriate motions are built into this one. First the right hand leads the way, then the left. The way in which the sections play their respective parts during the middle portion says a lot in terms of their overall timing skills. I would suggest practicing this one many times with a tempo reference, such as a metronome coming through a loudspeaker, which has been powered by a nuclear submarine – that sort of thing.

9


Timing exercise ÷ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 24 œ œ œ œ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 24 œ œ œ œ 44

All Sections

R R L R R L R R L R R L

All

©1994

B

L R L

÷ 44 œ œ . R L

R L

L R L

L

R L

R L

R

R

R

L

L

L

L R L

L R L

L R L

L R L

R

L

R

L

24 œ œ œ œ 44 œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ 24 œ œ œ œ 44

R L

R L

L R

R L

R

R L

L R

L R

÷ 44 œ

L R

œ

œ

L

R

L

R L R L

R L

R L

R L

R

L

R

L

R

R

R

L

R

R

L

L

R

R

R L

L

L

L

L

R

L

L

R

R

R L

L

L

R L

R L

R L

R

44 œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . R

R L

L

R

L

L R

R L R

œ œ L

L R

L R

L

L

R

R

L

L

R

L R

L R

œ œ œ œ œ

R

R

L

R

L

R

L R L

œ œ R

L

R

L

R

L

L

L

R

‰ œœ≈œœ œœœœ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œœœœœœœ R L

R L R L

L R

R L R L

L R L

L R

R L R L R L R 6

Û ÛÛ≈ÛÛÛ ≈ Û Û Û ≈ Û Û ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ R

R L

L R L

L R L

L R

L

œ ≈ œ œ œ 6

÷ 44 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û . R

R L

L

R

L

÷ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . R

R

œ ≈ œ

œ œ

R

L

Û 24 Û Û Û Û 44 Û Û Û ≈ Û Û ≈ Û Û ≈ Û Û Û 24 Û Û Û Û

L R

œ

R

L R L

÷ 44 Û . Û Û . Û Û . Û Û .

R

10

R

œ 24 œ œ œ œ

R

B

R L R R L R R L R R L R

÷ 44 œ œ œ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ 24 œ œ œ œ

R

S&T

R

24 Û Û Û Û 44

R

All

R

÷ 44 Û Û Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û 24 Û Û Û Û 44 Û Û . Û Û . Û Û . Û Û .

R L R

B

L R L

œ œ. œ œ. œ œ.

R L R L

S&T

R

÷ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 24 œ œ œ ≈ œ œ 44 ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ 24 œ œ œ œ R L

S&T

R

R L R L R L R

L


11


Accents & Taps Most of us know that HEREIN lies the area where most errors occur in the activity. Much of the time, it is the touch used by the players that causes these errors rather than the timing. When you play tap/accent patterns, you don’t want the taps to have a choked-off sound. Many players will squeeze the stick as hard as they can after an accent in order to “control” the taps. Well, squeezing the stick as hard as you can is never the right thing to do, especially in this instance. Obviously, we want total control over the taps. Just don’t confuse total control with bombastic over-squeezing. Give the poor little taps some room to breathe and, more importantly, bounce. The idea is that you don’t let the fact that there are accents interfere with the flow of smooth taps. Now, this is a difficult concept to master, but the resulting sound is worth it. The taps in any tap/accent pattern should carry weight; not the kind of anchored-down dead weight caused by holding on too tight, but the kind of weight that is the result of producing the fullest tone at that dynamic level through letting the stick resonate and bounce. Key points:

• Don’t over-squeeze the stick after an accent. Let it bounce (while still maintaining control). • Make sure the upstroke prior to an accent is aggressive enough to produce the accent in time but not too harsh that the accent is forced, causing that nasty sound followed by a nasty out-of-time tap. • Check to see whether or not you are breathing during tap/accent exercises. This is an easy and very accurate way to gauge your individual tension factor.

The Exercises Thirteen Originally written by Mr. Curt Moore, long-standing SCV great and personal friend, and modified by yours truly, this has been one of the most frequently played exercises the corps has had. The focus is on good sound and groove. The key part comes from the bass line, which isn’t playing strict single-hand patterns, but much more groove-oriented two-hand patterns. Here’s how SCV has typically played this exercise: • After the initial count-off, the exercise never stops until a “cut” is given. • The whole thing is played out on the right hand first, then the left hand, then back to the right, etc. • Tempo increases can be given through hand signals during the left hand repetitions, after which the line will gradually speed up together and (hopefully) hold the tempo. • The variations that follow are also dictated through hand signals during the left-hand repetition. • Variations are played through one time only, and then the original exercise resumes. THE MOST IMPORTANT ENSEMBLE FACTOR DURING ALL OF THIS IS THAT THE BASS DRUMMERS ARE GROOVING. 12


Thirteen

Snare

Tenor

Bass

> > > > > > > > > > > > ÷ 34 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 44 R r r R ... L

l

l

L ...

r l

R L

r l

r ... l ...

r

l

> > > > > > > > > > > ÷ 34 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 44 > > > > > > > > > ÷ 34 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 44 R

S

T

B

R

r

l

T

r

l

R

r

l R

r

l

r L

r

l

R

r

l

R

r

l

r

L

r

l

> > > > > > ÷ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .. > > > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û .. ÷ 44 r

L

r

l

r

l

R

L

r

L

r

l

r

l

R

L

r

L

r

l

r

L

Variation 1

>> >>> >> ÷ c œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ R r R r ...

> > >> > > > >> ÷ c œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ R r R r ...

B

L

> > > > > > ÷ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ..

L

S

r

>> >> > >> œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ

> > >> > > > >> œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœœ

L l L l ...

L l L l ...

> > > >> >> > > > > > > > >3> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >3 > > > ÷ c Û ÛÛÛ Û ÛÛÛ Û ÛÛÛ Û ÛÛÛ Û ÛÛÛ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛ Û ÛÛÛ Û ÛÛÛ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û R

LR

LR

LR

L

R

L R L L R L R L R

L

RL

RL

RL

R

L

R L R

R L

R L

R

L

13


Thirteen (cont.) Variation 2

S

T

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >> ÷ c œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ R r R r ...

L l L l ...

> > > > > > > > >> > > > > > > > > > > > > >> > œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > œœ > œ œ œ ÷c œ ≈ œœ R rR r R r LLR rR r R r LL

B

> > > > > > > > > > > > >> > > > > > œ œœ œ œ œœ œœœœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

R rRRR r LL r LL r LRLRLR

> > > >> > >>>> > > > >> œ œ ÷ c œ . œ œ œ ‰ . œ˚jœ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ .

L

> œ.

>˚> > j ÛÛ Û R R

R

> œœ ‰ .

>˚> >> >> > > > > > > > > > j œœ œœ œœ œœ ≈ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

> œ >œ >> . œœ‰

> > > > > > > >>> > > > > >> >˚ jœ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛ œ œ R R R R R RR

Variation 3

S

T

> > >> > > > > > > > > ÷ 34 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ r r R r ... l l L l ...

> > >> > > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷ 34 r

B

r

R

T

l

l

R

l

R

l

r

r

L

R

l

R

S

l

R

l

r

L R

l

...

> Û Û ≈ Û

L

r

L

> > Û Û Û Û Û

r

L

r

l

l

R

r

r

r

R

r

l

l

L

l

l

l

L

l

l

l

L

l

r

r

R

r

r

r

> > > > > > > > > > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > ÷Û

> Û Û ≈ Û

L

14

R

L

> > > > > > > > > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

R

B

l

> > > > > > > >> > ÷ 34 Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û R

S

r ...

r

L

r

r

r

R

r

r

R

r

r

l

r

R

r

r

R

r

r

L

l

l

l

L

l

l

L

l

l

> >> > > > 2> > > > > 2> > Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û L

r

l

R

L

R

l

r

L

r

l

> > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ r

r

r

R

r

l

r

R

r

r

r

R

R

R

l

r

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

L

L

r

> > > > >3 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L

l

r

l

L

l

r

l

L

l

L

L

L

l


T

÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R

B

> ÷Û

> Û Û ≈ Û

L

S

T

L

r

r

R

r

r

r

R

r

r

l

L

r

l

R

L

R

r

r

l

> >> ÷ Û Û Û Û Û. R

l

r

L

R

r

R

Variation l r L r 3 l (cont.) R R

r

R

r

l

r

R

r

r

r

> > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ r

r

r

r

R

r

r

L

l

l

l

L

l

l

L

l

l

> > > > Thirteen > (cont.) > 2> > > > > 2> > Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

> > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

R

B

r

r

r

R

> Û. R

r

l

> Û. R

r

R

r

r

r

> Û Û Û Û R

l

r

l

R

l

r

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

L

L

r

l

> > > > >3 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L

l

r

l

L

l

r

l

L

l

L

L

L

> > > > >3 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L

l

r

>> Û Û Û. r

L

R

l

L

> Û. R

l

r

> Û. R

l

L

r

L

L

L

> > >3 > Û Û Û Û Û R

l

R

R

R

next... Tap Dance Now for more “real world” uses of accent/tap patterns – using both hands…YEAH! The techniques mentioned earlier still directly apply here. It’s crucial to remember that exercises like this one should ultimately almost play themselves. The little sixteenth-note triplet figures should roll off the hands smoothly (except for the sextuplets at the end, in which case one would need to hold on a little more and bring the heights down). I usually explain this exercise like so: Pretend there is someone whose only job is to play the taps and another person whose only job is to play the accents. Both are playing very consistently. Imagine how that would sound. Now play so that it sounds like that. Oooohhh…

15


Tap Dance 3 >>> > > > > > > > >>> > ÷ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ

Snare

r l r l ...

L R L

L

R

R

L

R

L

R L R

L

r l r

3 > > >>> > > > > > > >>> ÷ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ

Tenor

r l r l ...

L R L

R

L

R

R

L

R

L

R L R

L

r l r

>>> > > > > > > >>> > > ÷ c ÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛ Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ Û ÛÛ ÛÛÛ Û Û ÛÛÛ ÛÛÛ Û Û

Bass

r l r l ...

S

R

R L R

R

L

L

R

R

L

R L R

L

R

3 > > > > > > >>> > > > > > > ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 R L L R L R L R L R l r l L R L L L

> > > 3 > > >>> > > > > > > ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 >

T

R

B

L

T

L

R

L R L

R

l r l

R

L

R L R

L

R

L

R

L

L

L

L

R

R

R

R

R

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > ÷ 78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 68 R

R

L

L

L

R

L

L

L

R

R

R

L

L

L

> > > > > > > > ÷ 78 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ œ œ œ c Û œ œ œ Û œ œ œ Û œ œ œ Û œ œ œ 78 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ œ œ œ 68 R

16

L

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 7 7 ÷ 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 68 R R R L L L R L L L R R R L L L

R

B

R

> > > > > > > > > >>> > > > œœœ œœœ ÷ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ Û Û Û Û œ œ œ Û œ œ œ 78 R

S

L

R

R

R

R

R

R

R


Tap Dance (cont.)

S

T

> > > > > 3 > >6 > 3 > > > > > > > > > > > ÷ 68 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó L L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R > > > 3 > >6 > > > >>>>> > > 3 > > >> ÷ 68 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó L

B

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L R

L R

L R L R L

R

R

L R

L R

L R L R L

R

> 3 > >6 > >> > > > > 3 > >> >> >>>>> > œœ œ ÷ 68 Û ÛÛ Û Û Û Û ÛÛ Û Û Û c Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛ Û Û ÛÛ Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛ Û Œ Ó R

L R

L

17


Flams

Now we proceed to more of the “meat” of rudimental drumming. Regardless of what stylistic background you may come from, most people can agree on how a flam should be played in a marching context - tight! For the purposes of cleanliness, we like to get those grace notes very close to their targets, without interrupting the flow of what is being played. That’s the key phrase…without interrupting the flow of what is being played. When you add diddles and some of today’s hybrid rudiments on top of that, it takes serious control to execute correctly. There’s the challenge… Key points:

• When playing isolated flams (like the exercise on the opposite page), resist the temptation to use arm for the grace notes. The wrist is a smaller muscle group, so it is instinctive to try to control the grace notes with the arm. However, more control-related benefits are attained by forcing the wrist to isolate and play the grace notes. Just keep thinking relax. • Keep those grace notes down. At SCV we try to maintain about an inch and a half for isolated grace note height. Whatever your preference, be as consistent as you can.

