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C O N T E N T S

February

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR................................................6

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CONTRIBUTORS......................................................................6 PAST EVENTS...........................................................................7 FASHION Fashion Forward: Rocking Red........................................8

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FOOD Syracuse Eats: Strong Hearts Café............................... 12 WOMAN BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES CONNECTION WBOC Leading Woman: Nancy Aureli....................... 14 HEALTHY WOMAN Rethink your drink........................................................... 16 Tobacco 21....................................................................... 18 Deciphering Cholesterol................................................... 20

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IN HER OWN WORDS Q and A with Evelyn Carter.............................................. 24 ON THE COVER Janice Turner: Shifting Your Paradigm Toward a Healthier Heart..................................................................... 27

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FOR A GOOD CAUSE Little Hats, Big Hearts......................................................... 34 INSPIRE Kristy Smorol.................................................................... 38 Jean Phillips........................................................................... 42 Patti DePaulis................................................................... 46

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UPCOMING EVENTS.......................................................... 48 MOVERS AND SHAKERS.................................................. 50

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LETTER from the Editor

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OUR TEAM

eart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Though you’ll read that statement several more times in this edition, I think it bears repeating. It’s something that I didn’t know before I started this job — coincidentally, on the same day as the Go Red for Women Luncheon, back in 2015. That first day, the luncheon, was a whirlwind of shaking hands, trading business cards and trying to remember names. I was so nervous about making a good first impression that I was barely able to soak in any knowledge. By this point, the third Go Red edition I’ve helped put together, I know some more facts about women’s heart health. I realize you’ll read them again and again as you flip through these pages, but I think they’re worth repeating. Thank you to our partner, the American Heart Association, for sharing these facts with me. Cardiovascular diseases kill one woman about every 80 seconds and about 80 percent of cardiovascular diseases may be prevented. Think about that. Every 80 seconds. That means that every 80 seconds, children lose mothers. Husbands lose wives. Families are forever changed. The good news is that second part: about 80 percent of cardiovascular diseases may be prevented. How do you do that? Know Your Numbers: • Total Cholesterol • HDL Cholesterol • Blood Pressure • Blood Sugar • Body Mass Index Take a minute and visit heart.org to learn more about those important numbers. And a last few facts from the AHA: • Less than 20 percent of women meet the Federal Physical Activity Guidelines. • More than 66 percent of women age 20 and older are overweight or obese. • About 63 percent are non-Hispanic whites. • About 82 percent are non-Hispanic blacks. • About 77 percent are Hispanics. • More than 50 percent of high blood pressure-related deaths were female. • About 42 percent of women in America age 20 or older have total cholesterol of 200 mg/dl or higher. Please flip through these pages, put faces and stories to these facts and figures, and help the AHA spread the word to end heart disease.

Lorna On Our Cover: Janice Turner was photographed by Alice G. Patterson of Alice G. Patterson Photography at Bethany Baptist Church in Syracuse. Special thanks to Jillain Pastella Salomone, owner of J. Luxe Salon, for Janice’s makeup styling.

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Publisher

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Editor

Riya Chacko Samantha Leader Deb Mendzef Kathie Morris Lorna Oppedisano Carol Radin Megan Stevens Peggy A. Thomas

David Tyler

Lorna Oppedisano

Design

Andrea Reeves

Photography Edges Photography Alexis Emm Mary Grace Johnson Steven J. Pallone Alice G. Patterson Jacqueline Vidler Daniel Ware

Advertising sales

Linda Jabbour Renée Moonan 315.657.0849 315.657.7690

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Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month. The publication is available free of charge.

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The magazine is published 12 times a year by Syracuse Woman Magazine, LLC and Eagle Publications, 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

Copyright © 2017 Syracuse Woman Magazine, LLC. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or republished without the consent of the publishers. Syracuse Woman Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts, photos or artwork. All such submissions become the property of Syracuse Woman Magazine, LLC and will not be returned.

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PAST SWM Events

Women Business Opportunities Connection held its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 3, at the Genesee Grande Hotel. Deborah Cabral,

The DeClutter Coach, presented Improving Focus & Working Proactively to Increase Productivity. Photography by Enfoque Images.

