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life is short. ride long. Let’s not mess around. Let’s get on board the longest and highest narrow gauge railroad in the nation. Let’s take America’s best scenic train ride from Antonito, Colorado or Chama, New Mexico. See the unspoiled West. Feel the rails underneath us. Listen to the steam whistle. The modern world can wait until we’re good and sooty and done.

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CONTENTS DISCOVER ARTE, CULTURA, HISTORIA 38

Walking in their footsteps Discover Taos' Historic District By Scott Gerdes 44

The art of design, the influence of a place The emergence of PuebloRevival architecture in New Mexico BY HARRISON BLACKMAN

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DISCOVER HOTELES

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It's a dog's life... in Taos Dog-friendly patios and trails

Green acres ...with solar heat and fine linens BY CAROLYN PATTEN

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Notable nooks, lovely lodgings Inns and B&Bs that channel the true spirit of Northern New Mexico

BY VIRGINIA L. CLARK

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Barrancos Blancos Mound of mystery, symbol of New Mexico geo-diversity BY ARCENIO TRUJILLO

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Fish on! Building a memory — take a youngster angling

A run with a view Some of Taos' most avid runners share their favorite routes

Admirable works Total Arts Gallery, the oldest art spot in town

BY LUCY HERRMAN

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BY MARY BETH LIBBEY

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Cook. Eat. Laugh. Learn. Taos chef's secret suppers and cooking classes plate a world of food and fun

Best cups o' Joe Taos-style roasts and hosts

BY LARRY KELLEY

Artful places, notable faces The museums and historic homes of Taos

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DISCOVER AVENTURA

Taos’ claims to fame They’re famous, but are they ‘gente’?

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BY SCOTT GERDES

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On top of the world Cliffs around Taos offer a treasure of climbing puzzles for beginner and expert alike BY JAY FOLEY

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Pleasing all the senses Sat + Wine is Taos' newest option in fine dining BY LUCY HERRMAN

DISCOVER LA MÚSICA 144

Music, sweet music 2018 summer/fall music guide for Taos and the Enchanted Circle BY ARIANA KRAMER

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Taos' cool factor Where to hear live nightly music

Epic excursions Heavy rapids, holes in one, heat, heights, horizons and hooves 122

Trippin' through Taos County Guided tours are a fun, hasslefree way to enjoy the region 124

DISCOVER EL MERCADO 74

Vintage treasure The beauty and history of true 'old pawn' BY SCOTT GERDES

Hidden magic of Taos Labyrinths, petroglyphs and waterfalls BY CINDY BROWN

DISCOVER DELICIOSO

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Only in Taos 12 unique merchants for your shopping pleasure

Pub crawling Finding handcrafted brews in Northern New Mexico

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BY SCOTT GERDES

Kevin Rebholtz

MOUNTAIN SKILLS GUIDE JAY FOLEY CLIMBING IN THE RÍO GRANDE GORGE SUMMER/FALL 2018


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CONTENTS DISCOVER NATURALEZA

DISCOVER LAS COMUNIDADES

DISCOVER EL MAGNÍFICO

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158

El animale de Taos: big horn sheep

Taos Pueblo A world apart

60 San Francisco de Asís Church

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La planta de Taos: the columbine 156

El animale de Taos: the red-tailed hawk

BY SCOTT GERDES

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Arroyo Seco Community of locals

BIENVENIDO A TAOS 30 Letter from the editor

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Taos Ski Valley Mountain's majesty

Things that sting (and some that don’t)

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BY CODY HOOKS

136 Río Grande Gorge

Angel Fire It's the sunsets... BY ELLEN MILLER-GOINS

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Red River Coolness to boot

FINDING YOUR WAY 32 Getting here 34 Area maps 36 Walking tour map

WHAT'S GOING ON 212 Events calendar

BY ELLEN MILLER-GOINS

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DISCOVER TAOS SUMMER/FALL 2018 STAFF + CONTRIBUTORS ROBIN MARTIN, OWNER CHRIS BAKER, PUBLISHER STACI MATLOCK, MANAGING EDITOR SCOTT GERDES, SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR KARIN EBERHARDT, ART DIRECTOR CHRIS WOOD, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR WILL AVERY II, PRODUCTION MANAGER MORGAN TIMMS, PHOTOGRAPHER MARY BETH LIBBEY, COPY EDITOR RICK ROMANCITO, TEMPO EDITOR ARCENIO TRUJILLO, SPORTS EDITOR CODY HOOKS, REPORTER JOHN MILLER, REPORTER YVONNE PESQUERA, DIGITAL EDITOR CONTRIBUTING WRITERS HARRISON BLACKMAN, CINDY BROWN, VIRGINIA L. CLARK, TERESA DOVALPAGE, JAY FOLEY, LUCY HERRMAN, LARRY KELLER, ARIANA KRAMER, ELLEN MILLER-GOINS, CAROLYN PATTEN CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS STEVEN BUNDY, KATHARINE EGLI, JAY FOLEY, LENNY FOSTER, JANE PHILLIPS, KEVIN REBHOLTZ, GERAINT SMITH, GAK STONN

Questa Serene and unspoiled 198

COVER PHOTO: TRAMPAS LAKES IN CARSON NATIONAL FOREST BY ANDREW MILLER.

EagleNest Angling, art, chillin' BY ELLEN MILLER-GOINS

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Scott Gerdes

Whimsy meets local art meets antiques at the Inn on the Río.


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Bienvenido a Taos

Welcome to Taos County

TAOS HAS BEEN WELCOMING VISITORS FOR MORE THAN 350 YEARS. YOU ARE FOLLOWING A TRADITION THAT CAN BE TRACED TO PRE-COLUMBIA DAYS.

AND NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

Part of the mystique is that Taos is a blend of cultures — Spanish, Mexican, Indian, Anglo. Even more so, Taos is a blend of interests, from art to history to cuisine to live local music to outdoor recreation to sociological experiment. The whole creates a "Taos Culture" that very nearly calls for the unqualified word "unique."

Historians, archeologists and the like have determined that the Indian pueblo at the foot of Pueblo Peak was a trading center and a crossroads for the original Americans for hundreds of years before the first Europeans came in the early 16th century. Taos is one of the oldest communities in the country, just behind St. Augustine, Florida. Still today, people around the world know of Taos and its mystique, which has created a powerful magnet for many travelers and adventure seekers.

The light from the sun seems to cast a special glow over Taos, which has drawn artists for decades. Fascinating galleries, museums, historic homes and studios are just waiting for art lovers to investigate. For all its impressive galleries and historic buildings, one of Taos County's greatest and perhaps most appreciated assets is the great outdoors. Chilling trout-filled streams, crisp mountain air, soaring birds of prey, a coyote trotting across a field, bighorn sheep effortlessly rock hopping up and down the jagged walls of the Río Grande Gorge, stately pines and blazing aspens ... they're all here to relish and celebrate. Regardless of where you make your home, and why you chose Taos as a destination, the different world of Northern New Mexico is yours to explore, soak in, think about and enjoy. Be assured that on any future visits, Taos' timelessness will be here. Bidding you welcome.

I’m proud to represent the people of our northern New Mexico community.

SCOTT GERDES

SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR

As New Mexico State Representative for District 42, I work hard to ensure the protection of our valuable cultural and natural resources. Whether you’re coming back for more New Mexican adventures or this is your rst visit to our High-Desert Paradise, we're glad to have you here. Stop and take in the views, savor the green chile, explore the steep and deep, and enjoy the shopping.

We're glad to have you here! State Representative

Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales District 42, Democrat

PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO RE-ELECT ROBERTO “BOBBY” J. GONZALES

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Julie Osmanski

Taos News Special Sections Editor Scott Gerdes

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Red River

Questa Tres Piedras

Arroyo Hondo

TAOS

Taos Ski Valley Arroyo Seco Taos Pueblo

Angel Fire

Ranchos de Taos Ojo Caliente

Pilar Main Route to Taos

Picuris Pueblo Peñasco

Velarde

Chimayó

High Road to Taos Mora

Española Los Alamos

Eagle Nest

Pojoaque 0

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M I L E S

SANTA FE Las Vegas

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Specializing in Minerals of New Mexico Featuring carvings by Taos Pueblo artist Justin Gomez

229 A Camino de la Placita (off Dunn House parking lot) Open 9am - 6pm 575-758-2326

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TAOS.org/100 36

MUSEUMS

HISTORIC BUILDINGS

NOTEWORTHY SITES

6 7 11 13 18 23 24

1 2 3 4 5

A Kit Carson Park & Cemetery B Location of original Our Lady of Guadalupe Church C Taos Community Auditorium D First Presbyterian Church E D.H. Lawrence Ranch

E.L. Blumenschein House Harwood Museum of Art Governor Charles Bent House Taos Art Museum at Fechin House Kit Carson Home & Museum Millicent Rogers Museum Hacienda de los Martínez

8 9 10 12 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22

Taos Plaza Hotel La Fonda de Taos Historic County Courthouse Our Lady of Guadalupe Church Guadalupe Plaza and Santistevan House Padre Martínez House La Loma Plaza Long John Dunn House Bert Phillips House Arthur Manby House The Historic Taos Inn El Ríncon Trading Post Walter Ufer Studio Luna Chapel and Sharp Studio Eanger Irving Couse House Mabel Dodge Luhan House Victor Higgins House

OFF THE MAP

San Francisco de Asís Church Taos Pueblo Arroyo Seco

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Things To Do Book Online Festivals & Events Trip Ideas

Far Away from the Every Day.

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DISCOVER

Arte Cultura Historia

Walking in their footsteps Discover Taos' Historic District BY SCOTT GERDES

Just about anywhere you walk in the heart of Taos you will find yourself immersed in the history of this place and of the Southwest. A majority of the most important historic sites in Taos are easily reached on a short walking tour of the town.

TAOS PLAZA Such a leisurely walk can begin at Taos Plaza — west of the intersection of State Highway 64 (aka Kit Carson Road) and State Road 68 (aka Paseo del Pueblo Norte) — the scene of many historic events. It is in the Plaza in 1861 where during the Territorial Period “Confederate sympathizers” ripped down the U.S. flag. New Mexico volunteer commander Kit Carson, Capt. Smith Simpson and Col. Ceran St. Vrain nailed the U.S. flag to a pole. They stood there day and night with loaded guns to make sure the flag flew during the American Civil War. With the blessing from Congress, the flag still waves 24 hours a day all year long in the Plaza — a reminder of the early days of New Mexico and a commemoration of the event. It is one of the few flags in the country that flies around the clock. Also on the Plaza lies the old Taos courthouse, erected after a blaze in 1932, which razed most of the north Plaza area. The courthouse site dates back to the massacre of New Mexico’s first governor, Charles Bent, in 1847. The exact date of how long the site had been used as a courthouse is uncertain because all records were destroyed by fire during the 1847 uprising. One of the earliest trials in one of the first courtrooms on the site resulted in the execution of eight American Indians who were tried and convicted for crimes during

the uprising. Seven of them were hanged from a cottonwood tree in the Plaza; the other was hanged in the courtroom because he refused to be executed in public, according to historic accounts. Within the courthouse is the old — allegedly haunted — county jail, which was featured in the film “Easy Rider.” The heart of downtown Taos was initially a Spanish fortified wall plaza with homes and a few businesses. It dates to the late 18th century when the Don Fernando de Taos Land Grant was ceded to Spanish settlers — who had forced their way onto Taos Pueblo — in 1796 by Don Fernando de Chacon, governor of New Mexico. The Plaza and Taos Pueblo served as terminal points of the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (aka King’s Highway) from Mexico City. Today, the center of the Plaza is a public gathering place (and the site of many community events, such as Taos Fiestas on July 20-21 and free music concerts every Thursday from 6-8 p.m. during the summer) with shade trees, benches, statues, historic markers, a gazebo and retail shops. A longstanding site on the Plaza is the Hotel La Fonda de Taos, which has an exhibit of author D.H. Lawrence paintings and is the oldest hotel in Taos. Merchants on the Plaza include galleries of Native American and locally made art and jewelry, the Gorge Bar and Grill, a couple of coffee shops and souvenir stores. continues page 40

Taos News archives Citizens gather on Taos Plaza in front of the then-county courthouse on Dec. 11, 1941, after learning Germany declares war on the U.S. The building still stands. It and a small jail inside are open to the public.

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Above: Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), Negative Number #035357 A still of Taos Plaza from a Highway Department movie in 1915.

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12” x 16”

“ A Day in Pilar, NM”

Oil on Panel

An invitation to visit the

Gonske Gallery and Studio on September 22nd and 23rd, 2018 from 1–4pm 1038 La Cienega Road • Taos, N.M. • 575.758.4042 • waltgonskeart@msn.com by appointment rest of the year Retrospective Exhibition Public Opening

Nedra Matteucci Gallery, Santa Fe, N.M. June 23rd, 2018 To order a hardbound retrospective catalog please send check for $40 to Walt Gonske PO. Box 1538 Taos, N.M. 87571 DISCOVERTAOS.COM

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Taos News file photo

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Arte Cultura Historia

continues from page 40

A MURAL AT THE BEGINING OF LEDOUX STREET. Scott Gerdes

TERESINA LANE Walking from the John Dunn Shops toward the Plaza you’ll run into Teresina Lane. The Alley Cantina can be found here as well as the rear of the old courthouse. This local hangout known as “The Alley” features nightly entertainment. It was built by Pueblo Indians in the 16th century and a portion of it is one of the oldest structures in town. It was first an outpost along the Chihuahua Trail and was later used by the Spanish government from the 17th to 19th centuries. The oldest section of the building was also Gov. Bent’s office in 1846. The street is named for his daughter. The property first became a restaurant in 1944.

LEDOUX STREET Steps from The Alley you’ll return to the Plaza. Heading southwest, you can stroll down Ledoux Street. This secluded winding street is named for French trapper and guide Antonine Ledoux. He settled in the Taos area around 1844. The street, which is in an area that was designed like a fortress, was first named after Charles Beaubien (an 18th century Canadian-born fur trader) and later after Capt. Smith H. Simpson, who served in the Ute War in 1855. From 1859 to 1861, Capt. Simpson was the confidential clerk of Kit Carson who, during that time, was an Indian agent in Taos.

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In the fall of 1863, he enlisted as captain of Company I, First New Mexico Volunteers, and served until September 1866. The first historic encounter on Ledoux is the E. L. Blumenschein Home and Museum. It is the original home of the famed artist and his family and is a National Historic Landmark. More information can be found on Pages 48 and 52. Further down the street is The Harwood Museum of Art, which showcases a permanent collection of more than 4,700 works and an archive of 17,000 photographs from the 19th century to modern day. The Harwood was established by artists Burt and Elizabeth Harwood in the early 1900s. In 1935, the Harwood Foundation was given to the University of New Mexico. The structure is a nice example of Pueblo Revival architecture. See Page 58 for more information.

HAUNTS A ghost tour is another fun and unique way to experience the Historic District. If you are not afraid of things that go bump in the night, Taos is full of paranormal activity. For more, contact Ghosts of Taos at (575) 613-5330 or visit ghostsoftaos.wordpress.com. A map of the Historic District can be found on Page 35. Let the hallowed footsteps of Taos’ past citizens guide you on your exploration: it’s an adventure of historic proportions.

WHERE TO PARK Just about any street near Taos Plaza is also part of the Historic District, and street parking is available on Paseo del Pueblo. There is metered parking on Bent Street and on the Plaza. Kit Carson Road has metered street parking, and a free lot is just a few blocks down the hill. Camino de la Placita, which runs along the west side of Taos Plaza, has a metered lot right by the John Dunn House Shops. There’s a metered lot off Camino de la Placita behind U.S. Bank and a free lot sits across the street by Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. Please note: Bent Street is a one-way street, and will take you from Paseo del Pueblo Norte to Camino de la Placita. SUMMER/FALL 2018


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MARCELINO BACA

Baca was a Taos native and a fur trader who helped establish the Southwest fur trade. Taos' establishment as a major trade center put the town on the map long before the arts did. Baca settled down with his family in 1854 in what is now Red River. Then it was Río Colorado. He died in the Civil War as one of the New Mexico Volunteers in a battle with invading Texans Feb. 21, 1862. LYNN ANDERSON

The country singer who gave us the crossover hit, “I Never Promised You a Rose Garden,” made her home here with longtime partner Mentor Williams for 20 years . She raised quarter horses and trained horses. D ONALD RUMSFELD

The former Defense Secretary under President George W. Bush splits lives in Taos part-time. He’s been spotted with his grandkids at a July 4 parade. Demonstrations erupted at his property during the Iraq War, but he remained unruffled. He told Gentleman’s Quarterly in 2007, “I have nothing to apologize for.” LARRY BELL Taos News file photo/Tina Larkin

Artist/ actor Dean Stockwell, right, walks off after posing in a picture with fellow artists Dennis Hopper, center, and Ron Copper May 4, 2009. Hopper was asked to curate a show at the Harwood Museum of Art called "Hopper at the Harwood."

A resident of Taos since 1973, Bell is probably best-known for his 3-D glass cubes. He told Trend magazine in 2014: “I’m a party guy,” Bell says, with a boyish grin. “… In Taos there is much less temptation.” His work graces the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate Gallery in London and just about every major museum throughout the U.S. and Europe.

ALD OUS HUXLEY

MIKE REYNOLDS

The British author of “Brave New World” reportedly wrote his collection of essays “Means and Ends” in 1937 while staying at the homestead that is now the Taos Goji Eco Lodge. The lore: Huxley once ran into the outhouse in fear of a dog. The philosopher and futurist was trapped in there for three hours.

The documentary on this man’s life is called “The Garbage Warrior” and, indeed, his Earthship community northwest of town is a monument to the idea that one can live off grid, use recycled materials to build comfortable, self-sustaining, attractive, artistic and downright cozy homes.

GARY JOHNSON

JOHN NICHOLS

The erstwhile Libertarian presidential candidate and former New Mexico governor has a home only a short drive from Taos Ski Valley. It makes sense. He is an avid skier, cyclist and all-around athlete.

Best-known for his novel, “The Milagro Beanfield War,” which dramatizes the ever-present pressures of development on Northern New Mexico, Nichols has lived in Taos for more than 40 years. The movie version was directed by Robert Redford in 1988 up State Road 76 in the tiny village of Truchas.

AGNES MARTIN

If O’Keeffe’s Taos link is a bit unearned, abstract artist Agnes Martin’s is long and deep. Martin first came to New Mexico when she was a young woman. Some of her large, minimalist paintings hang in the Harwood Museum here. The world-renowned artist moved to New Mexico in 1967, and in the end came back to Taos in 1993 and lived here until her death in 2004.

Rick Romancito

R.C. GORMAN The New York Times called him “the Picasso of American Indian artists." From the late 1960s to his death in 2005, Rudolph Carl Gorman lived in his compound visible from State Road 522 and exhibited his richly colored images of over-sized, impressionistic Native women.

DAVE HAHN

You could say he’s a Taos Ski Valley patroller, and that would be correct. But it would sort of miss the point. The man has scaled Mount Everest 15 times. He even guided former Gov. Gary Johnson to the summit of Everest and Mt. Vinson in Antarctica.

SUSAN POWTER

ROBERT MIRABAL

The Australian-born 1990's fitness and weight loss guru who said, “Stop the insanity!” nearly all the time lived in a Taos Earthship for a few years. The TV morning show "Good Morning America" came here in 2010 to film her. Powter told The Taos News, “I don’t have to stop the insanity in Taos. I kind of like it.” She moved to Las Vegas, Nevada by 2016.

The locals think of Mirabal as a farmer, flute maker, a good dad and, oh yes, a Grammy-award winning musician who played Carnegie Hall last year. Taos Pueblo born, Mirabal won the 2008 Native American Album of the Year. He plays locally quite often, and if you are lucky, you might catch one of these remarkable performances. That’s not everybody. But, it confirms the draw of this place, where people mostly leave you alone and you never run out of horizon.

Rick Romancito

NATALIE GOLDBERG AND JULIA CAMERON To those who have tried to tap into their inner writer or artist, these women are household names and former Taos residents. They both have since emigrated to Santa Fe. Between them they wrote dozens of books. “Writing Down the Bones” and “The Artist’s Way,” respectively, are their most popular works.