The Exercises

8th Note Flams I believe Glen Crosby introduced this exercise to the Vanguard in the late 80’s. It’s great for working flam sound and heights in an isolated environment (meaning no chagga-da chaggada). I truly believe that a drummer or drumline will benefit the most from this by practicing it SLOW. It forces one to work on control. Remember to use only wrist. Dut-digga-dut This is a timing exercise as much as anything else. Basically, it breaks down simple triplet flam patterns to one hand at a time in that hand’s original context. In other words, if you take the first two measures and combine them, you get the third measure and so on. The bass pattern is the exception. We have to have some groove in there somewhere. Flam Salad Extra thousand island, please. This is more basic, but it still covers flam accents, patty flafla’s, and flam taps. This would be an easy one to which you could add your own special blend of herbs and spices. Cheesy poofs This is my favorite. It makes use of a 2 against 3 pattern that is created through the use of internal dynamics between the hands. It’s also written with flam-fives so you can see where integrated diddles can go.

18

Flamus Nondragginus Did you say you want some more? Well, here’s some more. Play at your own risk! (with a metronome, hence the title)


8th Note Flams

Snare

Tenor

÷ c œj œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œj œ R R R R L L L L f

j j j j j j j j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

j j j j j j j j ÷c œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

j j j j j j j j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷c f

j j œ œj j j œ j j œ œ j œ œ œ

f R

T

B

S

T

R

L

L

L

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

j j j j j œ œj œ œ j j œ œ œ œ

L

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

j œ œj œj œj œj j j j œ œ œ

R

L

L

R

R

R

R

L

L

R

L

R

L

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

L

R

L

L

L

L

R

R

R

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

L

R

L

L

L

L

R

R

R

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

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Flam Salad (cont.)

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r

R l

> j ! ! œ œ œ œ

> >9 > > 5 > 5 > > > > j j j ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ R l l R l l R l l R l l r r L r r l l

r

r

r

l

l

R

R

L

L

R

R

25


Flamus Nondragginus

Snare

Tenor

> > > > >> >> > > > > >> >> j j j j j j j j j j ÷ c œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ j œ

R

L

S

T

S

T

R

26

L

R

L

R R

L

R

R

L

R

L

L

L

R

R

L

R

L

L

> > > > > > > > j ÷ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ > > > > > > > > j j j j ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ R

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

> > > > > > > > j j j j j ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ j œ

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

> > > > > > > j ! ! œ œ œ œj œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œj œ ! œj œ œ j > œ œ ÷ œ œ œ j œ

L

R

L

R

L

R R

L

L

L

L

R

L

R

L

R R

L

L

> >> >> > > > j> >> >> > > j > j œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ j œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ j œ ÷c j œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

j œ

j œ

L

j œ

> > > > > > > > j œ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ œj j j œ œ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ

R

B

R R

> > > > > > > > j j j j j ÷ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ j œ

R

B

L

> > > >> >> > >> >> > > j> > j j j j j j j j j j j ÷ c œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ R

Bass

R

j œ

> > > > > > > > j j j j j œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ R

R

L

L

R

L

R

L

> > > > > > > j> j j j jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ j œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ R

R

L

L

R

L

R

L

> > > > > > > > j j j j œ œ œ œj œ œ j œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ j œ

j œ

> > > > > > > > j j j j ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ R

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

> > > > > > ! j> ! > ! j j j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ R

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

> > > > > > j ! ! ! j ! œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ j œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ >

>


Flamus Nondragginus (cont.)

S

T

> > >> > > >> j j j j j ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ j œ

R

L

R

L

R

L

L

> > > > > > ! ! j œ œ ! j> > jœ œ œ œ! œ œj œ j œ œ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ R

B

R

L

R

R

L

R

L

T

> >> > >> > > ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ Û Û

T

R

L

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

L

R

L

R

L

> > > œ! œ! œ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ Û Û Û œ œ œ

L

L

R

L

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

R

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

R

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

R

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > j j j j j j j j j j j j œ j j œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ ÷ œ œ œ ˆ œ œ œœ œ œ ˆ j œ

l

r

L

> > @ ÷ Û Û œ

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

> > > !œ œ! œ! œ! ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ ≈ Û Û

> Û

L

R

R

L

L

r

> Û

R

l

R

R

> œ œ œ

R

l

r

L

L

> > ≈ Û Û L

r

l

R

R

> > > > Û Û Û Û

R

R

L

R

L

> > > > > > > > j j j j j j j ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ

> > > > > > > > !œ œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ

> > > > > > > > ! j j j ! ÷ œj œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˆ

r

j œ

L

L

B

R

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > j j j j j j j j j j j j j j ÷ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ j œ

R

S

R

R

j œ

R

B

> > > > > > > > j j j j j ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ

> > > > > > j> ! j> j œ œ œ œ œ! œ œj œ! œ œ œ œ! œ j œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ

L

R

S

j œ

r

r

l

l

R

R

R

R

l

l

r

r

L

L

L

L

r

r

l

l

R

R

R

R

l

l

r

r

L

L

r

l

R

R

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

R

l

r

L

L

> > ^ ^ > > > > œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ œj ˆ œj ˆ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ ‹ ‹ l

R

R

l

r

L

L

r

l

R

R

l

r

L

R

> > > > > > > > > > > > œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ œj œ œj œ œ! œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ûœ œ œ ÷ œ œ œœ Û œ œ œ Û œ œ œ Û œ j œ

R

R

R

R

27


Flamus Nondragginus (cont.)

S

T

> > > > > > > > > > > > j ! j ! ! ! j j j j j ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó r

j j œ œ R

r

l

R

l

r

> >> œ œ > ÷≈ ÛÛ L R

28

L

R

^ ^ ^ ^ ! ‹ ‹ ! œ œj ¿ œ j ‹ @ œœ œ. œ ÷≈ L

B

R

L

r

l

R

L

R

R

R

L

r r l l R l r r l l R l r r l l

R

L

R

R

R

L

r r l l R l r r l l R l r r l l

R

> > > > > > > œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œj ˆ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ Œ Ó

> > > j> ! ! ! > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ Û Œ Ó Å Û Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛœœœœ œ œ ÛÛ R L

R

L r l

R

L

R l r

L r l

R


29


Paradiddles Paradiddles, to me, are the most graceful of the rudiments. Someone, somewhere, sometime must have thought, “You know, I’d like to be able to play accent patterns really fast without all these veins popping out on my neck.” VOILÁ! I think it takes a while for younger players to truly understand the uniqueness, versatility, and power of mastering the concept of paradiddles. As soon as you get past the “who-invented-this-stupid-rudiment” stage and you don’t have to think so hard to play them, then you begin to understand why they’re used. They also make it much easier to map out traffic patterns on tenor drums. One important rule of thumb to remember is that paradiddles are designed for two-height interpretation and are most useful in that context. It helps to practice them “all up” to get comfortable with the sticking or to increase speed, but as soon as you’re ready to utilize them in a practical context, practice playing the accents up and the diddles down. The internal dynamics are crucial. All those inner notes should flow off the hands (controlled, of course) after each accent. If you’re playing a bunch of single paradiddles repeated (RlrrLrll, etc.), the accents should flow from hand to hand, and the nonaccents should be a continuation of the accent stroke. In other words, try not to stop the stick after the accent so that you have to completely re-attack for the small notes. Now, the two paradiddle exercises I’ve included are not basic exercises. They are rather long but worthwhile in that they will give you some idea of how paradiddles can be utilized on a grander scale to create interesting rhythms between sections. Key points:

• Paradiddles are flow-oriented by nature. • Go for consistent sound quality from both accents and inner notes. • It can help your sound quality and speed to practice paradiddles at one height, but that should probably be kept as a practicing technique only. • Learn and practice as many paradiddle variations as you can, for they will teach you a lot in terms of playing gracefully.

The Exercises Megadiddle Many paradiddle variations are present in a straight ahead 4/4 context. The flow of sixteenths should start from the get-go and not stop until the last note. Bass drummers, BEWARE! Zappadiddles This one will challenge the line a little more in terms of varying time signatures and rhythms. It got its name because the two thirty-second note passages are based off of a certain riff from Frank Zappa’s “Catholic Girls.” During the second 5/8 section (page 34, second measure), the slashes, which would normally indicate diddles, are interpreted as triplets. In other words, the two notes that the diddle consists of are spaced evenly between the two accents that surround them. I couldn’t figure out how to notate this when I was writing it. If someone figures this out, please let me know! 30


Megadiddle > > > > > > > ÷ c œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ r l r l ... R l R l l R l R l l R l R l l R p f > > > > > > > ÷ c œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ r l r l ... R l R l l R l R l l R l R l l R p f > > > > > ÷ c ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ R l l R l l r r L r r l l R l R pr l r l ... f

Snare

Tenor

Bass

S

> >> œœœœœœœœœ

Œ

l R R l r r l l R

>> œœœœœœ

>>>>>>>> œœœœœœ œ œœ œ

l R R l r r l l R R L L R R L L

>> > > ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ

Œ

l r r L R l R l R

> > > > > > >>> > >> ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ R l

r r

l

l

r r L r l

l

r r l

l

r r L r

l

l

r

r L r

l

l

r r

l

l

R l

l R l

r r

l

l

r r L r l

l

r r l

l

r r L r

l

l

r

r L r

r L r r

l

l

R l R l

l R R L r L r L L r

r

> > > > > > > > >> œ œœ œ œœ ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œœœœœœœ >

T

B

S

T

B

R l

l R l

r

r L r

r L L r

r

> > > > > > > > > > ÷ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ r r

l

l R l

r r L r l

l

r r l

l

R l

r r

l

l R l

l

r

r L r r

l

l

R l

l R l

l

r

r L r L r

r L r

r

> > >>> > >> > > > > > > > > > > ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ L r

÷

r L r

r L L R l R l R R l

> > > œœ œœœ œœ L r L r

r L r

R l R l

l R l

l R l

l R l

l

r r

L r L r r L r r L r r L r r

l

l

>>

> > > > > > > > > > œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ l

> œ

l

l R l

l R R l

l

R l R l

l R l

l R l

l R l

l

r r

L r L r r L r r L r r L r r

l

l

> > > > > > > > > > ÷ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ L r

r L r

r

l

l R l R l

l R l

l

r r l

l R l

r r l

l

r r L r l

l

r r

l

l R l

r r

l

l

r r L r r L

31


Megadiddle (cont.)

S

T

B

S

T

B

S

T

B

32

> > > > > > >> > >>> ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ r

r

l

l R l

r

r

l

l

r

r L r

l

l

r

r

l

l R l

r

r

l

l

r

r L r L r

r

l

l R l R R l

l

r

r L r L L R

> >> > >> > > >>> > >> ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ r

r

l

l

r

l

l R l R R l

r

r

l

l

r

l

l R l R R l

r

r

l

l R l

r

r

l

r

r L r L L r

r

l

l R l R R L

>> > >> > >> > >> > ÷≈ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ≈ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ≈ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ≈ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ L R l

l

r

r

l

l

r

r

l

l

r

r L

L R l

l

r

r

l

l

r

r

l

l

r

r L

L R l

l

r

r L

L R l

l

r

r L

>>> >> > > > > > > >> > ÷œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ l R R L r L L r

r

l

l

r

r L r

l

r r

l R l

r r l

l R l r r l

l R

l R l

l R l

l

r

r

l

l R L r

r L

>> > > > >>> >> > > > > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœˆœœœœœˆœœœœœˆ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ r L L R l R R l

l R l

r

r L r

r

l

l

r L r

l

l r r L r l

l

r r L

r L r

r L r

r

l

l

r

r L L r

r L

>>> >> > > > > > > > > > ÷≈ ÛÛÛ≈ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ L R L

L R l

l

r

r

l

l R l

r

r L r L r

l

l r r L r l

l

r r L

r L r

r L r

l

l R l

r

r L r

> > > > > > 3 > >> > > > ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó r r l l R l r r l l r r L r l l

r r l l R l r r l l r r L r l

l

R l r L r r l r L r L L r r L r L

L

> >> > > > 3 > >> > > > > > ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó r r l l R l r r l l r r L r l l

R R l l R l r r l l r r L r l

l

R l r L r r l r L r L L r r L r L

L

> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> > > > > ÷ Û ÛÛÛ Û Û Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û Û Û ÛÛÛ Û Û ÛÛÛ ÛÛÛ Û Û Û Œ Ó R l r r l l R L

R L

R L

R L

R L

R L

R L

r r L r r

l

l r r l l r r L

L

R

l

l


Zappadiddles > 6 > 6 > > 6 > 6 > > 6 > 6 > ÷ 58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R l r l r r L r l r l l R l r r L r l r l l R l r l r r L r l l R l r l r r L r l r l l R l r r

Snare

6 > > 6 > 6 > > 6 > 6 > > 6 > ÷ 58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Tenor

R l r l r r L r l r l l R l r r

Bass

T

R l r l r r L r l r l l R l r r

> 6 > > œœœœœœœœœ œ ÷ 58 œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ Û œ œ œ œ œ Û œ œ Û œœ 6

S

L r l r l l R l r l r r L r l l 6

6

6

6

> > > > > > > > > 6 > 6 > ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 98 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 L r l r l l R l r l r r L r l l R l r r L r l l R l r r L r l l r r L r l l R l r r L r l l R l r r l l > > > > > 6 > 6 > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 98 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 ÷ œ L r l r l l R l r l r r L r l l

R l r r L r l l R l r r L r l l r r L r l l R l r r L r l l R l r r l l

> > > > > 6 > > > > > > œ œ œœœ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 9 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷ Û Û œ œ Ûœ œ œ 8 Û œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 6

B

R l r r R l r r R l r r R l r r l l R l r r R l r r R l r r R l r r l l

S

T

> > > > > > > 6 > 6 > > 6 > 6 > ÷ 78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ R l r r L r l l R l r r l l R l r r L r l l R l r r l l R l r l r r L r l r l l R l r r L r l r l l R l r l r r L r l l 6 > 6> > 6 > > > > > > 6> > > > > > > œ ÷ 78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˆ œ œ œ ˆ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ R l r r L r l l R l r r l l R l r r L r l l R l r r l l

R l l R l l R l l R l l R l r r

6

6

> > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 7 ÷ 8 Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 6

B

L r r L r r L r r L r r L r l l

R

l

R

R

l

l

R

L

r

L

L

r

r

6

L

33


Zappadiddles (cont.)

