Page 1

Today’s Angus Advantage

Early Sale Issue

Early Fall 2018

Volume 12 Issue 4


A

WINNER

in the pasture too!

Remitall F Rosebud 6E Pictured is EF COLOSSAL 520, the 2017 Agribition Grand Champion Bull, RBC Supreme Challenge Top 10 Finalist, and 2017 Bull Champion of the World. COLOSSAL pasture bred 50 cows at BAR-E-L this summer and is more impressive than ever! Stay tuned for your opportunity to implement COLOSSAL into your program. Semen packages will be available for the 2019 breeding season.

Sire: S A V International 2020 Dam: Remitall F Rosebud 196A MGS: Remitall F Odyssay 67X Massive bodied, brood cow power and prolific producing cow family. Bred to S A V Sensation 5615 on April 10, 2018

Bull & Select Female Sale

Upcoming Sales

March 11, 2019 - At The Farm Selling: 80 Black Angus Yearling Bulls 40 Black Angus Yearling Heifers

November 11 - Brooking Open Book Invitational - AngusLive.com December 15 - Angus Collection Sale - Olds, AB March 14, 2019 - BAR-E-L Angus Bull & Select Female Sale - at the Ranch

L E R BA Angus

n ibitio r g A e s in th ction Sale l l e s She r & Perfe Powe

- Show Heifers Available - Semen & Embryos -

Dave & Lynne Longshore Family Stettler, AB

H. 403.579.2394

C. 403.740.6788

Email: barelangus@gmail.com Website: www.bar-e-l.com

Scott Anderson - 587.282.9683

Remitall F ell M

1 arch 1

ny S e g o r P

Decisive 35D

Sire: S A V Pioneer 7301 Dam: Remitall F Ellegra 115B MGS: S A V HArvestor 0338 BW 3.7 YW 76 WW 137 Milk 29 BW 78 205 WT 926 365 WT 1466

Richard Latimer 403.507.1122 Gary Latimer 403.507.1123 Box 3833, Olds, AB T4H 1P5 richard@remitall.ca Office 403.556.2742 - Fax: 403.556.2761

www.remitall.ca Directions: 4 Miles South Of Olds on HWY 2A, 1 Mile West on Amerada Road


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2 0 1 8 e a r ly f a l l I s s u e

In This

23

The summer of 2018 in Agriculture will go down in history as one of inconsistency, due to the environment and the political climate. Mother Nature was very stingy with rainfall in many areas and she was not afraid to turn up the thermostat over the past several months, leaving some producers short of summer pasture and winter forage. Most in the beef cattle business have experienced it before and being “the hardy bunch that they are”, will adapt and move forward, anticipating a wetter 2019.

Despite the negative factors that have dominated the newsstands and social networks, our cattle market remains strong and active. Over the past decade our Canadian beef market has built a high level of consumer confidence in this modern era where everyone wants to know, “what’s in it and where did it come from”, with all that we consume. We, as Canadians, should be proud of our efforts in supplying food for the world. Canadian beef is the most predictable, with the highest of safety standards and tracking methods compared to its competitors... simply put…Canadian beef is a “superior product” produced by you the producer. In the purebred sector, Canadian genetics are sought-after for ultimate breed improvement.

The political climate is a matter that will affect our Agricultural economy. Those who think our young photo-op Prime Minister will out duel the statesman from the south (who has three decades more bargaining experience), will be very disappointed when all the smoke clears. It is sad that a handful of producers, sheltered by quota, will affect the thousands of free enterprising farmers, ranchers and manufactures in trade talks.The one thing we can be certain of… no one will win.

As stated earlier, we are a hardy bunch with the ability to strive for higher goals despite outside pressures. Remember as you tour this fall season ….there is no substitute for quality… so make your decisions accordingly!

Cattle feeders try to get the most value from each pen, drawing on what they know of genetic potential and background, with an eye on the markets. All of that led to steer weights advancing 330 pounds in the 40 years since the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand was born. “The trend is at a lull, but it’s expected to resume at least for a while in this industry where all segments are paid by the pound”, says Mark McCully, CAB Vice President of Production. However, he notes several factors that could finally stabilize size. First explaining the drivers, McCully says the rising price of beef in comparison to corn underlies the trend. Even when corn was at $7 per bushel, carcass weights did not falter. “That’s because beef kept pace and the value of incremental gain was still supported,” he says, “especially on grids that rewarded the shift toward much better quality grades. Grid selling also had feeders looking at the cost of carcass gain rather than live-weight gain [see graphs].”

24 Moreover, while cattle prices were on the rise, the increasing cost of feeder cattle encouraged feedyards to put more weight on what they had rather than rush to market and pay more and more for new placements. “There was virtually nothing working against the trend toward heavier weights,” McCully says. The first distant sound of jake brakes can now be heard.

34

Cow weights have risen more than steer weights in the last 20 years and forage costs more than corn. The combination has ranchers redoubling efforts to curtail mature size through selection and heifer management. “Corn is relatively cheap now, but that could change,” McCully says. “If the cost of a pound of gain moves beyond the value of that pound, we’d have downward pressure on weights. There’d be pressure to ramp up growth technologies as well and a premium on ‘bulletproof ’ genetics that grade with fewer days on feed.” Genetics have certainly improved, enabling cattle to marble well with less waste fat and at lighter weights, but Choice premiums are only paid on those above plant average. That still encourages feeding known genetics a bit longer for CAB and Prime premiums, paid on each head. “We’ve always had the assumption that you have to feed to heavier weights to get cattle to grade, but that’s not a super-strong correlation, especially on average cattle as they get heavier,” McCully says. “You need to feed them to six tenths of an inch of back fat, but the data do not support feeding them to 0.8 or 0.9 inches. You reach diminishing returns.” In 2016, an analysis of data on 850,000 Angustype carcasses at CAB-licensed plants found marbling in 1,000 lb. carcasses was only slightly greater than in 900 lb. carcasses while back fat increased at a greater rate. “Carcass size may be reaching practical limits within processing and distribution as rail height above the floor cannot easily be changed and boxes of beef weighing more than 100 lb. make safe handling a challenge”, McCully says.

Kajal Devani Elected to Beef Improvement Federation Board of Directors July 26 2018: for immediate release

Rocky View County, AB - Canadian Angus Association (CAA) Member Service Team Leader Kajal Devani has been elected to the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Board of Directors as one of the Cattle Breed Registry Association Representatives. “I am humbled to have been elected and am excited to contribute to all the good work that BIF does,” says Devani.

CEO Rob Smith adds, “We are very excited that a member of the Canadian Angus Association leadership team is joining this esteemed industry board. Kajal is passionate about genetics and their ability to enhance production for two primary ends: successful farmers and ranchers and a memorable dining experience for the beef consumer. She knows that our business, even at its most scientific, is a ‘people’ business and is committed to creating value at every level for every member of the beef value chain. It is rare to have a Canadian elected to this board of directors and it’s a real benefit to the Canadian seedstock producer industry.” Devani joined CAA in 2009. She leads the generation of genetic evaluations for Canadian Angus breeding stock, identifies and monitors genetic conditions and counsels Association members on the application of genetic tools to balance and optimize healthy herds and economic gain. Raised on a mixed farm in Kenya, she obtained an undergraduate degree in animal genetics from the University of Manitoba, Masters from the University of Alberta and is a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary.

issue

Big Deal 24 Alberta Junior Angus Show Results 28 Canadian Junior Angus Presents 2018 Scholarships 30 Canadian Angus Assocation Presents Partner of the Year 32 Kajal Devani Elected to Beef Improvement Federation Board of Directors 34 Canadian Angus Auction Market of the Year Award 36 Black Ink - Unconventional Risk Management 37 On Target - Balance vs. The Trade Off 40 The Growing Requirements 46 Manitoba Youth Beef Round-up Results 48 On Target - Better Than Average 52 Restrictive Environment? Quality Still Pays 58 Can’t Get Enough 65

as in every

issue

The Real World Not Taken for Granted A Breeder’s....Veterinary Perspective Vet’s Advice Advertising & Subscription Rates Schedule of Events

23 26 33 41 70 71

BIF is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary this year. The international organization is dedicated to advancing and coordinating genetic improvement efforts in all segments of the beef industry. With a tradition of using science to benefit producers, BIF is the capstone for developing programs for improving the efficiency, profitability and sustainability of beef production. Headquartered in Verona, MS, USA, the Beef Improvement Federation holds an annual convention, bringing together industry professionals, producers and researchers to discuss current issues facing the beef industry. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents more than 2,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herdbook and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

48

For more information, please contact:

Tina Zakowsky, Administration Team Leader Canadian Angus Association tzakowsky@cdnangus.ca 1-888-571-3580 ext 3584

Judges

Chad Hollinger & Austen Anderson

showmanship

pee wee

Aklen Abey

Junior

Ty Nykoliation

Declynn Allum

Aklen Abey

Nathan deRocquigny

Junior

Nia Devonald

Junior

intermediate

Cody Carson

intermediate

scrapbook

Sam deRocquigny

Laine Muir

senior

senior

Aklen Abey

Justin Carvey

Naomi Best

individual Judging

photography

Teegan Hyndman

Aklen Abey

Taylor Carlson

intermediate

pee wee

Aklen Abey

Junior

Nia Devonald

intermediate

Laine Muir

senior

Naomi Best

team Judging

pee wee

Jagger Allum & Emily Murray

Junior

pee wee Junior

Lane Nykoliation

intermediate senior

Orianna Hyndman

stall card

Declynn Allum

graphic design

Joran Frey

pee wee Junior

pee wee

stockman’s knowledge

Junior

Emma Fox

intermediate

Royce Moellenbeck

senior

Cindy Jack

Aklen Abey

intermediate senior

Junior

senior

Orianna Hyndman

Teegan Hyndman

Justin Carvey & Amanda Scott

pee wee

intermediate

Emily Speers

Emma Fox & Ty Nykoliation Cody Carson & Rylee Paterson

Early Fall 2018.indd 4

art division

pee wee

public speaking

pee wee

Cover Photography Grant Rolston

Cody Carson

Kaitlyn Davey

Junior

intermediate senior

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4205F

BMAF BMAF

4205F

BMAF

4215F

BMAF

Blue Mont Miss Middlebrook

4215F

Blue Mont Miss Blackbird

18/01/2018

01/01/2018 01/01/2018 Riverbend Peerless 0016 PA Ranch House 349 Riverbend Peerless 0016 PA Jenny 939-137 PA Ranch House 349 PA Jenny 939-137 Vision Unanimous 1418

®

Buyer option of 2 (two)

Buyer optionstraws of 2 (two) of either strawsSAV of either Textbook 5115 SAV Textbook 5115 OR SAV Purebred 4896 to OR Harprey Miss Middlebrook 9C Vision Unanimous 1418 accompany this SAV Purebred 4896 to lot! Miss Middlebrook 64P Harprey MissHarprey Middlebrook 9C accompany this lot! Harprey Miss Middlebrook 64P

18/01/2018 EF Complement 8088 Buyer option of 2 (two) EF Commando 1366 straws of either EF Complement 808 8 Buyer option of 2 (two) Riverbend Young Lucy W1470 SAV Textbook 5115 EF Commando 1366 straws of either RiverbendSYoung Lucy W1470 SAV Textbook 5115OR A V Brilliance 8077 PFLC Blackbird 73D S A V Brilliance 8077 PFLC PFLC Blackbird 73DBlackbird 73A PFLC Blackbird 73A

SAV Purebred 4896 to OR accompany SAV Purebred 4896 to this lot! accompany this lot!

Consigned to sell at the

Blue Mountains Angus Farm

Consigned to sell at the

Blue Mountains Angus Farm Townline, RR3 636077 Euphrasia-Holland 636077 Euphrasia-Holland Townline, RR3 Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 Markdale, ON N0C 1H0

P: (905) 670-3450 M: (416) 616-8834 Greg Nolan Office: (905) 670-3450 M: (416) 616-8834

OctOber 13, 2018 - HanOver, On

WANTED: Angus cattle for our

WANTED: Angus Cattle for our Artisan Farms Angus Beef Program Artisan Farms Angus Beef Program

Weaned calves, finished… Weaned calves, shortshort keeps,keeps, finished...