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E.L. Blumenschein in his studio

Where Taos History Lives MARTINEZ HACIENDA

BLUMENSCHEIN MUSEUM

708 Hacienda Way 2 Miles West of the Plaza off Lower Ranchitos Rd. 575.758.1000

Just west of the Plaza 222 Ledoux St. 575.758.0505

H ARDWARE C OMPANY MADE IN TAOS

AGED WOODEN DOORS IN THE OLD WORLD TRADITION DESIGN, FABRICATE, FINISH & INSTALL DOORS IN STOCK

575.758.1357 100 EL TROS (CALL FOR DIRECTIONS) GAYLE & PETER BARLOW, PROPRIETOR OPEN BY APPOINTMENT

TAOSDOOR@TAOSNET.COM

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WWW . TAOSDOOR . COM SUMMER/FALL 2018


harwoodmuseum.org

LARRY BELL Hocus, Focus and 12

238 Ledoux Street, Taos, NM 87571 | 575.758.9826

June 9 - October 7, 2018

INSIDE/OUT

Peter Chinni Nov 3 - Jan 13, 2018 Clockwise from top: Larry Bell, Venice Fog I, 2017. © Larry Bell; Debbie Long, Bullet City, 2004, © Debbie Long; Marietta Patricia Leis, Significant Consequences, © Marietta Patricia Leis; Peter Sarkisian, Floating Pencil, 2010. © Peter Sarkisian; Peter Sarkisian, Cup’a Joe, 2011. © Peter Sarkisian; Peter Chinni, Mutation X, 1995. © Peter Chinni DISCOVERTAOS.COM

MIND UNDER MATTER Peter Sarkisian Jun 9 - Jul 22, 2018

HARNESSING LIGHT Marietta Patricia Leis, Debbie Long, Mary Shaffer Aug 4 - Oct 7, 2018

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DISCOVER

Arte Cultura Historia continues from page 48

THE COUSE SHARP HISTORIC SITE

Scott Gerdes

Courtesy photo Top:

Blumenschein Home and Museum Bottom:

E.L. Blumenschein in his home studio

The home of 20th century artist Eanger Irving Couse and his family and studios of Couse and J.H. Sharp — members of the Taos Society of Artists (TSA) who were instrumental in creating the cultural fabric of Taos as we know it today. Wander through the Couse home and see how these pioneer painters lived. Stand at Couse’s easel, see the model’s stage and props. Nothing is under glass. All remains as it was 100 years ago. Witness this unbroken chain of history as it is preserved into the future, from the 1835 Luna Chapel that served as Sharp’s first studio, to the restored 1915 Sharp studio, and a planned archive and research center. Docent tours are available from May through Nov. 3. Tours are by appointment only; available appointment hours are Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call to schedule. This summer the Couse Foundation presents the exhibit "J.H. Sharp: The Life and Work of an American Legend." This permanent, rotating exhibition in his studio on the property spans Sharp’s artistic career and includes numerous paintings, ephemera and Native American art he collected and which appeared in his work. The exhibition can be toured during the monthly First Saturday Open House 3-5 p.m,. June-October, and by appointment; available appointment hours are Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call to schedule a tour. From July 7-Nov. 3, the exhibit "Full Circle: Taos Pueblo Contemporary" honors the relationships with the TSA artists of the past and the many artists from Taos Pueblo who continue to redefine Native art and identity. The exhibition in diverse media in the site’s 1835

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Luna Chapel can be toured during the monthly First Saturday Open House 3-5 p.m., June-October, and by appointment; available appointment hours are Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call to schedule a tour.

46 Kit Carson Road; (575) 751-0369; couse-sharp.org; Hours: Tours are made by appointment May through October.

HACIENDA DE LOS MARTINEZ This thick-walled adobe, fortress-like trading post with 21 rooms surrounding two interior courtyards is on the National Register of Historic Places and gives a glimpse of rugged frontier life. It was constructed in 1804 by Severino Martinez. Severino and his wife, Maria del Carmel Santistevan Martinez, raised six children here. Their eldest son was the famous Padre Antonio Martinez, who battled the French Bishop Lamy to preserve the Hispanic character of the Catholic Church in the territory. The Hacienda is one of the few examples of Northern New Mexico style, late Spanish Colonial period "Great Houses" remaining in the American Southwest. Serving as an important trade center and gathering place, the Hacienda was the final terminus for the Camino Real, which connected Northern New Mexico to Mexico City. It was also the headquarters for an extensive ranching and farming operation. The New Mexico Architectural Foundation awarded the Hacienda de Los Martinez a first-place award for “A Historic New Mexico Structure that brings our community together in a lasting way." On May 18-20, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., the museum takes part in the "New Mexico Fiber Crawl." Fiber fans can visit the farms where New Mexico's history of fiber arts began, meet people who hand spin the

yarn and the artists who work with it, and visit the galleries and museums highlighting the most traditional as well as most cutting-edge work in the state. Beginning in Albuquerque and winding north to Taos, the Fiber Crawl features conversations with artists, exclusive access to gallery and museum collections and hands-on demonstrations (NMFiberCrawl.org).

Hours: Mon-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday noon-5 p.m. Admission: $8 for adults; $7 seniors; $4 per child (5-15), free admission for children under 5; free admission for Taos County residents on Sundays; tour rates and discount cards for multiple visits are available. 708 Hacienda Way off Ranchitos Road; (575) 758-1000; taoshistoricmuseums.org

GOVERNOR BENT HOUSE AND MUSEUM The home of the state’s first American governor — a trapper, trader and mountain man. Charles Bent was appointed governor of New Mexico in 1834 when the state became an American territory. Outside the home on Jan. 19, 1847 during the Mexican War (1846-1848), he was scalped alive and killed by an angry mob protesting the American rule who dragged his maimed body around town. Many of the Mexican families naturally resented the American conquest of their home, and the Taos Indians had long disliked Bent because of his trade relations with their northern enemies. During the chaos, Bent's wife, Ignacia and her first-born daughter Rumalda, and Ignacia's sister (Kit Carson's wife Josefa) dug a hole inside the home as an escape route into the adjoining house. Although partially filled in, the hole remains. This tucked-away house was converted into a quirky

museum in 1969, offering tours around the property. Exhibits include artifacts, paintings, photographs and publications that talk about Bent's exploits during the Mexican War. And be sure to check out the surprise oddity.

Hours: Daily, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Admission: $3 adults, $.50 children; 117 Bent Street ; (575) 758-2376; laplaza.org

KIT CARSON HOME AND MUSEUM Taos’ oldest museum is the home of Christopher "Kit" Carson, frontiersman, trapper, soldier and scout. The Kit Carson Home and Museum, still standing in its original footprint on Kit Carson Road in Taos, was built circa 1825 and purchased by Carson as a wedding gift for his third wife, Maria Josefa Jaramillo, a member of a prominent Taos family. The territorial-style adobe building was to be their home for the next 25 years. Seven of their eight children were born and raised in the home, along with several Native American children who had been freed by the Carsons from captivity. The Carsons moved to Fort Garland, Colorado in 1866, leaving many of their possessions behind. After the death of Josefa on April 27, 1868, and Kit shortly thereafter on May 23, 1868, the home changed ownership six times before it was purchased in 1911 by the Grand Masonic Lodge of New Mexico to be maintained as a memorial to Freemason Kit Carson in perpetuity.

Hours: Daily May through October, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Admission: $7 per adult; $6 for seniors; $5 for teens and students; free to children under 12; $5 tour groups of 10 or more; free to Kit Carson Home and Museum members; free to Taos County residents every Sunday; free to active military personnel and Masonic members. 113 Kit Carson Road;

(575) 758-4945; kitcarsonmuseum.org

THE E.L. BLUMENSCHEIN HOME AND MUSEUM Maintained as when artist Ernest L. Blumenschein, an original member of the Taos Society of Artists, and his family lived there. Along with Bert Phillips, Joseph Henry Sharp, and fellow Taos artists, Oscar E. Berninghaus, E. Irving Couse and W. Herbert “Buck” Dunton, Blumenschein created the Taos Society of Artists in July 1915. The rooms remain much as his wife and fellow artist, Mary, had decorated them, including their personal belongings and artwork. Some of the paintings by other members of the Taos Society of Artists and later artists were donated to the museum by members of the community as a tribute to the early years of the Taos art colony. The 1797 home is filled with a superb collection of the Blumenschein family's art (including daughter, Helen), a representative sampling of works by other famous Taos artists, fine European and Spanish Colonial style antiques and the family's lifetime of personal possessions. The home beautifully illustrates the lifestyle of Taos artists in the first half of the 20th century.

Hours: Mon-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Admission: $8 adults; $7 seniors; $4 per child (5-15); free children under 5; free for Taos County residents on Sunday; tour rates and discount cards for multiple visits are available. 222 Ledoux Street; (575) 758-0505; taoshistoricmuseums.org

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LEISURE LEARNING CLASSES

Experience the Arts in Taos, New Mexico Summer & Fall Courses Available! Designed by expert instructors for inquiring lifelong learners, Oklahoma State University’s Doel Reed Center for the Arts invites you to explore the art, culture and recreational experiences that Taos and Northern New Mexico have to offer. Leisure Learning classes combine hands-on activities, visits to local sites, lectures and discussions in this weeklong educational experience.

To find out more and to enroll, visit

drca.okstate.edu

56 Annual TH

JUNE 11 – AUGUST 6, 2018 Borromeo String Quartet Brentano String Quartet Miro Quartet Robert McDonald, piano Thomas Sauer, piano

www.TaosSchoolofMusic.com Taos, New Mexico

J ULY 7- NOV 3 FULL CIRCLE: TAOS PUEBLO CONTEMPORARY Inspired by the culture of Taos Pueblo, the Taos Society of Artists included promotion and preservation of Native art in their charter. The exhibition honors this historical relationship and showcases the flourishing local Native art scene.

MAY 1- NOV 3 DOCENT-LED TOURS MON-SAT BY APPOINTMENT 1ST SATURDAYS JUN-OCT OPEN HOUSES & ARTIST DEMONSTRATIONS

575 .751. 0369 couse-sharp.org/TNDG thecousesharphistoricsite

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PAINTING NEW MEXICO & THE AMERICAN WEST

“Hillside Adobe, Pilar� 12� x 16� oil on panel

Dora Dillistone doradillistone.com Studio Visits by Appointment (575) 776-8370 | (713) 444-1698 Title: Mud Puddle, 126 degrees SE Literal Landscape Series, Earth, Wind and Fire

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STUDIO & GALLERY

ODULPRUHIDVRFRP‡575.770.4462

1RUWK3OD]D7DRV10‡larimore.taos@gmail.com

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Welcome to

• O’KEEFFE COUNTRY • EXPLORE A LAND RICH IN BEAUTY, INSPIRATION & HISTORY Explore 21,000 acres of the dramatic cliffs, red hills and rock formations that inspired Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams, a landscape that continues to ignite the creative spirit in us all.

O’Keeffe Landscape Tours & Trail Rides Photo by Andres Salazar

Archaeology and Paleontology Museums & Tours Hiking Trails • Camping & Lodging Transformational Workshops

VISIT GHOSTRANCH.ORG & START PLANNING YOUR VISIT!

The tea house is located on the lavender farm and serves a RUSTIC GOURMET FARE Sit by the lavender, or shop in the store

Tea House Menu Visit the Purple Adobe Lavender Farm situated within the lovely and historic Chama River Valley in Abiquiu. Join a class and learn about the medicinal uses of lavender, stroll the fields, walk the labyrinth, enjoy lunch or have a cup of lavender tea while relaxing under ancient cottonwood trees. Visit our newly added Garden Center and Zen Nursery opening on Mother’s Day. Opens April 17 • Tuesday through Saturday 10-5pm • Tea House Open 10-2:30pm

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Gluten Free Fare Lite Lunch Scones - Quiche Salads - Soups and Daily Specials

Lavender Lattes - Espresso Cappuccino Organic Lavender Teas

Tea house opens from 10:00-2:30 Tuesday through Saturday

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DISCOVER

Arte Cultura Historia

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THE MILLICENT ROGERS MUSEUM The museum was established as a memorial to Millicent Rogers whose inspiration, patronage and collections form the cores of its holdings. Rogers (1902-1953) was the granddaughter of Henry Huttleston Rogers, one of the founders of the Standard Oil Company. At her homes in New York, Virginia, Italy and elsewhere, she entertained the great and splendid from American industrialists to European nobility. She was the fashionista of her day. In her later years, she visited and eventually settled in Taos. Here, she became close friends with many of the founding members of the Taos Society of Artists and passionately supported Native American artists. Her namesake museum houses 15 galleries featuring the heritage of the Southwest, including jewelry, paintings, and pottery, such as the family collection of heralded potter Maria Martinez.

Tina Larkin

The majority of the museum’s galleries, housing more than 6,000 objects, are representative of the diverse indigenous and Hispanic cultures of the Southwest with particular strengths in the traditional arts of Northern New Mexico.

Scott Gerdes

TAOS ART MUSEUM AT FECHIN HOUSE The former home and studio of artist Nicolai Ivanovich Fechin, showcasing a blend of early 20th century Russian and Southwestern artworks. Fechin built the home for his family between 1927 and 1933. Fechin, born in Kazan, Russia, in 1881, carved and molded the adobe buildings into a fascinating, harmonic marriage of Russian, Native American and Spanish motifs. Also home to the Taos Society of Artists.

Admission: $10 per adult; $9 for seniors; $6 per student; $8 per person in groups of 10 or more; free admission to children under 12; free admission on Sundays for Taos County resident; private tours by appointment. Docent tours on Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. are included with the cost of admission. It is always free to visit the museum grounds and store. 227 Paseo del Pueblo Norte; (575) 758-2690; taosartmuseum.org; Hours: Tue.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Museum will be closed July 4.

Courtesy photo Local artist Peter Chinni's sculpture, "Persian Wall," at the Harwood Museum of Art on Ledoux Street.

THE HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART The Harwood Museum of Art showcases a permanent collection of more than 4,700 works and an archive of 17,000 photographs from the 19th century onward. In the early part of the 20th century, many artists — such as Agnes Martin — were drawn to the Taos area to pursue a new, truly American art devoid of industrial influence, inspired instead by New Mexico's landscape and light, and the traditional Native American and Hispanic cultures of the region. One of the museum's most-prized assets is its Agnes Martin Gallery. The Harwood Museum collection brings to the public a unique record of this artistic convergence from its beginnings to the present day. The embracing spirit of the Harwood was established by artists Burt and Elizabeth Harwood. From June 9 through Oct. 7, the museum presents "Larry Bell: Hocus, Focus and 12," featuring the works of Bell, who has been a working artist since the late 1950s creating artwork in glass, on canvas and on paper in his Taos, and Venice, California studios.

Hours: Wed.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Closed Monday and Tuesday. Admission: $10 per adult; $8 for seniors; $8 per student; free admission to youth (18 and under), free admission to UNM students and faculty; free admission to members of the Harwood Museum of Art Alliance; free admission to Taos County residents on Sunday. 238 Ledoux Street; (575) 758-9826; harwoodmuseum.org

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THIS SUMMER MILLICENT ROGERS MUSEUM FEATURES THE TEMPORARY EXHIBIT 'EARTHEN TEMPLES, THE LIFE OF ADOBE CHURCHES,' FROM MARCH 23 THROUGH JUNE 24 1504 Millicent Rogers Road; (575) 758-2462; millicentrogers.org Hours: Daily April through October, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The museum is closed Easter Sunday (April 16), July 4 and during the Feast of San Geronimo (Sept. 30). Admission is $10 per adult; $8 for seniors (60+); $6 for military (active or veteran); $6 for students (16-21 with ID); $2 per child (6-16); free admission for children under 6; free admission for Taos County residents; tour rates and discount cards for multiple visits are available. Docent tours are also available.

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The 'Fifth Wonder of Taos’

Geraint Smith, “Reflections” [ BY SCOTT GERDES ]

Silently, but elegantly standing just to the side of State Road 68 in the Ranchos Plaza in Ranchos de Taos are thick, curving, organic adobe walls with visible strands of straw meshed within the dried clay. The historic structure is set back from the road. It's an architectural blessing that has stood for centuries as a place of faith. Its back side, in particular, has been as a model for many an artist, including Georgia O'Keeffe and Ansel Adams. When you first come upon it, you are looking at its famous back side, which is probably more recognizable to most people. This "Fifth Wonder of Taos," as local author and historian F.R. Bob Romero calls it in his book "History of Taos," is San Francisco de Asís Catholic Church. It was named for Saint Francis of Assisi (born in 1181 at Assisi in Umbria, Italy), the patron saint of animals, merchants and ecology. More than 200 years old, the church raised by Spanish colonists was completed by 1816 and served at one time as diocesan headquarters when the area was still a territory of Mexico. The exact year of when construction commenced is not certain. But it is the oldest existing Catholic church structure in Taos Valley. It is an excellent example of Spanish colonial church architecture. The plaza in which it sits is older than Taos Plaza. Built in the 1700s, Ranchos Plaza was erected for protection against nomadic Indian raids. In the mid-18th century, Spanish colonists moved just south from the bigger American Indian and Spanish community at Taos Pueblo to grow wheat and corn

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in the fertile land. The Comanche were attracted to the rich Taos Valley earth and often raided the settlers. To defend themselves, they built their adobe homes close to one another around a common plaza. The mission church sits in the middle. San Francisco de Asís Church still serves as a place of worship today, along with being a popular tourist attraction. Mass is open to the public, including during Christmas and Easter services. San Francisco de Asís Church is a National Historic Landmark. The fact that it houses Henri Ault's famous mystery painting also peeks many a visitor's curiosity. Every year during the first two weeks in June, this church experiences something else that makes it a different kind of place — the "Enjare" or the re-mudding of its adobe facade. Adding a new layer of fresh adobe keeps it from cracking and crumbling. Parishioners and volunteers come together every year to help maintain this important structure in a most traditional way. The massive structure reflects the nature of the religion it enshrines — solid and impregnable, a part of the earth and yet with its bell tower thrown heavenward in praise. The church is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (except for special occasions such as weddings). Please note that photographs cannot be taken of the inside of the church.

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Arte Cultura Historia

DISCOVER

Admirable works

Courtesy Emily Wilde

Total Arts Gallery, the oldest art spot in town BY VIRGINIA L . CLARK

Next year, Total Arts Gallery will be 50 years old, making it the oldest, continuously occupied, owned and operated art gallery space in Taos. Situated on one of Taos’ “gallery rows” east of Historic Taos Plaza at 122-A Kit Carson Road, Total Arts Gallery is typically part of the first walking tours around the Historic District that most folks take on their hunt for exciting and high quality fine art: a piece they want for a special place set aside in their home or collection. Whether a newbie or an

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old-hand collector, Total Arts Gallery’s stable of artists is a must-see. The gallery occupies six rooms of an adobe hacienda built in the 1800s. It opens into an inner courtyard, inviting visitors to tarry awhile to get a heightened feel for Taos, which emanates from the more than 200-year-old mud and straw walls. First opened in 1969 by current co-owner Harold Geller, the gallery is a labor of love by a close-knit trio of Geller, his business partner and best friend, artist Teruko Wilde, and Teruko's daughter Emily Wilde.

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ON TAP This season’s gallery events include the multiple-site exhibition Celebration of Clay 2018: “contemporary ceramics informed by tradition,” sponsored by the Taos Gallery Association through May 30. The closing reception will be the Saturday (May 26) on Memorial Day weekend, 4-6 p.m. Maps for the event are available at Total Arts, David Anthony Fine Arts, WilderNightingale and Copper Moon galleries. “Sara Lee D’Alessandro will install some large work in the courtyard,” Emily Wilde said. Also this season, Total Arts will have a solo exhibit of Teruko Wilde’s work from July 13 to Aug. 5, followed by Huihan Liu and wife Weizhan Liang’s work in a show opening Aug. 17 through Sept. 9. A special 50-year celebration is being discussed for 2019.

Total Arts Gallery co-owner and artist Teruko WIlde tries to keep the neighborhood cat, Spot, away from her sandwich.

Emily Wilde

"Whispering Forest" by Teruko Wilde

Their stable of artists represent world-class achievements in a wide range of techniques and media from traditional to contemporary, paintings to sculpture, including Art Students League of Denver instructors Doug Dawson and Kim English; Taos favorites Barbara Zaring, David Leffel, Ken Daggett and Sherrie McGraw among others; and super popular internationals Zaoming Wu and Huihan Liu to name a few of nearly 40 Total Arts artists. Total Arts also has special guest artists throughout the year. Teruko Wilde’s art alone has been represented by U.S. galleries from Hawaii to Florida. Further, her work has been in invitational group exhibitions in Australia, China, Thailand and London. Before landing in Taos in 1986, she was the owner of a fine art gallery and framing shop from 1971 to 1985 in Willard, Ohio; was co-publisher of the regional arts magazine, Prism; and co-publisher of the Willard Times Junction newspaper in Ohio. She told The Taos News in 2017 the “hero” in her life is her “mentor, my mother, Moto. She was a very strong, independent, intelligent woman who was ahead of her time. She lost everything, including her husband, my father. She raised three children during and after World War II without any government assistance. Yet, she was a generous and kind person who shared with others even though she had little for herself.”

"Heart to Heart" by Teruko Wilde

STAYING POWER “Our staying power can only be attributed to our, our clients' and our artists' appreciation and respect for the years of discipline required to master the skills required to create admirable works of art — oh, and sheer stubbornness, at least on our and our artists' behalf,” Emily Wilde says on the gallery’s website, partly in jest, but primarily in earnest.