S

T

6 6 3 > > > > >6 > > 6 > > 3 ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ 98 R l l l l R l l l l R l l l l R l R l l R l R l l R l R l l 6 6 6 > > > 3 > > > > 6 > > 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ! œ œ 9 ÷ œ œ 8 R

B

S

T

÷

l

S

T

œ.

r

L

r

l

r

l

l

R

l

l

R

l

l

R

l

R

l

R

l

l

R

l

R

l

> 6 >j >6 > 3 > > > 6> Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û l

l

r

r

L

r

l

l

R

l

r

r

l

l

R

l

R

l

R

l

R

l

l

l

98

R

> > > > > > > > > > ÷ 98 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 R l r r L r l l R l r r L r r L r r L r l l R l r r L r l l R l l R l l > > > > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˆœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 ÷ 98 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˆ ÷ 98

l

r

r

L

r

l

l

R

l

r

r

L

r

r

L

r

r

L

r

l

l

R

l

r

r

L

r

l

l

R

l

l

R

l

l

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 78 œ œ

> > > > > > > 7 ÷8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ c œ R l r r L r l l R l l R l l R l r r L r l l R L R L R L R

Œ

Ó

> > > > > > > ÷ 78 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ c œ

Œ

Ó

> c Û

Œ

Ó

> 7 ÷8 Û R

34

r

R

R

B

l

6

R

B

r

l

r

Û l

r

L

> Û R

r

l

> Û R

l

R

Û l

l

l

Û l

R

l

> Û R

l

R

> Û L

l

r

Û r

r

L

> Û L

r

l

> Û L

l

R

Û r

L

R

Û r

L

R

> Û L

L

R

R


35


Rolls I won’t go into too much detail here. Suffice it to say that double-stroke rolls in a marching context should be thought of as rhythms instead of rudiments. If a line is playing a thirty-second note roll, we should hear thirty-second notes in time. If a line is playing broken diddle patterns, we should hear those rhythms the way a drum machine would play them…articulated. If every member of the drumline is hearing the rhythms the same way, and can articulate them as such, it’s obviously going to be much easier to clean up. Key points:

• Play rhythms, not rudiments. • Articulate roll/diddle passages to create the appropriate rhythms. • The wrist is the primary mover of the stick for rolls and diddles. • Fingers can and should be used at faster tempos to produce stronger doubles. • In order to play smoothly, the arms can be used (once again, at faster tempos) to take some of the workload off the wrists. However, if you’re using some arm for rolls, don’t take the wrist out of the picture. Instead, try to use a little of everything (wrists, fingers, arm) for efficiency and good sound quality. • If you’re just getting started with rolls, I suggest practicing them slowly. Don’t try to get too fast too quickly, for you’re likely to blow right by some of the internal understanding that takes place by being patient.

The Exercises 9/8 rolls One day I was listening to Dave Brubeck’s “Blue Rondo A La Turk” and figured that the rhythmic phrasing used would be very fitting for a diddle/roll exercise. So there you go. The meter is grouped in four-bar phrases that go like this: 2-2-2-3, 2-2-2-3, 2-2-2-3, 3-3-3. The length is due to its compositional nature. It runs the gamut of commonly used roll and diddle figures in this style. Remember to practice this the way a drum machine would play it – in time and rhythmically accurate. It should normally be played fairly fast (sort of like cut time 9/8). Don’t be fooled by the quarter notes that it starts with. Think of those like eighth notes.

36

meow


9/8 rolls

Snare

Tenor

Bass

S

T

B

S

T

œ œ œ œ@. L

L

L

œ œ œ œ@.

L

!! ÷ 98 œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ R R R R L L L f œ œ œ œ@. œ œ œ ÷ 98 f

> > >j @ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@ L r l r l r L R l r l r l R l Í Í f Í >j > œœ > œ œ œ œ@ œœ @ œ œ ÷œ œ œ. œ œ

R

R

R

R

> œ ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ œ . œ@. œ . œ œ L R R R R L R L R l r Í > œ @œ . œ œ œ œ@. œ . Û@. Û . Û œ R

÷ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ R

R

R

R

l

r

l

f R

œ œ œ Û@. f R

œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ R

L

R

L

L

j œ! œ œ! œ œ@ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ œj

j j j j j œ œ@ œ œ@ œ œ@ œ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ L

Í

L

œ œ œ œ@.

j j œ@. œ@. œ œ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ œ L R L R R L L f

! œ@. œ@. œ œ œ œ œ L r l r l r L R l r l r l R l L R L R Í f Í Í f > > j œœ@ œœœ@... œœœ@... ! œ @ œ œ œ . ÷Û œ œ Û Û œœœœÛ œ. Û Û Û œ œ L R L R L R L Í Í f Í f

R

j œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ L

L

! œ! j ! ! ! ! ! ! j ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@ œj œ@ œ œ@ œ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ R

B

÷ 98 œ œ œ œ@. R R R R f

> œ . œ@. œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@. L R L R l r l r l R Í f

R

œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ ÷ œ@

L

R

L

R

R

j j j œ@ œj œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ j @ œ œ@ œ œ œ

L

L

j œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@ 37


9/8 Rolls (cont.)

S

T

R

R

R

÷ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œj œ@ 4

S

÷ œ . œ@.

^ !! ‹. ÷ œ . œ œ œ! œ! ÷ Û.

œ@.

L

S

T

R

R

R

œ œ œ œ@.

R

L

L

L

œ œ œ œ@.

L

R

R

R

R

L

R

L

R

R

j œ œ@

j œœœ œœœ@

j œœœ œœœ@ œ œ Û Û Û Û@. R

R

R

R

R

L

L

L

L

R

Û Û Û Û@.

R

L

L

L

R

R

R

Û Û Û Û@.

L

R

R

R

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

> > > >> >> > >> > >> > >> > > > > !! !! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

> ! !> > ! !> > > > > > > œ œ œ œ !œ œ! > > œ! œ! > œ! œ! > œ! œ! > œ! œ! > > ÷Û ÛÛ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ Û Û R

38

R

> >> >> > >> >> > >> >> >> >> > ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ! œ

R

B

L

j j @œ œ œ œ œ@ œ œ@ œ œ œ@ œj œ@ œ œ œ œ@ œ œ@ œj œ@ œj ‰ > > œ œ œ R R R R R L L L L L R R R R R L L R R R L p f j j >> œ@ œ œ œ@ œ . œ œ œ œ ‰ ÛÛ œ œ Û œœ œœ ‘ ‘ @ J R R L p f

4

B

R

>> @œ œ œ œ@ œ œj œ@ œ œ œ@ œ œj œ@ œ œ œ@ œ œj œ@ œj œ@ œj ‰ œ œ pR R R R R L L L L L R R R R R L L R R fR L

œ. 4

T

L

!! !! ! j j@ ÷ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ œ! œj œ@ œ œ@ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ! R

B

j j j œ œ@ œ œ@ œ œ@ œ œ œ œ@.

j ÷ œ œ! œ œ! œ œ! œ œ@

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

R

L

>j > Û Û R

L

L

>j Û L


9/8 Rolls (cont.)

S

T

B

S

T

B

> ÷ œ œ! œ@ R R Í > !@ ÷œœœ

œ œ! œ@ œ@ œ@. L L L L f

œ@ œ@. R

R

4

œ œ! œ@ œ@ œ@. R R R R p

Ͼ. L

4

œ@ œ@.

Ͼ.

> > > > > 4> > >j ÷ œ œ œ œ@. œ œ! œ œ œ@ œ œ œ œ œ R L L L L R R L R L R L Í > > > > > 4 > > >j @ ÷ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L L L L R R L R L R L R Í > ! > > > > 4 > > >j œ ÷ Û Û Û Û@. Û Û Û œ@ Û Û Û Û Û L

L

L

R

R

L

R

œ œ œ œ@.

j œ Û! Û@. f R

Û Û Û Û@.

R

R

R

R

4 @œ ! œ! œ! ! ! œ! œ! œ œ!j œ! ! ! œ œ œ œ! œ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ R R L L R R R R R f

œ@ ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ@ œ@ ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ@ œ œ R R R R L L L L R R p Í f > ! œ œ! œ@ œ œ@ œ@ œ@. œ œ! œ@ œ@ @ ÷Û œ. R p f Í

L

j œ œ! œ@. L R f

L

R

L

Í R

œ@ œ@. L

4

Ͼ. R

œ@ œ! ! ! œæ. œ œ œœ@

L

R

œœœ@...

4

œœœæ... œ.

R

> œ R f ^ ‹ f > Û R

f R

R

R

R

Ó.. Ó.. Ó..

39


Section 2 SCV Musical excerpts Through the past 30 years, the competitive repertoires of the Santa Clara Vanguard have been arranged from composers such as Shostakovich, Copland, Bernstein, Khatchaturian, Rimsky-Korsakov, and many others, as well as many popular broadway shows. As a young percussionist, I remember listening to the SCV drumlines playing music written by Ralph Hardimon, amazed at how musical a drumline could be! It’s not surprising that many of the folks who are currently drawn to try out for SCV come for that very same reason. However, upon auditioning and marching during the early season, they often discover they don’t quite understand what that “vibe” is all about. The truth is, to be successful in any musical endeavor, there must be a strong connection between the performer, the music they play, and the listener. Without these three elements in place, the music will not be able to complete it’s circle. This concept is essential to the SCV percussion program and should be apparent when listening to recordings of the corps. This Music The musical examples on the following pages are actual battery excerpts from SCV shows from 1996, ‘97, and ‘98. You will see many different styles of music – some are very dense, while others appear quite simplistic. One concept that I strongly believe in is that the music should “feel” good to play. There is always some sort of “groove” or “flow” that should be felt when playing these. The stickings are written in such a way to accommodate this, and the density (or transparency) of the parts is a direct result of the ensemble responsibility of the drumline during the given phrase. If the technique is approached correctly (as outlined earlier in this book), the music should accommodate this approach. Notes versus Music

40

Here is a touchy subject. This activity is based on competition; competition in which drum corps are judged for displaying their level of skill. In modern drum corps, a majority of this judging relates to the overall music ensemble (all brass voices, battery percussion, and pit percussion) and how well it ties together. The activity has evolved into this “full ensemble” approach, where as several years ago the brass and percussion elements were less reliant on each other for creating the overall package. This is not necessarily a bad thing – it’s just different than the “modern” approach. With this in mind, the battery arranger must address the challenge level of the players (how much to “cheese it up”) and when that stuff may just get in the way. Ultimately, a marching percussionist is going to learn all the fancy rudimental stuff anyway, so you don’t necessarily have to smear it throughout the arrangements. Granted, it’s important for the drumline to be able to “show off” in the show


from time to time, but it can’t be treated as THE ultimate priority. The music must dictate when the flamboyant stuff will be allowed to come into play. phrasing and Dynamics In terms of defining stick heights, pay close attention to the sticking indications (see note on page 1). Occasionally you may see hairpin dynamics with no starting or ending dynamic level. This would imply a sense of phrasing (a slight lift or fall). So rather than specifying stick heights in inches, you can get a feel for creating phrases that relate to each other dynamically over the span of several measures. The less the music is interpreted “beat to beat,” the better the chances of those phrases being expressed with a sense of character. This will result in a more satisfying relationship with the music and better communication with the listener. Cymbals You will also notice that in the following section, the scores include the cymbal line. Rather than present a confusing code of notation symbols here, explanations of the different cymbal techniques will be discussed in the excerpts as they come up. The cymbal parts will simply be labeled “on the fly” as to what sounds are required. As with bass drum music, the cymbal parts are notated for a section of four or five players. Each staff space will represent a different player in the section. Arrangers If you are using this music to study different arranging techniques, I’d highly recommend listening to the full corps recordings of these shows. That way you can get a better sense of how these parts actually apply to the full ensemble and what the resulting sounds are. Each excerpt is subtitled with a general musical reference in the production so that you can locate their existing points in the show. A Musician’s Approach The music should be written in such a way that both the performer AND the listener may relate to it. In any musical situation, whether it’s playing in an orchestra, drum circle, jazz combo, or speed metal band, there should always be the connection between the performer and the music. Music is a language that many people can read but can’t often speak. Or commonly (at least in this activity), we speak just enough of the language to get by. This would be analogous to the American tourist speaking broken Spanish in Mexico; everyone knows you’re from “out of town.” Understanding the notes, rhythms, dynamics, and stickings is only one small portion of the player’s responsibility. There should be just as much importance placed on making an emotional connection with the music and its phrasings so that there is a true understanding that communicates up into the stands.