Let’s Partner Up! Up! Let’s Partner

www.artisanfarms.ca

www.artisanfarms.ca ArtisanFarms_TAA_EF18.indd Early Fall 2018.indd 11 1

Contact Contact us! Us! Leni Brem Office: (905) 670-3450 LeniGreg @ the office (905) 670-3450 Nolan M: (416) 616-8834 Greg M:(416) 616-8834email E: gregn@artisanbeef.ca E: greg@artisanbeef.ca Mitch Whitton297-1517M: (647) 297-1517 Mitch M: (647) Andreas M: (519) 270-3258 Andreas E: Buschbeck livestock@artisanbeef.ca E: livestock@artisanbeef.ca

Today’s Angus Advantage  11

05-Sep-2018 9/6/2018 3:08:51 4:26:11PM PM


PM Echo 8’16 Reserve Champion at Agribition Full sib embryos to her sell

Sold in 2017 Sale to Trent Weber and Robyn Burt of Dragon View Angus

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Valley Lodge Cattle Co. Complete Dispersal Tuesday November 6, 2018 Johnstone Auction Mart Moose Jaw, SK

40 Cow/Calf Pairs & 10 Bred Heifers Sell Sale managed by:

Gordon C. Roger Balgonie, SK Ph: 306-771-2305 Cell: 306-570-8454 valleylodge@sasktel.net

Chris Poley 306-220-5006

Shane Ben Wright Michelson 519-374-3335 403-363-9973

View the catalogue online at BuyAgro.com Today’s Angus Advantage  13

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PACESETTER

RED ACC

158D

H T I W E C A SET THE P

-UP

OUND R D E R OT AT L E R U FEAT

TC ABERDEEN 759 R 128Z E T T E 42A S E E C IR A A P L K C E E C R C C A T N E C LAIRE 59Y CRES C K E E R C T N E C S E RED CR B 3 7 205 WEIGHT: 1213 R E T T E S E C A P ACC 765 WEANING WEIGHT: Z 8 Y IS A D ACC G EASE N I V L A C BIRTH WEIGHT: 81 & IGREE D E P ABAA 158D S S O R OUTC

X

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp 2 RR 2 Swan River,MB R0L 1Z0

Home: 204-734-2073 Bruce: 204-281-0851 Austen: 204-281-3560 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca Early Fall 2018.indd 14 158D ADnew.indd 1

Anderson Cattle Company Inc. Today’s Angus Advantage  14

9/6/2018 3:08:55 PM 2018-08-27 12:15:22 PM


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2018-08-16 9/6/2018 7:39:33 3:08:56 PMPM


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Bell Angus

Ken & Sheila Bell 306-591-7792

Coulee Crossing Cattle Comany

Glen Gabel Angus Glen Gabel 306-536-1927

Hall’s Cattle Company

Sandra Jeffery 306-693-2215

Barry, Patty & Justin Hall 306-533-8416

Edwards Angus

Hi Low Angus

Laird Edward 306-734-2624

Gerlei Angus

Gerald Kary 306-424-2332

Dan, Erin & Cassidy Howell 306-731-2940

Hollinger Land & Cattle Chad Hollinger 306-331-0302

Jackson Cattle Co. Chance Jackson 306-537-4690

Key Ranch

Wade Shrimpton 306-221-4715

L-dee stock farm Troy Dosselmann 306-867-7719

Ravenworth Cattle Garry & Donna Berting 306-231-7567

Wagner angus Sharon Wagner 306-631-3553

. . . c i s s a Clis our middle

Ward's Red Angus Clarke & Denise Ward 306-931-3824

Willowview Angus Ken Harle 306-539-8185

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in the Premier Livestock & Guests Falls View Production Sale Niagara Falls, ON • Watch for other opportunities this fall!

2

YOUNG DALE GRACE 169B

OUR LEADING ANGUS DONOR Embryos by Basin Payweight 006S sell December 29, 2018

HOOVER DAM 041 x GRACE 107W

BREEDS

ONE GOAL BUILDING AN ELITE FOUNDATION OF PROVEN SIMMENTAL & ANGUS GENETICS BCII SA LADY 0917

C+C PRIORITY x COPPER CRK LUTTON LADY

BROOKING COUNTESS 7077

NATURAL LAW x BROOKING COUNTESS 239

OUR LEADING SIMMENTAL DONOR

Genetic opportunities to be announced this fall!

W/C RJ MISS 8543 6043D

HIGH REGARD x MISS WERNING KP 8543U

RANDY & LAURIE JAMES

Box 67 • Arcola SK • S0C 0G0 Phone: 306.575.7833 jamesoilfield@sasktel.net Today’s Angus Advantage  18

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November 3, 2018 12:00 Whitewood Auction Mart Whitewood, SK 160 Cows 2-9 years old Elite ET Donors 70 Bred Heifers 65 Heifer Calves 5 Herd Bulls Cows bred to: Red YCLC Unanimous 865D Red T-K Cutting Edge 127D Red KBJ Rock 983D Red U-2 Rock Solid 165A Red SSS Amscrae 582C L83 T-K Red Zone 48E Red LWNBRG Harvester 103C 9 Mile Franchise 630S Red T-K Tallic 72E Red NRA Staunch 71A Red SSS Tuttle 264E Sale Consultants: Bouchard Livestock International | Castle Rock Marketing | Peterosa Exports | Sale on DLMS

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Blake's Red Angus ad_Today's Angus_Layout 1 8/30/2018 9:38 PM Page 1

HMG 14A

Red Howe Finest Tradition 20W daughter

HMG 34X

Daughter of the Immortal Mulberry. Donor quality female

HMG 23Z

Another Tradition daughter in top 1% for BW & 3% for CE

HMG 74A

Red Howe Hustle daughter in the top 15% for milk

HMG 31X

Powerful, productive, Charolais females

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Bench Angus

First Annual •Black Angus Bull & Female Sale•

•On Offer•

35 Long Yearling Bulls 10 Yearling Bulls 20 Purebred Bred Heifers •Progeny sired by• Crescent Creek 1136 Rito 61B Crescent Creek Chisum 2A Bar S Range Boss 4002 Vermilion Dateline 7078

Bench Angus Bench Farming Co. Ltd. Shaunavon, SK S0N 2M0 Ph: 306-297-1331 ext. 301 or 726 bhbangus@gmail.com

Sale managed by:

December 14, 2018 At the Ranch - Shaunavon, SK Chris Poley 306-220-5006 Shane Michelson 403-363-9973 Ben Wright 519-374-3335

View the catalogue online at BuyAgro.com Today’s Angus Advantage  21

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We thank the bidders, buyers and consignors for making our second Pinnacle Sale a resounding success. 29 Lots Grossed $273, 475 to Average $9,430

TOP-SELLING LOT Red Wheel Annie Oakley 8B BD: 1/4/14 Red Wheel N Deal 143Y x Red Wheel Ann 106X

Red Wheel Bar-E-L Patriot 60F BD: 1/28/18 Red Bar-E-L Anthem 46A x Red Wheel Annie Oakley 8B Pair owned by Wheeler’s Stock Farm & Combest Farms Look for this exciting pair on the Canadian Show Circuit

SEEDSTOCK CONSULTANTS SPECIALIZED SALES KEITH KISSEE • Cell: 817.821.6263 612 W. Franklin St., #12A Richmond, VA 23220 Ph: 804.353.2220 • Fax: 804.353.2221 kkseedstock@comcast.net www.kkseedstock.com

Today’s Angus Advantage  22

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The summer of 2018 in Agriculture will go down in history as one of inconsistency, due to the environment and the political climate. Mother Nature was very stingy with rainfall in many areas and she was not afraid to turn up the thermostat over the past several months, leaving some producers short of summer pasture and winter forage. Most in the beef cattle business have experienced it before and being “the hardy bunch that they are,” will adapt and move forward, anticipating a wetter 2019. The political climate is a matter that will affect our Agricultural economy. Those who think our young photo-op Prime Minister will out duel the statesman from the south (who has three decades more bargaining experience), will be very disappointed when all the smoke clears. It is sad that a handful of producers, sheltered by quota, will affect the thousands of free enterprising farmers, ranchers and manufacturers in trade talks. The one thing we can be certain of… no one will win.

Despite the negative factors that have dominated the newsstands and social networks, our cattle market remains strong and active. Over the past decade, our Canadian beef market has built a high level of consumer confidence in this modern era where everyone wants to know “what’s in it and where did it come from,” with all that we consume. We, as Canadians, should be proud of our efforts in supplying food for the world. Canadian beef is the most predictable, with the highest of safety standards and tracking methods compared to its competitors... simply put…Canadian beef is a “superior product” produced by you the producer. In the purebred sector, Canadian genetics are sought-after for ultimate breed improvement. As stated earlier, we are a hardy bunch with the ability to strive for higher goals despite outside pressures. Remember as you tour this fall season ….there is no substitute for quality… so make your decisions accordingly!

Get the wheels turning... Canadian Angus Association special issue advertising booking deadlines are coming up soon!

Annual Canadian Angus Association Late Fall Sale Journal Booking Deadline: October 10, 2018 Material Deadline: October 15, 2018 Camera Ready: October 19, 2018

Distributed to The Canadian Angus Members and Commercial Mailing List

Canadian Angus Association Bull Buyers Guide

Booking Deadline: January 2, 2019 Material Deadline: January 8, 2019 Camera Ready: January 15, 2019

Distributed to The Canadian Angus Members and Commercial Mailing List

Bryan Kostiuk Ph: 306-934-9696 info@todaysangus.com

www.todaysangus.com

Today’s Angus Advantage  23

Early Fall 2018.indd 23

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Cattle feeders try to get the most value from each pen, drawing on what they know of genetic potential and background, with an eye on the markets. All of that led to steer weights advancing 330 pounds in the 40 years since the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand was born. “The trend is at a lull, but it’s expected to resume at least for a while in this industry where all segments are paid by the pound,” says Mark McCully, CAB Vice President of Production. However, he notes several factors that could finally stabilize size. First explaining the drivers, McCully says the rising price of beef in comparison to corn underlies the trend. Even when corn was at $7 per bushel, carcass weights did not falter. “That’s because beef kept pace and the value of incremental gain was still supported,” he says, “especially on grids that rewarded the shift toward much better quality grades. Grid selling also had feeders looking at the cost of carcass gain rather than live-weight gain [see graphs].”

Moreover, while cattle prices were on the rise, the increasing cost of feeder cattle encouraged feedyards to put more weight on what they had rather than rush to market and pay more and more for new placements. “There was virtually nothing working against the trend toward heavier weights,” McCully says. The first distant sound of jake brakes can now be heard.

Cow weights have risen more than steer weights in the last 20 years and forage costs more than corn. The combination has ranchers redoubling efforts to curtail mature size through selection and heifer management. “Corn is relatively cheap now, but that could change,” McCully says. “If the cost of a pound of gain moves beyond the value of that pound, we’d have downward pressure on weights. There’d be pressure to ramp up growth technologies as well and a premium on ‘bulletproof ’ genetics that grade with fewer days on feed.” Genetics have certainly improved, enabling cattle to marble well with less waste fat and at lighter weights, but Choice premiums are only paid on those above plant average. That still encourages feeding known genetics a bit longer for CAB and Prime premiums, paid on each head. “We’ve always had the assumption that you have to feed to heavier weights to get cattle to grade, but that’s not a super-strong correlation, especially on average cattle as they get heavier,” McCully says. “You need to feed them to six tenths of an inch of back fat, but the data do not support feeding them to 0.8 or 0.9 inches. You reach diminishing returns.” In 2016, an analysis of data on 850,000 Angustype carcasses at CAB-licensed plants found marbling in 1,000 lb. carcasses was only slightly greater than in 900 lb. carcasses while back fat increased at a greater rate. “Carcass size may be reaching practical limits within processing and distribution as rail height above the floor cannot easily be changed and boxes of beef weighing more than 100 lbs make safe handling a challenge,” McCully says.

Today’s Angus Advantage  24

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Many formerly underutilized beef cuts benefit from larger size, such as the flat iron and Denver steaks from the chuck. The popular ribeye is most negatively affected, partly because of a tendency to cut the steaks ever thinner rather than innovate. “We could remove the flavorful spinalis muscle, process trimmings into high-quality burgers and just sell the ribeye fillet, rather than cut the whole ribeye too thin for most consumers to cook properly,” he says. Some strip steaks could also benefit from

innovative cutting, but the notion of “some but not all” brings up another issue: lack of consistency. At every stage of processing beef, workers need to have standardized plans for efficient work. Packing plants designed to divide carcasses into eight boxes cannot easily adjust when subprimal weight dictates that be moved to 9 or 10 boxes. The need for consistency and planning begins on the seedstock ranches that “have to look several years ahead to develop genetics for the next decade,” McCully says. “Angus breeders selecting for high performance while keeping downward pressure on mature cow size is one example of proactive planning.” As the modern cow herd evolves, every stakeholder from ranch to retail considers what incentives might emerge to create greater consistency in the box, meat case and ultimately on the plate.