We think of our artists and clients as family and pride ourselves on letting the work speak for itself.” DISCOVERTAOS.COM

TOTALARTSGALLERY.COM

(575) 758-4667

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FINE HANDWOVENS & WEARABLE ART

‘Caribbean Holiday’ - Cold Wax & Oil - 24” x 24”

Specializing in Encaustic and Cold Wax & Oil Paintings

137 north taos plaza, taos, nm 87571 ‡PDU\VWUDWWRQDUW#DROFRP www.marystrattonart.com

“Fabulous one-of-a-kind items; helpful, attentive and informed service... just an exceptional shopping experience.” — Ellen M. ««« »»» 117 Bent Street, Taos, New Mexico 87571 One block north of Taos Plaza on historic Bent Street

(575) 737-9800

Visit us in the store or online at:

www.artemisiataos.com

LEIGH GUSTERSON Take a Drive on the High Road to Taos and visit LIGHT MOUNTAIN GALLERY

See the fields and old adobe villages that inspire the paintings of Leigh Gusterson. OPEN THURSDAY THRU SUNDAY 11-5PM OR BY APPOINTMENT LIGHT MOUNTAIN GALLERY

575 779 2819

View map at www.leighgusterson.com

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Thom Wheeler

“War Chief” 40 x 40 acrylic on canvas

ThomWheeler.com • 939 Kit Carson • Taos 575 758-8870 DISCOVERTAOS.COM

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Painters: Max Jones Jim Wagner Jonathan Warm Day Coming Jocelyn Martinez Ryan Suazo Nancy Ortenstone Peggy McGivern Potters: Clay Hicks Rene Robles Weaver: Heather Lynn Howard Photographer: Tony Walker

Art | Gifts | Home Accents | Design Services Come step through the door of our 250 year old historic adobe home turned art gallery and see all that Jones Walker of Taos has to offer! From original artwork by legendary Taos artists to beautiful New Mexico traditional weaving to amazing Taos potters to handmade drums by a drum maker from Taos Pueblo we’ve got something for everyone!

Authentic Taos with a modern flair. 127 BENT STREET • TAOS, NM • 575.758.7965 DISCOVERTAOS.COM

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Arte Cultura Historia

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Geological wonder The drive from Albuquerque to Taos can be interesting — in a geological sense — as different “zones” are passed and elevation is gained. A visit to the Taos Valley from any direction requires either cresting over a mountain pass or crossing over a deep canyon on a steel bridge. The most direct route from Albuquerque, however, by jumping on Interstate 25 to Santa Fe, U.S. Highway 285 to Española and New Mexico State Road (SR) 68 to Taos affords road travelers a firsthand glance at Earth's crusty subdivisions. Traversing through the riverside canyon road offers some neat sites. If you have the privilege of extra time as you make your way to points north — or on the way back to the Albuquerque International Sunport — you may want to stop along the way to take in these “minor” natural wonders of Northern New Mexico. Aside from the usual grand formations that practically demand a stop — such as the pullout on the crest of the “horseshoe” on the road into Taos for a breathtaking view the Río Grande Gorge, or the Camel Rock formation near Tesuque Pueblo — there are several smaller natural attractions that deserve a swivel of the head or quick stop as well. One such roadside curiosity is a loamy monolith located near the junction of SR 68 and 75 in Río Arriba

County, otherwise known as the turnoff to Dixon, which stands prominently and contrastingly against the black basalt walls of the Río Grande Gorge. Known as Barrancos Blancos (“white canyons” or “white ravines”), the pale sandstone tower is hard to miss with its two crooked crosses adorning the top of its jagged skyline and a lonely, little cemetery at its base. In what looks like a melting candle, the ribbed face is indeed melting, though not from any heat source. Instead, water and wind are the culprit, causing the mini-mountain to shrink, albeit minutely, each time a significant amount of rain or snow falls in the area. But rather than being a lone-standing “mound” as one may perceive it from the road, it is actually a cliff — a connected mini-mesa that gradually rises from the southern bank of the Río Grande; its exposed face receding due to those erosive forces. Considered a “young” formation by geologists, Barrancos Blancos was created when water and sediment became trapped by basalt flows from volcanic uplifts. Compressed further by enormous amounts of hydraulic pressure, these pockets of clay and sand emerged when the water receded and the coarse block remained. Given the nearby confluence of the Río Pueblo and Río Grande in this spot, the alluvial clump contains material from the upper reaches of

Arcenio J. Trujillo Barrancos Blancos (white canyons) as seen from New Mexico State Road 68 with its weather-beaten ribs and butresses. The deep crevasses incised further by water and wind augment the mystery of this Northern New Mexico formation.

both canyons.

Ever changing light The way light mixes with the soil can produce a different hue at different times of the day. Thus, the color and contrast are always changing, and can range from beige to white to pink to brown as the sun casts light from different angles. Light from different times of the year can also alter one's perception of the depth of the protruding ribs and receding cracks. Sometimes snow sticks to the sides.

So, what about the lore? As the years passed, the fantasy that surrounded the mound turned to cynicism and doubt. Eventually, those tall tales became somewhat ignored. Time became a hot commodity, and getting through the canyon as fast as possible became more important. Common sense answers to our young questions

led (simply) to a more superficial appreciation for Barrancos Blancos, so named for its bland appearance. Passage of time has assigned new meanings upon arrival at this landmark, specifically while heading back to Taos. Heading north, a quick glance to the left to see the mound standing tall and stout signaled home was nearby. As to the question about treasure, the answer is easy: the mound itself is the treasure.

OTHER NOTABLE AREA FORMATIONS

CAMEL ROCK LOCATED ON TESUQUE PUEBLO IN SANTA FE COUNTY ALONGSIDE U.S. HIGHWAY 285.

ECHO AMPHITHEATER LOCATED 18 MILES NORTH OF ABIQUIÚ IN RÍO ARRIBA COUNTY ON U.S. HIGHWAY 84.

THE PALISADES LOCATED 8 MILES EAST OF EAGLE NEST ON STATE ROAD 64.

UNNAMED SANDSTONE DRIZZLE LOCATED 3 MILES SOUTH OF BARRANCO BLANCOS ABOVE EMBUDO STATION (VIEWED FROM THE RÍO GRANDE GAGING STATION PULLOUT) ON STATE ROAD 68.

IF YOU STOP

As with any roadside attraction, please take heed of the traffic whizzing by. A wide pullout is available on the south side of the highway and should be utilized to grab a photo or selfie far enough from the main travel lanes. Many of these areas are on private land, so jumping over fences to get a closer look could be considered trespassing. Travelers should also be respectful of the cemetery.

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RYAN MICHAEL SOPHISTICATED SHIRTS FOR THE MAN WHO DOESN’T NEED TO FLAUNT HIS SOPHISTICATION

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El Animale de Taos: Bighorn Sheep

Steven Bundy

[ BY SCOTT GERDES ]

Ovis canadensis, the ram, the symbol of the astrological sign Aries; bighorn sheep were known to roam the Upper Río Grande area long ago. A petroglyph of a ram was once carved into the rock of the Río Grande Gorge. There was a time, however, when these impressive creatures were eradicated from the North American landscape. Taos News reporter Cody Hooks wrote in 2016, "According to Eric Rominger, bighorn sheep biologist for the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, bighorns were extirpated in New Mexico around the turn of the 20th century [due to diseases introduced through European livestock and overhunting]. The last known evidence of a bighorn in New Mexico was a track found in the Truchas Peaks south of Taos. "The reintroduction of the bighorn sheep started in the 1940s when a group of sheep were gathered from Alberta and brought to the Sandia Mountains. A herd was started in the Pecos Mountains with a mix of fresh blood from Alberta along with a few Sandia sheep — the founding stock for many of the rest of New Mexico’s herds.

This mammal is an herbivore. They live in large herds. Males typically weigh 128 to 315 pounds, grow to 35- to 41-inches tall at the shoulder, and 5- to 6-feet long from the nose to the tail. On average, ewes (females) weight 75-201 pounds, and are 30to 35-inches tall and 4-to 5-feet long. The males' distinctive, curling horns can weigh up to 30 pounds. Females also have horns, but they are shorter with less curvature. In the wild, the bighorn's life span is 6 to 15 years. It's no guarantee you'll spot one, but Rocky Mountain bighorns are known to frequent the precipitous, snaggy walls of the gorge and roam along La Vista Verde Trail in the Orilla Verde Recreation Area in Pilar (just south of Taos off U.S. Highway 64), the Wheeler Peak area in Taos Ski Valley and Latir Peak Wilderness. The latter two areas are located within Carson National Forest.

"When Rominger came to the department in 1996, bighorns were officially endangered. Only 166 desert bighorns and fewer than 600 Rocky Mountain sheep were present in New Mexico. Now, he said, there are 15 herds spread across the Land of Enchantment." Much of that success is due to the conservation efforts of Taos Pueblo. A large chunk of the area that bighorns make their home is Pueblo land.

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CLAUDETTE BARKER

WATERCOLOR DEMO Join Claudette, June 2nd (1st Saturday Art Walk) Here in front of the gallery.

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experience 226 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Unit B • Taos, NM 575.770.2263 • www.facebook.com/spicetaos

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ΖGD.DYDȴDQ$UWLVWLF'LUHFWRU

August 17 – September 1, 2018 Celebrating 35 Years

Chamber music festival featuring Carnegie Hall & Lincoln Center musicians bringing the beauty of live music to Taos, Angel Fire, Las Vegas & Raton

Join us this summer for two weeks of concerts and events celebrating the music of Mozart, plus world premieres, education and family concerts, parties, and more!

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El Mercado

DISCOVER

Only in Taos 12 unique merchants for your shopping pleasure

Katharine Egli

Coyote Moon

Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is alive and kicking at this fun, artsy shop. Inside you'll find skeletons, sugar skulls, jewelry, pottery, clothing and folk art. And that's just scratching the surface. Much of the inventory is handpicked in Mexico, Peru and from local artists. John Dunn House Shops, (575) 758-4437 • squareup.com/ store/coyotemoontaos • Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily

Made in New Mexico

Scott Gerdes

Everything here is made in the Land of Enchantment. It's the only store in the state that can state that claim. Red and green chile powders, pods, salsas, sauces, jams, jellies, biscochitos, piñon coffee, wood carvings, Native American jewelry, T-shirts, ornaments, fetishes, clocks, Day of the Dead items, ristras, wreaths, farolitos and books. 104 Taos Plaza, west side, (575) 758-7709 madeinnewmexico.com • Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily

Taos News file photo

fx18

103 Bent Street, (575) 758-8590 • fx18.com

Parsons Gallery Parsons could almost be considered a museum — although it is a gallery — due to its important, impressive and

Scott Gerdes

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After looking around in this cool, hip little shop, it quickly becomes a hands-down favorite place to find gifts. At fx18 you’ll find locally made jewelry and artworks, fun clothing, books and eclectic items — too many to mention. Locals consistently vote fx18 the best “funky” store in town in The Taos News’ annual “Best of Taos” poll.

extensive early to mid-19th century collection of works by members of the famed Taos Society of Artists, Taos founders, early Santa Fe and Taos art colony painters, as well as 19th

century Navajo weavings and pueblo pottery. Parsons Gallery is located in the historic home of Ferdinand Maxwell (a pioneer land owner and friend of Kit Carson).

Robert Parson's other gallery in Taos is Parsons Gallery of the West, which features traditional Taos art that reflects historic and contemporary impressions of the American West.

131 Bent St., (575) 751-0159 • parsonsart.com • Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Closed Sunday

It is located at 122-D Kit Carson Road and in the 1920s-'30s, the building was the home and studio of Taos Society of Artists member Victor Higgins.

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Red Emporium, Inc. RedNewArrow Arrow Emporium, Inc. Mexico’s Finest Furniture Showroom. New Mexico’s Finest Furniture Showroom. Fine Fine Furniture, Furniture, Lighting, Lighting, Accessories Accessories && Art. Art.

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hallmark) until after 1945. Colvert said people often ask who made the vintage piece they are looking at. "Without a hallmark it is nearly impossible to tell," she tells them. "While that may be a bad thing in contemporary jewelry, in vintage jewelry it usually just means that it is old." People also want to know the history of vintage pieces. Colvert said unless they acquire a piece from the original buyer, it is also impossible to know this. "Most likely the true 'old pawn' pieces have changed hands many times over the years since they were pawned on the reservation," she said. Because stunning, prized vintage jewelry typically doesn't come with provenance or a hallmark, these beautiful creations from the past are unfortunately being reproduced in Asia from photographs and shipped to the U.S., even to the Southwest, and being passed off as the real deal. Fake 'old pawn' will have turquoise-colored plastic and a gray tone to the silver created from chemical oxidation and not from natural patina. "While the techniques of creating this chemical patina are getting better all the time, you can often tell," Colvert explained. "This false patina looks more black than soft gray, and, because it is put on with a brush, the edges are often much more regular than what nature would create." Sterling silver and coin silver will patina with age to "a beautiful gray color," Colvert described, when the owner lives in a dry climate like the Southwest. In places more humid, silver can turn black quite quickly. "It takes decades for a real patina to develop in dry air, and it adds significantly to the value and beauty of this jewelry," said Colvert. "People who buy old silver jewelry and polish it up to a

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bright shine are destroying a lot of its value, history and beauty." Remember to trust your source.

WHAT'S IT WORTH TO YOU? "Old pawn" is also an investment. It certainly can be worn, but great care must be taken. Local jewelry maker Gail Golden has experience repairing pieces of "old pawn." "It is very gorgeous and fragile," Golden said, "and a lot of the turquoise is toast. So, it does become an issue when buying 'old pawn' as to whether you want to wear it every day or treasure it as an artifact." The monetary value placed on a true piece of 'old pawn' includes factors such as the sand-casting of the silver and the quality of the turquoise. All of which, Golden added, "are all over the map, but play a part in the final worth of an old piece." And when it comes to reproductions, it isn't just the buyer that gets scammed — the fake stuff puts contemporary American Indian jewelers out of work. A plastic "stone" in a cheap silver piece of jewelry from Asia is going to have a lower price than a handmade Native American piece with real turquoise and a higher grade of silver. "This is an increasing problem and why we make a big deal of telling our customers that we don't sell anything in the store that is imported," Colvert said. "Also, while we love the beauty of the 'old pawn' pieces, we all need to understand that if we want to continue the tradition of having beautiful Native American Southwestern jewelry, we need to support living artists as well as collecting the pieces from the past."

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CREATIVE

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across ffrom Kit C Carson PParkk • 575 575.758.1241 • vortexyarns.com BLUE SKY PET AND FEED SUPPLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED PET SUPPLY STORE

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Not your cookie cutter, cracker jack, same ole mountain town. Uniquely Taos.

Over 500 properties can be found at www.enchantedhomeseller.com

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Photos courtesy Earthship Biotecture

Earthships If you’re in the market for a bit more luxury and would like to find out what this looks like when it’s totally off the grid, The Greater World Community, billed on its website as “the world’s first Earthship subdivision,” (established in 1998 by founder/builder Michael Reynolds) has both. This 684-acre community (364 acres set aside for the housing) north of Taos off State Highway 64 now has 75 residences, some of which are available for overnight rentals through the main community website,

or AirBNB, VRBO and other avenues. All the homes here are totally off-grid, and about 90 percent of the energy they generate is renewable. The largest and most exotic of the rentals available through the main website, Phoenix Earthship, features an outer greenhouse with towering banana trees, grape vines, birds, turtles and a fish pond with fountain. The three-bedroom, two-bath space has 5,300 square feet, an interior “jungle,” outdoor fire pit and chicken coop and run. Nightly rates are $410 for the entire house, or

$140-$245 for one of the wings. At the other end of price and extravagance are a couple of tidy and charming little Earthship Studios for rental on AirBnB for $90 a night. Complete with brick floors, adobe walls, full kitchen, small bath and sleeping/ working areas, they, like all the Earthship places, have tons of natural light and flourishing flowers in the planters, which are part of the whole recycling setup. Showers are solar-heated, filtered rain water, and water from the showers and sinks feeds the interior jungle planter.

When planter water drains, it’s pumped to flush the toilet. There are no restrictions on electricity, as it’s all provided by the sun. When you book an Earthship stay, be sure to tour the main visitor center, where you’ll get an in-depth look at how off the grid works and what to expect as this unique community develops. Guided tours are $10 per person; self-guided tours are free.

#2 Earthship Way earthshipglobal.com (575) 751-0462

Carolyn Patten began her career as a feature writer for the Santa Fe New Mexican and the Santa Fe Reporter. She is the author of the guidebook, “The Insider’s Guide to Palm Springs,” co-author of “Hidden San Francisco & Northern California” and “Hidden Coast of California,” and update author for DK Eyewitness Travel Guides to California, Northern California, Los Angeles, Seattle and Hawaii.

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AUTHENTIC

A B&B Stay is the best way to experience taos Choose from 14 outstanding Bed & Breakfast inns, each providing an authentic New Mexican charm ranging from rustic to artistically inspired. Find the perfect place from which to discover Taos. taosbandbinns.com

LA DOÑA LUZ INN An Historic Bed & Breakfast

Delight in the ambience of our quaint and colorful 200 year-old adobe inn! Enchanting rooms richly decorated in the Taos tradition and centrally located just steps off the old Plaza. TRIP ADVISOR CERTIFICATE OF EXCELLENCE 2011 – 2016 RECOMMENDED BY: The New York Times and USA Today Weekend. FEATURED IN: Honeymoon Magazine, Family Fun Magazine, The Historic Traveler Magazine, National Geographic and on The Travel Channel series “Romantic Inns Of America”

www.stayintaos.com 575-758-9000 92

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E US’ S IN TH N IN NTIC ROMA MOSAT TODAY 0 1 P O T US F THE ‘ONE O

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ADOBE & PINES INN An Authentic 1830’s Adobe Hacienda

Kiva Fireplaces • Deep Soaking Jetted Tubs • Hearty Breakfast Spa Services • Private Hot Tubs, Entrances, Sauna, Patios & Deck

2011-2017 Award of Excellence –TripAdvisor “Best of Southwest”–BedandBreakfast.com

www.adobepines.com 575-751-0947 • 800-723-8267

INN ON LA LOMA PLAZA

A Historic Taos landmark, 2 blocks from downtown, featuring exceptional hospitality, Southwest ambiance and old world charm. Enjoy expansive gardens, mountain views, fantastic full breakfast, and romantic rooms with fireplaces. All rooms have air conditioning. Peggy & Jerry Davis, Innkeeper · laloma@ VacationTaos.com

VacationTaos.com • 315 Ranchitos Road • 800-530-3040 • 575-758-1717 DISCOVERTAOS.COM

Experience Authentic Taos!

Centrally located condominium with fireplace, on a quiet neighborhood, tree-lined street. Walk to the Plaza, El Monte Sagrado, and Kit Carson Park. For more information on rates and availability

casadelapaloma404@gmail.com

214-802-7692

HACIENDA DEL SOL Taos Mountain is our backyard. Twelve beautifully appointed rooms and suites with spacious gardens backing onto Taos Pueblo. Outdoor hot tub. www.taoshaciendadelsol.com 575-758-0287 866-333-4459

CASA BENAVIDES INN Downtown Historic Inn 3/4 block from Plaza. Free WiFi in all 38 rooms, extensive art collection, patios, balconies, hot tub, luxury rooms available, air conditioned rooms. BREAKFAST and afternoon tea with desserts included. Voted BEST B&B four years in a row. Book online or call for reservations. www.casabenavides.com 137 Kit Carson Road • 575-758-1772 93


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18 Hole Mountain Golf Course Lodging | Dining | Catering Special Events | Weddings

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Alpaca Ranch • Enjoy petting and feeding alpacas • Shop for Yarn, Apparel, and much more • Open Fri thru Mon 10am-4pm • Tours: 11am, 1pm & 3pm 31 Lodge Road

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FLY FISHING!!

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DISCOVER

Aventura

ON TOP

of the world

Jay Foley

Learning to climb at Taos Ski Valley with Mountain Skills Rock Guides.

Cliffs around Taos offer a treasure of climbing puzzles for beginner and expert alike BY JAY FOLEY

I feel the rock’s crisp texture in my hands; a cool breeze blows back my hair. Nothing is on my mind but reaching the next hold, which seems impossible, yet by using my feet and legs to stand on a perfect flat edge, it puts my body in balance on the rock. Suddenly, what seemed impossible becomes effortless. As I reach the top, feeling the exposure and taking in a view unlike any I have ever seen from the ground, my mind feels clear and alive. I take a breath of the freshest air and feel truly part of nature and this stunning landscape. Elated with the accomplishment of attaining the seemingly impossible, for a minute I melt into the solitude of being the only person on the edge of this cliff as I become one with my surroundings.

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I call down to my belayer before sitting back on the rope and am lowered to the ground. I should have been scared, but my guide has taught me to trust the ropes; I know they can hold thousands of pounds. A feeling I have cheated the laws of gravity passes through me as I pass through this vertical world with safety and confidence. What an extraordinary way to experience the majestic landscape of Northern New Mexico. Despite some impressions that only muscle-bound adrenaline junkies practice rock climbing, it is actually a slow-paced, dance-like, safe endeavor that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and fitness levels. Since climbing techniques start with legs and feet, anyone who enjoys hiking or can make

it up a flight of stairs can succeed on a beginner rock climb. A beginner is always attached to a sit harness and a rope that is anchored above them. This anchor and rope can support more than 4,000 pounds. Once climbers reach the top or decide to stop, they simply sit back into their harnesses and the rope safely lowers them to the ground. Taos has become a world-class destination for skiing, hiking and outdoor rock climbing. With well over 300 bluebird sunny days, it is possible to comfortably climb outside year-round. Taos is the perfect place to experience outdoor climbing for the first time or test your skills as an advanced climber on many different climbing styles and locations.

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Rock Climbing

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DISCOVER

Aventura OFF-ROAD TOURS

continues from page 112

The phrase “off the beaten path” is exemplified where the pavement literally ends. Take a ride through aspen groves, abandoned gold mines and ghost towns in a 4x4 vehicle. For Red River trail information and maps, visit redriver.org/things-to-do/ summer-recreation/ohv-jeeps.