MARK TIME HUT… 41


SCV 1996 excerpt #1 from La Mer, 3rd movement (closing production, first impact)

This is a simplistic example of how broad rhythms can enhance the musical book. The quarter note triplets and accents in the tenor part are reflective of the brass rhythm, while the 8th note to triplet figure mimics an accompanying line that exists under the main theme. Bass drums and snares are utilized to fill in more of the quarter note triplet feel and supply some impact “answers” (along with cymbals) on the downbeats of measures 2 and 4. The subtle dynamics in each part go a long way toward actually giving shape to the phrase. The difficulty in this phrase does not exist within the physical playing of the parts. The difficulty lies in interpreting the open rhythms accurately with a sense of shape and direction. Oftentimes, the more “open” the rhythms are, the more difficult it is to get a drumline to play them together.

q»¡¢º

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

42 S

> j 4 ÷4 œœ R f

> œ

÷ 44 œœ f

œœ

÷ 44 œœœ f

3

3

R

3 > 3 > 3 >3 > > > 3 > >3 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ R

l

r

L

r

l

R

l

3

œ

œœ

œœœ

œœœ

R

œ œ œ

R

œ

L

3

œ

R

R

L

œ

R

3

L

œ

L

R

L

L

R

> œ œ œ œ

R

L

R

L

P R

l

R

l

l

>3 œ R

l

l

R

l

l

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

l

R

l

R

l

R

R

l

R

3

œ

Œ

l

> œ œ œ œ

˙˙˙> i ˙ ƒ

3 3 > >3 > > > 3 > >3 > ^ 3 j ! ! ! ! ! ÷œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R

œ

œ œ œ œ œ ? ? ? ! ! ! ! œ ! 3

L

R

3

÷ 44

R

l

3

œ

R

R

Ó

l


! !

f

T

3

> ˙ ƒ

˙˙ i (cont.) Excerpt #1∑from La Mer, 3rd movement ˙

÷ 44

Cymbals

S

3

3 3 > >3 > > > 3 > >3 > ^ 3 j ! ! ! ! ! ÷œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R l R l l R l l R L R L R L R l R l R l R f P > 2 œ ÷ « R

B

÷ œœœ

C

÷

3

œœœ

œœœ

3

? p ∑

?

?

> œ œ œ œ ? f ˙˙˙> i ˙

3

œ

œ

œ>

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó ∑

43


excerpt #2 from La Mer, 3rd movement (closing production, build to last impact)

This example shows how opposing rhythms (i.e., quarter note triplets against eighth notes) can actually enhance the sense of building tension that this phrase is intended to supply. The duple roll in the snare voice at letter M is to simulate a long tone in the upper brass voice. It also will help to support the 16th notes in the tenor voice which are there to partner with some keyboard lines in the pit. While all this is going on, the bass drums are playing a totally unrelated rhythm of quarter note triplets which are mirroring an ostinato set by the lower brass. With snare and tenor voices assuming more melodic roles, and bass drums acting as accompaniment, it’s important to consider that a mezzo forte in the bass line will need to be slightly less than a mezzo forte for snares or tenors. This way the opposing rhythms will not be distracting to each other, and a sense of direction will be felt to the listener. The Cymbal groove in the first two measures consists of three different sound effect techniques. The “sizzle-choke” for players 1 and 3 is simply a sizzle sound (horizontal or vertical), achieved by gently striking the cymbals together, then letting the resulting “buzz” of the cymbals vibrate against each other. The choke portion comes from sliding the leading cymbal down into the surface cymbal to achieve a vacuum. This vacuum is the choke which releases the sound of the previous sizzle. A “suck” is simply an isolated vacuum choke sound as discussed above. “H.H.” is simply a choke technique which simulates that of a closed hi hat. Held horizontally, the top cymbal opens up like a clam shell and closes onto the bottom cymbal.

q»¡§§ rim

Snare

Tenor

M

> ÷ 44 x œ x œ x œ x œ x œ x œ x œ x œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! R L R L ... R L R L ... f F P > > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ ÷ 44 œ R L R R L L R ... P f F 3 œ œ3 œ ÷ 44 œ œ œ P

Bass

Sizz/ch.

÷ 44 œ œ. œ œ œ œ. œ œ P Suck Sizz/ch.

Cymbals

H.H.

œ œ3 œ œ œ œ

44

S

3

÷ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ!

3

? œ f F

Crash

˙˙ ˙ f

œ

œ

œ3

œ

Ó

> 3 3 > ^ ^ 3 > 3 j M œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ


S

T

> 3 3 > ^ ^ 3 > 3 j ! ! ! ! ! M œ œ œ œ œœ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R L R L R L R L R R l r r l l R l f P Crescendo 3 ^ 3 > 3 3 ! ! ! œœœ œœ œœœœ œœ œ M œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷ œ œ œ œj R L R L R L R L R L R R L R R L L R f P Crescendo

C

÷

B

C

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÷ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ!

÷œ

T

Crash

˙ ÷ 44 œ œ. œ œ œ œ. œ œ ˙˙ ‘ Excerpt #2 from La Mer, 3rd movement (cont.) P Suck f

B

S

Sizz/ch.

H.H.

Sizz/ch.

Cymbals

f F

3

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œ

œ

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œ œ 3œ œ œœœœ œœ œ œ œ œœ ? ? œ f P Crescendo 3

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÷ ÷

œ œœœ

R

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3

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j œ

Ó

œ œj œ œj œ œj œ R R R R p 3

œœ œœ œœ œœ f p 3

œ

^ ^ ^ M œM œ M R L R L R ƒ 3

3

3

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? ? ? ??? ? ? Œ Ó ƒ f p œœœ œ p

3

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3

œœœ œ

œœœ œ

∑ 45


excerpt from La Mer, 1st movement (first impact of show)

This section should reflect a majestic feel. As the first impact of the 1996 SCV show, the density of the battery music exists to supply some rhythmic motion underneath the huge chords being played by the brass. Thematically, the last two measures hint at the Bolero rhythm which is present at other points in the show. The main thing here is…THINK BIG! Make all the open rolls sound like big, fat, juicy rhythms that give the illusion of pure sustain (to resemble the brass sustaining). The bass drum runs in measures 1 and 3 should be an addition to the already established roll of the snares and tenors. These runs should be played with single sticking (RLRL) to supply the best amount of support to these rolls. Since this excerpt combines “all up” passages and two-height passages, snares and tenors should pay close attention to the height indications in the stickings. Remember, think big in terms of setting a mood and let the rhythms flow.

q»ªº

Snare

÷ 44 œ œ! œ! œ!œ! œ! œæ R L R L R L ... f 6

f

R L R L R L

Bass

Cymbals

6

Ͼ 6

!!!!!! æ ÷ 44 œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œæ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 6

Tenor

Ͼ

6

÷ 44 ? f ÷ 44

Orch.

˙˙˙ i ˙˙ > f

6

6

...

6

> > 9 > > > 9 > > >3 > ^ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œj œ 6

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S.

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l

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l

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r

r

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6

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> > 9 > > > 9 > > >3 > œ œœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ 3

Ó

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3 6 > > ^ ^ j j j ! ! ! ! œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ 6


3

÷ 44

Cymbals

Orch.

C.

S.

T.

6 ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œæ œ œ œ œ ! ! ! ! ! ÷ œœ œœœœœœ œ

6 ^ ! œ œ œ œ œj M œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ œ! œ œ> œ> œœ œ œ

R

R L R L R L R L R L

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6

l R l

l

r

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r

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3

3

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l

l

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L R L

B.

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6

6

R R L L R L R L R L

B.

>

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3

T.

>

˙˙ i ˙˙ ˙> 1st movement (cont.) Ó Excerpt from La Mer,

˙˙ i ˙˙ ˙> f

3

S.

>

3

÷ Œ

Œ

˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙

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3

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! œ œ!œ!œ œ œ œ !!! 3

3

˙˙˙ i ˙˙ > 47


excerpt from 4th Motion

(last main section, before closing production)

Imagine that this section of music were to accompany the big chase scene in an action movie. It has to have an intensely strong vibe and supply a good amount of rhythm to accomplish the necessary drive. Rhythmically, the brass melody consists of only half notes (except for mellophones playing a running 8th note accompaniment, simulated by the bass drums). The rolls at letter H in the snare and tenor parts should supply a sense of the half note sustain (brass), while driving the phrase through use of open roll rhythms. By frequently modulating the rhythmic feel (i.e., from 8th notes, to triplets, to quarter note triplets, to 16th notes, etc.) there should be a sense of tension inherent in this aggressive section of the show. In general, this phrase should be treated in a two-height manner, although unaccented notes at letter H (rolls) should have a bit more body to them than a standard low tap height. By the fifth measure of H, a strict accent-to-tap definition may be made, as indicated by the sticking case.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

48

S

q»¡¶§ ^ 4 ÷ 4 M œœœ œœœ œœœœœœ R R L R R L R R L R L R L Í ^ ÷ 44 M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R L R L R R L R L R L Í

h

> œ R f > œ

f R

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R

l

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l R

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l

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l R

L

R

L

R

R

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œ œœœ œœ > œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ ? œ œ œ Í f œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙ i ÷ 44 œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ Ó ˙˙ p ƒ ÷ 44

> 3 > 3 > > 3 ÷ œ œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œj œ

j œ

œ

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÷ 44

Cymbals

S

T

B

C

S

T

B

C

œœ œœ œ p

œœ œœ œ

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f

œœ ˙˙ i œœ ˙˙ œ Excerpt ˙ from 4thÓMotion (cont.) ƒ

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˙˙˙ i ˙˙

Ó

>j œœœ œœ ‰ Œ Ó . 49


excerpt #1 from Oceans opener (last statement and ending of main opening production)

This excerpt should be fairly self-explanatory. Since it is the end of the opener, it will need to provide a good sense of direction and excitement. This is yet another example of where the percussion parts will need to not only drive the phrase but supply much of the rhythmic interest. Most of the brass parts here consist of longer, held-out chords, meaning the responsibility of the battery section increases. In general, this should be approached in a two-height manner. The following approach should be exercised in the case of hairpin dynamics. When used during accent passages, the dynamic markings affect only the accents. If the hairpin appears beneath unaccented rhythms, that would be a clear indication that all notes were meant to be affected dynamically. For this reason, it is best to avoid the “stick height approach” to teaching dynamics to marching percussionists. Approach dynamics as just that – DyNAMICS! Stick heights will reflect the dynamics.

Snare

Tenor

q»¡¶º ^ 3 4 ÷ 4 M œ! R L f ^ 3 ! ÷ 44 M œ f R

Bass

Cymbals

50

÷ 44 ? > f> ˙i ÷ 44 ˙˙˙˙ f

3 > ^ ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ R

L

R

L

R

l

r

l

r

r

L

3 > > ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

L

R

œ

L

R

L

R

l

r

r

l

l

R

^ œ œ œ œ M R

^ M L

Rim

œ

œ

œ Ó

3 ^ ^ ^ ^ >> >> > ÷ M œ M œ M œ M œ œ ≈ œ œ ˙z

œ œ œ œ œ

xxx xx Œ

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R

L

R

> >

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L

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L

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3

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z

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> 3 >3 >3 j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ


Cymbals

> f> ˙i ÷ 44 ˙˙˙˙ f

> ˙˙ ...i ˙˙ .. Œ Ó ˙ Excerpt #1 from Oceans Opener (cont.)