Today’s Angus Advantage  25

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Bulls and Bugs Shorty gathered the last of the 26 pairs and started them down the hill towards the wire gate that he had left open. He counted once more to be sure, 26 pairs and one bull . . . 49A. He really couldn’t miss 49A, he was a big Hereford bull with plenty of personality. Shorty had heard stories of the rather successful show career of the big bull. He had been shown as a calf, then as a yearling and later as a mature bull and with all of that attention, the bull had developed a personality that was, well, kind of a pain in the butt. The herd wandered out onto the road and then to the right, down the road in the direction they were supposed to go. Shorty followed along, shouting occasionally as the cattle moved off the ranch property and onto the main road. Ahead on the left side of the road, was a yard in which a native family lived and operated a small but efficient ranch. The current operator was a proud, middle-aged Native man named Thomas and he lived there with his wife, two kids and his elderly father. As Shorty passed the yard he glanced towards the house and there on the porch was Thomas’ father. The old man raised his left hand and yelled, “Hello cowboy!” to Shorty as he passed. Shorty grinned, the old man greeted him everytime he went by and in the same manner. Shorty usually waved back and carried on, but this time Shorty reined his horse to the left, stopped, stood up in the saddle, raised his left arm and shouted, “Hello Indian!” The old man started to laugh and he was still laughing as Shorty turned back to the task at hand. It was only a few

moments before Shorty heard the soft whinnie from his bay gelding and turned in the saddle to see Thomas approaching on a big sorrel mare. “Shorty.” “Thomas.” “Mind if I join ya?” “Not at all,” Shorty replied. It was not unusual to have the soft spoken Thomas join him as Shorty moved cattle past his ranch. He seemed to enjoy moving cattle with Shorty and even though Thomas seldom spoke, Shorty enjoyed the company. “Where we going?” Thomas asked after a half hour or so. “The Grove.” “Oh. That 49A?” “Yup.” “He isn’t getting any smaller, is he?” “Not yet,” grinned Shorty. The road the cowboys were on was a famous, historic road, one that had been at one time, the main route of commerce between the two closest towns. As commerce increased the settlers of the nearby valley had built a highway in the valley bottom and rendered this road nearly unused. It did however service a couple of native families, the ranch and several grow ops located back in the hills north of the ranch.

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That being said, it was not unusual to see some shady looking characters on the road and this morning was no different. The cattle met an old Volkswagen beetle on a twisty section of the old road that the locals called ‘the banks’. There were steep clay banks on both sides of the road, one side the banks went straight up, the other straight down. The VW chugged to a stop on the side of the road that dropped into the ravine below and the driver turned the vehicle off.

could have sworn he saw the bull smile. 49A turned and wandered down the road.

The driver was a ragged looking young man, with a full set of dreadlocks and a long scraggly beard. He leaned out the driver side window and watched with some enthusiasm as the cattle filed by. The cattle ignored the young man…until 49A got to the VW. Shorty watched the bull as he changed his course and walked directly over to the parked car.

“I think he wanted to breed you.” Thomas delivered that line perfectly straight faced and in a true low key tone as only Thomas could. He turned and rode away.

49A towered over the vehicle, he easily outweighed the parked car, had seen several vehicles but for some reason he was intrigued by this one. He started at the front of the car, sniffed the hood and then walked to the driver’s side. Rasta Boy had leaned back inside the car and was frantically fumbling for the handle to roll up that driver’s side window. The Hereford bull walked up to the driver’s door, stopped, shimmied his body until he was looking directly at the driver, tipped his massive head to his left and stuck his entire head through the window into the VW. Shorty and Thomas watched as 49A surveyed the interior of the vehicle, including the driver, who was now huddled in the back passenger side seat. The bull looked around for a few seconds, turned, licked the steering wheel, tipped his head and pulled his head free of the VW. He looked around at Shorty and Shorty

Thomas was the first to the vehicle. He pulled his big horse to a stop, leaned over in order to see the terrified driver and asked the young man, “You okay?” “I think so man…what the hell was all that about?” The young man was clearly upset by what he considered a near death experience.

As Shorty passed the Volkswagen, the young man was scrambling over the front seats, returning to his driver seat. Shorty smiled and tipped his hat. The driver had found a clear plastic bag and was fumbling with the hand rolled ‘cigarette’ inside. Shorty turned in the saddle, “You should have smoked that baby a while ago.” “Did you see that, dude?’ Shorty couldn’t resist, “See what?” The young man was now wiping the bull snot off his steering wheel with his shirt tail. It was several minutes before the men heard the engine of the Volkswagen again. “I think he might have to change his underwear tonight.” “Either that or turn ‘em inside out.” Thomas grinned. “I wonder how big that head looked from the back seat?” Shorty didn’t answer, but Thomas didn’t mind. Shorty figured that was the most Thomas had ever said to him in one day and Thomas never did stop smiling that day.

Grant Rolston was born and raised in ranching country near Penticton, British Columbia. After graduating school, he worked on a purebred Hereford ranch, then assumed a position at Western Breeders Artificial Insemination Unit. In 1980, he left the livestock scene and joined the Edmonton Police Department, where he received his formal training in photography, working for the IDENT unit (crime scene investigation). After a decade, he returned to the industry, purchasing a herd of purebred Angus cattle but both Grant and his wife, Lauralee, worked off the ranch to make a living. He chose livestock photography and is now Canada’s premier livestock photographer of beef cattle. Grant and Lauralee travel throughout nine provinces in Canada for on farm photography, in addition to all major livestock shows, including the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, the Canadian Western Agribition, and all major National Junior shows in the summer months. Grant and Lauralee Rolston reside in Vulcan, Alberta. With four decades of experience, Grant shares things that are “Not Taken for Granted.”

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43rd Annual

Alberta Junior Angus Show August 12-14, 2018

PEEWEE Division Peewee Champion Casey Trefiak with Miss Jewel 611E

Peewee Reserve Champion Luke Henderson with LLB Genello 666F

Commercial Division Commercial Grand Champion Cache Mclerie with BCL Cassandra 531C

Commercial Reserve Grand Champion Kylie Sibbald with Compass Molly 6E

Open Division Open Champion Casey Trefiak with Miss Jewel 611E

Open Reserve Champion Kennedy Paget with Whiskey Lane Mary 37E

Owned Division

Champion heifer calf Halley Adams with Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 12F Champion bull calf Layne Morasch with Red Lazy MC Capital 144F Champion Junior Heifer Brynne Yoder with Red Cinder Freyja 29E Reserve Champion Junior Heifer Maddison Sibbald with Red Six Mile Marta 993E

Bashaw, AB

Champion Intermediate Heifer Halley Adams with GreenWood Vixon JJP 17E Reserve Champion Intermediate Heifer Kailey Brandl with BCC Black Velvet 16E Champion Senior Heifer Luke Haggart with GGA Conanga 2E Reserve Champion Senior Heifer Robert Geis with Bar E-L April 35E Champion two year old Halley Adams with Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 138D Reserve Champion two year old cow Thomas Wildman with Towaw Duchess 412D Champion Mature cow Maddison Sibbald with Riverstone Georgina 9C Reserve Champion Mature cow Layne Morasch with Red Lazy MC Sparkle 169C Grand Champion Owned Halley Adams with Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 138D Reserve grand Champion Owned Thomas Wildman with Towaw Duchess 412D

Bred & Owned Division

Grand Champion Bred & Owned Brynne Yoder with Red Cinder Cheta 193E Reserve grand Champion Bred & Owned Thomas Wildman with Towaw Duchess 401F Supreme Champion Halley Adams with Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 138D Reserve Supreme Champion Thomas Wildman with Towaw Duchess 412D

Aggregate

Peewee champion Quinn Pedersen Peewee Reserve champion Rex Curtis Junior champion Brynne Yoder Junior Reserve champion Wynton Brandl Senior champion Maddison Sibbald Senior reserve champion Baxter Blair

Triple Crown Winners

Purebred Champion Thomas Wildman with Towaw Duchess 412D Commercial Champion Jill Mclerie with BCL Selena 755E

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Canadian Junior Angus Presents 2018 Scholarships Totalling $4,500 July 25, 2018: for immediate release Rocky View County, AB - Three young women have received scholarships totalling $4,500. Meghan McGillivray of Kamloops, BC received the first place scholarship of $2,000; Halley Adams of Forestburg, AB received the second place scholarship of $1,500 and Heidi Tymko of St. Paul, AB received the third place scholarship of $1,000. The scholarships were presented at Showdown, the annual national Canadian Junior Angus (CJA) show. Meghan McGillivray of McGillivray Livestock is a director on the CJA board. In 2017 she was selected as one of Canada’s official youth representatives at the World Angus Forum in Scotland. Since joining the CJA six years ago, she has attended every Showdown and Guiding Outstanding Angus Leaders (GOAL) conference. She is currently studying physiology at McGill University, which she believes is an excellent prerequisite to medical school, working towards her goal of becoming a sports medicine doctor. She also coaches competitive gymnastics and is a cheerleader at McGill. Halley Adams of Ter-Ron Farms has been contributing to Canadian Junior Angus for 10 years. She currently serves as the president of the Alberta Junior Angus Association. She plans to pursue a career in veterinary medicine and is in her second year of pre-veterinary studies. She hopes to open her own clinic and pursue a career in embryo transplant. Outside of her studies and helping out on the farm, Adams enjoys playing the clarinet, running meetings and events as president of her 4-H Beef Club and serving as assistant captain for the Stettler Storm midget female hockey team. Heidi Tymko of Crestview Angus is also a 10 year CJA member. In 2016 she joined the CJA board as an Alberta director. Tymko is interested in the sustainability and productivity of purebred cattle and ways to make beef cattle production more efficient for the world’s increasing population. She is currently in her second year of agribusiness studies at the University of Saskatchewan. Canadian Junior Angus (CJA) is the national association for Angus youth up to age 21. CJA’s goal is to help prepare future cattlemen for the beef industry by educating and informing Juniors about the Angus industry. Showdown began in 2000 as a way for Juniors from across the nation to gather in one location to exhibit their Angus cattle in conformation divisions. It rotates to provinces throughout the country every July. This year 98 juniors and 143 head of cattle took part in Showdown in Barrie, ON. There have been many different activities and contests added over the years with 16 competitions now available including print marketing, sales talk, judging, team judging, team grooming, photography, literature, art, scrapbooking, graphic design, farm sign, public speaking, Angus cook-off, best herdsman, showmanship and conformation as the current competitions.

For more information, please contact: Tina Zakowsky, Administration Team Leader Canadian Angus Association tzakowsky@cdnangus.ca 1-888-571-3580 ext 3584

First place scholarship recipient Meghan McGillivray of Kamloops, BC

Second place scholarship recipient Halley Adams of Forestburg, AB

Third place scholarship recipient Heidi Tymko of St. Paul, AB

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Canadian Angus Association Presents Partner of the Year Award to St. Helen’s Packers July 25, 2018: for immediate release Rocky View County, AB - The Canadian Angus Association is pleased to present the CAA Partner of the Year Award to St. Helen’s Packers. St. Helen’s is a full-service butcher shop located in Toronto. They were selected to receive the award based on their philosophy of building strong relationships with partners, continuous re-investment in their facilities and providing safe quality products for their customers. CAA CEO Rob Smith, President Trevor Welch and Senior Director of Business Development, BC & Alberta Brian Good presented the award to St. Helen’s President Robert Bielack at Showdown, the Canadian Angus Association’s annual national Junior show, in Barrie, ON. “We chose St. Helen’s as the award recipient because of their work promoting Angus programs such as Certified Angus Beef,” says Rob Smith, CAA CEO. “When the Canadian Angus Association operated its own branded beef program in the 1990’s, St. Helen’s was the first plant to come on board. Our relationship is a longstanding one and it is our pleasure to recognize that commitment with this award.” St. Helen’s Packers began as a small butcher shop in the early 1950’s. Today they are one of the largest family-owned and operated federal meat establishments in Canada. St. Helen’s is vertically integrated; from sourcing livestock from their associated feedlots to distributing their products with their own fleet. They pride themselves in sourcing cattle directly from approved livestock suppliers and selecting cattle to match customer’s needs. Their roots as a full service butcher shop allow them to process almost any type of meat. Sourced domestically from approved livestock suppliers, St. Helen’s can custom select cattle to match their customer needs. Responding to changing customer demands, they have undertaken expansion in value-added and case-ready products for clients of all sizes. The research and development department responds quickly to changing consumer trends and can rapidly develop high quality products in both taste and appearance. The Canadian Angus Association introduced the Feedlot of the Year Award in 2011 to recognize feedlots that promote Angus to their customers and that feed Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed tagged cattle. In 2014, the award program was expanded to recognize the CAA Partner of the Year to acknowledge important partnerships and other sectors of the supply chain that promote Angus beef to the public and appreciate authentic Angus beef. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents more than 2,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herdbook and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

For more information, please contact: Tina Zakowsky, Administration Team Leader Canadian Angus Association tzakowsky@cdnangus.ca 1-888-571-3580 ext 3584

CAA CEO Rob Smith, St. Helen’s President Robert Bielak, CAA President Trevor Welch, CAA Director Graham McLean, CAA Senior Director of Business Development, BC & Alberta Brian Good Today’s Angus Advantage  32

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Biography: Dr. Colin Palmer is an Associate Professor of Theriogenology (Animal Reproduction) at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Originally from Nova Scotia, Dr. Palmer worked in mixed practices in Ontario and British Columbia and has owned/operated a practice in Saskatchewan. Dr. Palmer along with his wife Kim and children Lauren, Emily and Carter run a herd of purebred Red Angus cattle under the KC Cattle Co. name.