HOT SPRINGS BLACK ROCK HOT SPRINGS This clothing-optional spot just north of Taos in Arroyo Hondo is pretty well known and easy to get to — don’t expect to be alone. From State Highway 522 north, turn west onto County Road B007. You’ll take a hard right after about 2.5 miles; stay to the left and go down hill to the John Dunn Bridge that crosses the Río Grande. Go left up the hill and park at the first switchback. You’ll walk about 5-10 minutes downstream to a pair of mud-bottomed rock pools on the Río Grande’s west bank. Water temperature is typically around 97 degrees contingent on water levels. MANBY HOT SPRINGS These two natural, clothing-optional hot pools were named for a seedy business man who immigrated from England to New Mexico in 1883. During his land-grabbing days, Arthur Manby stumbled upon natural hot springs just south of the Black Rock Hot Springs in Arroyo Hondo. Even though the area was Indian country, his arrogance drove him to claim the springs. His plan was to build a resort hotel on the site. He never got the financial backing. Years later, Manby was found beheaded in his Taos hacienda in 1929. To get there, take State Highway 522 toward Questa north of Taos. Turn west onto County Road B007. The road takes a hard right after about 2.5 miles and turn left onto another dirt road just before B007 makes a hard turn to the right. This stretch of road to the Manby Hot Springs parking lot needs to be taken slowly — a high clearance vehicle is recommended. Continue past the Dobson House sign and take the next left at the fork in the road. Continue staying to your right until you reach the large parking lots for the Manby Hot Springs. At the left side of the parking area, take a 15-20- minute walk on a dirt and rock path to the river. Water temperature is typically in the neighborhood of 97 degrees depending upon water levels. ]

Courtesy Ojo Caliente/photo by Ryan Heffernan

OJO CALIENTE MINERAL SPRINGS RESORT & SPA The only geothermal springs in the world with four different minerals: lithia, iron, soda and arsenic. Public and private pools are open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. This secluded, top destination resort and spa also features hiking and biking trails. From Taos, drive north out of town on Paseo del Pueblo Norte/U.S. Highway 64 west 10 miles to the Río Grande Gorge Bridge; approximately one half-mile past the bridge, turn left (south) onto the West Rim Road. There is an Ojo Caliente sign on the right side of the road pointing left. Continue south for 8.5 miles until you reach a road junction for State Road 567. Turn right (west) onto SR 567; continue through the village of Carson for 9 miles until you reach U.S. Highway 285. Turn left (south) at the stop sign onto U.S. 285. Continue south 10.4 miles to Ojo Caliente. Turn right onto 414 (Los Baños Drive) at the Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs sign. This turn is before mile marker 353 on US 285. The springs’ entrance is approximately one quarter of a mile at the end of the road. Visit ojospa.com or call 800-222-9162.

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Courtesy Exceptional River Trips in New Mexico/Matthew Gontram

WHITEWATER RAFTING Whether it’s your first time rocking and rolling through the lively waters of the Río Grande or you’re a seasoned rafter/kayaker, the thrill never fades. Taos has a number of experienced and reputable whitewater rafting outfitters who will provide a family-friendly excursion you’ll never forget. Matthew Gontram of New Mexico River Adventures is one of those outfitters: “The beauty of rafting and kayaking in New Mexico is that no matter the season — whether the water level is high or low — there is a trip for everybody.” The most popular trips are half day and full day. And some outfitters offer two- and three-day trips from the Río Grande to Río Chama. For the die-hard adventurers wanting a more extreme whitewater experience, Gontram recommends the inflatable kayak. “That ups the ante as far as adventure,” he says. Rafting requires no experience and participants can choose whether to paddle or not, and it doesn’t take a tremendous amount of effort to get down the river. Each raft holds two to six people, not including the guide.

WATER TEMPERATURES ARE TYPICALLY WARMER IN NEW MEXICO THAN OTHER WESTERN RIVERS. THE RAFTING SEASON IS FROM MARCH TO OCTOBER. BIG RIVER RAFT TRIPS bigriverrafts.com 1-800-748-3746 COTTAM’S RÍO GRANDE RAFTING cottamsriogranderafting.com (575) 758-2822 FAR FLUNG ADVENTURES farflung.com (575) 758-2628/800-359-2627 LOS RIOS RIVER RUNNERS losriosriverrunners.com (575) 776-8854

NATIVE SONS ADVENTURE COMPANY (575) 758-9342; facebook.com/ pg/Native-Sons-AdventureCompany NEW MEXICO RIVER ADVENTURES newmexicoriveradventures.com 1-800-983-7756 NEW WAVE RAFTING newwaverafting.com 1-800-984-1444

BOBCAT PASS WILDERNESS ADVENTURES Check out their family-friendly ATV/UTV two-hour tours and famous Cowboy Evening in Red River. Call (575) 754-2769 or visit bobcatpass.com for prices and reservations. JEEPS R US Rent a 2012-2015 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 and set off on your own Red River off-road experience. Rentals are for 4 or 8 hours. Must be at least 25 years old to drive and have full insurance coverage on your personal vehicle. For more information, call (505) 310-0451. NEW MEXICO ADVENTURECO.-BIGHORN SPORTS & RENTALS Three-hour Jeep tours and ATV/ UTV tours in Red River around Greenie Peak, Goose Lake, Cabresto Lake or The Old Pass. You can also pan for gold during the Jeep tours. Call (575) 754-2721 or visit bighornsports.us. RED RIVER MOUNTAIN ADVENTURES Family-friendly Jeep and OHV rentals for sightseeing and exploring the mountainous area surrounding Red River. For more information, call (575) 754-6363 or visit redriverohv.com. RED RIVER OFFROAD Offering guided Jeep tours on mountain roads around Red River. For more information, call (575) 754-6335 or go online to redriveroffroad.com. WEEZIE’S WILD RIDES Self-guided UTV tours. Fouror 6-hour rentals before June 15. After June 15, 6-hour rentals only. Renters can utilize Goose Lake Trail, Cabresto Lake Trail and Greenie Peak. Call (575) 754-1726 or email weezieswildrides@gmail. com for more information. SUMMER/FALL 2018


Courtesy Angel Fire Resort/Terrance Siemon

DISC GOLF ANGEL FIRE RESORT Cast your first throw at Hole No. 1 and continue the scenic course up to 10,000-plus elevation. The 18-hole course at the summit of the mountain has amateur and pro tee pads. It is free to play, but a lift ticket or season pass is needed to use the chairlift. Course maps, disc rentals and scorecards are available in the Ticket Office at the base of the Chile Express chairlift. Call (575) 377-4320 for any additional information. PICURIS PUEBLO A world-class, 20-hole course set on tribal land featuring many obstacles and unique pin locations. To get there, take Paseo del Pueblo Sur (south) to State Road 518. Follow signs to Peñasco. For more information, call (575) 587-2519.

GOLF

MOUNTAIN BIKING

TAOS COUNTRY CLUB

No matter your level of skill, Taos Ski Valley, Red River Ski and Summer Resort and Angel Fire Resort convert trails into downhill, so-called “gravity” trails during the summer that appeal to speed merchants on two-wheelers. Taos Ski Valley has its Berminator Trail from the top of Lift 1, and separately owned Northside at Taos Ski Valley can get riders to 12,000 feet elevation. The Red River Ski Area chairlift runs all summer with bike carriers and maintained trails.

Taos Country Club sits at 7,000 feet in elevation and holes range from 5,336 to 7,300 in yardage. This par-72 layout’s Bermuda fairways route their way through low sagebrush. Frequent sand traps guard the undulating Bent grass greens. The course, designed by Jep Wille, was awarded a four-star rating by Golf Digest. The Terrace serves drinks, craft beers, snacks and gourmet dishes. Next door is a full-service pro shop, and the expansive patio affords stunning views of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and the Río Grande watershed. TCC is located south of town. Take State Road 68 and turn right on County Road 110. For green fees, tee times and more information, go online to taoscountryclub. com or call (575) 758-7300. ANGEL FIRE RESORT The meeting of mountain and meadow at 8,500 feet produces 18 holes as varied as any. With yardage from 4,868 to 6,645, the bluegrass fairways wind through tall stands of Ponderosa pine and across rich, wet bottomland. Plenty of elevated tee boxes, blind shots and leave-the-driver-in-the-bag shots. Hole No. 18 climbs up a hill to the clubhouse, where two eateries, bar, pro shop and locker rooms await. Opening Day is May 16. For more information, go online to angelfireresort.com or call (575) 377-4488.

RED RIVER This small mountain town with an Old West feel has two disc golf courses: one on the back side of the Red River Ski and Summer Area apex and the other is a 9-hole course in Mallette Park. The course at the ski area has 18 holes and last September hosted the first annual Drew Judycki Memorial Tournament. Added this season are amateur tee pads making the course more beginner friendly. Free to play if you bike or hike to the top or you can purchase a chairlift ticket. SIPAPÚ SKI & SUMMER RESORT Named by Disc Golf Digest as one of the top five scenic courses in the country, Sipapú features a 20-basket disc golf course that’s free to all visitors. Every hole has three sets of tees (pro, advanced and recreation). To get there, take Paseo del Pueblo Sur (south) out of Taos to State Road 518. Follow the signs. For more information, call 800-587-2240. For tournament info go online to sipapunm.com. TAOS ROC PIT This in-town course was designed around an old gravel pit. There are presently 17 baskets on the course that traverses three clockwise spirals, has some short steeps and blind holes. Free, public course. From Taos, off Paseo del Pueblo Sur, turn west at Chamisa Road near the Sagebrush Inn. The course is about three blocks on the right. TWO GRAY HARES Just 5 miles from Sipapú off State Road 518, this 18-hole course amid high desert trees and sagebrush is on a private “farm” that covers 12 acres and has three sets of tees. Cost is $3 a day to play. Call (575) 587-2087 for more information.

Angel Fire Resort (opening day May 18, Demo Days May 26-27) has become a mecca for competitive mountain biking. The mountain’s Bike Park hosts world and nationally ranked events in downhill racing — including the USA Cycling Gravity Mountain Bike National Championship. And if you really want to test your skills, the Scott Enduro Cup Mountain Bike Race will be held June 9-10 at the Angel Fire Resort Mountain Bike Park and on surrounding trails (endurocupmtb.com). Throughout the summer, both locals and visitors flock to its 60-plus miles of trails. Turquoise Tours offers two pickup and dropoff tours to New Mexico’s No. 1 ranked bike trail, the South Boundary. For more details, go online to turquoisetours.us. The South Boundary Trail tops many riders’ lists. Nationally renowned, the 22-mile single track begins at about 7,000 feet elevation in the opening of Taos Canyon on U.S. Highway 64 east. The first 5 miles climb 2,400 feet to where the trail crests, setting up about 20 miles of level riding and descent to a parking lot along Forest Road 76 above Angel Fire at about 10,000 feet. The trail winds through evergreens, aspens and meadows, with spectacular views both east and west peaking near 11,000 feet at Osha Mountain. Here are a few other prominent rides in the Taos area: The West Rim Trail is a relatively flat beginner route beginning at the Río Grande Gorge Bridge and runs about 9 miles along the rim of the gorge. It’s mostly a single track that is shared with day hikers and meandering visitors. The paved West Rim Road provides an excellent opportunity to drop-off-car return.

Courtesy Angel Fire Resort

VALLE ESCONDIDO This golf course at about 8,500 feet — whose name means “hidden valley” in Spanish — is a throwback (no carts). Owned and operated by the Valle Escondido Homeowners Association, this nine-holer sprawls across mountain pastures and cat-tailed wetlands, and around inconveniently situated ponderosa pines to postage-stamp greens. Fairways tend toward the “natural state,” so clean-and-place is acceptable at all times. The humble clubhouse serves as a community hangout with cold beer, cocktails and bar food. To get there, take U.S. Highway 64 from Kit Carson Road or Paseo del Cañon toward Angel Fire. Take a right on County Road past the Enchanted Moon RV Park and Campground. For green fees, tee times and more information, go online to taosgolf.org or call (575) 758-3475.

Devisadero Loop is located across from the South Boundary trailhead. This 5-mile loop is steep with uneven terrain — termed “brutal” by even expert riders. Almost all of its 5 miles is uphill, so both ascent and descent are gnarly. Look out for hikers and trail runners since this is one of the most popular trails around Taos. The Amole Canyon trailhead is on the south side of U.S. Hill on State Road 518. The moderate trail is perfect for families and weekend riders who are looking to get into the forest without getting too serious. There’s 7 miles on dirt trails and logging roads through piney woods.

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Courtesy Angel Fire Resort

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Aventura LLAMA TREK

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WILD EARTH LLAMA ADVENTURES

ROAD BIKING ORGANIZED CENTURY RIDES Fans of riding the Enchanted Circle should check out the Rough Riders 200 and Enchanted Circle Century Tour. Both rides incorporate the Enchanted Circle loop, which takes riders through Taos, Angel Fire, Eagle Nest, Red River, Questa, Arroyo Hondo and back down to Taos. The Rough Riders 200, part of the Gran Fondo, is June 23-24 and starts from Angel Fire making a loop to Mora, Sipapú and Taos. Brave riders complete back-to-back century rides during the two-day event. Shorter options are also available, including the new 150, ride 100 miles on Saturday and 50 miles on Sunday. For riders new to endurance cycling, the 50-mile Sunday ride is called the Bobcat Pass 50. (granfondoguide.com). On Sept. 9, avid cyclists embark on a 100-mile ride around the Enchanted Circle Century Tour that takes you to Taos, alongside two state parks, the Vietnam Memorial, Eagle Nest Lake and Palo Flechado and Bobcat passes. The tour starts in Red River at 8,750 feet, with a low point of 7,000 feet and a high point of 9,820 feet at the top of Bobcat Pass. Riders can also opt for shorter treks of 25 and 50 miles (redriverchamber.org/ enchanted-circle-century-bike-tour or granfondoguide.com).

CRUISING ROUTES

Courtesy Angel Fire Resort/Terrance Siemon

If you are looking for a long-distance ride outside the Enchanted Circle or the Mora Loop, try the Ojo-High Road 125. You’ll start your trek near the Río Grande Gorge Bridge and ride on to Ojo Caliente. From the high desert of Ojo Caliente, you’ll ride through Española and onto the High Road to Taos. From the High Road you’ll go through the small communities of Chimayo, Truchas and Peñasco before journeying back to Taos.

ZIPLINE

Tres Piedras is another good place to start your long-distance ride. An out and back from Tres Piedras to the Brazos Overlook is 54 miles and features 4,400 feet of climbing. Add on a stop to Tierra Amarilla to make it even longer. Riders eager for a 150-mile ride should try the Tres Piedras, Tierra Amarilla, Chama, Antonito, Tres Piedras loop. For easier rides closer to the town of Taos, park your car at the intersection of State Roads 150 and 230 and cycle up State Road 150 all the way to Taos Ski Valley. The Hondo-Seco-Valdez loop is another local road favorite.

aataosskivalleywildernessadventures.com (575) 751-6051

BOBCAT PASS TRAIL RIDES (RED RIVER)

facebook.com/people/ Cieneguilla-Stables (575) 751-2815

NANCY BURCH’S ROADRUNNER TOURS (ANGEL FIRE)

STEAM TRAIN Built in 1889, the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad is a piece of living history. The railroad’s scenic steam train trips begin a 48th season May 26. The trains depart daily from both Antonito, Colorado and Chama, New Mexico through Oct. 21.

TAOS INDIAN HORSE RANCH TAOS PUEBLO

The train follows 64 miles of tracks that cross the borders of Colorado and New Mexico 11 times, skirts along canyon walls through Toltec Gorge, burrows through two tunnels, steams over Cascade Trestle 137 feet above a roaring river and climbs to the top of 10,015-foot Cumbres Pass, the highest point reached by any steam railroad in North America.

recreation-t. nm-unlimited.net/ Pages/Stables/ IndianHorseRanch (575) 758-3212

nancyburch.com (575) 377-6416

RED RIVER STABLES

On June 17, join U.S. Geological Survey’s emeritus scientist Peter Lipman for a ride through one of the most unique, varied geologic areas in the U.S. Stop at many outcrops and rail cuts along the right of way to collect photographs and samples only accessible on the train route.

redriverstables.com (575) 754-1700

RÍO GRANDE STABLES

riograndestables.com (575) 776-5913 888-259-8267

bobcatpass.com (575) 754-2769

Courtesy Angel Fire Resort

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Courtesy Wild Earth Llama Adventures

For details and pricing, go to cumbrestoltec.com or call (888) 286-2737.

What a rush! Angel Fire Resort features one of the highest-altitude, six-line, adrenaline-educing outdoor adventures in the state that take you from the top of the mountain, soaring over the Moreno Valley from 120 to 1,600 feet long during the Rocky Mountain Zipline Adventure Tour. New this year, the resort unveils the Family Flyer, which is made up of two ziplines offering younger kids — who don’t weigh enough for the full adventure tour — a chance to experience the excitement of mountain-top ziplining. Children weighing as light as 50 pounds – 250 pounds will be able to join in the fun. Those weighing 90 pounds and above can participate in the full six-line tour. The tours take on average of two to three hours. Call 844-218-4107 for availability. Ziplines open May 18, weather permitting. For details on what to wear and weight restrictions, go online to angelfireresort.com/ activities/summer-activities/ zipline-adventure-tours/. Down the road a piece, the Pioneer Flyer zipline awaits at Red River. Aboard this double-seated zipline, you and a family member or friend sit side-by-side in padded seats with dual seat belts. Together, your seats ride up the line to the towers situated at the Red River Ski and Summer Area, which is U.S. National Forest land. In fact, this is the first seated zipline on Forest Service property in the U.S. The zipline begins running June 10. For more information, visit the summer activities page at redriverskiarea.com.

— Compiled by Scott Gerdes, some information provided by Andy Dennison for The Taos News.

A.A. TAOS SKI VALLEY WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

CIENEGUILLA STABLES (EMBUDO)

llamaadventures.com 1-800-758-LAMA (5262) Courtesy Angel Fire Resort/Terrance Siemon

HORSEBACK RIDING See the Sangre de Cristo mountains from a whole new perspective. Area horseback rides are suitable for riders of every experience level, including first-time cowboys and cowgirls.

Educational and memorable day hikes and multi-day treks with naturalist guides and gentle llamas through some of the area’s most beautiful backcountry. The llamas are not ridden; they are “wooly hiking companions” and gear carriers. Gourmet meals are prepared and served fresh in the great outdoors. Join Wild Earth for their popular, “Take a Llama to Lunch!” Day Hike, or take a MultiDay Wilderness Expedition with opportunities to camp near hidden alpine lakes and climb New Mexico’s tallest peaks.

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CONNECTING THE COMMUNITIES OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO!

Whether commuting, sightseeing or exploring your own backyard, let the RTD Blue Bus take you there! 22 fare-free routes throughout Santa Fe, Taos, Los Alamos and Rio Arriba Counties. A small fee takes you into the Santa Fe National Forest and to Ski Santa Fe, and provides weekend express service to Española and Santa Fe. Where public transit goes – Community Grows See how far we can go together!

RidetheBlueBus.com Toll Free: 866-206-0754 | 505-629-4725 Now plan your trip on Google Maps!

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Discover Taos from a different perspective See Us On Facebook!

1103 Paseo del Pueblo Norte Suite 3A, Just north of El Meze Restaurant and south of Elevation Coffee

Sales Service Accessories 575.758.5551 taoscyclery.com

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Immersive Cultural & Active Guided Tours

DAY TOURS

Taos | Santa Fe | Albuquerque Multi-Day Taos Glamping Tours Custom Crafted Tours Our tours take you beyond what you would see and experience on your own. 575.779.5516 heritageinspirations.com Instagram@taoschic DISCOVERTAOS.COM

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Concerts, festivals, movies, dining and alabama Shakes

FIND THE BEST THINGS TO DO ALL YEAR LONG WITH TAOS’ OFFICIAL EVENT CALENDAR. WITH ONE SIMPLE CLICK YOU’LL FIND IT CHOCK-FULL OF THE BEST CONCERTS, FILMS AND ART EXHIBITS NAVIGATE WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO

TAOSNEWS.COM/CALENDAR

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Aventura

Hidden magic of Taos Labyrinths, petroglyphs and waterfalls BY CINDY BROWN

Steven Bundy

LABYRINTH ON THE MESA Labyrinths are found all over the world throughout time. They have been used as a form of pilgrimage or meditation and as a search for balance and wholeness. Taos has its share of labyrinths dedicated to personal and world peace. A small spiral labyrinth can be found on the West Rim Trail. The trail begins at the rest area just west of the Río Grande Gorge Bridge. A walk of a mile over gently rolling, sage-covered terrain will bring you to the spiral of purposely placed rocks. Head south on the trail. When you see the bench at the overlook to your left at about half a mile in, stay to the right and walk another half mile. On the top of a ridge, you will see the spiral marked by prayer flags on a wooden post. Other attractions here include views into the Río Grande Gorge and a possible sighting of big horn sheep near its edge. Although they are not often seen, rattlesnakes are found here, so use care especially when stepping off the trail. It is best to keep dogs leashed to ensure their safety and that of wildlife. This is a lower elevation trail, located at about 7,000 feet. It is a good place to begin your hiking adventures in Taos. During the summer months, it can be hot here, so plan to go in the morning, evening or on a cooler day.

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Labrynith and prayer flags along the West Rim

For further exploration: Many labyrinths are on public and private land in Taos. How many can you find? Be sure to research ahead of time and ask for permission if the labyrinth is on private land.