3 ^ ^ ^ ^ >> >> > ÷ M œ M œ M œ M œ œ ≈ œ œ ˙z

> 3 >3 >3 j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ L r l R l r L r l P >3 >3 jœ Œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ

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f > 3 > >3 > ÷œœœœœœœ R

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51


C

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˙˙ i ˙˙ ...i ˙˙ ˙˙ .. Œ ˙> Excerpt #1 from Oceans Opener (cont.) >˙

Œ

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> > > > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ > ^ > ! M M M M œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ

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j j œ ˙i œ ˙ ‰ œœ ≈ œ .. Excerpt>#1 from>Oceans ˙Opener (cont.)

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L

R

L

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3

T

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53


excerpt #2 from Oceans opener (first major statement of main opening production)

This section provides a great exercise for understanding how rhythmic modulations may take priority over the player’s thought process. What does this mean? Good question. Try this: Take out all double strokes, stickings, and buzz strokes in the snare part and play only the underlying rhythms. You’ll find that through the first five measures it’s difficult to be extremely accurate with timing since the rhythmic feel (check pattern) modulates so frequently. With this in mind, it’s very important for players to have a clear understanding of how the check patterns relate to the rhythms they are playing and the rhythms they will be changing to as well as coming from. For this reason, it would be very valuable to practice this excerpt with a metronome. In the cymbal part, you will notice a couple special effect techniques: the sizzle and taps. A sizzle is created by gently striking the two cymbals against each other and letting the resulting vibrations create a buzzing “sizzle” sound. Since this is a form of sustain, it is also good practice to define when to separate the cymbals, therefore releasing the sound of the sustained sizzle. Taps are simply played by striking the edge of one cymbal (the stroking cymbal) against the edge of the other cymbal. This is usually done at approximately a ninety-degree angle. The sound of taps may be varied depending on how close to the edge of the cymbal one plays. It will provide a soft, yet articulate sound.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

q»¡∞º > > 9 > > > 9 > 4 ÷4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R l r L r l R l r L r l R l r L r l F f > 9 > > > > 9 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷ 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R l r L r l R l r L r l R l r L r l F f œ ÷ 44 F ÷ 44

œœœ œœ

? ˙˙˙ ˙˙

54

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3

Œ

3

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z

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z

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^ > > > 3 M œ œ œ œ! œ! R R L R ƒ ^ > > >All Up3 M œ œ œ œ! œ! R R L R ƒ All Up

œ! œ! œ! 3

! œ! œ! œ 3

> > > œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ? ? ? œ œ !œ !œ !œ ! ! 3 > ˙˙˙ ˙˙ ƒ

3

3 > > > 9 > >3 > > ^ ^ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ M M 3


÷ 44

Cymbals

œœ œœ œ

S

3

R

! ! ! ! 3! ! œæ œ œ œ ÷ œ œ œ 3

T

R

B

C

S

T

B

C

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ6 ÷ œœœœ æ 6 ÷

3 > > > 9 > >3 > > ^ ^ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ M M 3

R

L

R L R

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

l

R

l

l

R

R

l

R

R

3

R

l

r

l

r

L

r

l

R

3

l

r

L

r

l

R

l

l

œœœ œœ

œœœ œœ

œœœ œœ

Sizz.

R

l

R

R

‰ ? >? >? > >?

œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? > 3

R

3

9

3 >3 3 > 3 > 3 ^ 3 j ! j ! j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ!œ!M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ R l r l R R l r L r l r l R l r l R R R R R R p 3 ^ 3 > 3 ^ 3 3 > > ! > > > > œ j j M œ ! œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ!œ M œœ œ Œ ÷ œœ œ œ œ œ œj œ R R l r L r l r l R L R L R R L R p 3 œ œ œ œ > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ^M > > > > œ œ3 œ œ ! ! ÷œ Œ ? œœ ??? ? 3 ! ! 3 ! p 3 6 > > ˙˙ .. œ ˙˙˙z ÷ œ. Ó Ó ˙.

Crash

r

> >3 > > ^ ^ 3 > 9 > > œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ M M œ

^ ^ ! ! ! ÷ M œœœM

Choke

> ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ ƒ

˙˙ œœ ˙˙ œœ ˙ Excerpt #2 from Oceans œ Opener Ó(cont.)

÷ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œæ 3

3

˙˙˙ ˙˙

Ó

Ó

œœœœœœ 3

Œ

œ

3

œ Œ Ó

˙ ‰. œœ Taps

Ó 55


SCV 1997 excerpt #1 from Seven Stages (end of production before closer)

This excerpt needs to be approached with intensity and drive. This is also the first musical example where the “crush” is applied to the snare and tenor parts (4th bar of letter I). This technique will also be seen later in the book and it provides a useful sense of sustain. It is basically defined as one or both sticks (the left stick in this instance) pressed into the head like a buzz stroke. Depending on how much pressure is applied, the note can be longer or shorter. Either way there should be a sense of sustain, and not just attack. Frequently (as in this case) the crushed note should tie into the next note. When this is the case, the next note (the right hand in this case) acts as the release of the sustained note. Ping shots are simply higher pitched, thinner sounding rim shots achieved by pulling the bead of the stick closer to the rim when playing the shot. Bass drums should note that the inner notes at letter J (players 2 and 3) should be muffled with the left hand, while the accents (not being muffled) are speaking loud and clear.

Snare

Tenor

q»¡•º ÷ 24

i

œ ÷ 24 œ œ œ R L R L F

Bass

÷ 24

Cymbals

÷ 24

> > j ! ! j œ œ œ œ œ œ

f > > j œ ! œ! œ œj œ œ R

f R

S

l

(muffle)

œ. F

˙˙˙ i ˙˙ f

56 Stick Click ^ ^ ÷ M œœœœ x œ œ M œ Ping

l

r

r

Œ

L

L

> > j ! ! j œ œ œ œ œ œ

> j ! œ œ œ

> ^ j ! µ œ œ œ œ œi M œ

> > œ! œ! œ œj œ

>^ œ M

^ µ j œi M ‰ œ œ

œ.

œ.

L

j œ

L

r

r

l

Œ ∑

J

l

R

R

R

R

Ping

l

L

L

r

L

œ.

r

R

L

L

R

l

R

. œ. œ œ. ∑

œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ!


÷ 24

Cymbals

˙˙ i ˙˙ ∑ ˙ Excerpt #1 from Seven Stages (cont.) f

Stick Click ^ ^ ÷ M œœœœ x œ œ M œ Ping

S

T

B

÷

C

÷

S

T

œ

R

C

R

L

R

L

œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑

J

œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! R

L

...

œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! R

L

œ! œœ! ? . > ƒ œœœ i œ >œ ƒ

...

œ.! œ! œ! œœ! œ.! œ! œ œ œ œ . œ > > >

œœœ i œ >œ

R

Œ

^ œ ! ! ÷ œ+ + œ œ M

> œœ

Œ

R

L

Œ

R

œ! œ! œ! œ! ÷ œ œœ œœœœ œ > > ÷Œ

œœœ i œ >œ

Œ ∑

œœœœœœ 6

œœœ i œ >œ

Œ

3 3 ^ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ M

R R L L R

B

F

ƒ > ^ ^ j ÷œ M ‰ œ œ œ M œ R L L R L R L F ƒ R l r r l

œ! œ >

œœ! .

œ.! œ! œ! œœ! œ.! œ œ œ œ . > >

œœœ i œ >œ

Œ

^ ^ œ M Œ xM R R B p ƒ 6 6 > œœœœœœ œœœœœœœ ++ R L R L R L R L R L R L R π F z

œœœœœœ œ œ > > 6

œœœ i œ >œ

Œ

œ! œ! œœ! œœ.! œ! œ œ . œ > > >

Crash Choke

Œ

œœœ œœ fl Ï

œœœ i œ >œ

Œ

∑ ∑ µ Œ ? fl ∑ 57


excerpt #1 from The Epilogue (Last two measures of show)

This is another example of creating a majestic mood through the use of big, fat, open rhythms. During these two bars, the brass music is simply sustaining a loud chord. How unique for the end of a drum corps show, eh? This is a two-height example, but the rolls and RRL triplets should be approached higher than the usual low tap height. Since the part is meant to sound “fat” (for lack of a better word), it’s important to not lose the definition of all those rolled notes. There is a rhythmic idea that is used frequently here. It consists of a six-stroke roll leading into a 16th note triplet. The 16th note triplet is actually a tuplet rhythm within a tuplet. Since the sextuplet contains six partials, this triplet would begin on the fifth partial and would flow into the next downbeat. It may also be helpful to think of that triplet in relation to the “ninelet” rhythm found in the second to last measure, since they are of the same rhythmic value. Regardless, the rhythms need to have a sense of flow, and if played accurately, this flow should happen naturally.

Snare

Tenor

q»¶º > 4 ÷4 œ R ƒ > ÷ 44 œ R

ƒ

Bass

Cymbals

58

S

6 > > 6> > > 3 >6 3 > > > œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ 6

R

L

R

R

L

R

L

R

R

L

R

3 3 > > > > > ! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ! ! œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 6

6

6

R

œ > ÷ 44 ? œ œ œ œ œ ! ! ! ! ! ƒ 6 ˙i ÷ 44 ˙˙˙˙ > ƒ

L

œ 3

R

œ

R

L

R

œ

L

3

œ

R

œ

R

L

R

R

R

L

L

> >3 > > j j œ œ œ œ œ œ R

R

L

L

> > > > ? œ œ œ œ 3

Ó

> > >6 3 > > 9 > > > 6> > > ^ > 3 > > > ÷ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ Œ Ó


Cymbals

S

T

ƒ ˙i ÷ 44 ˙˙˙˙ > ƒ

R

R

Ó

Excerpt #1 from The Epilogue (cont.)

L

R

L

R

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

r

l

R

L

L

R L R

R

L

L

R

6 > 6 > 9 > >> 3 > ^ > 3> > > > > > > ! ÷œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ M œ œ œ œ Œ Ó R

> ÷? œ 3

C

3

> > >6 3 > > 9 > > > 6> > > ^ > 3 > > > ÷ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ Œ Ó

R

B

6

˙i ÷ ˙˙˙˙ >

L

R

œ

R

L

R

l

r

L

r

l

R

l

r

L

R

L

R

R

R

L

L

R

Rim xx > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ ? xxx ? ? ? ? Œ Ó > > > > 3

9

˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙

3

˙˙˙ i ˙˙

Ó

59


excerpt #2 from The Epilogue (main impact of closing production)

Modulating rhythms are prevalent in this excerpt, and, as in the previous example, the mood needs to be big and majestic. The slow tempo accounts for the measures seeming a little “full”; but still, if proper attention is being paid to the check patterns existing beneath all rhythms, this phrase should feel very comfortable in the hands. With that in mind, if you derive nothing else from this example, at least realize that it feels good to play. Notice the tap-height indications and how they relate to accents. Low taps would be the usual two-height interpretation of unaccented notes (lower case stickings). However, there are times when the taps should be higher to fatten the sound a little. This is indicated with upper case stickings on unaccented notes. Also, this is a good example of how bass drums need to interpret two-height rhythms differently than snares or tenors. When there is only one person playing a drum at the time of the two-height rhythm (see measure 2), the unaccented notes need to have more body to them. You may want to define this as “accents = forte” and “non-accents = mezzo forte.” This is quite different than the definitions that snares or tenors usually follow.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

60

S

q»¶º > 3 > 6 7 ÷ 4… œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@ R R L R L R L f > 6 > 6 œ œ 7 ÷ 4 œœ ≈ œ œ œ œ@ R L R L R L f ÷ 74 ? f ˙. ÷ 74 ˙˙˙˙ .... > ƒ

œ

œ@.

> > 9 > > >6 > > 6 > > > >> 5 ! @ @ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ R l

r L r

l R l

l R

l R L

R L

L

R

L

R

L R L R L L

œ@.

R l

r L r

l R l

l R

l R L R L R L

L

R

L

R

L R L R L L

L

L

l

6 > >>> > 9 > > > > > >> 5 > >6 ! œ œ œ œ œ @ œ@. œ œj œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœ œ œœœœœ

œœœœœœœ !!!!! 6

r

œ 3

œ

œ ˙˙˙ ... ˙. >˙ .

œ

œ œ œ œ> … œ> … œ> … œ> œ

œ

3

œœœ œ >œ

> >6> > > 6> > > > 9 > > ^ > 3> > > > 6 > > 9 >> > 6 ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@ œ@. œ œ!œ œ œ œ œ œ!œ!œ œ!œ!œ . …œ œ œ …œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ@ œ@.