Feed Options for Surviving Winter

For many areas of western Canada the summer of 2018 was one of the driest in several years. Reports of hay crops yielding half or even a third of normal production coupled with very little carryover from this past winter has many livestock producers wondering what they are going to do. In my own area, I have never seen as many annual crops baled; nor have I been as happy to be given a neighbour’s yard or waste lands to make hay on. Decent feed can be made out of many failed crops. With threats of frost and many crops still looking green, being able to purchase a damaged crop may be a viable option. Canola is ideally harvested late flower to mid-pod, but has a tendency to take several days to dry down and because of the high sulfur content, it should be fed with other feeds. I have never heard of sulfur toxicity occurring from feeding canola hay, but I would still proceed with an “ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” philosophy. Naturally increased sulfur concentrations in feed are most likely to interfere with copper and selenium availability so you had better have a sound mineral feeding program. If cut at the right stage, canola can be comparable to alfalfa hay, but its value declines substantially with plant maturity. Too much canola forage and cattle do not perform very well, so limiting it to no more than 50% of the ration is a good idea. Many crops, particularly cereals and canola, will accumulate nitrates in the days following frost damage. The levels will decrease after about 10 days so if frost damage has occurred don’t be in a big hurry to cut. Unfortunately, clipping a few plants and submitting them to the lab is NOT an effective way to check a crop. Cut, dry and bale then collect samples from several bales for the lab. Concentrations greater than 1% definitely require feed management; however, animals should not be exposed to large quantities of feeds containing more than 0.5% nitrate if they have not been consuming nitrate containing feed already. Mixing higher nitrate forages with low nitrate forages through grinding and mixing is the best way to handle nitrate intake. Offering a high nitrate bale and a low nitrate bale at the same time is a recipe for disaster. Hungry cattle exposed to high nitrate feed are most at risk for acute nitrate poisoning as they will consume large quantities of feed very quickly, resulting in the release of huge quantities of nitrate in the rumen. Depression, muscle tremors, salivation, labored breathing, staggering, disorientation and an inability to get up are signs of acute toxicity in live animals. Many animals may simply be found dead with signs that appear like they were struggling to get up before they died. Signs are likely to appear with five to 10 hours of

consuming a large quantity of contaminated feed. Weeds such as lambsquarter, pig weed, kochia and thistle can accumulate nitrate as well, so be careful when cutting weedy crops or the commonly weed infested corners of fields. For most producers, if you haven’t considered straw you should. Cereal and pea straw are great products for stretching feed resources. The best feed value, of course, is the grain kernels, so never consider straw to be as good as green feed. Both cereal and pea straw lack sufficient energy and protein to meet the maintenance requirements of a dry beef cow so if fed alone your cows will perform poorly. Cattle will not be able to eat as much straw as hay because it does not move through the gut as fast. In fact, feeding too much straw in the ration can lead to impactions. Increasing protein in the ration will improve the digestibility of straw, increase throughout and go a long way toward meeting dietary needs. One approach is to ammoniate straw - rumen microbes are able to utilize alternative forms of nitrogen to facilitate their function in building new proteins. Providing grain and/or hay; especially alfalfa hay, is another way to increase the protein content of the ration. Late gestation and lactating cows have even greater nutritional requirements which are difficult to meet when straw is a significant part of the ration. A good idea would be to finish feeding straw during mid gestation and to limit feeding of straw to cows in at least average body condition (BCS 3, 5-point scale). Feed testing is advisable because available nutrient contents of feeds can vary greatly. I often hear the argument, “why feed test, it is the only feed I have so what am I supposed to do not feed it!” Well no, but perhaps modest purchases in pellets, some high quality grains and tub grinding etc. can be made to ensure that healthy viable calves are born and that cows rebreed in a timely manner. We have found that purchase of a modest amount of pellets complete with a mineral pack and ionophores, i.e. Rumensin®, is very efficient way to supplement home grown feeds and improve productivity. Ionophores fed at appropriate levels can improve feed efficiency and reduce the incidence of bloat.

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Kajal Devani Elected to Beef Improvement Federation Board of Directors July 26 2018: for immediate release Rocky View County, AB - Canadian Angus Association (CAA) Member Service Team Leader Kajal Devani has been elected to the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Board of Directors as one of the Cattle Breed Registry Association Representatives. “I am humbled to have been elected and am excited to contribute to all the good work that BIF does,” says Devani. CEO Rob Smith adds, “We are very excited that a member of the Canadian Angus Association leadership team is joining this esteemed industry board. Kajal is passionate about genetics and their ability to enhance production for two primary ends: successful farmers and ranchers and a memorable dining experience for the beef consumer. She knows that our business, even at its most scientific, is a ‘people’ business and is committed to creating value at every level for every member of the beef value chain. It is rare to have a Canadian elected to this board of directors and it’s a real benefit to the Canadian seedstock producer industry.” Devani joined CAA in 2009. She leads the generation of genetic evaluations for Canadian Angus breeding stock, identifies and monitors genetic conditions and counsels Association members on the application of genetic tools to balance and optimize healthy herds and economic gain. Raised on a mixed farm in Kenya, she obtained an undergraduate degree in animal genetics from the University of Manitoba, Masters from the University of Alberta and is a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary. BIF is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary this year. The international organization is dedicated to advancing and coordinating genetic improvement efforts in all segments of the beef industry. With a tradition of using science to benefit producers, BIF is the capstone for developing programs for improving the efficiency, profitability and sustainability of beef production. Headquartered in Verona, MS, USA, the Beef Improvement Federation holds an annual convention, bringing together industry professionals, producers and researchers to discuss current issues facing the beef industry. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents more than 2,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herdbook and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

For more information, please contact: Tina Zakowsky, Administration Team Leader Canadian Angus Association tzakowsky@cdnangus.ca 1-888-571-3580 ext 3584

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Canadian Angus Auction Market of the Year Award Presented to The Electronic Auction Market (TEAM) at Livestock Markets Association of Canada Convention May 17, 2018: for immediate release Rocky View County, AB - The Canadian Angus Association is pleased to honour The Electronic Auction Market (TEAM) with the Auction Market of the Year Award. This marks the eleventh year the award has been presented by CAA. Senior Director of Business Development BC/ AB Brian Good and Director of Business Development SK/MB Bob Toner presented the award at the Livestock Markets Association of Canada annual conference in Moosomin, SK. TEAM was established as a closed network operated by the Calgary Stockyards from 1986 to 2002 and made the transition to the Internet in August 2002. They have now marketed more than 4,000,000 head online. TEAM continues to work hard to maintain the efficiency of cattle sales to keep customers satisfied. TEAM is a family-owned business. Don Danard co-owns the company with his son, Jason. Jason is the VP Sales and Marketing for the Calgary Stockyards and the acting Principal of TEAM. Don’s son Bryan is the acting owner of the company and represents the third generation of Danards who buy and sell cattle at Calgary Stockyards Association. The Danards pride themselves in providing comfort for their cattle, as they believe a comfortable product is a better product. They do this by boarding their cattle in dirt, not concrete, with straw bedding and access to water to minimize shrink and stress. Congratulations to the Danard family and all the staff at TEAM. The Canadian Angus Association proudly awards you for your efforts in promoting Angus and Angus-cross cattle and the Canadian Angus Tag Program as well as your contributions to the agriculture industry. CAA also sponsored the Reserve Champion Auctioneer buckle which was won by Kyle Soderberg, Lloydminster, Northern Livestock Sales. The Auction Market of the Year Award was introduced in 2006 to recognize and honour those auction markets that work hard to promote Angus cattle. Auction markets across Canada have been recognized for their support of the Canadian Angus feeder sales program. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents more than 2,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed HerdBook and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed. For more information, please contact: Tina Zakowsky, Administration Team Leader Canadian Angus Association tzakowsky@cdnangus.ca 1-888-571-3580 ext 3584

Auction Mart Award Presentation Left to right: Bob Toner, Director of Business Development SK/ MB; Bryan Danard, TEAM; Brian Good, Senior Director of Business Development BC/AB (Canadian Angus Association)

Reserve Champion Auctioneer Buckle Presentation Left to right: Bob Toner, Director of Business Development SK/MB; Kyle Soderberg; Brian Good, Senior Director of Business Development BC/AB (Canadian Angus Association)

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Sounds of thunder interrupted the radio blaring on our front porch. With binoculars we watched lightning strikes in the distance, waiting for a dispatcher’s voice to say the call number 9210. When those numerals rang out over the storm, we knew the lightning had turned to wildfire. It was time to get in the truck and go. Growing up the daughter of a wildland firefighter and forest manager and working a stint as a dispatcher myself, I waited by the radio a lot. My upbringing included hours of learning and teaching fire prevention tactics and a never-ending supply of Smokey the Bear gear. Wildfire season is akin to calving – and perhaps weaning – in the beef cattle community: exciting times when all the training, management and investment in new technology pays off. It’s go time. Most of the year is spent in preparation for those few months. But what was exciting to us often meant disaster for others. We’ve all heard “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” That truth is why most childhood ride-along chats with my father were centered around healthy forest management and fire prevention. Those lessons easily translate to producing beef.

Recently on a ride-along with a Missouri rancher, he explained his own risk management strategy. It hinges on preventing disaster for the final user and buyer of his product, the beef consumer. In a market where profits are often scarce, he takes comfort in the fact that today’s national beef herd helps prevent disaster by producing more high-quality beef than ever. He rides out the volatility by targeting upper-end quality grades. Though some may see retained ownership beyond weaning as a risk of its own, this rancher’s true insurance policy is in raising cattle that perform well in the feedyard and at the grading stand.

The tactic pays off. While others took a hit on seasonal market swings, this summer he earned a net premium of more than $200 per head above what he would have made by selling the calves at weaning on the live market. There are a thousand ways cattle production can go wrong, but one often forgotten is the risk associated with producing a bad steak. Selection for marbling means less work for the chef and more satisfaction for diners. It’s added insurance to keep consumers putting beef on the dinner table.

Why spend years creating a product that results in disaster on the dinner plate? Well, the retort goes, if everyone jumped on that bandwagon, we’d have too much marbling in the herd. This rancher doesn’t think so and neither does his seedstock provider. “I’ve never not used a bull because he had too much marbling,” he told me. “Can you imagine what our industry would look like if every animal we produced went upper 2/3 Choice or Prime? People would be gobbling it up.” Maybe it’s an unconventional approach to risk management but it seems to be working. Those who look beyond the ranch gate and see consumers happily spending more to buy a premium brand of beef know prevention of bad eating experiences puts dollars in their pockets and builds demand. Although there’s still a lot that can go wrong between the ranch and restaurant, it all starts with a good product that begins in the pasture. Remember, only you can prevent bad beef. Next time in Black Ink®, Miranda Reiman will explore a pointed question. If you have any now, email nerceg@certifiedangusbeef.com.