Look for a rock carving near the trail with long vertical lines. Although the meaning of these symbols is not known for certain, such lines are thought to represent rain or water. Protect these symbols for the future by not climbing on or touching them.

PETROGLYPHS FROM THE PAST

The trail is a bit under 1.5 miles round trip and gains about 700 feet in elevation. Big horn sheep are sometimes seen here along with coyote, cottontail rabbit, elk and deer. A fee of $3 can be paid at the parking lot near the bridge.

Rock art is found all along the Río Grande. Some of these petroglyphs are marked by informational signs while others remain hidden and can be found only on a guided hike or sometimes by accident. The Picuris Trail is a short, steep path beginning near the Taos Junction Bridge and ending on the mesa above the Río Grande. After a few rock steps, there are a series of switchbacks climbing up through the sage, pinon, juniper and cholla cactus. A few segments of the trail require some scrambling over the basalt rocks. At the top of the mesa, Picuris meets up with the network of trails in the Rift Valley system. This trail is named for the Native peoples who used this path in the past. Merrill Dicks, archeologist with the Bureau of Land Management, says many rock symbols can be found here, indicating that it is a very old trail and that the Taos Junction area has long been an important crossing point.

For more adventure: Hike north from the Taos Junction Bridge and find the confluence of the Río Pueblo and Río Grande where they come crashing together.

GAVILAN FALLS Along the rivers and streams of the Taos Ski Valley area, big drops in elevation create spectacular waterfalls. Some are wellknown, like the one located near the Phoenix Grill. Others are hidden and can be found just off the trail if you know where to look. One hidden waterfall is located near Gavilan Trail. Find the trailhead near mile marker 13 on the Ski Valley Road (State Road 150). SUMMER/FALL 2018


WHEN SETTING OUT ON A NEW HIKE, BE SURE TO PICK UP A MAP AND GET SOME LOCAL ADVICE. Visit outfitters such as Mudd N Flood and Taos Mountain Outfitters on Taos Plaza and the Boot Doctors at 226 Paseo del Pueblo Norte. Local bookstores and other retailers carry guide books, including Cindy Brown’s book “Taos Hiking Guide.” The Carson National Forest and Bureau of Land Management have offices on Cruz Alta Road and also provide trail information on their websites. Many of the trailheads have maps posted, and some of them have maps you can carry with you. CONTACT INFORMATION Carson National Forest office, 208 Cruz Alta Road, (575) 758-6200 Bureau of Land Management office, 226 Cruz Alta Road, (575) 758-8851

CIndy Brown

The hike begins at 9,200 feet and climbs gradually until it reaches the crossing of West Gavilan Creek about 20 minutes into the hike. After this point, the trail steepens and climbs up away from the creek. A profusion of wild flowers grow along the trail, including pink wild geraniums, purple fireweed and the scarlet gilia fairy trumpet. Climb up another 20 minutes, following the switchbacks. Look to the left to catch a glimpse of a wooden sign that says: Gavilan Falls a quarter mile. A short walk brings you to an overlook where you can get a glimpse

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of the falls. Use caution as the trail soon becomes narrow and unstable. The sign was posted by adventurer Doug Scott. Find his books on New Mexico waterfalls at local bookstores.

For more exploring: Gavilan Trail continues to climb for a total of 2.5 miles until it reaches Lobo Ridge at 11,800 feet. Head up the ridge a short distance for spectacular views to the north.

In the summer months, watch for frequent afternoon thunderstorms. The hike to the ridge is a moderately difficult hike at high altitude. If you are new to town, allow a few days to become acclimated to the altitude and begin by doing some of the lower elevation trails along the ski valley road, including Yerba and Manzanita.

Cindy Brown is the hiking columnist for The Taos News and the author of the “Taos Hiking Guide.”

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RED RIVER BREWING COMPANY Red River's first and only brewery opened just this April. RRBC is a brewery, bar and full-service restaurant open for lunch and dinner seven days a week. The onsite-crafted brew styles range from a light and easy-drinking blonde ale to a dark and robust oatmeal stout, and everything in between. The initial summer line-up includes a Belgium wheat beer, a porter, awesome IPAs, amber ales, brown ales and a Belgium Tripel — 12 or more different beers on tap all the time. Plus house-made root beer. RRBC boasts indoor and outdoor bars, live music on most weekends, and the patios are dog-friendly for friendly dogs. RRBC is a snowball's throw from the base of Red River Ski and Summer Area in a brand new, purpose-built 9,300-square-foot building. At 8,750 feet, RRBC is the highest elevation brewery in New Mexico. RRBC is not only another place to have a beer and eat while in Red River but also another reason to visit this old mining town.

217 West Main Street, Red River (575) 770-2519, redriverbrewing.com

TAOS MESA BREWING CO. The brewmasters at Taos Mesa Brewing have the goal of producing beers as iconic as Taos. Twelve distinct house beers are on tap at all times from thirst quenchers to full-bodied dark porters.

CRAFT BEER

HEAVEN AT 8,750 feet where the hops meet the pines

From Altbier to fruit beers to Schwarzbier, TMB beers are crafted on-site in a 10 barrel, all-grain infusion mash brewhouse. Called "The Mothership," TMB's flagship location features an outdoor amphitheater, indoor entertainment stage, dance floor and lunch and dinner menus. It is a live music hot spot and the site for the annual, three-day Music on the Mothership festival (past headliners include Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle). TMB has a second Taos location: the Taos Tap Room near Taos Plaza on Paseo del Pueblo Sur, which also serves lunch and dinner, including killer pizza cooked in a wood-fired oven.

20 ABC Mesa Road, El Prado (575) 758-1900, taosmesabrewing.com

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Delicioso

Cook. Eat. Laugh. Learn. Taos chef’s secret suppers and cooking classes plate a world of food and fun BY LUCY HERRMAN

T

AOS HAS SO MUCH TO OFFER visitors in the summer: Hiking, biking, river rafting, ballooning, gallery hopping, live music and most important of all, exquisite dining. The number of restaurants offering excellent culinary experiences usually exceeds expectations, especially for a small town like ours. We have an abundance of dedicated chefs and cooks in restaurants of all kinds to satisfy every type of appetite. For a really unique fine dining experience, with an intimate feel, you may wish to try the Secret Supper Club, a monthly pop-up dinner offered by one of Taos’ most respected chefs, Chris Maher. Chef Maher came to Taos many years ago to open a restaurant, Momentitos de la Vida (now known as Sabroso), which received six 4-Diamond Culinary Awards under his guidance. Although self-taught, Maher is a James Beardrecognized chef. He’s cooked for many luminaries, including the Dalai Lama and President Clinton.

Lucy Herrman of Taos is regular contributor in The Taos News of all things food and is an accomplished cook.

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Lucy Herrman

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A

old-world atmosphere, and is lived in and loved by the Mahers, their son Milo, and their dogs. Classes are conducted in the main kitchen around a generous center island. A large vintage stove is against the wall. Students work around the island with plenty of workspace.

FTER HE SOLD Momentitos de la Vida, he retreated for a year and a half to Los Angeles — where he had a long, successful career as an actor. But his passion was food, and Maher soon returned to his true loves: cooking, Taos and Valerie, although perhaps not in that order. Together, Chris and Valerie Maher created Cooking Studio Taos, a lovely culinary world of cooking classes, Secret Suppers and more — all in a beautiful setting.

In good weather, classes might be conducted outdoors in their second kitchen where a wood-burning pizza oven resides. An organic vegetable garden is located next to the patio, and their chickens (currently 16) preside. The Mahers are dedicated gardeners, and in season, many of the ingredients used in the class are grown right in their own garden.

Maher’s monthly Secret Supper Club is attended by local Taoseños and visitors alike. Held in a different location each month, usually a historic Taos home or other fascinating venue. The secret location is not revealed until the morning of the dinner, and the menu is kept under wraps until you walk in the door. When you arrive, you are greeted by Valerie Maher as she hands you a glass of wine. A printed menu describing that evening’s gourmet five-course dinner awaits at each place at the long communal dining table. Attendees stake their chairs and then mingle with the other guests, with time to get to know each other. You discover that some guests have been to several Secret Suppers. Others come every month. And a few are trying it for the first time. By the end of the evening, all present agree: What a great way to make new friends and have an excellent meal in the process. For those who want to go one step deeper and get their hands into the action, you might want to take an in-depth cooking class with Chef Maher. In addition to the Secret Suppers, he conducts a cooking school, sharing his extensive knowledge and sheer enthusiasm. The cooking school is located in the Maher’s lovely and rustic Arroyo Seco home. The adobe has an inviting

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Weekly classes offer a variety of cuisines from New Mexican to Italian, from Moroccan to Thai, from French to Spanish. During the course of a fivehour, hands-on class, each student contributes to the process of preparing a meal they will later consume, having learned the recipes, techniques and theory.

Scott Gerdes

COOKING STUDIO TAOS AND THE SECRET SUPPER CLUB ARROYO SECO, NEW MEXICO (575) 776-2665 COOKINGSTUDIOTAOS.COM

And should you arrive in Taos wishing for a private class for your family or group, the Mahers will expertly tailor one to your tastes and likings — a wonderful experience in togetherness. In addition, during the summer, Cooking Studio Taos offers a weeklong Cooking Camp for kids ages 8-16. Your children can take all the classes or drop in for one. In researching this article, I had the pleasure of attending Cooking Studio Taos for a Moroccan class. Among the students were visitors from New York, Denver and Santa Fe, as well as locals. As the food writer for The Taos News, and a former cooking teacher myself, I take pride in my cooking knowledge. But I love watching how other chefs do things, and quite frankly, I always learn new techniques.

The class gathers in the living room, sitting on comfortable chairs and sofas. Each student holds the recipes we will be preparing that day. “Chef Chris” goes over them one by one, explaining the process and answering questions. He talks about techniques and ingredients (especially unusual ones), and shares anecdotes from his past. Once everyone is comfortable with the recipes and have all questions answered, it’s time to get cooking. Unlike many cooking schools, where one watches a teacher at the front of the room prepare all the recipes under a large mirror, Cooking Studio Taos has you elbow deep in the process itself. Few shortcuts are allowed. Every dish and almost every condiment are made from scratch. As each student team labors at working on its dish, peering curiously at what the others are doing, Valerie Maher serves some wine to pass the moments from preparation to finished fare. Each student cleans up their own mess at the counter and washes their own dishes. Pretty soon, the food is baking or bubbling away for its last few minutes of cooking. Valerie Maher and some of the students set the enormous, square dining table. More wine is poured and dinner is served. By now, everyone is a friend and busy exchanging contact information, promising to text or email photos of the day’s activities. All have shared a memorable time, gained valuable knowledge and eaten a remarkable meal. Most will want to join another future class. Many will return to attend a Secret Supper Club dinner. But all are caught under the spell of Chris and Valerie Maher’s personal culinary world at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

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pizzA sandwiches local goods produce groceries

Monday- Friday 9 am-7 pm - Saturday & Sunday 10 am-6 pm Ice Cream

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2155 hwy 75, 75 dixon (505) 579-9625 dixonmarket. com •

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On Taos Plaza (575) 758-8855 134

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Nature’s Extravagance

Steven Bundy [ BY SCOTT GERDES ]

Hundreds of feet beneath a steel deck arch bridge, the Río Grande (Grand River) flows unfettered as it snakes and tumbles over boulders and smaller rocks on its 1,900-mile journey from the Continental Divide in the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado to the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican provence of Chihuahua. It is one of the longest rivers in the country. The Gorge, which runs northwest to southeast through Taos, is about 50 miles long. The river was made a part of the National Wild and Scenic River System in 1968; among the first eight rivers Congress designated as Wild and Scenic. This river is managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Gorge Bridge and runs south along the canyon rim to Route 567 above the Taos Junction Bridge in Pilar.

The water came into the rift valley after being created by faulting and volcanic activity due to separation in the Earth’s crust when the North American and Pacific plates scraped against each other some 29 million years ago. Those tectonic plates still show some activity, as evidenced by the sustained hot springs in the area, such as at Ojo Caliente and the Manby Hot Springs near the John Dunn Bridge (in Arroyo Hondo just north of Taos off U.S. Highway 522).

Besides the bridge, other good places to view the Río Grande Gorge are the Overlook on State Road 68, about 8 miles south of Ranchos de Taos and The Wild Rivers Recreation Area about 35 miles north of Taos. To get to Wild Rivers, drive north toward Questa on U.S. Highway 522 to another 3 miles on Highway 378. At La Junta Point, the Red River converges with the Río Grande.

The Gorge Bridge was erected along U.S. Highway 64 in 1965. It sits 650 feet above the Río Grande and spans 1,280 feet. It is the second highest bridge on the U.S. Highway system and is the fifth highest bridge in the country. The fabled overpass has had cameos in many films, beginning with "Easy Rider" (1969). Followed by "Twins," "She’s Having a Baby," "Natural Born Killers," "Wild Hogs," "No Country for Old Men," "Terminator Salvation," "Paul" and "This Must be the Place."

The canyon ecosystem descends 800 feet from rim to river, creating a unique diversity in plant and animal life. It is home to ancient piñon and juniper forests. Wildlife includes mule deer, red-tailed hawk, mountain blue bird, cutthroat trout, prairie dog, river otter, bald eagle and Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. A good place to view bighorns is the West Rim Trail that extends from the rest area west of the

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Fresh from our roaster to your door is just a click away Served at these fine establishments: Cid’s Food Market Dixon Cooperative Market Taos Food Coop Taos Cow The Coffee Spot Elevation Coffee The Taos Inn La Montañita Coop (SF)

Lambert’s of Taos Trading Post Cafe Bent Street Deli Mabel Dodge Luhan House Inn on La Loma Old Taos Guesthouse Española Community Market

www.taosroasters.com

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La Planta de Taos: The Columbine

Jan Martenson [ BY SCOTT GERDES ]

Three hundred and twenty known species of wildflowers and native plants can be found in the high desert of Northern New Mexico. One of the most common is the columbine.

A. chrysantha is the golden columbine. This yellow species is found in damp places up to 11,000 feet in elevation, Martenson says. It blooms from April to September and grows from 12 inches- to 48-inches tall.

Columbines are truly unique-looking flowers and frankly, just look happy. With their dangling bell-like shape and spurs at the back, there is nothing else quite like these perennials. Columbines come in almost every color — blue, orange, pink, purple, red, white, yellow. The most common in this part of the world are the blue, red and yellow species.

The western red columbine (A. elegantula) is sometimes called the shooting star columbine. It can be seen at subalpine elevations and in forests along stream banks, such as along the Italianos Trail in Taos Ski Valley. The western red columbine blooms in early spring into mid-summer. It grows from 10 inches- to 24-inches tall.

Columbine is derived from the Latin word for dove, columbinus. The Latin name of the columbine genus is aquilegia, derived from the word aquilia, meaning eagle, referring to the similarity of the curved spurs of some species to the bird's talons. "But another explanation," says Jan Martenson, president of the Taos Chapter of the Native Plant Society of New Mexico, "is that the word is derived from 'aqua' (water) and 'legere' (to collect) referring to the 'nectar at the base of the spur.' "

Columbines can also be seen along the aptly named Columbine Trail between Questa and Red River.

Aquilegia coerulea is the Latin name of the blue columbine, which is seen most often in alpine and subalpine regions — you can’t miss them in the summer on a hike to Williams Lake in Taos Ski Valley. Also known as Colorado blue columbine, it is the state flower of Colorado. It blooms from June until September and grows from 6-inches to 32-inches tall.

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La Musica continues from page 144

MOTHER’S DAY FESTIVAL (MAY 11-13) LMNOC Broadcasting, Inc. celebrates mothers with its 17th annual Mother’s Day festival. The three-day weekend at Kit Carson Park brings together families, friends, and neighbors in honor of our mothers and celebrates the culture and music of Northern New Mexico. lmnoctaosradio.wixsite. com; (575) 758-4491. Katharine Egli

TAOS PLAZA LIVE (MAY 31-AUG. 23)

Every Thursday night (6-8 p.m.), all summer long, the Taos County Chamber of Commerce brings the best of Taos’ musicians to the historic Taos Plaza stage. Concerts are free and family-friendly. taosplazalive.com; (575) 751-8800.

TAOS OPERA INSTITUTE (JUNE 1-JUNE 30)

An intensive, holistic program for the serious young vocal professional, Taos Opera Institute draws some of the most distinguished faculty and up-and-coming young professionals from around the country to teach and learn at the beautiful Taos Ski Valley. A series of uplifting operatic concerts are held for the public during the month of June. taosOI.org; (806) 236-5159.

FESTIVAL ECLECTICA (JUNE 16)

Courtesy Big Barn Dance/Dave Hensley

An inaugural festival/fundraiser during Balloons Over Angel Fire Father’s Day weekend to benefit Angel Fire's Shuter Library. The festival will feature renowned Zydeco accordionist, singer/ songwriter and Grammy-nominee, Dwayne Dopsie with his group the Zydeco Hellraisers, Taos singer/ songwriter, Max Gomez, the award-winning pan-Latin group Baracutanga, and other exciting acts. Held at the balloon venue, Colfax County Airport, Angel Fire. For more information, see FestivalEclectica.com.

TAOS SCHOOL OF MUSIC (JUNE 17-AUGUST 5)

The roots of Taos School of Music go back to the 1950s, but the internationally known chamber music school officially opened in 1963. The school faculty includes three renowned String Quartets (the Borromeo, Miró and Brentano) along with pianists Robert McDonald and Thomas Sauer. Student and faculty performances are held at the Taos Community Auditorium and the Hotel St. Bernard in Taos Ski Valley. taosschoolofmusic.com; (575) 776-2388.

DOG DAYS OF SUMMER (AUG. 11) For the ninth consecutive year, Molly Dog Productions presents a benefit concert for Taos' Stray Hearts Animal Shelter. The headliner for this year's event is the acclaimed duo The Secret Sisters with more acts to be named. The third LP from The Secret Sisters, "You Don't Own Me Anymore," is nominated for a 2018 Grammy award in the "Best Folk Album" category. Performance held at KTAOS Solar Center from 5-9:30 p.m. For updates, visit mollydogproductions.org.

MUSIC FROM ANGEL FIRE (AUG.17-SEPT. 1) Andrea Clearfield is composer-in-residence for the Music from Angel Fire’s 35th season. This year also brings back Opus 35 for an in-depth look at Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who lived to the age of 35. The festival also presents works that were written when Bach, Beethoven, Brahms and other great composers were 35 years old. Performances take place in Angel Fire, Taos and throughout Northern New Mexico. musicfromangelfire.org; (575) 377-3233.

PIANOTAOS (SEPT. 23) Join PianoTaos for its third Taos Fall Arts Festival program "Americana: Stories & Legends," which includes works to fit the theme in the beautiful historic Taos Museum of Art at Fechin House, located a few blocks from Historic Taos Plaza on Paseo del Pueblo Norte. Each local pianist will play a selected piece inspired by a work of art in the museum. Free parking. Free admission. taosartmuseum.org; (575) 758-2690

MICHAEL HEARNE’S BIG BARN DANCE MUSIC FESTIVAL (SEPT. 6-8)

Join the fun for this year’s 16th annual Big Barn Dance that brings together some of the most well-respected names in country, Americana, and folk music as well as up-and-coming singer-songwriters. The weekend festival is produced and hosted by Michael Hearne, an impeccable guitarist and singer-songwriter whose heartfelt manner will make you feel like you’re one of the family. bigbarndance.com.

BLUEGRASS AND OLD TIME MUSIC FESTIVAL (SEPT. 13-16) Southwest Pickers and Red River Bluegrass present the 43rd Annual Southwest Pickers Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival. The festival includes bluegrass, old time and Americana bands, instructional workshops, dancing, food, a beer garden and vendors. Held in Brandenburg Park in the historic town of Red River, north of Taos. southwestpickers-festival.org. For even more music events, be sure to check the Discover Comunidades pages.

— Ariana Kramer is a freelance music writer for The Taos News Tempo arts and entertainment magazine.

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Katharine Egli

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THE ONLY GUIDE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO TAOS GALLERIES, ARTISTS, AND STUDIOS

Read Northern New Mexico’s Premier Arts Guide online at

galleryguideoftaos.com

‘A Man of Taos,’ Tony Lujan, Taos Pueblo,” 1930. Ansel Adams, Gelatin silver print. 17 5⁄16 x 13 in. Collection for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona © 2015 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

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La Animale de Taos: The Red-Tailed Hawk [ BY SCOTT GERDES ]

From high above, raining down over the open fields and mesas there is a common sound heard around these parts: keee-eerrrrr. The call is that of the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). This rusty-red tailed, beefy påjaro (bird) of prey is keen-eyed and an efficient hunter, often perched atop a telephone pole or other high places on the look out for mice, rabbits, reptiles and other prey. Once they've locked in on their meal, these hawks swoop down in a steady, mastered dive. Every red-tailed hawk has a unique coat of brownish feathers. A white V along the back is a classic sign of a red-tailed hawk. They typically grow from 18 to 26 inches long with a wingspan of 38 to 43 inches. The average weight of a red-tailed hawk is 24.3 to 51.5 ounces. They can live in the wild up to 21 years and have been known to easily adapt to life around humans. These stunning birds are aerial acrobats during mating season. A pair will soar while flying in a large circle. The male will then plummet into a nosedive followed by a steep ascent to circling altitude. After a time doing this ritual, the birds grab each other by the talons and spiral down toward the ground. Red-tailed hawks are monogamous and often mate for life. The relationship of the red-tailed hawk to spiritualism is symbolic and significant. They are often thought of as spirit animals -— angels in the skies, sent as messengers. Writes Stacey L. L. Couch, certified Shamanic practitioner in Pagosa Springs, Colorado, "Red-tails are divine messengers meant to bring guidance from the heavens and ground the guidance out in the physical world." Hawks also have a special place in indigenous spiritual beliefs among some New Mexico pueblo tribes. They are often a symbol of power and bravery.