44


Cymbals

S

T

B

f ˙. ÷ 74 ˙˙˙˙ .... > ƒ

3

6

3

˙˙ .. ˙˙ .. Excerpt #2 from The Epilogue (cont.) >˙ .

> >6> > > 6> > > > 9 > > ^ > 3> > > > 6 > > 9 >> > 6 ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@ œ@. œ œ!œ œ œ œ œ œ!œ!œ œ!œ!œ . …œ œ œ …œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ@ œ@. R l R l l R R l l R L

L

R l R L R l R l r L r l R

R R l

R R l R

R

L

R

L

R L

R l R l l R R l l R L

L

R l R R l R R l r L r l R

R R l

R R l R

R

L

R

L

R

S

T

÷œ

3 > œ> œ> œ œ > > œ œ œ œ œœœœ œœœœœœ ! !!!!! 6 ! ! ! > >œ

œ

6

˙ ÷ ˙˙˙˙

œœœ œœ P

> 6 4 ÷ 4 œ œ@ R

L

L

C

˙˙˙ ... ˙˙ ..

??????

œœœ œœ

œœœ œœ f

œ@.

Ͼ

œ@.

> 6 œ œ@ œ@.

Ͼ

> 3 > œ œ œ œ œ

R

R

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷ 44 ÷ 44

3

> 3 ^ œ œ œ M œ

L

6

œœœ œœ

6

> 6 œ œ@ œ@.

L

> 6 ÷ 44 œ œ@ R

B

L

4 4

> > 9 >> > 6 > >6> > > 6 > > > > 9 > > ^ > 3> > > > 6 j M ! @ !! !! j !!!!! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ@. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 44

6

C

œœ œœ >œ

L

L

L

L

3

R

R

R

R

L

L

L

R

R

L

L

R

œœœ œœ

? ?

3

œœœ œ >œ ƒ

j œ

44

> œ R

Œ

Ó

> œ L

Œ

Ó

?

Œ

Ó

3

œœ œœœ ? ? ? ?

œœœ 4 4

˙˙˙ ˙ >˙

Ó 61


excerpt from The Masque (end of tune, “shout” section)

This piece should be played with a bit of a lilt, sort of like that of a Scottish pipe drummer. The RllrrLR sticking is used frequently and should simulate that of a slurred six-stroke roll. Also, the “lilting” rhythms should be played as rhythmically accurate as possible. With these sorts of rhythms, it’s easy to incorrectly interpret them as dotted rhythms (i.e., dotted 16th to 32nd). All the crush strokes in the snare voice are to be played as a double stop. Using both hands, press into the head just hard enough to get the indicated length of sustain. The sustain should last the full duration of the indicated note value and, as in this case, lead almost directly into the next attack. For this reason, care must be taken when coming out of a crush to place the next attack. By analyzing the role of different voices, it is obvious that the bass drum parts are there to supply melodic direction, while cymbals punctuate key phrase points. Snares and tenors share the role of spicing up this phrase of music by providing the dance-like “lilt.” Have a wee bit o’ fun, and make it feel good.

e Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

62 S

q»¡¢º ^ 3 > ÷ 24 M œ œ œ œ R l r l R f > 3 > ÷ 24 œ œ œ œ œ R l r l R f œ ÷ 24 ? > f ˙i ÷ 24 ˙˙˙˙ f

^ > > > > > 6 > 3 >6 > j 3 >3 µ µ œ ‰ œœœœœœœ≈œ œœœœœœœ œ ‰ M œœœœ≈œ B

R

l

l

r

> j œ œœ ‰

œ

œ ‰ Jœ

œ

R

>j > > 6 >> µ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œz

r

L

R

œ

L

L

œ

l

E

l

l

r

r

R

B

> 6 > > > œœœœœœœ œ œ R

l

l

r

r

œ

L

R

œ œ ∑

F

L

R

l

R

> œ œœœ ≈œ

^j M

l

R

l

6

l

‰ Jœ ‰ ‰

r

r

l

R

l

j œ

œœœ .. i œœ ...

> 6 >> > ^ 3 > > >3 >6 > µ M œœœœ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ µ œ


÷ 24

Cymbals

S

T

R

÷œ

C

÷

B

C

S

l

l

r

l

l

r

r L R

B

r L R

^ M R

L

F

R

> 6 >> > ^ 3 > > >3 >6 > µ M œœœœ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ µ œ

> œz

> œ R

Œ

œœœ œ

œ œ ‰ Jœ

œ

R

R

œ œ ‰ œ œœ œœœ J ∑

l r l R

˙˙˙ i ˙˙

On Rim > > > 3 3 µ ÷‰ œœœœœœœ œ x x x x R l r l r l R B R L R L P > > z z z ÷˙ œ œ œ F P > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ> œ ÷œ œ Œ > 3 F P 3 ˙i œ.i ÷ ˙˙˙˙ ‰ œœœœ .... F

÷œ

z

> œz

œœ .. i œœ .. œ.

Excerpt from The Masque (cont.)

> 6 >> ÷œ œœœœœœ

B

T

>j > > 6 >> µ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œz

R

S

˙˙ i ˙˙ ˙ f

B

R

l

l

r

r L R

l

R

l

l

r

r L R

B

∑ œ

œ

> >3 > > >3 > > x x ‰ œœœ œœœœ R R R L R L R L R f > z z z œ œ œ œ œ f > œ> œ> œ> œ> œ> œ> œ> Œ œ 3 3 f œœœ i Œ œœ ƒ

> ^ > 6 >6 j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œœ

œ œ

œ ∑

> œz R

œz œœœœœœ 6

j œ

> œ

63

Œ


C

˙i ÷ ˙˙˙˙ F

S

÷œ

T

B

z

÷œ >

z

> œz

œœ ... i œœ .. œ

œœ i œœ œ ƒ Excerpt from The Masque (cont.) Œ

> ^ > 6 >6 j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œœ

R

R

l

r

l

r

l

r

z

œ

R

l

r

l

r

l

r

6 œœœœœœœœœ ÷œœœ œœœœœœœ 6

64

÷

L

r

l

r

l

R

l

R

>6 6 > ^ > > œœ M œ œ œœœœ≈ œœ œ œ œ ++

6

C

L

r

l

r

L

R

l

j ‰ ? >

>œ ∑

j œ

> œ L

Œ

> œœ

Œ

Œ >? Crash Choke j œœœ œœ ‰ Œ .


65


excerpt #2 from Seven Stages (impact statement after long build)

From the beginning of this phrase, there is a rhythmic change in the check pattern of every bar until you arrive at the double bar. For this reason, it is recommended to keep your eyes/brain a measure ahead of where you are actually playing to adequately prepare for the upcoming rhythmic changes. This would be another example of where it is helpful to try playing the underlying rhythms without stickings, flams, or diddles so you can get a feel for the rhythmic modulations. At the double bar the tenor part is a feature which was doubled with keyboards in the pit in the SCV show. Don’t let the fact that there are scrapes and cross-overs affect the sound coming out of the drums! Be sure the rhythm is full (with full double strokes) and that you are arriving at the proper playing areas on the heads. This is one of those licks where it’s easy to get pumped up and “ram,” but could easily result in the sound quality and rhythm accuracy going out the window. Don’t fall victim to this tendency. Nobody wants to see a flashy tenor feature if it sounds bad. Snares have a staccato crush five measures before the end. That should be a very short sustain (also used to “set” the left stick for the following stick shot), while the crush two bars later should lead with sustain into the ping shot. Cymbals should be playing all full crashes unless otherwise indicated. The “zing” sound is achieved by scraping the inside of one cymbal with the edge of the other cymbal. This should be done from a ninety-degree angle.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

66

S

q»¡•º 3 > > 9 > > 3 3 j j ! ! ! ! ! ! 2 ÷ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! R L R L R R R L L R l l R l l r r L R F f f 3 > > 3 > 9 3 > ! ! ! ! œ ! ! ! ! ÷ 24 œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R L R l l R l l r r L R f F f ÷ 24 ? > f ÷ 24

˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙ ƒ

œ

œ

œ ∑

œ

œ

œ

œ ∑

> ^ > > 3 5 3 ^ ÷ M œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ!

> œ œ! œ! œ! R Í > œ ! œ! ! œ œ R Í œ

œ

˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙ ^ 3 M œ œ œ œ

44


÷ 24

Cymbals

S

T

f

˙˙ i ˙˙ >˙ ƒ

Excerpt #2 from Seven Stages (cont.)

> ^ 5 ^ ÷M œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ R L R L R L R l r r l l f > 5 > œ œœœ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R L L R L r l l f

B

÷œ

œ

œ

C

÷

Œ

S

T

B

C

S

> > 3 3 ! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ!

^ 3 M œ œ œ œ

> 3 > 3 œ œ! œ! œ! œ! ! ! œ! ! œ œ œ œ

^ M

R

R

R

R

œ

? > œœœ i œ >œ

œ

œ

˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙

÷ 44 ? Í ÷ 44

÷

3

œ

œ

?

˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙

Ó

Œ

œ

œ

R

L

L

L

3

œ œ œ œ

R

L

R

L

L

24

j œ

4 4

44

24

4 4

44

œ

2 ?œ œ œ ???? 4 F ˙˙˙ i 24 Ó ˙˙ >

>Stick> Shot > Ping > > ^ z µ µ œ œ œ œ œ. œ x x œ œ M œ

R

œ

œ

> > 9 > 9 ^ 4 ÷ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œjœ œjœ œjœ œjœ R l r L r l R l r L L L R R R L L L R L R L R L R L F Í > ^ z 4 ÷ 4 ˙z œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ ˙ R L R L Í F 3

˙˙ i ˙˙ >˙

^ M R f

Œ

j œ

œ œ + œ œ œ + œ R R L L ... f ˘ ? Œ f Crash Choke j œœœ œœ ‰ Œ fl f

> > j œ œœœœ œ œ

j œ

> œ Œ

67


Í

C

S

T

B

C

68

F ˙˙ i ˙˙ Ó Ó Excerpt #2 from Seven>˙Stages (cont.)

˙i ÷ 44 ˙˙˙˙ >

>Stick> Shot > Ping > > ^ z µ µ ÷ Œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ x x œ œ M œ ∑ ∑ R l R L r R R R L R l π P > ^ z ! !œ œ œ M ∑ Œ ÷ œ œ œ œ ++ œ œ œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ + œ œ R R l R l p P ÷ ÷

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

œ œ>

Œ

z

p ∑

œ P

œ>

>> œ œ œ œ œ œ> œ œ> œ Zing

˙˙ i ˙ F

2 4

j œ

j œœ œœ ‰ Œ œ fl f

Crash Choke

> > j œ œœœœ œ œ

j œ

> > œ œ œ œjœ

j œ

R R l l r

r

L

r

L

L

œ œ> œ œ > Taps

‰ œœ ..

> œ Œ R

> œ Œ R

Œ >œ ∑


69


excerpt #1 from ‘97 Opener (first full ensemble statement after soloist)

This aggressive piece of music requires a good deal of concentration from all individuals. Each section carries its own level of responsibility. There is a rhythmic theme present, and it’s easiest to see in the bass drum part (which imitates the theme played by lower brass). The rhythm at number 6 may act as the “theme,” and in the following three measures, that theme should still sound like it is existing beneath the surface. To a more subtle degree, the snare and tenor parts are indicating this rhythmic theme as well. You can see this during the four measures of rehearsal number 6. The accents in the snare and tenor parts exist to help stay connected to the rhythmic theme mentioned. Treat this excerpt in a two-height fashion and pay close attention to the stickings. At times (i.e., snare part measure four after the ping), there are easier alternatives to the sticking, but the particular sticking will result in a different feel to the rhythm. This is intentional to arrive at a different sound than just straight sticking. Once you get used to it, it should feel pretty comfortable.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

70

q»¡ªº > > > ^ 7 ÷ 4 œ œœœœœœ œœœœ œœ œœœœœœœœœ M Œ R l r r l l R l r r l l R L R R L L R R L L R P > ^j > > ^ ‰ MM Œ ÷ 74 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ M R l r r l l R R l r r l l R ƒ P œ œ ÷ 74 œ ‰ Jœ ‰ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ > > P ÷ 74

>j > > > > ^ µ µ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œœ œ œ œM œœ œ œ œ ‰ µ R R l r B R l r r l l R l r l r B B f > > > > > j œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ R l R l r r l R r l R l r r l l R l r r l l f œ œ œœ ‰ Jœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œj Œ > > f j œ

˙˙˙ i ˙˙ ƒ

Ping > > >> > > 3 > ^j ^ >> j j j j ! ! ! ÷ ‰ M œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœMœœœ œ œ œ œœœœ œœ œ œ Ping