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18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

Markdale, ON NOC 1HO P: 519-477-3431 #: (905) 898-4463 E: Office mattbuschbeck@gmail.com Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315

Gerald Kellington Manager

Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

MATT BUSCHBECK

Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Unlock your full sales potential! Contact us to find out how info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

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Ian & Joy Rudkin

3320 bradburn Road blackstock, on, L0b 1b0 905.718.5331 maplelinefarm@hotmail.ca

(a partnership)

4023 Meadowbrook Drive, Unit 108, London, Ontario N6L 1E6 www.weavercroft.com Kevin Brooks 519-878-1183 kb@weavercroft.com

John Weaver 519-318-6302 john@weavercroft.com

Jim Weaver 519-868-0328 jw@weavercroft.com

Rick Stull 12249 8th Line, Georgetown, ON L7G 4S4 Ph: (905) 877-8145 • Cell: (905) 703-0503

Breeders of quality Angus Cattle Today’s Angus Advantage  39

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One of the big challenges of livestock judging is explaining “balance” to a new evaluator. As we attend county fairs, state previews and junior nationals, we’ll hear the term used to describe cattle in nearly every class. After the judge remarks on the calf’s balance, they’ll follow up with a collection of terms that support their view of balance. Ask anyone to explain balance; the wide range of answers you get shows why this is a tough concept for beginning livestock judges. I once heard it described as “when all things come together correctly. “You’d think a judge could simply justify a class winner by saying they are the nicest balanced and then move on, but no, there are other roads to balance. It has also been described as “when visually divided in half, the animal is proportional on both ends.” Yet, in most steer shows you watch this summer, animals with this definition will likely not prevail because a well-balanced steer has a chiseled front end with a square hip and thick quarter. You’re more likely to hear “wedge-shaped” than proportional.

Cow genetics in the report covered a range of breeding programs from straight Hereford cows in Australia to SimAngus and Angus cows in the American midwest. Calf management ranged from 140 day weaned calf-feds to traditional, 7 month weaning with long yearling backgrounding periods and short, 100 day finishing. Across this variety of systems the results between Angus and Waygu sired calves was relatively consistent. Angus sired calves were heavier at weaning and faster gaining after that to finish quicker and produce heavier carcass weights. The Waygu sired calves produced carcasses with greater marbling. Selection for extremes generally requires trade-offs. In this case, chasing extreme marbling resulted in longer feeding periods and lighter carcass weights because of reduced genetic growth potential. For those marketing at weaning or after backgrounding, the challenge is greater because the extreme benefit is not recognized while the reduced pre-weaning growth is fully realized. For any breeding plan and sire breed, a balanced approach helps avoid making trade-offs that are contrary to the long-term market. If you want enhanced marbling with lighter carcass weights, remember that management can get there faster than genetics. This spring, for example, carcass weights declined as cattle feeders marketed earlier than usual; switching to a calf-fed system can also reduce carcass weights while enhancing quality. In both cases, the changes are quickly reversible by adjusting management. Genetic change takes longer to reverse and sometimes the trade-offs are more costly than the gain.

Historically, we talk about performance data with little focus on phenotype. Wait, why the sudden change in topic? What’s performance got to do with balance? Well, a balanced phenotype discussion gives us a chance to highlight different management philosophies, breeding objectives and carcass value. As a fan of quality, I reviewed a collection of data that incorporated Waygu cattle into a terminal breeding program. Could it be a logical progression for those who want to take marbling to the next level? Not so much, because of net losses to the trade-off effect. The data illustrated that the most profit potential still comes from a balanced approach rather than chasing extremes.

As we reflect on that balanced show steer and the economics of how it’s put together, remember each beef primal contributes differently because of value and weight. Comparing a steer that qualifies for the Certified Angus Beef® (CAB®) brand versus one that simply grades USDA Choice, there was a $79 value difference favoring the brand through May. The loin contributed $30, the rib made up $18 and the chuck provided $15 in value, those three primalshipping in $63 of the $79 in value difference. The round added $9 in value to the CAB cutout while the plate, brisket and flank combined to make up the remaining $7. When it comes to picking a class winner, that steer with the largest rear quarter may represent a negative trade-off, versus a more valuable one with more in the front end that “balances” up a bit better.

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R

emote drug delivery devices (RDD) are becoming more commonly used in some modern day cow calf operations. The older style capture guns used in the past were generally used by veterinarians to tranquilize and “capture” cattle that needed further treatment. They could then be loaded and transported if that was necessary or put in a smaller compound if further treatment was necessary. Capture guns have also been used by veterinarians to capture escaped stock in areas where there are no collection corrals. Wildlife officers also use these same capture guns with potent capture drugs to catch and relocate wildlife. This article will go over the advantages and disadvantages of relying on these RDD for treating cattle. This primarily pertains to cattle on large pastures where the ability to restrain and examine cattle is limited. Strong, elusive or fractious bulls may even see these devices used on them. Initially the older capture guns were cumbersome and had hard metal darts that could inflict lots of damage. Today’s modern RDD (capture rifles and handguns) shoot lightweight darts that are loaded easily and are very accurate to shoot. The two I am most familiar with are the DanInject System and the Pneu-Dart System. Both have darts that can take up to 10 cc of product each and have projection systems that accurately deliver product up to 20 to 30 meters away. Wind must be taken into account when firing these.

Dan-Inject System RDD

The greatest issue with these RDD devices is the diagnosis made properly from a distance. There is no close examination and identification of the animal may be difficult. Also, does the delivery device put the product where it needs to go from a Verified Beef Production standpoint? Can we get the proper dosage delivered? If you are going to use products, especially prescription, in these devices your veterinarian should work out the protocols for the specific conditions you can treat with these remote devices. The beauty with today’s modern medicines are a number of the products have low dosages, long lasting capabilities and most are approved subcutaneously. The darts can be used with shorter needles so although not a guarantee, most of the product can get delivered subcutaneously. Shooting from the side on mature animals, the neck or shoulder area, is a decent target with these accurate rifles. One must take into account whether darting a calf, yearling, cow or bull realizing the skin thickness is very different between these groups. Be ever cognizant of where the jugular vein is. Some products, if given intravenously, are most likely to get a severe allergic reaction. Always have epinephrine on hand any time antibiotics or anything is being injected. If hit up over the shoulder I have seen instances where animals limp for a few days. Here the shoulder blade may have been hit. Never dart cattle on the run if possible.

From our producers and ranchers viewpoints these dart guns offer easy and timely treatments: labor savings and very minimal stress on the cattle that are darted. If the right treatment is given even one day or several hours earlier than it would normally be, treatment response is improved. Fewer treatments may be necessary and it can be much less stressful than roping and stretching the cattle out in order to treat. The darts come out shortly after contact so they can be gathered up. Some darts are one time usage while others are reusable. They are colorful so seldom are lost. One needs to work out with your veterinarian standard SOP’s for common pasture conditions with prescriptions as necessary. A couple of worries as a veterinarian are that we might have some cattle treated unnecessarily and a lack of prudent usage of antimicrobials. Since looking from a distance the wrong diagnosis could be made. We are also limited to the low dosage, long acting antimicrobials that will fit into one dart. The beauty here is on lameness, so we can watch a couple days for natural improvement and then treat if necessary. Carry a good set of binoculars so you can at least make a good visual exam. One person does all the locating, identifying, diagnosing and treating in a cost effective manner. If it is a serious ailment and one that requires further testing or diagnosing then it is advisable to catch and remove to a treatment area. That is the sort of decision, you as the person in charge of animal health must deal with on a case-by-case, day-by-day basis. I would advise if one treatment does not show improvement that cattle get removed or caught so a proper diagnosis and complete treatment can be given. Lots of potential use and labor savings for you producers with some negatives such as over treatment or product not delivered where it should be. All these negatives deserve consideration. Although you don’t need a firearms safety course, be careful because they are like a real gun. If you have never handled guns before, a firearms safety course may be a good idea. It is imperative you get the ID of the animals, record the treatment and record where the animal was hit. Have very legible ear tags and the binoculars will help with identification. Try to retrieve all the used darts so watch closely after the dart is in. Darts will generally fall out after a few steps and they have very visible tails. I would say understand the labels and withdrawals of product, don’t over treat or treat unnecessarily and work with your veterinarian. The RDD’s may have more of a role into the future as they may be used for vaccinations or giving nutritive supplements in some instances and even some dewormers or painkillers on an emergency basis. Again your veterinarian does the SOP’s. If necessary to treat and timeliness is of the essence the RDD may be able to help you out but proceed with caution and know your equipment. A treatment (dart) gun is a tool to be used at the appropriate time and for appropriate conditions. Really try and avoid using the rump wherever possible. Lots of things to consider before pulling out the dart gun but it is a tool on remote, large pastures or pastures with no handling facilities.

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20/20 Angus

Owen • Bernadette • Chantz Legaarden Box 93 • Paynton, SK • S0M 2J0 306-903-7070 • 2020angus@yourlink.ca

Are you on the list?

Make your sale standout! Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Clint, Suzanne, Eric, Luc & Alexi Smith Box 284, Mankota, SK H: 306.478.2470 C: 306.478-7470 F: 306.478.2480 breedcreekranch@sasktel.net Today’s Angus Advantage  42

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Red & Black Angus Box 23 Gladmar, SK S0C 1A0 www.dkfredangus.com

Dwayne & Karen Fettes 306-969-4506

dkfredangus@sasktel.net

Scott, Tina Brandy & Eric 306-815-7023

dkfredangus@gmail.com

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Glenn & Mel Sisson

(306) 873-4890 Cell: (306) 852-9047 RR 1, Ridgedale, SK S0E 1L0 “The Final Legacy of the Black Pearl” Sale ~ December 16, 2017 Saskatoon, SK

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Tom & Vicki Flanagan Maple Creek, SK P: 306.662.2272 C: 306.662.8120 tomvic@sasktel.net sheidaghananghus.com

Sunderland Ranch Ltd. Registered Black Angus Cattle

Terry & Rachelle Sunderland www.sunderlandranch.net Box 2139 Maple Creek, SK S0N 1N0 terrysunderland@sasktel.net 306-662-3021

Home of SAV Ten Trillion 3112A Son of AAR Ten X 7008 5A X SAV Blackcap May 5530

Box 176 Dundurn, SK S0K 1K0 306.492.2161 wilbarcattle@gmail.com b r ya n a n d t r a c e y w i l l m s w w w . w i l b a r fa r m s . co m

Willowview Angus Farm Ken & Sandy Harle

Box 512, Regina, SK S4P 3A3 306-359-6100 306-539-8185

harleks@imagewireless.ca

Purebred Registered Red Angus

The Kereluiks

Box 278, Sheho, SK S0A 3T0 twin.heritage@sasktel.net www.twinheritage.com Mitch Allan and Ann Michael 306.272.7501 306.849.4638 306.220.1976 “Add a Touch of Heritage to Your Herd

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Beef cattle genetic power keeps moving up. Just look at the trend for pre- and post-weaning growth potential across breeds. Look at the continued improvement in quality grade across the industry. Some say that growth increase has come at the detriment of the cow herd, increasing feed and forage requirements beyond what the ranch can maintain. But steer carcass weights peaked at 930 lbs. in fall 2015, not maintaining their historic 5 lb. annual increase as predicted. While carcass weights vary seasonally, they have declined annually since 2015 and trend lower in 2018. No, this isn’t just a review of carcass weights, but the trend change serves as an example of the role management can play in the ability to achieve genetic potential. Carcass weights are on their third year of decline, but genetic potential for carcass weight has continued to increase; the difference is management. Cattle feeders can quickly change carcass weight by choosing to market cattle at lighter weights. Meanwhile, improvements in genetic potential for marbling let them do that while increasing or at least holding quality grade steady. New research highlights the role management plays in allowing genetic potential to be expressed. Emma Neidermayer and co-workers from Iowa State University evaluated the influence implants and trace mineral recommendations have on finishing performance. While their work focused on the finishing phase, the data posed interesting questions for the entire industry in view of gains in genetic potential. For those who doubt what growth-promoting implants can do to reduce resources needed to produce beef, Neidermayer’s data showed a 10.5% increase in carcass weight while improving feed efficiency 23%, with no detrimental effect on quality grade. While these results exceed previous reports, the authors suggest that may be attributed to improved genetic potential further enhanced by technologies. Better genetics and technology led the Iowa State group to evaluate trace mineral levels during the finishing period as well. Historically, mineral recommendations were set to prevent animals from displaying deficiency symptoms without regard for improved performance. This study went beyond that, looking at trace mineral levels where calves were not supplemented, or only at required levels, or at consultant-recommended levels

(1.5 to 3 times the minimum requirement, depending on the mineral). Carcass weights were improved 3% with no change in feed efficiency or carcass quality grade by adding trace minerals at levels recommended by industry consultants compared to those fed at merely the required level or unsupplemented. These data suggest trace mineral supplementation may need to be modified to suit the “growing demand” for nutrients by calves with greater genetic potential. As you visit with your nutritionist this summer, discuss your cow herd’s genetics. When purchasing mineral supplements or developing a creep feed, consider the increased growth potential you have built your herd around and ensure you’re providing adequate nutrients to capture genetic potential. Deciding whether to creep feed calves is a ranch-level example related to the carcass weight discussion and the Iowa State experiments. Creep feeding is a management tool that can add nutrition to let a calf express its full preweaning genetic potential. Milk and abundant forage may be all that’s needed to meet the calf ’s minimum requirements, but genetic growth potential may be left unmet due to inadequate nutrition. That growth potential may not be lost, just transferred to the next owner and similar to the carcass weight decline, the lighter weight calves may be just as profitable. Since genetic potential, nutrient resources and market value differ across operations, you should consider management strategies that optimize all three, rather than seeking to maximize only one.