Steven Bundy

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314A Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, NM • 575-758-1924 • 800-530-8899 ©2018 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

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DISCOVER

Comunidades

The Pueblo: a world apart

BY SCOTT GERDES

If Pueblo Peak is the heartbeat of Taos, then Taos Pueblo is its soul. No visitor should miss seeing the ancient pueblo — perhaps the world's oldest apartment building. Here, life goes on much the same as it has for nearly 1,000 years. You may notice a shiny pickup truck parked nearby or see modern cell phones, but the customs and the unwritten Tiwa (pronounced TEE-wah) language have changed little over the centuries. Please note that the Pueblo periodically closes to the public for tribal rituals. Call (575) 758-1028 before you plan to visit. THE HISTORY

Splinter groups of prehistoric Puebloan people established a permanent settlement in Taos Valley around 1000 A.D. Those who settled in Pot Creek left the pueblo established there between 1320-1350. They are credited with building the multi-storied structures that became Taos Pueblo (pueblo is a Spanish word for "village). They were farmers and hunters, and their geographic location made the pueblo something of a crossroads and trading center for other Indian tribes. In 1540, the Spanish Conquistadors of the Coronado Expedition arrived at Taos Pueblo's doorstep. They are said to be the first Europeans to see Taos Valley.

They were looking for gold. Fifty-eight years later, Don Juan de Oñate colonized New Mexico for the Spanish empire. In the beginning, while hesitant, the Tiwa Indians opened their doors to the strangers hoping for harmonious living. But the Influential Catholic clergy’s main motive was to convert the Tiwa to the Catholic religion and enslave them to build a chapel in the name of Saint Jerome. Because of forced baptism, Natives were given Spanish surnames. Skirmishes periodically broke out and the fighting culminated in 1680. Under the leadership of Po'pay, from San Juan Pueblo, the Spaniards — and the indigenous people they brought with them — were defeated during the Pueblo revolt and forced to retreat south. The Spanish “reconquest” was carried out by Don Diego de Vargas in 1696. The Spanish colonists then returned to the valley for good. Over time, the faiths that divided the two cultures became blended. This is seen in the prominence of the Blessed Virgin Mary within the church and in the religion-inspired artwork since the Tiwa clos ely associate her with Mother Earth.

TAOS PUEBLO IS NOT JUST A HOME; IT'S A WAY OF LIFE. The preserved, proud culture of the Red Willow people stands tall amid the large timbers and adobe bricks that make up the nearly 1,000-year-old multistory dwelling. Taos Pueblo culture inhales and exhales the warm smell of cedar wood and bread baking in hornos (outdoor adobe ovens). Its

heart beats faster during the traditional dances and feast days ... in the drum beats, ancient songs and handcrafted art. It lives in the faces of the more than 1,900 Pueblo members. The land base of Taos Pueblo is 99,000 acres. It is a sovereign nation. NATIVE ENERGY

The power of Native Nations is as strong as ever, an energy that is clearly evident at the annual Taos Pueblo Powwow. The 33nd gathering of Native Nations for three days of singing, dancing and drumming during the second weekend of July (13-15) is held at the powwow grounds located at the end of Ben Romero Road in El Prado. Turn at the designated entrance north of the Overland Ranch off U.S. 64 west/Paseo del Pueblo Norte and follow the dirt road. The road will lead to the Taos Pueblo Reservation Lands. This is where the powwow has taken place during the summer for more than 30 years. During that time, the powwow has become well known throughout the nation for its high quality drum groups, dancers and scenic beauty. Admission to the Taos Pueblo Powwow is $15 per person/per day; $20 per person/2-day pass; $25 per person/3-day pass; and children 10 and under admitted free. Fees include camera/ video charge. Cash only. No refunds due to inclement weather. Admission does not include entry to Taos Pueblo. Tickets available only at the gate. Grounds open at 10 a.m. each day. The powwow ends at approximately 10 p.m. on Friday (July 13) and Saturday (July 14); 6 p.m. on Sunday (July 15). Call 888-285-6344 or visit taospueblopowwow. com for more information. CELEBRATIONS OF FAITH

by the Spanish colonization and represent the celebration of the Patron Saints of the Catholic religion. Feast Days also coincide with the traditional Pueblo spiritual beliefs, which allows the people of the Pueblo community to practice both the Catholic and Pueblo religions. A typical Feast Day is a day of eating, visiting with family, friends and enjoying the traditional dances that are allowed to be witnessed by public spectators. Feast days are an integral part of the Pueblo culture.

Katharine Egli

Although feast days are open to the public, one must be invited into a home to visit and/or share a feast day meal. Please use common courtesy and do not walk into a home uninvited. Other common courtesies include: After a dance is over please do not applaud for these are not performances. Native dances are part of a ceremony and it is an honor to see them. And while watching the dances, please refrain from talking to community members regarding what is the significance of the dance and don't speak with the dancers. Cameras and cell phones are not allowed during religious ceremonies; they could be confiscated and won't be returned. Feast day hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call for ceremony times, (575) 758-1028.

Feast days were introduced continues on page 162

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HACIENDA DEL SOL HISTORIC TAOS LUXURY INN

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VAN GOGH/MONET INSPIRED HOME sothebyshomes.com/0565427 | $999,999 Nestled along the Rio Grande in Guique – very close to Abiquiu – this historic estate has been meticulously maintained and renovated. It includes two 1,800-square-foot structures, an acequia, lush lawns, and mature trees. David Córdova | 505.660.9744

RANCH RETREAT IN MORA COUNTY sothebyshomes.com/0566059 | $765,000 On nearly 240 acres at the edge of the Sangre de Cristos, this lovingly maintained energy-efficient ranch features a warm, light-filled open-concept residence; equestrian facilities; a full-size dressage arena; and a guesthouse. Rebecca Holland | 505.670.1316

26584 EAST HIGHWAY 64 sothebyshomes.com/0565908 | $710,000 Unique, distinguished 4BR, 3BA home with tremendous mountain and stream views. Only 12 miles to Taos and 13 miles to Angel Fire. Two-story open-concept residence with spacious master suite and 3-car garage. David Córdova | 505.660.9744

437 TUNE DRIVE sothebyshomes.com/0565741 | $510,000 This tranquil 2BR, 2BA Taos home on 14.45 acres was built using the “Cast Earth” model invention of Harris Lowenhaupt. Cast Earth is similar to adobe or rammed earth but is stronger and more durable. Open concept living, and vast Rio Grande Gorge views. David Córdova | 505.660.9744

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A Realtor With the Home Field Advantage I’m a native Taoseña and have raised my children in this beautiful community. It would be my pleasure to share the love I have for Taos and make you feel at home as well.

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DESSERT

GO AHEAD AND ORDER

AFTER ALL, YOU’RE HELPING TO BUILD A BETTER COMMUNITY

EAT OUT For A

CAUSE

DINE OUT ON THE 25TH

On the 25th of each month you can

AND 25% OF THE PROCEEDS HELP FUND

establishments while also helping

H A B I TAT F O R H U M A N I T Y TA O S

our hard-working neighbors can

C U R R E N T LY B U I L D I N G TA O S H O M E S # 3 2 , # 3 3 , A N D # 3 4 !

sample some of Taos County’s finest us to build a community where work toward the gift of stability, safety, and self-reliance through affordable shelter.

These establishments have agreed to donate 25% of their proceeds on the 25th of their particular month to Habitat for Humanity of Taos in honor of our 25th anniversary.

V i s i t W W W. T A O S H A B I TAT. O R G f o r a s c h e d u l e a n d l i s t o f p a r t i c i p a t i n g r e s t a u r a n t s .

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Things that sting (and some that don’t)

[ BY CODY HOOKS ]

This is the best time of year to play outside and really experience the vastness of Northern New Mexico. It’s that special season after the spring winds (the kinds that can reach 60 miles an hour) have calmed down and before the bone-chilling nights of autumn give way to the full brunt of winter. Maybe an adventure means splashing by the río, seeking out new vistas or just stumbling upon whatever’s down the road. In any event, walking, hiking, climbing, biking and birding fill the days. As fun as it is to go romping around New Mexico, playing outside in a place like Taos has its dangers. Some hazards are inherent to the landscape — rain, hail, sun — but even the shear amount of lands open to recreation coupled with relatively poor cell reception conspire to make this an alluring place of the wildest order, filled with as many potential dangers as it has venues for fun. Among those hazards are little bites from some of the reptiles, insects and arachnids that call New Mexico their home.

SNAKES Though not common, it’s entirely possible to come across a snake, even on a popular and busy trail. New Mexico has at least eight types of rattlesnakes. They can sense heat, making bare hands and exposed feet and ankles especially susceptible to a bite. Like most “dangerous” animals, they usually only attack people when they feel threatened and defensive. If you see a rattlesnake, back up and get some distance. New Mexico sees about 75 to 100 rattlesnake bites every year, according to the New Mexico Poison and Drug Information Center. Burning, bruising, pain, swelling, nausea and sweating are among the potential symptoms. Their venomous saliva can kill if left untreated. If bitten, get help immediately. The center advises calling 911, as anti-venom is the only definitive treatment. Don’t use a tourniquet or try to suck out the venom. BLACK WIDOWS

The best way to avoid an unpleasant to life-threatening encounter with some of the smaller critters in the area is to be prepared and be aware. Don’t touch, sit, squat or lay down anywhere before taking a thorough look around.

You’re more likely to encounter a black widow spider around a house or shed than on the trail, but the same rules of awareness apply: Don’t put your hand where you can’t see.

TARANTULA HAWKS AND TARANTULAS

Black widows are incredibly common and docile. Aside from being shiny black with swollen abdomens, females’ red hourglass-shaped mark on their backs are tell-tale identifiers of a black widow. According to the state poison center, the bite of a black widow is most painful in the first 8 to 12 hours and can cause severe muscle spasms. The bites can even be deadly, especially in small kids.

Tarantula hawks are as fierce as their name suggests. The large wasps are black with orange wings and have one of the most painful stings of any insect on the planet. Luckily enough, humans aren’t their target. As the state insect, they are found throughout New Mexico — just like one of their most notable victims. Before a female tarantula hawk lays her eggs, she hunts down a tarantula spider and delivers a paralyzing sting. The young wasps hatch inside the dying tarantula. For humans, the sting is electric, but generally has no long-term effects. It’s worth noting that the wasps’ prey, tarantulas, are generally reclusive except during the fall, when the males go looking for a mate and can be seen crossing roadways en mass. If picked up and agitated, tarantulas can bite and or shoot little hairs off of their backs, which can irritate the skin.

Shake your shoes if you leave them outside. THE BEST OF THE REST Of course, this list is by no means exhaustive. But most bugs aren’t dangerous. The dry mountains and mesa lands of the Southwest boasts the most biodiversity in the world for bees and some other bugs, and most of them don’t sting. Truthfully, mosquitos and the humble prickly pear cactus are more likely to “sting” than anything else. More information can be found at nmpoisoncenter.unm.edu.

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Arroyo Seco A community of locals All the merchants live pretty close to Arroyo Seco, typically not more than 10 miles away, or right here in the little artist's village on the way to Taos Ski Valley. They all know each other and that gives this place a special feeling of closeness, of being part of a family. Visitors will pick up on it. Just know you are welcomed here. HISTORY

As with many of the communities in Northern New Mexico, "Seco" grew from a land grant. The area was officially settled when the Martínez brothers planted crops and then homes here in the early 1800s. Arroyo Seco's Church of the Holy Trinity dates back to 1834. It is built of adobe with heavy vigas and corbels and an altar where an original bulto — a three-dimensional sacred sculpture, which represents the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit — is still revered.

GREAT FOOD

GREAT LODGING

Taos Cow was named one of the top 10 ice cream shops in America by Bon Appétit magazine. The ice cream is locally made and comes in many different and unusual flavors — ever heard of lavender ice cream? Abe’s Cantina y Cocina, established in 1945, is perhaps the oldest hangout for locals and serves the best chicharron burritos in the area; Aceq is a favorite farm-to-table restaurant that uses organic ingredients; and Sabroso is famous for its fresh-squeezed margaritas, fine dining and live entertainment. You can get groceries at Sol Food Natural Market, which is walking distance from the Abominable SnowMansion hostel. They sell organic produce and meat, and also have a deli and juice bar.

Want to stay in Arroyo Seco longer than a day? The village also has lodging accommodations, the Abominable SnowMansion, a number of vacation home rentals in the area and bed and breakfasts, such as Adobe and Stars just outside of Seco on the way to Taos Ski Valley.

GREAT SHOPPING

At Arroyo Seco Mercantile you can find everything from Pendleton blankets to antiques. Santos y Mas sells santos, of course, plus retablos, paintings, ornaments and much more. Don’t forget the beautiful jewelry and sculptures at ClaireWorks, and Francesca’s pretty clothes. There is more to explore here and something for everyone.

GREAT ZANINESS AND HOOPLA

The "biggest little parade in the country" or the annual Fourth of July celebration in Arroyo Seco gathers hundreds of spectators each year, as community members and local organizations parade down two blocks. It consistently attracts a crowd: around 5,000 people congregate here every year, and the number keeps growing. It’s a short parade route that begins around noon, but it includes a big array of attractions, from painted ponies to unusually decorated floats, trucks, vintage cars and Taoseño trucks. This is a unique, fun event with live music all day. To avoid heavy traffic, come early and stay late.

GREAT PROXIMITY

Katharine Egli

A beautiful mountain drive from Seco up State Road 150 is Taos Ski Valley, with numerous options for outdoor recreation. Seven miles in the other direction is Taos. For a complete rundown on the village, check out visitseco.com. — Staff report

“Top ten ice cream shops in the country.” -

TAOS COW ICE CREAM CO. CAFÉ & DELI 776-5640 OPEN 7AM TO 7PM, 7 DAYS A WEEK LOCATED IN DOWNTOWN ARROYO SECO

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Taos Ski Valley Mountain's majesty

Surrounded by sacred wilderness and infused with the cultures of the Taos Pueblo, Hispanic and European peoples who have defined it, Taos Ski Valley (TSV) is steeped in legend and mystique. The vast, rugged terrain and generous, free-spirited community call out to a different kind of adventurer — a mountain lover with a passion for outdoor thrills and a taste for cultural discovery. The new 80-room hotel The Blake at Taos Ski Valley named after the resort's co-founder Ernie Blake — was open for its first full ski season this year. The decor and museum-quality art weaves the European, Hispanic and Native influences of Taos together into a beautiful, cultural tapestry. It also offers luxurious spa treatments and excellent dining. The village itself is young. It was incorporated in 1996. It is the highest residential home in the state at 10,388 feet above sea level. The last official census put TSV's human population at 69, but they share the valley with a much larger population of elk, deer, bears and bighorn sheep. TO THE TOP OF THE WORLD ON TWO FEET

There are many hiking trails to chose from. The hike to Williams Lake Trail is a popular trek accessed at the parking lot in which 1,000 feet are gained in altitude (start at about 10,000 feet) in just under 2 miles. Englemann spruce stands

Courtesy Taos Ski Valley

dominate the beginning of the trail. As you get closer to the upper end, it opens up into meadow land and scattered rock fields. Another reward for reaching the natural lake is the opportunity to continue on up to Wheeler Peak along the Wheeler Peak Trail, the highest point in New Mexico at 13,131 feet. Other trails include Long Canyon/ Bull of the Woods at 3.6 miles; Gavilan at 2.4 miles; Italianos Canyon at 3.5 miles; Manzanita Canyon at 4.2 miles; and Yerba Canyon at 4.0 miles. For more details on the trails and maps, go online to skitaos.com. Due to new lift installation/ construction, there will be no chairlift rides this summer. And when accessing the Wheeler Peak/Williams trailhead, be mindful of construction impacts.

ON TWO WHEELS

The popular Northside Trail (ridenorthside.com) is a self-guided, fee-based mountain biking area on 1,200 acres of private recreational development. As a mapped and signed trail system designed especially for mountain biking, Northside is a looped trail network with spectacular overlooks, single and double track routes through blue spruce and aspen stands, and meadows. The terrain is best suited for the intermediate and higher level rider. Singletracks.com selected Northside as one of the 20 most scenic mountain bike trails in the Western U.S. For the even more adventurous, one can pedal to the top of Frazer Mountain, 12,163 feet, the highest point on the property at an average grade of less than 10 percent.

Northside is open dawn to dusk from late June through October, weather permitting. Access permits are for sale at many locations in Taos Ski Valley or at the trailhead kiosk. Permits are also sold in Taos at Taos Cyclery and Gearing Up Bike Shop. KIDS WEEKEND DAY CAMP

The Field Institute of Taos offers a true camp experience for kids that focuses on outdoor education through games, nature crafts, hiking, photography, obstacles and other "mountain fun." The program is a full day for kids ages 6-12 and takes place every Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Camp begins June 24. Cost is $65 per day (scholarships are available). Meet at the base of chair 1 from 9 a.m.-10 a.m. to register and check in. In-town pick up and drop off is available. Call (575) 770-2391 or go online to fitaos.org.

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EVENTS JULY 7 BACON & BREWS NOON- 4 P.M.

Sample beer and bacon from across the Southwest while cooling off in the mountain air. The festival will be held outside at the Taos Ski Valley main base plaza area. Live music. skitaos.com

JULY 21 TAOS SKI VALLEY ARTS FESTIVAL 11:30 A.M.-4 P.M.

Check out and shop dozens of local and regional artists' works, eat wonderful food, enjoy the children's craft tent. Live music. Free admission. skitaos.com

AUG. 4 UP & OVER TRAIL RUN 9 A.M.-2 P.M.

Now in its 13th year, this 10k Trophy Series Event at Taos Ski Valley will challenge your body and stimulate the senses. taosskivalley.com/trailrun/

AUG. 17–19 SUMMER WINE FESTIVAL 9 A.M.-8 P.M.

Wine tastings, food, hiking, live music and more during this inaugural event. For a complete schedule, visit skitaos.com.

SEPT. 1 MUTT STRUT 11 A.M.-4 P.M.

The 2nd annual 5k dog fun run/walk at Taos Ski Valley to benefit Stray Hearts Animal Shelter and Taos Avalanche Dogs. Also dog activities, live music and food. Dogs must be on leashes. Registration begins at 9 a.m. skitaos.com

SEPT. 15-16 OKTOBERFEST 11:30 A.M.-5 P.M.

Head to the mountains for the annual Oktoberfest celebration, weather permitting. Festivities include an authentic Schuplatter band, German beer and food, activities and crafts for kids, yodeling contest, stein-holding contests and much more. This is a free event for all ages. Oktoberfest will be held outside on the frontside of the mountain next to the Children's Center. skitaos.com

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Photos courtesy Taos Ski Valley

HUNGRY?

The Resort Center has a rejuvenated look and feel. Restaurants are creating new menus in a commitment to providing more choices for healthier and selective diets with food coming from New Mexico sources, including organic produce and sustainable fisheries. TSV eateries include Northern New Mexican cuisine at Stray Dog Cantina; The Blonde Bear Tavern, featuring refined European alpine cuisine; and the 192 restaurant at The Blake, which specializes in wood-fired pizza and eclectic tapas. Please note that the Bavarian Lodge and Restaurant will be closed this summer for kitchen renovations. MOUNTAIN WEATHER

It's always chilly at night in the mountains. So if you're out after sunset, it's wise to bring fleece or a sweater.

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Angel Fire sunsets… BY ELLEN MILLER-GOINS

Visitors soon appreciate what “Angel Fire” means the first time they witness a sunset — one of those spectacles of red, orange, violet, pink, gray, white and blue that are so magic your smart phone cannot capture its spirit and you end up wishing you had brought your paints. Angel Fire is cool, comfortable, even tranquil in the summer, but opportunities for fun are plentiful with summer art exhibitions, chamber music, free outdoor summer concerts, art/farmers’ markets, movies in the park, shopping, birding, wildlife tours, horseback rides, sightseeing at nearby ghost towns, and so much more.

WHAT TO DO Angel Fire Resort offers a par 72, 6,653-yard, 18-hole golf course, disc golf, scenic chairlift rides, a swimming pool and fitness center, tennis center, climbing wall, Euro-Bungy Jumper and a playground at Olympic Park. Monte Verde Lake is an ideal place to hike, fish, boat, or relax on shore. Those looking for a bit more adventure can rent stand-up paddle boards. Extra wide boards make this activity easy for beginners to learn. Fishing equipment, bait and pedal boats are also available for those wanting a family fish fry and the lake is stocked with rainbow lake trout throughout the summer.