S

6


˙˙ i ˙˙ ˙ ƒ (cont.) Excerpt #1 from ‘97 Opener

÷ 74

Cymbals

Ping > > >> > > 3 > ^j ^ >> j j j j ! ! ! ÷ ‰ M œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœMœœœ œ œ œ œœœœ œœ œ œ R l r l r L r l R R l r L L r l R l R L R L R l l R R l R l r l r L r r p f >>>>> > ^ > > > > >> j j œœœœœ M œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœœœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœœœœ ÷ œ œœ œ Ping

S

T

R L R L R

L

R

r

l

R

l

r

L L r

l

R l r r l

r

l

R l r r l

B

j > œ œ> œ œ œ œjœ> œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ ÷ J >œ

C

÷

S

T

B

C

S

7

÷

j œ

> > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

L

r

l

‰ œj œ œ >

> ^ ^ ! œ œ œ M œ œ M œ œ 44 L r l R L L R L L ƒ >j > ^ > ^j > Mœ ‰M œ 44 œ œ R R L L R R L R L ƒ j . > . ÷ œ. œ œ œ. œ œ œ. œ ? ‰ ? Œ 44 > > > ƒ > ÷ œ œ œ! œ LRL R l r p f > >> ÷ œrœ œ œ ‰ z

r

> 3 > 3 ^ > ^ ! ! M œ œœœœM œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ R L R L R L R l l r L R L R L R L R R l r r l l F > ^ > > > 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ! œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ R L R L R L R l r l R L R L R L R L R l r r l l F > œœœ > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ ! œœ ! ? ? œ 3 > > 3

44 œœ œœ iŒ œi ƒ

Ó

> > >j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ

71

Ó


C

S

T

B

C

72

÷

4 œœ œœ iŒ Ó 4 œi ƒ Opener (cont.) Excerpt #1 from ‘97

> > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R l r L r L R L Í > j j ÷ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ R L R L R L R L Í > > ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > Í ÷

> > >j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ƒ > > ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Mj ‰ Œ R L R L R R L L R L R R L L R P ƒ œ> œ œ œ œ œ œ> œ œ œ œ œ j ‰ Œ œ œ >? ƒ j œœ ∑ œ ‰ Œ fl ƒ R

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

R

Ó Ó Ó Ó


73


excerpt #2 from ‘97 Opener (ending)

As in the previous ‘97 Opener excerpt, this piece of music needs to be approached with drive and intensity. This acts as the final statement to a lengthy piece of aggressive music, and just as much purpose should be put into the emotional vibe as the notes themselves. In terms of stick heights, it is important to pay attention to the sticking indications. During a crescendo, if the stickings of unaccented notes are upper case, all notes should grow in volume. If the stickings indicate tap height (lower case), only the accents would grow in volume. *Note for bass drums: At letter E, a low tap height check pattern (8th notes) should exist throughout these four measures. The exception occurs at the two dotted quarter notes in the third bar, in which case the music should be played as written. The accents should only be played when the written part indicates an accented note for that player. The rest of the part consists of the 8th note check pattern at a low tap height and alternating sticking. This will result in a pitched accent pattern coming from the bass line.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

74

q»¡¶§ ÷ 24 ÷ 24 œœ œœ p œ œ ÷ 24 œ p ÷ 24

∑ œœ œœ œœœ ∑

œœœ œ

> > 3 3 3 > >3 >3 >3 œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R R R R L R L R L R L R L R P F > > >> >> > 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ Œ œœ œ f R l r LR l rLR l rL f 44 ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ ? Œ f F 44 ˙˙˙˙ i ∑ ∑ Ó ∑ ˙ F

q»¡ªº > ^ >j ^ > > > ^ ^j > > > > > z 7 ÷ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œœœœœœ 4 œ M ‰ œ M œ œ œ M ‰ M œ e

S


Cymbals

÷ 24

˙˙ i ˙˙ ˙ F Excerpt #2 from ‘97 Opener (cont.)

4 4

Ó

q»¡ªº > ^ >j ^ > > > > > > z ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 74 œ M ‰ œ M œ œ L R LRL R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R R L R L R L R f p f >>> > > > > > >> > ^ ^ ^ ^j ^ ^ ^ M z œ œ œ 7 œ œœ œ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœ 4 M M ‰ M M M + ÷ Œ œ R L R RL R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R R L R L R L R f ß * See Note > j> > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ z > z 74 œœ œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ ÷œ ? ? ? ? œ >œ >œ e

S

T

B

C

S

T

÷Ó

L

C

S

R

L

R

L

> ÷ œœœ

L

R

L

R

L

R

R

L

R

œœœ> j œœ> œœ> > œœœ> ‰ œœœ œ œ œœœ œœœ ‰ > >

R

L

R

L

R

B

R

L

R

L

R

œœœ> J

> œœœ œœ œœ> ‰ œj ‰ > >

œœ j œœ œ œj œœ œ ‰ œœj ‰ ÷ œœ ‰ œ œ œ œœ ‰ œ fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl > > fl

^ 3 ÷ 4 M.

^ M.

R

R

^ M.

^ M.

^ M.

^ M.

L

^ ^ ^j ^ M M ‰ M M L

R

R

L

> œœœ> œœœ ‰

œœœ> J

œœ >œ

j j 74 œ œœ ‰ œ œ œœ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl

R

L

^ ^ ^ ^j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^j ^ ^M ^ ^j Mj ^ M ‰ + ‰ M ÷M M ‰M M M + M M ‰M M L

L

All HH Chokes

> ^ >j ^ > > > ^ ^j > ^ > > > ^j ^ µ ÷ œ M ‰ œ M œ œ œ M ‰ M œ M œ œ œ ‰ M œ œ M.

R

B

˙˙˙ i ˙˙ f

> ^ ^j > œ M ‰ M œ

> 44 ˙z

R

L

L

R

> œœ ..

j œ

^ M. B

> œœ ..

(1 Player) œœ> œ> ^ ^ œ J œ. œ.

j œœ œ > >

^ ^ ^ 44 M œ œ œ M œ M œ 34 R l

r

l

R

l

R

l

^ ^ ^ ^j ^ 44 M M ‰ j ‰ M M 34 + R

L

R

R

L

* See Note 44 œœ œœ ‰ j ‰ Jœœ œœ 34 œ

j œœœ œœ œ j 4 Œ ‰ ‰ œœ ‰ œ . 4 > >œ. fl fl fl

j œœ œ 34 fl fl

^ ^ ^ > >>> > > > > M œ œ Mœ œœœœM œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

75


C

œœ j œ œj œœ œ œ œ ‰ œœj ‰ ÷ œœ ‰ œ œ œ œœ ‰ œ fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl fl > > fl

j œœ œ j œœ ‰ œ. Œ 44 œ œ ‰ œœ ‰ > >. fl fl fl

j œœ œ > >

j œœ œ 3 4 fl fl

Excerpt #2 from ‘97 Opener (cont.)

S

T

^ 3 ÷ 4 M. R p

> ÷ 34 œœ .. p

÷ 34 œ . p

^ M.

^ M.

^ M.

^ M.

^ M.

> œœ ..

> œœ ..

> œœ ..

^ MM ..

^ MM ..

œœ .. >œ .

œœ .. >œ .

. . >? >?

B

As Written

B

C

S

T

÷ 34 œœ .. fl

œ.

œœœ ... fl

B

B

œœ .. fl

B

œœœ ... fl

B

^ ^ ^ > >>> > > > > M œ œ Mœ œœœœM œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

44

R

R

L R L R L

R

l

r

L

r

l

R

76 S

l

R l

r r l l R l R

L

R L R

L

R

L

R

R

L

L

R

l

r

l

r

L

R

l

r

l

r

l

> 3> > > > 3 > 3 ^ 3> > 3^ > 3 3 3 > > 3 3 > > 3 > ! j ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M M œ œ! œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œj œœ œ œœœœ œœœ ÷œ L R

R l

r L

R

R

l

r L

R

R

> > > œœ œ œ > œ ÷ ? œ œ œ ?œ œ œ œ ? ? ? ? > > 3

C

l

>3 > 3 > > 3> > > > 3 3 3 ^ 3 3 > > 3 3 ^ 3 j j j ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œM œœœ M œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

R

B

R

f ^ ^ > >> > > >>> > ^ M 4Œ z M œM 4 œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Lrl R l r l R l r r l R R L R L R L R L Í f > 44 œ œ œ œ > œ œ œ > œ œ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ ? > f

œœœ ... fl

œœ .. fl

> 4 ˙z 4 Rlrlrl Í

˙i ÷ ˙˙˙˙ > ƒ

3

Ó

3

3

R

L

3

œ

L

R

l

r

l

r

L

R

œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙ i ˙ >˙

l

r

l

œ

Ó

3 > 3 > > > > ! ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ

Œ Ó

r

l


C

S

T

B

C

˙i ÷ ˙˙˙˙ > ƒ

Ó

˙˙ i ˙˙ >˙

Excerpt #2 from ‘97 Opener (cont.)

3 > 3 > > > > ! ! ! ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! R l r l r l R L R L R L R L ... ƒ > >> > > >3 > > > > 3 3 ! > > > > > > œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ ! ! ! œ ! œ œœ œ + ÷ œ œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ + œ œ R l r l r l R L R L R L R L R L L R L R ƒ œœœœœœœœœ > >œ œ œ œ œ ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ?! ! ? . ? > > >? >? > > > 6 3 6 ƒ œ œœœ œœœ ˙˙˙ i ˙˙˙ i œœ ÷ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ ˙ > >˙ ƒ

Ó

œ R

Œ Ó

> œœ

Œ Ó

Œ Ó >? j œœœ œœ ‰ Œ Ó fl

77


SCV 1998 excerpt #1 from ‘98 Opener

(after percussion segmental features, build to final impacts)

To accompany a fairly broad, yet dark, brass melody, the percussion assumes a busy and aggressive role in this phrase. Approach this with intensity and strictly define the phrase as two heights unless otherwise noted. The quarter note triplets in the 2/4 measure, as well as just before letter P, should be treated like a special effect. Attack with an accent and quickly diminuendo to a very low level. Afterwards, the dynamic immediately returns to the forte level and the thicker rhythmic density returns.

o Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

78

q»¡•º 3 >>>>> >>>>> 3 ^ ! ! ! 4 ÷ 4 M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! R l l r r l l R L R L R l l r r l l R L R L R f ^ ^ > > > 3 ! ! ! 3! ! M M œ œ œ 4 ÷4 œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ l R l r r l l R l l R l r r l l R l R f > œ ÷ 44 ? ‰ Jœ œ œ œ œ ÷ 44

f ˙˙˙ >˙

Ó

œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ J ∑

^ 24 M R

44

Œ

> 3 24 œ œœ

œœ p

R

3

24 4 ? ? ? 4 p 24

44

˙˙˙ >˙

3 > > 3 ^ 3 >>>>> > > 3 ^ j j ! ! ! ! ! 4 ÷ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œjœ œjœ 3

S

44


Cymbals

÷ 44

S

÷ 44

T

÷ 44

B

C

f ˙˙ ˙ >˙

Ó

T

B

C

S

Excerpt #1 from ‘98 Opener (cont.)

44

˙˙ ˙ >˙

3 > > 3 ^ 3 >>>>> > > 3 ^ j j j j ! ! ! ! ! œœ œœ œœœœ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œœ œœ R R l l r r L r l l R l l r r l l R L R L R l L r R R R R p f >>>>> > >3> 3 > > 3 3 j > ! ! ! 3! > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœœœ j œ œ œ œ œ! œ œœ œœ œ œ œœœ R R l l r l R l R l R l r r l l R L R L R l L r R R p f 3

÷ 44

œ

œ f

÷ 44

‰ Jœ œ

3 œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ œ œ > p

œ

p

S

2 4

^ M œ

5 5 > > ! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ! œ œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ!

÷ œjœ Œ œz R LRL R l R f 3 > 3 3 ! ! œ! > 3! ! > ! ! ! œ ! ! ÷ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R f ÷ œ > f

Œ

Œ

÷ Ó

÷ œ!

>? œœœ >œ

Œ

œ!

œ!

œ!

˙˙˙ >˙

Ó

All Up

L

R

Ó

> ! ! ! ! ! ! ! œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ All Up

Œ

L

R

L

...

œ> !œ !œ !œ !œ œ> !œ !œ !œ !œ >? ? ? ? >? ? ? ? 5 5 ˙˙˙ ˙

> > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

∑ 79

^ M

Œ

Ó


f C

S

T

÷ Ó

÷ œ! R

! ÷œ R

80

B

÷? >

C

÷

œœ ˙˙ œ ˙ œ Excerpt > #1˙from ‘98 Opener (cont.)

Œ

œ! œ!

?