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Judges

art division

Pee Wee

Chad Hollinger & Austen Anderson

showmanship

Pee Wee

Aklen Abey

Junior

Ty Nykoliation

Intermediate

public speaking

Declynn Allum

Aklen Abey

Nathan deRocquigny

Pee Wee Junior

Nia Devonald

Intermediate

Junior

Intermediate

Cody Carson

scrapbook

Sam deRocquigny

Laine Muir

senior

senior

Aklen Abey

photography

Teegan Hyndman

Aklen Abey

Taylor Carlson

Justin Carvey

individual judging

Pee Wee

Aklen Abey

Junior

Nia Devonald

Intermediate

Laine Muir

senior

Naomi Best

team judging

Pee Wee

Jagger Allum & Emily Murray

Pee Wee

Naomi Best

Junior

Pee Wee Junior

Lane Nykoliation

Intermediate

Emily Speers

Intermediate senior

Orianna Hyndman

stall card

Pee Wee

senior

Declynn Allum

graphic design

Joran Frey

Aklen Abey

Junior

Orianna Hyndman

Pee Wee

Junior

stockman’s knowledge

Junior

Emma Fox

Emma Fox & Ty Nykoliation

Teegan Hyndman

Intermediate

Intermediate

Royce Moellenbeck

senior

Cindy Jack

Junior

Cody Carson & Rylee Paterson

senior

Justin Carvey & Amanda Scott

Cody Carson

Intermediate senior

Kaitlyn Davey Today’s Angus Advantage  48

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Young Handlers Award

Brett Grieve

Digger Award

Jonathan Karsin

Bob Gordon Memorial Overall Stockman’s Knowledge Award

Cindy Jack

Cook-Off

Bobbi Foster, Sully Fox, Jaylin Hill, Hayden Bigney, Bree Russell and Lukas Cavers

Grand Aggregate

Pee Wee

Aklen Abey

Junior

grand champion angus female Justin Carvey with Sunny Grove Ruby 48D

Intermediate

reserve grand champion angus female Levi Best with CHL Karama 58C

Ty Nykoliation Emily Speers

senior

Naomi Best

conformation

Team Grooming

champion angus heifer calf Lane Nykoliation with N7’s Blackwood Lady

Roundup Scholarship

reserve champion angus heifer calf Justin Carvey with Swindon Ruby Tuesday

Nolan Glover, Angel Grieve, Brooklyn Hedley, Emma Falconer, Hannah Mann and Aklen Abey $1000.00 Recipient - Amanda Scott

herdsman award

Sierra Inglis

all star team

Kaitlyn Davey, Elektra Breault, Garnett Speers, Piper Bigney and Rhett Sigurdson

reserve champion senior angus female Levi Best with CHL Karama 58C

champion angus bull calf Levi Best with CHL Big Interest 73F

champion junior angus female Lane Nykoliation with N7’s Mary Kate reserve champion junior angus female Levi Best CHL Dolly 80E champion senior angus female Justin Carvey with Sunny Grove Ruby 48D

CATTLE ENTRIES NOW OPEN

As Alberta’s largest agricultural show, Farmfair International has been helping you buy, sell and connect for 45 years and will continue to be a part of your big deal.

• Purebred Beef Shows – Nov. 7-10 • Legends of the Fall – Nov. 7 • Red & Black Angus Show – Nov. 9 • Prospect Steer & Heifer Show – Nov. 10 • Bull Pen Show and Commercial Cattlemen’s Day – Nov. 10 • Junior Futurity Showcase – Nov. 11

farmfairinternational.com

#FARMFAIR | Edmonton EXPO Centre Today’s Angus Advantage  49

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Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

John & Gloria Turner Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

BoxBruce, 234,Ione Souris, MB & Breanna R0KAusten 2C0& Katie Email giturner@xplornet.ca Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0

www.andersoncattle.ca

204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca (204)483-3234 John (Cell) (204) 483-0764 Gloria (Cell) (204)-741-0648

www.andersoncattle.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Quality Purebred Red & Black Angus Genetics Annual Bull Sale - 3rd Saturday In March Albert, Glen, Larissa, Ian Dr. David & Shelly Hamilton Hamilton (204) 872-2358 (204) 822-3054 (204) 526-0705 (204) 325-3635 larissa_hamilton@hotmail.com • www.hamcocattleco.com

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Doug & Jason McLaren

Box 373, Neepawa, Manitoba R0J 1H0 Doug: 204-476-6248 jmdfarms@mts.net Jason: 204-476-6723 mclarenj@hotmail.com

www.jasredangus.com

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Few producers strive for average - from cow productivity to cost reduction, we all want to be better than that. Yet half of every herd is below its own average, so the bar we compare against is important for context. As the summer video sale reports come in, we hear lots of comments wondering how some cattle trade at such exceptional prices. They’re sure the next owner has assured themselves a loss because they paid on the wrong side of average. Let’s take a closer look at strategies. With above-average inputs that yield merely average output, the math is certain to result in parentheses. For those who have never seen accounting math, that means a loss. On the other hand, a high-input, high-output model may very well generate the same or more dollars than a “value buyer” who cuts costs to the quick. Neither scenario assures the operator a profit, but each has identified where the opportunity lies within their system.

need to buy more land or cows and even a small return on investment is favorable because of the short timeline. The investment to enhance feeder calf marketing can be as simple as the time to develop a marketing document that chronicles the last year of work. Focus not only on the products used but how and when they were administered. Couple that with a brief phone video and a few calls to feeders to solicit buyers and you are certainly an aboveaverage marketer. If you increase calf value by only a single bid, the math favors your effort. Those less inclined to try harder at marketing might capture value closer to the end user of the beef produced. Retaining ownership beyond weaning may add value to your forage and grains along with that of calves. Diversified operations may improve crop-enterprise bottom lines by harvesting highmoisture corn to cut drying cost and shrink while providing excellent feed. Calves grazing corn stalks, whether owned or rented, offer residue reduction and nutrient cycling while getting more use out of land, the most costly asset on the books. While stalks are best suited to supporting cows, systems where calves can be fed on stalks transform those feed nutrients into fertilizer, reducing total system costs. Thinking about alternative practices, it’s easy to forget what you can’t see, like the fertilizer value of purchased hay. It nets feed and fertilizer for a lower cost per acre on owned land, often with added carrying capacity. It works best when cattle readily consume the hay, to echo the comparison of calf prices. Buying “expensive” hay may offer the better alternative to buying land or equipment.

The average provides a reasonable benchmark to compare our system against the wider industry in a mathematical sense. However, in a biological system as diverse as we have in North America, there are countless opportunities and decisions along the way to move production above or below the line. The ideal time to evaluate such opportunities? Daily and continuously, because those forks in our management road keep coming at us, presenting ways to modify the system and beat the average. The openings most often overlooked are those we enjoy the least and most cattlemen put marketing at the top of that list. We enjoy watching calves grow and taking steps to add value but as traditional price takers, the ability to capture value is better for some outfits than others. Ironically, enhanced marketing is one of the least costly inputs on the ranch: no

If you have below-average calves, you can “value-buy” them into your own backgrounding enterprise to capture value on reduced shrink and greater marketing power with large group size. That option requires no more cows to net more pounds of beef marketed per acre. History suggests adding weight to your open cows as another way to do that. No matter how far we advance, there will always be average production. The challenge is to look at every event or report that causes you to ask, “How did they make that work?” Then look for answers that fit your resources and move your average higher.

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SELLING!

Pine Coulee Black Annie A29 Connealy Impression x G A R Expectation 4915

Pine Coulee Entense Z63 S A V 004 Density 4336 x OCC Emblazon 854E

DT Donna RT Sweet Pea 981 Leachman Right Time x D H D Traveler 6807

Pine Coulee Lucy Y7 Pine Coulee Powerhouse W112 x N Bar Emulation EXT

F E M A L E

SA L E

DONORS/PROVEN COWS • HEIFER CALVES • BRED HEIFERS October 18, 2018 ● Big Horn Resort ● Billings, Montana Social 6:30 pm

Sale 7:30 pm

Offered By Pine Coulee & Guests Pine Coulee Angus, Jim & Andrea Stampfel, 406-780-1230 H-C Cattle, John & Laurie Carrel, 406-855-2832 Barragree Cattle Co, Brian Barragree, 406-780-1219 Zane Barragree, 406-425-1720

PineCoulee.com •

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Fleming Stock Farms Box 1 Granum, Alberta T0L 1A0 Phone: 403-687-2288 Cell: 403-625-0427 (Duncan) Cell: 403-625-1124 (Cecilie) Cell: 403-625-1060 (Cooper) Email: flemingangus@xplornet.com

Duncan, Cecilie & Cooper Fleming "Quality goes in before the name goes on"

◊ Angus Cattle ◊ ◊ Ranch & Performance Horses ◊

Leon & Melissa Lee Oyen, Alberta Leon Cell ◊ 403-664-0370 Melissa Cell ◊ 403-664-9177 E-Mail ◊ diamondlranching@gmail.com Box 441 ◊ Oyen, Alberta ◊ T0J 2J0

performance RED & BLACK angus

Bob Hahn bhahn@hahnco.com cell. 780.991.1355 home. 780.464.0296 fax. 780.423.4836 www.hahnangus.com

22525 Twp Rd 514 Sherwood Park, Alberta, T8C 1H5

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Mick & Debbie Trefiak

14 miles east of Wainright and 11 miles north on range road 4-3

RR 1 Edgerton, Alberta T0B 1K0 P :: 780-755-2224 F :: 780-755-2223 C :: 780-842-8835 mick@mjt.ca www.mjt.ca

Lee & Laura Brown

Box 217, Erskine, AB T0C 1G0 403-742-4226 Lee cell 403-740-9429 llbangus@telus.net www.llbangus.com

Annual Bull and Female Sale second Saturday in March

Pedersen Livestock

Kurt & Becky Pedersen

(780) 755-3160 (780) 209-9999 Kurt Cell www.pedersenlivestock.com

Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 (780)853‐9673 sean@roundrockranching.com www.roundrockranching.com

The Best Beef in a Better World

Sean McGrath

V

sean@rou www.rou

The Best Beef in

Sean McGrath

Samtia Angus

REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS CATTLE Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 Lee & Layne Gleim & Family (780)853‐9673 Box 4467, Taber,sean@roundrockranching.com AB Home: (403) 223-8442 www.roundrockranching.com Cell: (403) 795-0004 or (403) 634-8226 The Best Beef in a Better World “Our Vision is Based on Quality Not Quantity” layneg@cciwireless.ca

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The Best Beef in

Sean McGrath

Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 (780)853‐9673 9/6/2018 sean@roundrockranching.com www.roundrockranching.com

sean@rou www.rou

3:10:29 PM

V

sean@rou www.rou


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No matter the environment, cattle should improve.

Restrictive environments simply require more balance.

That common thread links everything from sustainability to carcass utilization, Phil Bass told ranchers at the Florida Cattlemen’s Association annual convention in June.

“It’s everything,” Bass said. Growth and carcass quality coexist when the right genetics align. Targeted management can bring out the animal’s full potential no matter its home.