Courtesy Angel Fire Resort/Terrance Siemon

The top-rated Angel Fire Bike Park is giving Bike Park season pass holders four buddy passes so they can introduce their friends to the park at a discount. Angel Fire maintains more than 100 miles of downhill and cross-country green belt trails for all ability levels that also tie into the National Forest trail network, including the popular South Boundary Trail. This summer, the Resort’s Rocky Mountain Zipline Adventure Tour is unveiling the new Family Flyer with two ziplines that will offer younger kids who don’t weigh enough for the full adventure tour a chance to experience the excitement of mountain-top ziplining. Look for a newly redesigned PDGA-approved Disc Golf course located at the top of the Chile Express chairlift. Balloons Over Angel Fire 2018 returns Father’s Day weekend, June 15-17, and will include the inaugural Festival Eclectica, a fundraiser for the Shuter Library of Angel Fire, June

16 at the balloon venue, Colfax County Airport, Angel Fire. The festival will feature renowned Zydeco accordionist, singer/songwriter and Grammy-nominee, Dwayne Dopsie with his group the Zydeco Hellraisers, Taos singer/ songwriter, Max Gomez, the award-winning pan-Latin group Baracutanga, and other exciting acts. For more information, see FestivalEclectica.com. Angel Fire is home to the nation’s first monument to honor veterans of the Vietnam War. On U.S. 64, just north of Angel Fire the Vietnam Veterans Memorial features a chapel, visitor center and museum, a veterans’ walk and a “Huey” helicopter on display. (575) 377-2293, vietnamveteransmemorial.org

WHAT'S IN A NAME Angel Fire is nestled on the other side of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains from Taos in the Moreno Valley. One story of how Angel Fire got its name is credited

to plains Indians because of the lightning and the St. Elmo's fire that illuminated the surrounding peaks. Another widely held legend records that it was named by Moache Utes who gathered there to renew their ancestral ties with the Great Spirit who they saw as the sun's rays that danced upon a mountain peak or the "fire of the gods." The legend further says that nomadic Franciscan friars Christianized the Ute name into "breath of angels." Frontiersman Kit Carson is often credited with changing the name to Angel Fire in 1845. At 8,382 feet, Angel Fire Airport is the fifth-highest airport in the continental U.S. and the highest in New Mexico. The 8,900 x 100-foot runway is adequate for smaller planes and private jets. Landing and taking off can be tricky. Precautions and safety tips are posted for pilots’ perusal.

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Photo by Jeff Caven

Angel Fire Resident John R. Sutton General Building Contractor, a long-established builder in the Moreno Valley, is known for taking the time to communicate with his clients and get a clear vision of what the owner is after. Working hard to establish his quality of workmanship and working relationships with sub-contractors, John strives to create a solid and dependable team. Managing this team is vital to a project finishing on schedule with the owners expectations in mind. Visit our website for additional photos and testimonials... suttonconstruction.com

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John R. Sutton General Building Contractor, Inc.

Ofďƒžce: 575.377.6570 Cell: 505.603.4727 Centro Plaza | Mountain View Blvd. | PO Box 76 | Angel Fire, NM 87710 designbuild@suttonconstruction.com | NM License #57394

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EVENTS JUNE 15-AUG. 31 COOL SUMMER NIGHTS CONCERTS IN THE PARK 5-7 P.M.

Every Friday night the Cool Summer Nights Concert Series in Angel Fire's Frontier Park will offer a free night of live music from regional acts along with a Kids Zone with giant Jenga, cornhole, face painting and games. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. angelfirecoolsummer.com

JUNE 17-SEPT. 2 ART & FARMERS MARKET IN ANGEL FIRE SUNDAYS, 10 A.M.-2 P.M.

Regional produce, arts and crafts and live entertainment at Frontier Park.

AUG. 17-SEPT. 1 MUSIC FROM ANGEL FIRE During this 35th season, world-renowned musicians perform chamber music from classical, romantic, baroque and contemporary masters. See musicfromangelfire.org for locations, times and to buy tickets.

MAY 16 ANGEL FIRE GOLF COURSE OPENING DAY Tee off at 8,500 feet on this par 72, 6,653 yard, 18-hole golf course. To book a tee time, call (575) 377-4488. angelfireresort.com

MAY 22 AMBUSH COMMEMORATION 11 A.M.

A gathering at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the battle in Con Thien, South Vietnam. The ceremonies will focus on the men who died and the next of kin and battle survivors they left behind. The public is invited. vietnamveteransmemorial.org

Photos courtesy Angel Fire Resort

MAY 26-27 MOUNTAIN BIKE DEMO DAZE 9 A.M.-4 P.M. Try an extensive selection of the latest mountain bikes and test ride to your heart's content on real trails. The only lift-access summer bike demo in the Southwest. Held at Angel Fire Bike Park. angelfirebikepark.com

MAY 28 MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONIES 9 A.M.-6 P.M.

Veterans and their friends and families come from all around the country to honor our fallen soldiers from the Vietnam War. Featured are a Flag March (9 a.m.), special ceremony (11 a.m.), speakers, book signings, tours and a morning motorcycle run from Red River. The Flag March starts at the intersection of U.S. Highway 64 and State Road 434 and proceeds up the hill to the memorial. All events held at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire. The public is invited to participate. vietnamveteransmemorial.org

JUNE 9-10 SCOTT ENDURO CUP MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

In 2017, this race drew 200 professional and amateur racers to the Angel Fire Resort Mountain Bike Park and surrounding trails to prove their skills on the trails. endurocupmtb.com continues on page 184

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Photos courtesy Angel Fire Resort

JUNE 15-17 BALLOONS OVER ANGEL FIRE

JULY 1 ANGEL FIRE ADVENTURE MARATHON

This year, 40 hot-air balloons will fly over Angel Fire throughout the weekend with a special Balloon Glow on Saturday evening. Free admission. This year, Festival Eclectica coincides with the ballon festival. This inaugural fundraiser for the local library features Dwayne Dopsie with his group the Zydeco Hellraisers, Taos singer/songwriter, Max Gomez, the award-winning pan-Latin group Baracutanga, and other acts. For more information, see FestivalEclectica.com and balloonsoverangelfire.com.

Join in on the experience of the 4th annual Angel Fire Adventure Marathon, Half Marathon 5k and Happy Feet Kids' Run. facebook. com/AngelFireAdventure/

7 A.M.-9 P.M.

JUNE 15-17 ANGEL FIRE ENDURANCE RUN The only 100-mile running event in New Mexico. Held on the Angel Fire Resort property, runners have the option at sign up to enter a 25k, 50k, 50-mile, 100k or 100-mile race. angelfireresort.com

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6 A.M.-6 P.M.

JULY 7-8 ANGEL FIRE ARTSFEST 9 A.M.-5 P.M. SAT; 10 A.M.4 P.M. SUN.

Now in its 37th year, this is one of the longest-running arts festivals in Northern New Mexico. Artists from all over the Southwest come to Angel Fire to display their works. Art, food, entertainment and a silent auction. Held at the Angel Fire Community Center. artup-nnm.org/ artsfest/

JULY 21 ANGEL FIRE GARDEN CLUB TOUR 8 A.M.-2 P.M.

Visit some of the most beautiful mountain gardens in the Southwest. angelfirefun.com/ events/view/9914

AUG. 4-5 HABLA TAMALE FESTIVAL 10 A.M.-6 P.M.

The Angel Fire Chamber of Commerce hosts tamale-makers from around Northern New Mexico to show off their talents. Tamale cook-off competition, tamale-eating contest, Wally & Molly tamale contest, kids' area, music, arts and crafts vendors. angelfirechamber.org

SEPT. 1 BRICK LAYING — RUN FOR THE WALL REUNION

studio environment including Angel Fire, Black Lake, Taos Canyon, Eagle Nest and Valle Escondido. For a tour map and more information, visit angelfirestudiotour.org.

SEPT. 29-30 THE TREK DIRT SERIES MOUNTAIN BIKE CAMP This instructional weekend camp for riders of all ages returns to Angel Fire. It features technical skill development sessions, small group instructional rides and a program highlighting maintenance clinics and bike set up. dirtseries.com

9 A.M.

Run For The Wall friends return to lay bricks into the Memorial Walkway at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire as part of their annual reunion. RFTW lays about 400 bricks annually, including eight Medal of Honor Bricks. The public is welcome to attend. Call (575) 377-6900 or visit vietnamveteransmemorial.org.

SEPT. 29 ANGEL FIRE STUDIO TOUR 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

NOV. 11 VETERANS DAY CEREMONY AT ANGEL FIRE 11 A.M.

The annual Veterans Day Ceremony will be held at the 11th hour, on the 11th day of the 11th month at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire. Weather permitting, the ceremony will be held outside in the Amphitheater. For updates on the keynote speaker and other details about the ceremony, visit vietnamveteransmemorial.org.

Featuring many of Moreno Valley artists and craftspeople in their

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VALLE ESCONDIDO GOLF taosgolf.org

12 miles East of Taos on Highway 64

Discover Angel Fire! Dreaming about staying and playing in Angel Fire this season? Let Brenda’s Property Management make your stay in Angel Fire easy and fun, so you have time to hit the slopes. Your next family vacation starts right here! Call 575-377-5917 to reserve now.

9 HOLE, PAR 36 U.S.G.A. MEMBER, ALPINE WALKING COURSE 9 holes $23.00 + TAX • 18 holes $29.00 + TAX Senior and Youth Discounts

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Reservations Required • 575.377.6416 Hwy. 64/434 (1 mile west of blinking light on 64), Angel Fire, NM www.nancyburch.com

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Red River

Coolness to boot BY ELLEN MILLER-GOINS

No doubt about it, Red River’s changed through the years but the most striking thing about this small community is the way it hasn’t changed. Generations still come, year after year, to enjoy cool summer days, family friendly fun and abundant nature. Small shop, restaurant and lodge owners still greet returning customers by name. Whatever your recreation or relaxation desire, this town provides. Little ones can frolic on state-of-the art playground equipment at Brandenburg Park in the middle of town or Mallette Park, which rests amid tall shade trees and towering cliffs. Gun fights are a family tradition at Frye’s Old Town. The Red River Community House has a packed summer schedule with myriad free activities every day, including: Nature Hikes, Flower Walks, S'mores & Stories, Games on the Lawn, Movies in the Mountains, Music in the Mountains, Jammin' on the Porch, fitness classes, crafts, line dancing, senior games, church, and more. See redrivercommunityhouse.com for more information. Over Memorial Day Weekend, thousands of motorcycle enthusiasts from all walks of life get ready to rumble for the annual rally. It's one crazy party and one beautiful ride to the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial in Angel Fire. redriver.org/events/ memorial-day-motorcycle-rally

Taso News file photo

With U.S. Forest Service on all sides, Red River has hundreds of miles of trails for hiking, biking, fishing and horseback riding. At Red River Ski & Summer Area, visitors can ride a chairlift to the top, then explore Moonstar Mining Camp on the backside, “zip” down from the face to the town’s fishing ponds on the Pioneer Flyer or test their skills on the challenging Hidden Treasure Aerial Park. Guided Jeep Tours offer an entertaining trip into the area’s mining past. Four wheel aficionados will find miles of roads to explore and, thanks to an ordinance approving their use — with restrictions — some off-highway vehicles can depart from most locations right in town (see wildlife. state.nm.us/download/ohv/ local-ordinances/Red-RiverROV-Usage.pdf). Just over the hill, visitors can enjoy a unique opportunity: The approximately 4,000acre Robert Mutz Ranch, located in and around the former mining boomtown

Elizabethtown in the Moreno Valley, is for sale but for now Red River Stables and Red River Mountain Adventures are offering a rare glimpse into this historic property — through guided tours by horseback or 4x4s. Local guides offer horseback rides from short rides to allday treks through some of the most scenic terrain in the Sangre de Cristos. Moreno Valley Cowboy Evenings on Bobcat Pass offer true western hospitality with Dutch-oven cooking and live entertainment.

it is still possible to find remnants of the past. The historic Little Red Schoolhouse houses a museum with numerous artifacts and photos from Red River’s past. The Young House also sports a fine collection of mementos from one of the town’s first settlers. This summer check out the brand new Red River Brewing Company. And for even more fun things to do, go online to redriverskiarea. com/summer/activities/.

Thanks to a great stocking program, the Red River offers excellent angling from the Upper Valley, to Fawn Lakes, all the way to the Red River Fish Hatchery outside Questa. Check out Middle Fork Lake, Lost Lake, Horseshoe Lake and Goose Lake, all good for native cutthroat. Red River was born from mining. Much of the town's mining history has disappeared like the prospectors who once sought gold, but continues on page 192

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EVENTS MAY 19 BACON & BREWS All day. Kick off summer with the 1st annual Bacon & Brews event in Red River. Come to Brandenburg Park for bacon, beer, games, music and beers and wines from all across New Mexico, including the new Red River Brewing Company. There will also be select vendors offering everything from clothing to art and family-friendly tailgating games such as cornhole, over-sized Jenga and more. Poo Live Crew will be playing in the park all day. redriver.org

MAY 24-25 MEMORIAL DAY MOTORCYCLE RALLY Hop on your bike to join some 20,000 riders Monday morning on the 25-mile parade to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire. Other festivities include the Harley Davidson Busted Knuckles Stunt Tour, live music and vendors. Held in Brandenburg Park. Proceeds benefit Beds4Kidz. (575) 754-1708; redriver.org/events/annual-events/ memorial-day-motorcycle-rally

JUNE 2 CLASSIC CAR SHOW Red River's annual car show features all years, makes and models of the hottest roadsters in the region. Three unique night parades, Hula Hoop contests, bubble gum-blowing contests, evening sock hop, raffles, cake walks and road rally. redriver.org/events/ annual-events/classic-car-show

JUNE 15-17 RED RIVER ART & WINE FESTIVAL From 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. tantalize your taste buds with fine wines and delicacies. This event features both silent and live auctions, art, pottery, photography, wine sampling and live music. Held at Brandenburg Park. redriver.org

JULY 4-8 MICHAEL MARTIN MURPHEY’S AMERICAN WEST FEST

AUG. 4 DULCIMER FESTIVAL A day filled with workshops, concerts, singing, and jamming in Red River at the Community House. Don’t know what a dulcimer is? Sign up for a workshop and you’ll be playing in no time. redrivercommunityhouse.com

AUG. 4 RED RIVER HALF MARATHON & 5K

Courtesy LC Media

This family-friendly festival at Brandenburg Park will include American Indian artists, mountain men and Old West cowboy historical re-enactment. Scheduled for daily sets are Ryan Murphey, Brennan Murphey, Carin Mari, American Indian prodigy Gareth Laffley and more. Get tickets online at smarturl. it/MMM_WestFest2018. For more information, visit redriver.org.

JULY 28 2ND ANNUAL WAGS & WINE FESTIVAL A celebration of furry friends and wine. Some of the activities will be a Doggy Bake Sale; Yappy Hour; The Grand Fur Ball; accessory vendors; and wine tastings from top Southwest wineries. All donations for this event go toward funding a dog park for the town of Red River. Held in Brandenburg Park. redriver. org/events/wags-wine

Challenge yourself at this event with a race or fun run through Red River's Upper Valley. The 13.1 mile race begins in town at 8,750 feet and climbs more than 700 feet with a turnaround point at just above 9,400 feet elevation. Runners take in amazing views including Wheeler Peak, the highest point in New Mexico at 13,161 feet. Half marathon entry fee is $65; $40 for the 5k. redriver.org/events/annual-events/ half-marathon-5k-run

AUG 16-18 LARRY JOE TAYLOR'S "HOT CHILI DAYS, COOL MOUNTAIN NIGHTS" MUSIC FESTIVAL & COOK-OFF Red River’s rousing music scene can trace its roots back to Texas, mostly centered around Austin’s “red dirt rock.” True to this tradition, the annual event features live music all over town with Larry Joe Taylor & Friends, as well as multiple cook-offs in Brandenburg Park like the CASI "Red River Red" cook-off, the New Mexico State Green Chile Championship and the Lone Star BBQ Society cook-off. Held from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

For more information and tickets visit larryjoetaylor.com/red_river/ music_lineup or redriver.org

SEPT. 13-16 THE 44TH ANNUAL SOUTHWEST PICKERS BLUEGRASS AND OLD TIME MUSIC FESTIVAL At this annual Red River event you can look forward to bluegrass, old time and Americana bands, instructional workshops, dancing, food, beer garden and vendors at various venues around town. southwestpickers-festival.org

SEPT. 21-23 ASPENCADE ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR AND RED RIVER FOLK FESTIVAL Browse through booths of hand-crafted items, jewelry, home furnishings, food, art, pottery, and specialty goods while you enjoy food and live entertainment in Red River. Special 3-day pass to all events at The Motherlode and Brandenburg Park available for only $55 until Aug. 15. redriverfolk.com

OCT. 5-7 OKTOBERFEST IN RED RIVER Authentic German food and music; arts and crafts exhibitors, microbreweries and wineries; games and contests; food vendors and family friendly activities. Get a commemorative taster mug or stein with your $5 admission fee. Held in Brandenburg Park. redriver.org/ events/annual-events/oktoberfest

AUG. 3 9TH ANNUAL BUCKAROO BALL Pull out your finest Western duds for a night of food, festivities and fundraising. The gala hosts an evening of cocktails, food, live music, dancing and silent and live auctions to benefit the Red River Valley Foundation, a nonprofit created by and for the people of Red River. Tickets are $25 per person. Includes two drink tickets. Held at the Red River ConferenceCenter. redrivervalleyfoundation.org/events

Taso News file photo/Katharine Egli

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Courtesy Red River Historial Society The town of Red River, which sprang up from a mining boom, circa 1930s.

5)&$"/%:$3"5&

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Questa Serene and unspoiled This tiny, historic village on the northwest shoulder of the Enchanted Circle, is undergoing an awakening. After its main source of income ended in 2014 with the closing of the Chevron-owned molybdenum mine, long-neglected qualities have blossomed. What local Taos County residents have always known is that the unspoiled outdoors surrounding Questa offer some of the most dramatic and serene hiking, rock climbing, camping and fishing in Northern New Mexico. Only a half-hour drive north of Taos, Questa makes for a great getaway for the afternoon, or longer. Questa is a good jumping off point for excursions into the the Río Grande del Norte National Monument whether by foot or all-terrain vehicles. This “Wild Rivers” area is where the Red River joins the Río Grande in its deep and dramatic gorge and is maintained by the Bureau of Land Management. This year marks its fifth year of designation by President Obama. The roughly 242,000 acres is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the West. It is home to many hiking trails, grass and sagebrush mesas, American Indian archaeological sites, volcanic peaks and forest. Fishing, and bird and wildlife watching are some of the other popular activities here. Anglers will love Eagle Rock Lake on the east side of Questa and the section of the Red River that feeds into and out of the lake. With mountain lakes up above and two river chasms to fish for

Taos News file photo

northern pike and several varieties of trout below, Questa is an angler’s paradise for sure. In the heart of town is the beautifully restored San Antonio del Río Colorado Catholic Church. This historic, adobe structure has stood at the heart of the village since the mid-1800s. But it needed help. The fundraising effort for its resurrection was organized by the community. Its restoration was done by

volunteers over about five years and who logged more than 40,000 hours. Questa is about 24 miles from Taos, take Paseo del Pueblo Norte/U.S. Highway 64 to State Highway 522 north. For more information about the area, call the Village of Questa at (575) 586-0694; go online to visitquesta.com or contact the Bureau of Land Management field office at (575) 758-8851. continues on page 196

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EVENTS

AUG. 18-19 STUDIO ARTS TOUR 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

JUNE 4-OCT.14 QUESTA FARMER'S MARKET

Local artists will display their work and wares at various locations throughout the Lama to El Rito corridor. This is the first studio tour of the year in Northern New Mexico. Presented is locally made pottery, painting, jewelry, photography, hand made furniture, glass-working and traditional/contemporary crafts. The venue is held at various locations throughout Questa. questaartstour.com.

Held every Sunday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. near the intersection of State Roads 38 and 522 at the Questa Visitor Center/QEDF Parking Area.

JUNE 2 NATIONAL TRAILS DAY, QUESTA HISTORY WALK Join local historian Flavio Cisneros for a free, .6m loop along the Questa History & Community Trail. A 5000-year timeline highlights rare geologic features, Hispano and multi-cultural settlements, Native life and conflicts, frontier religious devotion, orchards and arts. Meet at Questa’s traffic light, corner of State Roads 522 and 38. begins at 10:30 a.m. questatrail.com

SEPT. 15 NEORIO 2018: ROOTS — RAICES 4-9 PM

NeoRio outdoor contemporary art and community event is held at the Montoso Campground, Wild Rivers Río Grande del Norte National Monument. Artists and collaborators delve into the theme of “Roots — Raices,” exploring various angles: botanical, cultural, metaphorical and beyond. Discover art installations along the rim of the Río Grande Gorge, related hands-on activities, afternoon music and poetry salon, a delicious, locally sourced Northern New Mexico fall feast, artist talks, music around an evening campfire and more. leapsite.org/neorio/ neorio2018

JULY 8 "GATHERING MEMORY: OBJECT, PHOTO AND STORY WORKSHOP" Former New Mexico State Historian Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez will give a presentation on history and memory, and lead the community though a memoir workshop. Participants are asked to arrive with an object that holds a special memory about a person, event or place; a photograph that could be used to tell a story; and the name of one ancestor whose life holds special meaning. Held at the VFW Hall, 1 mile north of the traffic light in Questa, on State Road 522. Free admission. Starts at 2 p.m. questatrail.com

Scott Gerdes

4-7 P.M.