œ! œ!

?

œ! œ!

?

> > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

> > > > > > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

> œ> œ> œ> œ> œ> > > œ œ ? ∑

^ M R

Œ

Ó

> œ

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

R

>œ ˙˙˙ >˙ I

Ó


81


excerpt #2 from ‘98 Opener (following final impact, build to last move)

This phrase needs to give the feeling of growth. Snares will notice that they start playing at the edge of the drum (approximately one inch from the rim). Two measures later the playing area changes to the “1/2 way” position (meaning halfway between the edge and center of the head). For the last three measures they will be in the center of the drumhead. Not only does this exhibit an increase in dynamics, it also increases the thickness of sound. Bass drums will notice that their dynamic marking is consistently lower than that of the other sections. There are two reasons for this: Rudimental bass drums typically speak louder than other instruments, and their part is somewhat of an accompaniment to the other parts, therefore requiring them to be a bit softer. As mentioned earlier in the book, the bass drum staccato marking instructs the left hand to muffle the left head of the drum, resulting in a more dry timbre. This is done so the accented notes (which aren’t muffled) are not only louder, but have a more round sound. All cymbal techniques have been introduced in previous examples. Take note that the main “tie” in the cymbal part is that of the “suck” and “HH” sounds. They are there to line up with the accents found in the bass line (which also mirrors an ascending mellophone line).

q»¡ªº

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

82

>At edge > ^ > > > ^ µ j ! j ! 4 ÷ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ R l r L r l R L R l r r l l R l R l P ÷ 44 ÷ 44 ÷ 44

> ÷ œ œ!

At center

S

Ping

œœ Œ p œ. p

œ.

Sizz/ch.

Tap

Ping

Ó

Ó

œ. > . œ ‰ Jœ

Tap Sizz/ch.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ P Suck H.H.

z Œ œ

LRL

œ. œ> ‰ Tap

Tap

œ. > J œ œ.

Sizz/ch.

H.H.

œ œ œ œ œœ œœ

Suck

> > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

H.H.

Tap

> > > > >^ j ! œ œ œ œœ œ œœœ œ M œ R l r L L r r L L R l F >> >>> > œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ At 1/2 way

F

Ping

R R l r L L r r L L R l

œ. P

œ.

> ^ ! œ œ œ! œ!M œ œz Ping

r L

r

l R l

> ^ œ!œ œ! œ!M r L

r

RLR

œ œ œœ œœ

l R l l r r l l

œ. > . >œ œ. œ> œ œ œ œœ œœ œ ‰ Jœ 2 «

> > > > ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ

Œ

Ó


p Cymbals

S

T

B

÷ 44

Sizz/ch.

Tap Sizz/ch.

Tap

>At center > > ! ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L r l R l r r l l R f > > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ÷œ œ œ œ R l r l R l r r l l R f ÷œ œ F

÷œ œ f

Sizz/ch.

Tap

H.H.

2 «

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œfrom œ œ œ œ Excerptœ #2 œ ‘98œOpener (cont.) Tap Suck P Suck H.H. H.H.

œ œ œ œ œ œ

Sizz/ch.

C

Tap

P

Tap

œ œ

Suck

Œ

Ó

> > ^ > > œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

l

l

r

r

l

l

œ

H.H.

R

R

l

l

r

r

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Sizz/ch.

Tap

œ

> > > > ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ œ

œ

œ

Tap

œ œ

Suck

r

r

l

l

œ

l

R

R

l

l

œ œ

R

R

œ

H.H.

L

L

? ?

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Tap

œ

l

œ œ œ œI

R

R

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83


excerpt from Chorus Girls’ Dance (jazz tune - ending from early season)

This portion of the 1998 Vanguard show concludes a piece in which a recurring theme is manipulated into a full-scale jazz production. All parts should be approached as if to simulate being played on a trap set in a big band setting. With this in mind, all 8th-note rhythms should have a swing interpretation (with a jazzy triplet feel). The only exception to this rule would be the duple roll in measures 2 and 3. In the snare part, the crescendo which occurs five measures before the end is to affect only the accents (taps stay low). Tenors should crescendo the singles for those two bars, then switch to a two-height approach, continuing to crescendo the accents only. The crush in the bass drum part (measures 1, 2, and 4) should be done with both mallets pressing firmly into both heads of the drum. The accents are the driving force of this whole phrase, so be sure to aim for them as rhythmic checkpoints. The notes in between are important, and need to be played accurately. If you are driving for the accent points to be in time, the inner notes should fall into place more easily.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

Cymbals

84 S

h»¡¢º ^ ÷C M R f > ÷ C œœ f ÷C œ > f ÷C Œ

Swing 8th notes

6 > > ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ M

6 > > ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ M

> 6 > ^ œ œ œ œ œ M œ

> 6 > ^ œ œ œ œ œ M œ

R

R

l

l

l

l

>œœ µ

r

r

r

r

L

L

R

R

R

R

l

l

r

l

r

>œœ µ

œ œ œ œ > 3

23 Ó

^ œœœœœœM 6

r

r

L

L

R

R

œ œ œ œ > 3

˙˙˙ ... >˙ .

˙˙˙ .. . >˙ . f

^ ! ! ! ! ! ! ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ M

l

> œ œ! R f P > œ œ! f R

œ

f

P

!œ P

œœœ >œ

z

œ

>3 > 6 Cœœœœ œ œœœœœœ


f

S

T

˙˙ .. ˙. ˙˙ .. Excerpt from Chorus Girls’˙˙˙ ...Dance (cont.) > > f

÷C Œ

Cymbals

^ ! ! ! ! ! ! ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ M R f ^ œ! œ! œ! ! ! M œ œ! œ ÷ R

B

C

÷ ˙˙˙˙

S

T

÷œ l

÷œ l

B

C

S

÷œ ÷

^ ÷M

> 6 >^ œœœœœœM R

l

l

r

r

L

R

> 6 ^ ^ œœœœœ M M R

l

œ>

l

r

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r

L

RL

œ

Œ

> œœ

>3 > 6 Cœœœœ œ œœœœœœ

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6

R

L

R

L

R

L

> 6 3 œ œ œ 3 œœœœœœœ 2 R L R L R L R L R L Í f

f

> ÷ !œ !œ !œ œ œ! œ! œ ! f

R

>3 > 6 Cœœœœ œ œœœœœœ

^ œœœœœœM

3 2 Ó

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µ 23 ? >

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z

l

r

l

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R

R

C

3

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Œ

3 > > 3 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R

l

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r

l

C

l

l

r

l

r

l

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l

R

l

R

l

r

l

r

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œ

R

l

r

l

r

r

r

œ

˙˙˙ ˙

> 3 > œ œ œ œ œ œ

R

l

r

l

R

œz

l

RL

F 6 6 6 6 > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R L R L R L ... Í . >? F

œœœ ... œ. F

j œ œ j œœœ œ

œ.

œ

œœœ ... œ.

˙˙˙ ˙

3 > 3 > ^ 3 ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ M

j œ œ j œœœ œ

œ œ œ 3

˙˙˙ ˙ 85

^ ^ 3 œ œ œ M œ œ M 3

Œ

Ó


F

C

S

T

B

C

86

÷

j œœ ... œœ ˙˙ œœ .. œ œ ˙ œœ .. . œ œ ˙ Excerpt from Chorus Girls’ Dance (cont.) F

^ ÷M R

> ÷œ

3 > 3 > ^ 3 ^ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ œ M R

l

r

l

R

l

r

l

R

l

r

l

R

> œ

> ^ 3 ^ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ M œ œ M œ œ 3

R

R

l

r

l

R

l

> ÷œ

œœ

‰ Jœœ Œ

÷Œ

œœœ .. œ ..

j œœœ œ

œœœ œ

r

l

R

. >? œœœ .. œ ..

l

r

l

R

^ ^ 3 œ œ œ M œ œ M 3

l

r

l

R

l

l

œœœ œ

>? œœœ œ

˙˙ ˙˙

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ >? ƒ

Ó

œœœ Œ >œ I ƒ

Ó

R

ƒ ^ 3 3 > M œ œ œ œ œ œ l r l R l r L ƒ

j >? ? j œœœ œ

j œœ œœ


87


excerpt #3 from ‘98 Opener (middle portion of opening piece)

At letter L, the breaks in the rolls and/or the accents are intended to simulate the brass melody for five measures. The crescendo in the first two bars for snares and tenors is to affect only the accents and not the taps. Notice that bass #2 is indicated to play at a forte level in the last half of measure two. This is to imitate the snares and tenors. The rest of the bass drums should be dedicated to a twocount crescendo to drive into the letter L phrase. Also, bass drum crushes should be done with both hands. The last three measures exist to supply an impacting “punch” to a loud brass chord which is tied for two measures. Be careful with the rhythms here since they aren’t quite as natural to feel at first. It must also be noted that not all the unison bass drum notes here will line up exactly with the snare and tenor rhythms. This is OK, and you will not die from it. Breathe deep and play in time.

Snare

Tenor

Bass

L q»¡¶º 3 > > > > > > > > >>>>>>> > 3 ! ! ! 4 ÷ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R R f f Í > > > >>>>>>> > 3 > > 3 > > œ œœœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ! ! ! 4 œ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ ÷4 œ œ œ œ œ! œ! œ R R R R L R L R L R L R L R L R R f f Í œœBassœ 2œœœ= œForteœœœ œ œ > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 ÷4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ?! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ 3

Cymbals

88 S

÷ 44

> 3 > 3 ^ ! ! ! ! ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ M

z

œ

3

œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œœœ

˙˙˙ i ˙> ƒ

5 5 > > > ^ j M œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ


3

÷ 44

Cymbals

S

T

C

S

T

LRL

> 3 ! > 3 ! ^ ! ! M ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ

> œœ

÷œ

l

r

l

C

S

L

r

r

L

l

œ

z

œ

R

> ÷œ œ ÍR L > œ ÷

j œ

l

r

l

r

L

R

> œ

L

> œ œ œ> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

5

5

> œ œ œ R L R f > > œœ œ œ L R f

7:6 3 > > > ! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L R L R L R l r l r l r L R Í f 7:6 3 3 > > > ! ! ! ! ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ L R L R L R l r l r l r L R Í f 3

>œ œ œ œ œ œ ! ! ! ! ! 3

œ>

œ

3

˙˙˙ i >˙

÷Ó

^ ÷M

R

˙˙˙ i ˙>

j œ

µ ? >

5 5 > > > ^ j M œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ R l r l r L R L f 5 5 ^ > > > œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ µ œ ? >

÷

÷

l

r

œ

œ

R

B

Excerpt #3 from ‘98 Opener (cont.)

R

R

˙˙ i ˙˙ > ƒ

> 3 > 3 ^ ! ! ! ! ÷œ œ œ œ œ œ M

R

B

> >3 > ^ > > > ^ œ œ œ M œ œ œ M

3 > 3 ! ! œ œ œ œ! œ! L

R

L

R

L

> 3 ! ! ! œ! œ œ œ œ 3

L

R

L

R

L

! œ! œ> œ œ œ œ ! ! >œ > 3 3

œ ∑

> œ

> > > ^ > >9 > > œ œ œ M œ œœœœœœœœœ œ Œ Ó

5

89


C

S

T

˙˙ i ˙ >˙ Excerpt #3 from ‘98 Opener (cont.)

÷Ó

^ ÷M

> œ

> >3 > ^ > > > ^ œ œ œ M œ œ œ M

> œ

^ ÷M

> œ

> >3 > ^ > > > ^ œ œ œ M œ œ œ M

> œ

œ

> > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? Œ ? > >

R

L

R

B

C

90

L

> ÷ œŒ ÷ ˙˙˙˙ >

i

R

R

R

R

L

L

R

R

L

L

R

R

L

L

R

R

3

œœœ i >œ

œœœ i >œ

> > > ^ > >9 > > œ œ œ M œ œœœœœœœœœ œ Œ Ó

5

L

L

L

5

R

L

R

L

R l r L r l R l r

L

> > > ^ > >9 > > œ M œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœ œ Œ Ó L

R

L

R

L

R l r L r l R l r

> 3 œ œ œ œ œ > > > ?. ? ? ? ? J > >

5

Œ

˙˙˙ ...i >˙ .

L

Œ Ó >? ˙˙˙ i Ó ˙


91

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Fresh Perspectives  

Fresh Perspectives for the Modern Drumline by Jim Casella & Murray Gusseck. © 1998 Tapspace Publications, LLC. Portland, OR. All rights rese...

Fresh Perspectives  

Fresh Perspectives for the Modern Drumline by Jim Casella & Murray Gusseck. © 1998 Tapspace Publications, LLC. Portland, OR. All rights rese...

Profile for tapspace