The University of Idaho meat scientist who spent years as the Certified Angus Beef ® brand’s “Dr. Phil” was addressing Floridians but his key message was for all beef producers. “We have to remember that cows don’t just walk all over the range and into a steak house,” Bass said. “Something has to happen in between.” “Environmental obstacles stand in the way of consumer demand, but well-managed herds overcome them,” he said. “You can put these magical creatures just about anywhere to eat grass and turn it into meat,” Bass said.“Wow, we should be excited about that. That’s miraculous! The challenge with that is the variation of region and therefore cattle. We need to manage that, too.” Change may not be easy, improvement will look different for each, but something can be done. Top of the consistency.

list:

“I put my butcher hat on...I don’t know what that would look like” Bass joked, “but I need consistency. I need it to be high-quality every single time.” If the harvest process becomes inefficient, beef becomes less affordable for the end user making protein choices every day. What’s more, it better taste good.

“Although these [bos indicus] animals can do very well in the southeast, they do have a specific enzyme that prevents the natural tenderization we like to see from a meat perspective,” Bass said. To offset the enzyme’s impact, he suggested bringing in British-type breeds like Angus in a crossbreeding program. “Talk to local university animal scientists,” he said. On a broad scale, the beef industry is set up to generate a high volume of cattle in the southeast and move them to areas where feed yards are prevalent, thus generating an efficient, high-quality product that pays premiums to the seller. The signals are there for the live cattle and meat side to work together, packer and rancher with the same goal. Many ranchers have done it, met with money in their pockets. “You have to have the balance, you have to have the pounds but then you also have to have the marbling to go along with it. The quality. The consistency,” Bass said. “That’s so the grocery store consumer who doesn’t understand the meat business and beef community can at least trust what they’re buying.” “The benefit that beef has is taste,” Bass said. That’s the leg up on the competition.

“We use all of our senses, visual, everything,” Bass said. “The meat has to look good, has to taste good, so that people come back to it. “If we as a beef community do not deliver something that tastes good, we won’t have to worry about raising cattle. We have to deliver what the consumers want.”

“It is exceptional, it is different and it’s highly palatable, way beyond that which you can get from any other species.” It’s crucial that cattlemen take full advantage.

It can feel like an uphill battle, particularly for those who sell at weaning for a price per pound. But cattlemen are in this together, within an industry defined by resilience and improvement.

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Chris Poley 306-220-5006

Shane Michelson 403-363-9973

Ben Wright 519-374-3335

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C. BAR D. RANCH Punchaw Red Angus

Mike & Brenda Wheeler 4694 Blackwater Rd. Vanderhoof, BC V0J 3A1

Purebred Red Angus Cattle Albert & Jackie Tosoff 28450 Punchaw Road, Prince George, B.C. (75 KM S.W. of Prince George) P: 250-483-1283 E: punchaw-tosoffs@live.ca

Tel: 250-567-4020

Email: north.40@live.ca

Bulls Sell At The Vanderhoof Bull Sale on April 2019

’t Don e bl m a g with r you ! sale Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list on www.BuyAgro.com info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

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2018 marks the fourth year of the Canadian Angus Association special issues. In an effort to bring the most value to our advertisers, the Late Fall issue which was the member directory will now be the Annual Canadian Angus Association Late Fall Sale Journal and the Winter issue will continue to be the Canadian Angus Association Bull Buyers Guide. Both issues will continue to be mailed to the Complete Canadian Angus Membership and Canadian Angus Association Commercial Mailing List.

Canadian Angus Association Special Issue Advertising Booking Deadlines... Annual Canadian Angus Association Late Fall Sale Journal Booking Deadline: October 10, 2018 Material Deadline: October 15, 2018 Camera Ready: October 19, 2018 Distributed To The Canadian Angus Members And Commercial Mailing List Canadian Angus Association Bull Buyer’s Guide Booking Deadline: January 2, 2019 Material Deadline: January 8, 2019 Camera Ready: January 15, 2019 Distributed To The Canadian Angus Members And Commercial Mailing List

P: 306.933.4200 F: 306.934.0744 info@todaysangus.com www.todaysangus.com Today’s Angus Advantage  61

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Breeders

Services DESIGN DESIGN

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Graphic Artist ~ Owner Pictures, Advertisments, Logos C: 780.385.0030 Email: ty.dietrich.21@gmail.com

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Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list! info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Today’s Angus Advantage  63

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SEPTEMBER 29 EASTERN EXTRAVAGANZA ANGUS SALE - LINDSAY, ON

OCTOBER 6 GILCHRIST FARMS & GUESTS “IN IT TO WIN IT” SALE - LUCKNOW, ON 22 JUSTAMERE 19TH ANNUAL “SALE OF THE YEAR” ANGUS SALE - LLOYDMINSTER, SK

NOVEMBER

MARK STOCK Box 89, Hazelet, SK S0N 1E0

306-678-4811 Cell: 403-357-8104

RING SERVICE & LIVESTOCK SERVICE

3 ROYAL ELITE ALL BREEDS SALE - TORONTO, ON 6 VALLEY LODGE CATTLE CO. COMPLETE DISPERSAL - MOOSE JAW, SK 12 ANGUS HARVEST CLASSIC SALE - MOOSE JAW, SK 21 SIX MILE RANCH “GENETIC FOCUS”2018 SALE - REGINA, SK 28 ACADIA COLONY CHAROLAIS AND ANGUS SALE - OYEN, AB

DECEMBER 1 MANITOBA ANGUS KEYSTONE CLASSIC - BRANDON, MB

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3 RIGHT CROSS RANCH COMMERCIAL BRED HEIFER AND LONG YEARLING BULL SALE - KISBEY, SK

Auctioneer

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Box 2330 Warman, SK S0K 4S0

11 JOHNSON LIVESTOCK ANGUS FEMALE SALE - PEEBLES, SK 13 BANDURA RANCHES ANNUAL TWO-YEAR-OLD BULL AND FEMALE PRODUCTION SALE - BROOKS, AB

Cell (306) 220-5006 chris@tbarc.com

14 BENCH ANGUS 1ST ANNUAL LONG YEARLING BULL AND PUREBRED BRED HEIFER PRODUCTION SALE - SHAUNAVON, SK 17 MAPLE LAKE STOCK FARMS PRODUCTION SALE - HARTNEY, MB 19 MAPLE RIDGE ACRES COMPLETE RED ANGUS DISPERSAL - SASKATOON, SK 29 PREMIER LIVESTOCK & GUESTS, FALLS VIEW PRODUCTION SALE - NIAGARA FALLS, ON

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By Producer Communications Director Miranda Reiman with CAB Vice President Mark McCully It’s a story that keeps surprising the beef community. In 2018’s first quarter, cattlemen again set records for the percentage of carcasses grading AA-Choice and Prime, and qualifying for the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand. They kept breaking those records. “It’s a little bit unbelievable,” says Mark McCully, the brand’s vice president of production.

Mark McCully

Quality grades hit a high of 81.5% Choice and Prime in February, besting records just established in January and last fall. Then, every single week in February set a new high for CAB brand acceptance, the share of black-hided cattle that made it into the brand after being presented to USDA and Canadian graders for evaluation. “The first question when we look at this kind of quality is, ‘Have we reached some point of market saturation?’” McCully says. “The reality is, that would be showing up in some really narrow Choice-Select [AA/A] spreads and that’s just not what we saw through April. We’re seeing the demand continue to grow and that spread continues to stay strong.”

McCully says cattlemen have responded to the signals, which included a record $75 million in grid premiums paid for CAB qualifiers last year. “The long-term trend has been driven by a focus on the carcass genetics,” he says. “It’s been an organized effort of managing that calf from the ranch to the packing plant.” The widespread drought that affected many herds starting in 2011 and 2012 accelerated the genetic improvement. “We’re still seeing the effects from cattle made through that expansion phase,” McCully says. “The way that happened was by keeping back better, younger cattle—rebuilding with heifers and often times breeding them to Angus bulls.” Mother Nature will get less credit as time goes on. “We’re probably at the end of that big cattle turnover that happened through the drought,” he says. “So it will still be a factor, but to a lesser degree moving forward.” USDA’s updated maturity standards also played a minor role in this winter’s quality grade hike. A December change allowed cattle to qualify for the most youthful “A” maturity category based on either dentition or skeletal evaluation. Many branded beef programs, including CAB, revised their specifications to match. “The science showed it was eating-experience neutral,” McCully says, noting it brought in more brand-eligible carcasses than they initially estimated. “A few cattle that were getting downgraded before are now able to achieve premiums.”

The first 16 weeks of 2018 averaged 34.9% CAB, compared to 30.3% for 2017. That’s an added 13,188 head branded each week. “The idea that we’ve matured or hit some sort of a quality ceiling, I understand why people say it, but I don’t believe the economic signals support that,” he says. The CAB boxed beef premium averaged $8.76 per hundred weight (cwt.) for the first quarter, compared to $9.19/cwt. for those months in 2017. “That’s down slightly, but the math tells the more complete story,” McCully says. The certified head count increased by 20.4% (from 1.3 million to 1.6 million, or 300,000 head), but the spread only declined 4.7% or $0.43.

Beef buyers have taken the recent quality upswing and asked for more. “They’re accessing more of the product, whether that’s Prime or CAB— or CAB Prime—and they like it, and their customers like it, so they’re bidding that product up,” McCully says. “There was a time in my career where I would have said 30% [CAB acceptance] is probably where we’ll start maxing out. I don’t believe that’s the case anymore.” The numbers show, “We’ve got opportunities to grow,” he says.

“There’s a customer base out there today, people now accessing highquality products that maybe just never thought they could before,” McCully says. When you look at a greater slice of time, the story gets even richer. Rewind to the first 16 weeks of 2010: 1 million head certified with a 24.1% CAB acceptance rate and a CAB-AA/Choice spread of $6.20/cwt. Comparing 2018 to 2010, acceptance rate increased by more than 10 percentage points, certified head count rose by 55.5%. Even with that added supply, the CABChoice spread increased by 41.3%.

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20/20 Angus

42

Brooklyn Cattle Co.

54

A.S. Galten Farms

38

Buschbeck Cattle Company

38

Aberlynn Farms

54

BuyAgro.com 35

AG+ Plus Design

62

C. Bar D. Ranch

Alameda Agencies Ltd.

62

C.D. Land & Cattle

Allencroft Angus

25

Cadillac Stock Farms

38

Alta Genetics

62

Canadian Farm Insurance Corp.

63

Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society

63

Castlerock Marketing

16

Anderson Cattle Co. Andrew Angus

14, 50 6

60 25, 54

Arda Farms

54

Chapman Cattle Company

54

Arm River Red Angus

42

Circle 7 Angus

42

Artisan Farms

11, 62

Clair Lane Stock Farm

38

Arway Angus

38

Clear River Red Angus

55

Atlasta Angus

54

Clear View Stock Farm

6

Awesome Angus Farms

54

Clegg Angus

55

Baintree Angus

54

Clevelands Farm

42

Bandura Ranches

72

CMT Farms

42

Bar 2J Quarterhorses & Registered Black Angus

54

CNI Ranching

42

Bar DK

42

Combest Red Angus

55

Bar Double M

25

Coulee Crossing Cattle Company

17

Bar-E-L Angus

IFC

Country Lane Angus

55

Crescent Creek Angus

42

Cudlobe Angus

25

Barragree Cattle Co. BCII Show Cattle

53 6

Bell Angus

17

Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd.

63

Bench Angus

21

Deer Range Red Angus

42

Big Sky Stock Farm

25

Deer River Ranching

55

BJ Cattle Co.

54

Delorme Livestock

42

Black Ridge Angus Farm

42

Diamond L Ranch

55

Blairs.Ag Cattle Company

BC

Diamond T Cattle Co.

55

Blake’s Red Angus

20

DJ Cattle Co.

50

Blast Angus

60

DKF Angus

43

Blue Mountains Angus Farm

11

Dorran, Steve

63

BMB Brewin Angus

54

Double Bar D Farms

43

Bootis Black Angus

50

Double C Red Angus

43

Border Butte Angus

54

Double F Cattle Co.

43

Bouchard Livestock International

15, 25

Double Trouble Cattle

6

Bova-Tech Ltd.

62

Dragonview Angus

60

Bow Valley Genetics

62

Drumhaggart Ltd.

50

Breed Creek Angus Ranch

42

DSMR Stock Farm

6

Brendale Acres

38

Dusty Rose Cattle Co.