Dia de los Muertos is a time-honored tradition to remember loved ones. It originated in Mesoamerica as a blend of Spanish, Aztec and ancient traditions; today, it's celebrated worldwide. Festivities during this fourth annual event include music, art making and a feast. Each year many contribute posole, prune pies, hot chocolate, pan de muerto and more. Bring a dish to share, perhaps a favorite of someone you are remembering. All are invited to bring photos of loved ones or objects to add to a community altar.

JULY 17-22 WILD RIVERS PLEIN AIRE PAINT-OUT Artists congregate from July 17-20 at the Wild Rivers Recreation Park in Questa to paint outside during this third annual event. On those days demonstrations and workshops will also be held. On July 21 and 22, the featured events are the Quick Draw, pop-up art show and an awards celebration on July 21 at the Alpine Lodge in Red River from 5-7 p.m. wildriverspleinair

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NOV. 2 DIA DE LOS MUERTOS — DAY OF THE DEAD

Taos News file photo

Participants can make sugar skulls, paper marigolds and other art; supplies and instruction provided. This event is free, donations are appreciated. Held at La Sala, 2331 State Road 522. (575) 224-2102, leapsite.org

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Questa Lumber & Hardware Co. Look for our new full service Hardware store and Lumber yard at 2349 St. Hwy 522 (Next to Family Dollar)

Visit us for all your hard-to-find seasonal, contracting, and home repair needs. We have the experience to get the job done with our family of stores.

575-586-0414

575-586-0561

575-586-0419

Questa Health Center 2573 State Highway 522ŇQuesta NM

575-586-0375

Medical | Dental | Behavioral Health Care

Ask about our medically-guided weight loss program.

Personalized service is our number one priority!

575-586-1440

DISCOVERTAOS.COM

Accepting New Patients Walk-ins Welcome

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Eagle Nest Fly Shack & Lodge Lodging, Fishing & More starting at

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Free Choice for Real Estate in Chama

CHAMA

This beautiful log sided manufactured home nestled in the quiet Ponderosa subdivision South of Chama is charming and inviting on 5.44 acres. You will feel one with nature as you relax and watch deer and elk wonder through your property or take a walk through your back property and follow a nature trail from the front balcony to a wildlife viewing gazebo. Indulge in relaxation listening to your seasonal creek that runs through the back property. There is a mudroom/laundry room with access to the side yard and a brand new water heater. There is a wood burning stove in one bedroom with French doors leading to a private deck. This home has a room that could accommodate an office or possibly a third bedroom. There is a detached two car garage that has the space for a workshop. Most furniture stays. Retreat and live simultaneously in this wooded mountain home! $217,900, MLS#201800418 If you are into VIEWS... this is the home for you! Like new 3 bedroom, 2 bath, attached 2 car garage & huge deck sitting on top of a cliff over looking the Chama Valley on 5.17 acres. You can even see HeronLake! This home is a true treasure. Ticonderoga Subdivision is the premiere Subdivision in the Chama Area, with it’s 395 acres of Conservation Easement, 5 stocked ponds, and countless trails to explore. Enjoy the views from the Chavez Creek Box...and incredible fishing. Secure gated community with year round acess. You can’t beat a deal like this!!! $379,999, MLS# 201602279

Michele Marino Qualifying Broker

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(575) 756-1351 • (575) 756-4717 (cell) 669 Terrace Ave. Chama, NM 87520

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MAY 11 - 13

MAY 17 – 19

MAY 18 –20

MAY 22

17th Annual Day of Celebration for Moms

5th annual Dennis Hopper Day

New Mexico Fiber Crawl

Ambush Commemoration

LMNOC Broadcasting Inc. is the host of this free community concert weekend. The event is a three day family-oriented event, which unites families, friends, neighbors and visitors in honor of our mothers while preserving Northern New Mexico traditions, heritage and culture. Held at Kit Carson park on the heart of Taos. facebook.com/991kxmt/, (575) 758-4491

61st Annual Mother's Day Whitewater Races People have been competing in this paddle race since the 1950s, twisting and turning rafts and kayaks down the Pilar Racecourse. For more information and complete schedule of events, visit mothersdaywhitewater.com.

Easy Rider Rally & Ride, commemoration concert and Rebel Film Festival to commemorate this former Taos resident and counter-culture icon. Events held at Taos Center for the Arts, Ranchos de Taos Plaza and KTAO Solar Center. Visit dennishopperday.com for complete schedule.

MAY 18 – 19

Run for the Wall 4-6 P.M. | Annual Veterans motorcycle ride from the West Coast to Washington D.C. with a stop in Angel Fire including ceremonies at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park. angelfirefun.com; vietnamveteransmemorial.org; (575) 377-6900

MAY 18 –20

MAY 12

Artist Talk: Nikesha Breeze 2 P.M. | Nikesha Breeze will discuss her work at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. The program is free with admission and free to museum members. harwoodmuseum.org

Arts & Crafts Fair 10 A.M.-4 P.M. DAILY This companion to the Taos Lilac Festival is now in its 48th year. Held at Kit Carson Park. taoschamber.com

10 A.M.-5 P.M. | Visit the galleries and museums highlighting the most traditional as well as most cutting-edge fiber work in the state. Beginning in Albuquerque and winding north to Taos, the Crawl features conversations with artists, exclusive access to gallery and museum collections and hands-on demonstrations. In Taos, the Crawl is hosted by La Hacienda de Los Martinez (taoshistoricmuseums.org) at 708 Hacienda Way off Ranchitos Road, (575) 758-1000. In Mora, New Mexico the Crawl is hosted by Victory Alpaca Ranch, 1 State Highway 434; victoryranch.com; (575) 387-2254. MFiberCrawl.org

Taos Lilac Festival 11 A.M.-5 P.M. FRI.; 10 A.M.P.M. SAT. AND SUN. The Grand Festival Weekend celebrating this fragrant May bloomer features a pet parade and costume contest (Sat. 11 a.m.); live entertainment; kids' carousel; open-air expo; beer, wine and food garden; Wine Dinner at medley.; self-guided walking tours; Taos Taco CookOff; and many family-friendly activities. All events except the Lilac Festival Wine Dinner are held at Kit Carson Park. taoslilacfestival.com

DENNIS HOPPER DAY

11 A.M. | A gathering at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the battle in Con Thien, South Vietnam. The public is invited. vietnamveteransmemorial.org

and a morning motorcycle run from Red River. The Flag March starts at the intersection of U.S. Highway 64 and State Road 434 and proceeds up the hill to the the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire where all ceremonies will be held. The public is invited to participate. vietnamveteransmemorial.org

JUNE 1 – 3 MAY 25 – 27

Victory Ranch sheering demonstration CALL FOR TIMES | Watch the ranch's world-class alpaca sheerer over Memorial Day Weekend. Victory Ranch is located in Mora, New Mexico at 1 State Highway 434. Call (575) 387-2254 or visit ictoryranch.com.

MAY 26 – 27

Cello Chicks 5:30 P.M. | A Taos Chamber Music Group favorite returns with four female cellists featured in a something for everyone program, spanning Bach and the classics to jazz, pop and beyond. Performance at Arthur Bell Auditorium at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. Individual tickets are $25 for adults, $20 for museum members and $12 for students and are available at the museum or online. Visit taoschambermusicgroup.org for online tickets. For more information or call (575) 758-9826.

4th Annual Music on the Mothership Music on the Mothership (formerly Music on the Mesa), the coolest, grooviest festival in the world. Located at Taos Mesa Brewing, a one-of-kind location just minutes from the Río Grande Gorge and 8 miles from Taos. For lineup go to taosmusiconthemesa.com.

JUNE 9

Michael Franti & Spearhead 7 P.M. | Franti, musician, poet, spoken word artist and singer-songwriter, returns to play at Kit Carson Park in Taos with The Wailers and Dustin Thomas. michaelfranti.com

SOMOS:

A special reading with Natalie Goldberg and John Nichols

MAY 28

Memorial Day Ceremonies 9 A.M.-6 P.M. Veterans and their friends and families come from all around the country to honor our fallen soldiers from the Vietnam War. Featured are a Flag March (9 a.m.), special ceremony (11 a.m.), speakers, book signings, tours

Katharine Egli

DISCOVERTAOS.COM

Rick Romancito

7 P.M. | A unique evening at the Harwood Museum of Art at 238 Ledoux St., with two of Taos' favorite authors; John Nichols and Natalie Goldberg will read from their writings. harwoodmuseum.org

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THE 33RD ANNUAL TAOS PUEBLO POWWOW WILL BE HELD JULY 13-15

JUNE 22

Jazz: Greg Abate and Richie Cole 7:30 P.M. | The Taos Jazz Bebop Society and the Harwood Museum of Art bring these two jazz legends to Taos for a concert performance. Held at the Harwood Museum, 238 Ledoux St. harwoodmuseum.org JUNE 23 - 24

Rodeo de Taos Sanctioned events begin at 2 p.m. at the Taos County Sheriff's Posse Arena, Drive In Road, Taos. Events include bareback bronc riding, barrels, break-away roping, bull riding, ribbon roping, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, team roping and tie down roping. For more information and directions, call (575) 758-3974.

Rough Riders 200 Two days of bicycle riding 100-plus miles each day through winding canyons and over nearly 10,000-feet high mountain passes. Start time on both days is 7 a.m. granfondoguide.com

Katharine Egli

RED RIVER: Festivities begin at 10 a.m. with a parade. redriver.org/events/ annual-events/4th-of-july-parade-celebration EAGLE NEST: Fireworks over Eagle Nest Lake. Festivities at the lake from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. including a Fireman's Barbecue and a parade down Main Street at 2 p.m. eaglenestchamber.org ARROYO SECO: The quirkiest parade in the area. Begins at noon. TAOS: The Town of Taos celebrates the 4th of July with live music, pancake breakfast and a fireworks display to cap off the evening. Held at Kit Carson Park. taos.org/ events/4th-july-concert/

JULY 4

JULY 7

Fourth of July celebrations

Virginia Couse Leavitt: "In My

Grandfather's Footsteps" 10 A.M.-NOON | The Couse-Sharp Foundation presents Virginia Couse Leavitt, granddaughter of early Taos painter E. Irving Couse, who will present a lecture based on research trips she and her husband made to Europe in the 1980s. Held at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. harwoodmuseum.org

"Full Circle: Taos Pueblo Contemporary" 3-5 P.M. | An open house for the opening of an exhibit inspired by the culture of Taos Pueblo and the Taos Society of Artists, which included promotion and preservation of Native art in their charter. The exhibition is in the 1835 Luna

Chapel at the Couse-Sharp Historic Site. Free admission. The exhibit is on display through Nov. 7 at 146 Kit Carson Road. couse-sharp.org

JULY 10

Doel Reed Center for the Arts Talk 4 P.M. | David King Dunaway and John Nichols will discuss writing about the Southwest. Held at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. Free with admission and for museum and Doel Reed members. harwoodmuseum.org

JULY 13 –15

33rd Annual Taos Pueblo Powwow FRI. AND SAT. 10A.M.-10 P.M.; SUN. 10 A.M.-6 P.M. A powwow is a gathering of Indian Nations in a common circle of friendship. 120 Veterans Highway, Taos. taospueblopowwow.com

JULY 17

Doel Reed Center for the Arts Talk 4 P.M. | A visiting artist will discuss his/her work. Held Courtesy Angel Fire Resort

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at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. Free with admission and for museum and Doel Reed members. For updated information, visit harwoodmuseum.org.

JULY 20 — 22

Fiestas de Santiago y Santa Ana A centuries old fiesta celebrating the gathering of generations to enjoy food, traditional music and fellowship, while honoring the cultural uniqueness of Taos. Held at Historic Taos Plaza. Includes a children's and historical parade and live entertainment. fiestasdetaos.com

Larry Bell and Friends 7 P.M. | Held at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. harwoodmuseum.org

JULY 7

Jazz: Charles McPhearson 7:30 P.M. | Performance held at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. harwoodmuseum.org

Oliver Prezant and Emanuele SUMMER/FALL 2018


Arciuli 2 P.M. | Prezant will give a lecture/presentation on the Ives "Concord Sonata" followed with its performance by Arciuli. Held at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux St. harwoodmuseum.org

SEPTEMBER 1

SEPTEMBER 1 — 2

Brick Laying — Run for the Wall Reunion

Chama Valley Studio Tour

9 A.M. | Run For The Wall friends return to lay bricks into the Memorial Walkway at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire as part of their annual reunion. The public is welcome to attend. Call (575) 377-6900 or visit vietnamveteransmemorial.org.

AUGUST 4

South Boundary BigRide 7 A.M.-3 P.M.

SEPTEMBER 1 — 2

The South Boundary BigRide is a stunning 40-mile mostly single-track ride on the South Boundary Trail from Angel Fire Resort to the Taos Youth and Family Center. Ride begins at 10 a.m. Part of the Zia Rides series. ziarides.com

Cleveland Roller Mill Museum tour 10 A.M.-3 P.M.

Taos Garden & Home Tour 9 A.M.-4 P.M. | Los Jardineros Garden Club of Taos invites you to tour some of Taos' most beautiful gardens and homes. gardencluboftaos.org

Turquoise Gala Celebrate the Millicent Rogers Museum and its goal to share the arts and cultures of the Southwest during the annual Turquoise Gala at El Monte Sagrado in Taos. For updated information, please visit the museum calendar at millicentrogers.org or call (575) 758-2462.

AUGUST 9 – 11

Taos Pride

Katharine Egli

AUGUST 9 — 12

Enchanted Circle Adventure Ride 7 A.M.-10 P.M. | During this event hosted by KTM/AMA National Adventure Riding, visit sites such as Ojo Caliente Hot Springs, Río Grande Gorge, the Greater World Earthship community, Cimarrón Canyon and the many towns around Taos and the Enchanted Circle. Morning and afternoon motorcycle rides. Enjoy a campfire, a bike skills clinic or KTM new model demo. Register online at tickets.holdmyticket. com/tickets/304848. For more information, skitaos.com.

Glam Trash Fashion Show 4-5:30 P.M. | A hat made of old camera film? A skirt made from bottle caps? This annual, fashion show done Taos style has seen many fun and inventive apparel and accessory designs in its 18 years of delighting crowds. Free. Held at Taos Plaza.

Watch as water flows over a massive 18-foot, 6-inch cast iron water wheel at this historic property in Cleveland, New Mexico. The wheel powers the original flour mill — a threestory adobe building — which is now a museum. This event only happens over Memorial Day Weekend. Free admission. About 1 hour from Taos. Call (575) 387-2645 or go online to clevelandrollermillmuseum.com.

10 A.M.-5 P.M. | Artist studio tour along State Road 64/84 in northern Río Arriba County. chamavalleystudiotour.com

SEPTEMBER 1 — 3

TAO Studio Tour

Over Labor Day Weekend, tour the studios of Taos artists throughout town. Now in its 11th year. For a map and more information, visit taosartistorg.org.

SEPTEMBER 6 – 8

Michael Hearne's 16th annual Big Barn Dance Cut a rug to live world-class country, Americana and folk music at one of New Mexico's most-anticipated music events. Plus songwriting workshops, dance lessons, art gallery tours, camping and more. Held at Kit Carson Park. bigbarndance.com continues on page 216

NEW MEXICO'S MOST-ANTICIPATED MUSIC EVENTS, MICHAEL HEARNE'S 16TH ANNUAL BIG BARN DANCE, IS SLATED FOR SEPT. 6-8 AT KIT CARSON PARK IN TAOS.

AUGUST 25

Celebrate diversity and "be exactly who you are" during a weekend filled with films, a parade (Saturday, 11 a.m. from the Taos County Courthouse to Kit Carson Park), drag show, food, vendors and a host of live performances from noon-5 p.m. at Kit Carson Park. taospride.org

Arte de Descartes 4-7 P.M. | Artworks made from found objects and repurposed materials take center stage at the 18th annual Arte de Descartes free exhibit at the Stables Gallery of the Taos Center for the Arts. Courtesy Big Barn Dance/Dave Hensley

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for this annual tour. The High Road begins from State Road 518 in Ranchos de Taos to Chimayó along State Road 76 at Peñasco and through the small towns of Cordova, Truchas and Ojo Sarco. For a tour map and more information, visit highroadnewmexico.com.

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El Rito Studio Tour Rick Romancito

Kids and adults watch in awe as the balloons rise into the morning sky during the 2017 Taos Mountain Balloon Rally. This year's rally will be held Oct. 26-28.

SEPTEMBER 9

Enchanted Circle Century Tour This bicycle tour begins in Red River taking you through a 100-mile roundtrip trek to Taos, alongside two state parks, the Vietnam Memorial, Eagle Nest Lake and Palo Flechado and Bobcat passes. grandfondoguide.com

SEPTEMBER 14 — 15

The PASEO Project 5-10 P.M. | Annual outdoor art installation, performance and projection festival on the streets of Taos' Historic District. paseoproject.org.

SEPTEMBER 15

Bull of the Woods Trail Races This trail run is an 8-mile or half marathon, high-altitude trail race designed to maximize your trail running experience on a primarily single-track course through Taos Ski Valley's high alpine forests, meadows and overlooks. bullofthewoodsrun.com

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NeoRio 2018: Roots — Raices 4–9 P.M. | Join in the 10th annual NeoRio outdoor contemporary art and community event at the Montoso Campground, Wild Rivers Río Grande del Norte National Monument This year, artists and collaborators delve into the theme of “Roots — Raices,” exploring various angles — botanical, cultural, metaphorical and beyond. The event features hands-on activities, afternoon music and poetry salon, a Northern New Mexico fall feast, artist talks, music around an evening campfire and more. leapsite. org/neorio/neorio2018/

SEPTEMBER 23

PainoTaos A program coinciding with Taos Fall Arts Festival. This year's theme is "Americana: Stories & Legends," held in the historic Taos Museum of Art at Fechin House, located a few blocks from Taos Plaza. Free parking. Free admission. pianotaos.org.

SEPTEMBER 22 — 23

High Road Artisans Studio Tour Contemporary and traditional artists on the High Road to Taos Scenic Byway open their studios over two consecutive weekends for this annual tour. The High

Road begins from State Road 518 in Ranchos de Taos to Chimayó along State Road 76 at Peñasco and through the small towns of Cordova, Truchas and Ojo Sarco. For a tour map and more information, visit highroadnewmexico.com.

El Rito Studio Tour 10 A.M.-5 P.M. From painters to potters, El Rito artists open their studios to the public during this annual fall tour. For a tour map and more information, visit elritostudiotour.com.

SEPTEMBER 23 — 30

Taos Fall Arts Festival 10 A.M.-6 P.M. DAILY The 45th Taos Fall Arts Festival is held at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish gym (205 Don Fernando St.) in Taos featuring more than 200 works in its Open exhibition "Beyond the Horizon." taosfallartsfestival.com

SEPTEMBER 22 — 23

High Road Artisans Studio Tour Contemporary and traditional artists on the High Road to Taos Scenic Byway open their studios over two consecutive weekends

10 A.M.-5 P.M. | From painters to potters, El Rito artists open their studios to the public during this annual fall tour. For a tour map and more information, visit elritostudiotour.com.

OCTOBER 6

Mother Garden Plant and Seed Giveaway 3-5 P.M. | Collect seeds from the flowers planted decades ago by Virginia Couse on the grounds of the Couse-Sharp Historic Site, 146 Kit Carson Road. Free admission. cousesharp.org

OCTOBER 6 — 7

Taos Wool Festival 9 A.M.-5 P.M. SATURDAY; 9 A.M.-4 P.M. SUNDAY Now in it 35th year, this festival is a regional wool market with juried artists, crafts, vendors, live music, live animals, demonstrations, workshops, kids activities and more. Held at Kit Carson Park in Taos. Free admission. taoswoolfestival.org

OCTOBER 7

Sabor, A Taste of Taos NOON | A food-tasting event at Historic Taos Plaza with live music and family fun. taoschamber.com

OCTOBER 26 — 28

36th Annual Taos Mountain Balloon Rally Approximately 30 hot air balloons rise from the TMBRA field and float over Taos during this popular weekend event. The rally includes tethered rides for kids on Oct. 26 at 8:15 a.m.; mass ascensions on Oct. 27 and 28 from 7:30-9:30 a.m.; a Balloon Rally Parade on Oct. 27 at 1 p.m. and at dusk on Oct. 27 the highly attended "Balloomenshine." The TMBRA field is located on Albright Street in Taos behind the Taos County Court House and across from The Taos News. For more information, visit taosballoonrally.com or call (575) 758-9210.

NOVEMBER 3 — 4

Dixon Studio Tour 9 A.M.-5 P.M. Now in its 37th year, the Dixon Studio Tour is one of the oldest continuously run studio tours in the state. More than 50 artists and businesses representing virtually every art and craft form will be participating in the tour. Dixon is located 50 miles north of Santa Fe and 25 miles south of Taos on State Road 75 off State Road 68. dixonarts.org

NOVEMBER 11

Veterans Day Ceremony at Angel Fire 11 A.M. The annual Veterans Day Ceremony will be held at the 11th hour, on the 11th day of the 11th month at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire. Weather permitting, the ceremony will be held outside in the Amphitheater. For updates on the keynote speaker and other details about the ceremony, visit vietnamveteransmemorial.org. SUMMER/FALL 2018


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