18

Broken T Ranch

42

Dwajo Angus

55

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Early Sunset Ranch

1

Hi Low Angus

17, 43

Eastondale Angus

43

High Tree Cattle

43

Edwards Angus

17

Highwood Valley Angus

25

EKW Red Angus

43

Hollinger Land and Cattle

Emmatt Creek Ranch

43

Honeybrook Farms

43

Eton Six Cattle

50

Iron Pipe

25

Everblack Angus

55

Ivanhoe Angus

43

F Bar & Associates

50

J & S Cattle

43

Fair Haven Farms Ltd.

50

J Bar Dee Farms

43

Farmfair International

49

Jackson Cattle Co.

17

Fleming Stock Farms

25, 55

JAS Red Angus

51

17, 43

Flewelling, Craig

63

Jim Nugent Livestock

64

Fraser Farms

50

JJL Livestock

44

GBS Angus Farm

43

Johnson Livestock

GBT Angus

43

Johnston/Fertile Valley

69

JPD Farms

38

Gerlei Angus Get-A-Long Stock Farm Gilchrist Farms Glasman Farms Glen Gabel Angus

17, 43 55 6, 7, 38 50 16, 17, 43

Glen Islay Angus

38

Glennie Bros. Angus

31

Goad Family Angus

55

Gold-Bar Livestock

17

Graham Red Angus

38

Grant Rolston Photography Ltd.

63

Greenbush Angus

50

GTA Ranch Inc.

55

H.S. Knill Co. Ltd.

67

Hahn Cattle Co.

55

Hall’s Cattle Company

17

Hamco Cattle Co.

50

Hamilton Farms

55

Harprey Farms Hartford Bros. Harvest Angus Hasson Livestock

KBJ Round Farms

55

KC Cattle Co.

44

Kembar Farms

51

Kenray Ranch

44

38 16, 60 6 43

Hazel Bluff Angus

55

H-C Cattle

10, 44

6, 38

Hawkeye Creek Ranch HBH Farms Inc.

Justamere Farms Ltd.

3

9 53 Today’s Angus Advantage  67

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Key Ranch

17

Northern View Angus

44

Kissee, Keith

22

Northway Cattle Co.

56

Kopper LC

25

Nu-Horizon Angus

44

Kueber Farms

55

Ockerman Angus

56

Lauron Red Angus

25

Ole Farms

56

Lazy B Livestock

16

Ossaw Angus

51

Lazy MC Angus

55

Ottercreek Cattle Co.

Lazy S Ranch Inc.

55

Paradise Farms

LCI Doenz Ranches

55

Peak Dot Ranch Ltd.

44

L-Dee Stock Farm

17

Pedersen Livestock

56

Leela Farms

38

Pine Coulee Angus

53

Lewis Farms

56

Poley, Chris

64

LLB Angus

56

Poplar Meadows Angus

Locust Grove Angus

39

Premier Livestock

Lone Stone Farms

56

Pugh Farms

56

LT Log & Tin Forest Products Ltd.

63

Ravenworth Cattle

17

Lucy 7 Cattle Co.

56

Red Rock Red Angus

56

M & J Farms

51

Red Rose Angus

45

Macks Red Angus

39

Redekop Cattle Company

44

Macnab Angus

44

Redrich Farms

56

Maple Line Farm

39

Rehorst Farms Ltd.

39

Reid Angus

56 64

Maple Ridge Acres

2, 44

6 6, 39

12, 60 6

Mar Mac Farms

51

Remax Blue Chip Realty

Marin, Nate

64

Remitall Farms

McGowan Farms

56

Right Cross Ranch

44

McMillen Ranching Ltd.

44

Rivercrest Angus Ranch

56

Meadow Ridge Ent. Ltd.

44

RJ Livestock

Merit Insurance Brokers

64

RNR Flicek Black Angus

44

Midnight Fire Cattle Company

44

Rob Roy Angus

39

Miller-Wilson Angus

56

Round Rock Ranching

56

Minburn Angus

56

Royal Angus

44

MJT Cattle Co. Ltd.

56

RSL Red Angus

44

Samtia Angus

56

Moose Creek Red Angus

8, 44

IBC

25, 56

Movin On Farms

56

Sandy Bar Ranch

45

Myjoco Angus

39

Schaff Angus Valley

62

NCJ Cattle Co.

25

Schulz Angus

57

Neilcairn Angus

39

Sheidaghan Anghus

45

Nolan Angus Farm

39

Shiloh Cattle Company

57

Nordal Limousin & Angus

44

Shortgrass Cattle Company Ltd.

57

North 40 Red Angus

60

Six Mile Ranch Ltd.

North Perth Angus

39

Skinner Farms

3 45

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Skyebrook Angus

45 25, 57

Southern Angus Farm

Upper Glen Angus

39

Valley Blossom Ranch

45

Spady Farms

16

Valley Lodge Cattle Co.

13

Spring Creek Simmentals

45

Vikse Family Farm

57

Springside Red Angus

45

Vos Vegas Farms

39

Spruce Ridge Stock Farms

51

Wagner Angus

17

Spruce View Angus Ranch

57

Walkerbrae Farms

39

Standard Hill Livestock

45

Ward’s Red Angus

8, 17

Steen Agencies

64

Watchapese Farm & Ranch

57

Still Meadow Farm

60

Waveny Angus Farm Ltd.

57

Stock, Mark

64

Weavercroft International

39

Stockmens Insurance

64

Whitney Black Angus

39

Storebo Farm

45

Wilbar Cattle Co.

45

Stromsmoe Black Angus & Herefords

57

Wild West Angus

51

Stronaway Angus

25

Willowside Farm

39

Sunderland Ranch Ltd.

45

Willowview Angus Farm

Sunny Grove Angus

45

Windy Willows Farms

45

Sunset Ridge Red Angus

51

WRAZ Red Angus

45

Symens Land & Cattle Co.

57

Xcel Livestock

T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd.

17, 45

6

2, 3, 6, 7, 13, 17, 21, 59, 64

Y Coulee Land & Cattle Co.

45

T Bar K Ranch

19, 45

Yarrow Creek Farm & Ranch

57

Tambri Farm

6, 39

Z Bar Angus

45

Tannas Ranches

57

Ter-Ron Farms

57

Thistle Ridge

25

Today’s Publishing

47

Tri A Angus

57

Triple L Angus

45

TSN Livestock

51

Tullamore Farms

39

Twin Heritage Farms

45

Dennis Johnston ~ David Johnston 306.227.2344 ~ 306.867.7959 PH/Fax: 306.856.4726 Conquest, Saskatchewan ranchers@sasktel.net www.johnstonfertilevalley.com

Bulls For Sale By Private Treaty

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Advertising and Subscription Deadlines and Editorial Calendar For More Information Contact:

Bryan Kostiuk Editor 306.934.9696 C: 306.292.7763

Shane Michelson Marketing C: 403.363.9973

Chris Poley

Marketing 306.933.4200 C: 306.220.5006

Ben Wright

Marketing C: 519.374.3335

S UBSCRI BE We appreciate your interest in Today’s Angus Advantage and hope you have enjoyed this issue. To receive further issues, please fill out the following subscription form and return it along with your payment (prices listed below) to:

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July 5

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21 28 30

Six Mile Ranch Genetic Focus Regina, SK Acadia Colony Charolais and Angus Sale Oyen, AB Manitoba Angus Association AGM Brandon, MB

September

December

29 29

1 2 3 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 17 17 19 19 29

Eastern Extravaganza Angus Sale Lindsay, ON BC Angus AGM Williams Lake, BC

October 1 3 6 6 13 18 19-20 22 24-27 29 31-3

Cudlobe Angus Influence Satellite Sale Saskatchewan Angus Breeder Information Session Moosomin, SK Gilchrist Farms & Guests “In It To Win It” Sale Lucknow, ON Shades Of Autumn Female & Prospect Sale Houston, BC BC Elite Angus Sale Prince George, BC Ladies of the Beartooths Female Sale Billings, MT, USA Canadian Red Round-Up Show & Sale Olds, AB Justamere 19th Annual “Sale Of The Year” Angus Sale Lloydminster, SK Manitoba Ag Ex Brandon, MB Chinook Classic Angus Sale Taber, AB Stockade Round-Up and Saskatchewan Angus Gold & Junior Show Lloydminster, SK

November 2-11 3 3 3-5 6 7- 10 7-11 12 15 19-24

The 96th Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Toronto, ON T Bar K Ranch Cow Herd Dispersal Whitewood, SK Royal Elite All Breeds Sale Toronto, ON 28th Commonwealth Agriculture Conference Edmonton, AB Valley Lodge Cattle Co. Complete Dispersal Moose Jaw, SK Agri-Trade Red Deer, AB Farmfair International Edmonton, AB Angus Harvest Classic Sale Moose Jaw, SK Blake’s Red Angus & Wood River Charolais Proven Producer Female Sale Moose Jaw, SK Canadian Western Agribition Regina, SK

Manitoba Angus Keystone Klassic Brandon, MB Mar Mac New Generation Female Sale Brandon, MB Right Cross Ranch Commercial Bred Heifer and Long Yearling Bull Sale - Kisbey, SK McMillen Ranching Ltd. Fall Female Production Sale Carievale SK 3rd Annual Pride Of The Prairies Sale Saskatoon, SK Glennie Bros. Long Yearling Bull Sale Carnduff, SK Youngdale Angus Production Sale Alameda, SK Johnson Livestock Angus Female Sale Peebles, SK Bandura Ranches Annual Two Year Old Bull and Female Production Sale Brooks, AB Bench Angus 1st Annual Long Yearling Bull and Purebred Heifer Production Sale Shaunavon, SK Medicine Hat Pen Show Medicine Hat AB Maple Lake Stock Farms Production Sale Hartney, MB Border Butte Black Angus Bull & Select Female Sale Medicine Hat AB Maple Ridge Acres Complete Red Angus Dispersal Saskatoon, SK Masterpiece Angus Sale Saskatoon, SK Premier Livestock & Guests, Falls View Production Sale Niagara Falls, ON

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Published 5 times/year- Winter, Spring, Summer, Autumn and Fall

Box 2330 Warman, Saskatchewan S0K 2T0 Phone: (306) 933-4200 Fax: (306) 934-0744 info@todaysangus.com www.todaysangus.com

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Publications Mail Agreement: 40021107

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Offering

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View the catalogue onlie at www.buyagro.com and bid live with Today’s Angus Advantage  72

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A

WINNER

in the pasture too!

Remitall F Rosebud 6E Pictured is EF COLOSSAL 520, the 2017 Agribition Grand Champion Bull, RBC Supreme Challenge Top 10 Finalist, and 2017 Bull Champion of the World. COLOSSAL pasture bred 50 cows at BAR-E-L this summer and is more impressive than ever! Stay tuned for your opportunity to implement COLOSSAL into your program. Semen packages will be available for the 2019 breeding season.

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Bull & Select Female Sale

Upcoming Sales

March 11, 2019 - At The Farm Selling: 80 Black Angus Yearling Bulls 40 Black Angus Yearling Heifers

November 11 - Brooking Open Book Invitational - AngusLive.com December 15 - Angus Collection Sale - Olds, AB March 14, 2019 - BAR-E-L Angus Bull & Select Female Sale - at the Ranch

L E R BA Angus

n ibitio r g A e s in th ction Sale l l e s She r & Perfe Powe

- Show Heifers Available - Semen & Embryos -

Dave & Lynne Longshore Family Stettler, AB

H. 403.579.2394

C. 403.740.6788

Email: barelangus@gmail.com Website: www.bar-e-l.com

Scott Anderson - 587.282.9683

Remitall F ell M

1 arch 1

ny S e g o r P

Decisive 35D

Sire: S A V Pioneer 7301 Dam: Remitall F Ellegra 115B MGS: S A V HArvestor 0338 BW 3.7 YW 76 WW 137 Milk 29 BW 78 205 WT 926 365 WT 1466

Richard Latimer 403.507.1122 Gary Latimer 403.507.1123 Box 3833, Olds, AB T4H 1P5 richard@remitall.ca Office 403.556.2742 - Fax: 403.556.2761

www.remitall.ca

Directions: 4 Miles South Of Olds on HWY 2A, 1 Mile West on Amerada Road


Today’s Angus Advantage

Early Sale Issue

Early Fall 2018

Volume 12 Issue 4

Todays Angus Advantage - Early Fall 2018  
Todays Angus Advantage - Early Fall 2018