February 2018

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FASHION FORWARD The Power of Red

Rocking Red By Kathie Morris

Dressy night

I’ll start with Valentine’s Day. To me, Valentine’s Day is a bonus. It’s a chance to dress up after the holiday season has ended. If there was ever a time to wear velvet, this is the season to do it. Velvet evokes such romance. And it doesn’t have to be red velvet. Stores and boutiques are currently showing all shades — blue, pastels and black. If you aren’t brave enough to wear red, try pink or black. Speaking of black, if this is your go-to color, how about a black jumpsuit, glammed up with gold jewelry? Or try something bold — a romper! Pair it with tights and a fabulous pair of boots. The choice of boots this season is endless. There are luxe fabrics like velvet, suede, brocades and more. And don’t forget the over-the-knee boot, which has become a staple. Now, let’s talk about the cocktail dress. Think lace, with a peek of skin. You’ll have them swooning! The asymmetrical neckline and cold shoulder are still going strong. Try a sequined dress, and watch how you glitter on the dance floor. Top this off with a red coat (it is February, after all) or, better yet, a faux 8

fur jacket. When it comes to accessories, be sure to bring on the glitz and glam with evening bags, jewelry and maybe even red shoes! Casual night

Whether you’re going out or staying in, keeping it casual can be fun. Sweaters with sleeve detail, in soft fabrics, are cozy and warm! Try a cardigan or jean jacket with a pink button down and a vintage pin. Don’t be afraid to try leggings in a geometric or plaid pattern, paired with a tunic. Jeans, jeans and more jeans! They’re better than ever, with the latest technology working for all ages. Gone are the days of uncomfortable, binding jeans. New jean fabrics have a wonderful

stretch and come in a bunch of great colors and trendy styles. They will surely have you taking your old jeans and sweats out of the rotation. Try layering red, pink or lacy fishnet tights under your ripped jeans. Go for comfort and warmth when picking out casual footwear, like flats and boots. Think about a pop of color for beanies and mittens. National Wear Red Day

Don’t forget National Wear Red Day on Feb. 2! We’ll all be wearing red to show support for women’s heart health. This is a good time to invest in a red dress. Since red is the color of the season, you’re sure to have plenty of shopping options. If dresses

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aren’t for you, try a pencil skirt, a sweet red sweater or maybe a tailored blazer, paired with a wide belt at the waist. Headed to the gym? Be sure to add a bit of red to show your support! Wear what works for your daily routine. Whatever your style, February is the month to show your passion. Wear the clothing you love to support a cause. Follow your heart! SWM Kathie Morris owns The Changing Room. Visit the downtown Syracuse shop at 425 S. Warren St., and the Baldwinsville location at 25 Syracuse St. Connect online at facebook.com/ thechangingroom.km. Clothing by The Changing Room. Hairstyling by Shannon Fleming of Marisa's Fortress of Beauty. Makeup by Juliana Pastella of Pastel Makeup + Style.

Photography by Daniel Ware

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ebruary is the month of the heart. When thinking about what to wear this month, why not put more heart into choosing outfits? According to The Wall Street Journal, the color of the moment is red! Red isn’t only trendy; it’s also associated with wealth, happiness and passion. Who doesn’t want to have more of those in her life? Here are some simple tips to help you be creative with your style.

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Sweets, Treats more

&

for your

Valentine!

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& more for your Valentine!

Sweets,Treats

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SYRACUSE EATS Strong Hearts Café

Serving Food with a Purpose

Our vision and mission include everyone.” — Joel Capolongo, Strong Hearts Café cofounder and co-owner

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Photography by Steven J. Pallone

By Megan Stevens

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From top: Earth Crisis milkshake; bacon cheeseburger, made with veggie burger and tempeh bacon; “egg” trick muffin; winter kale salad.

lmost 10 years ago, on a car ride from New York City, Nick Ryan and Joel Capolongo imagined what it would be like to open up their own vegan café. Little did they know, their thoughts would begin to transform into reality only a halfyear later. They were headed home from a concert in the city when they decided to stop at a small café, which ultimately fueled their inspiration. On the ride back to Syracuse, they began to brainstorm and envision what their own vegan café could entail. “We wanted a place where we not only could serve the vegan population, but also be customers,” Joel said. A month later, Joel’s girlfriend walked into the brick building at 719 E. Genesee St. and saw a vacant spot that looked promising. She came back, reported the news to Joel and the next day, Nick and Joel spoke with the landlord. Things began to take off from there, and six months later, they served their first customer at Strong Hearts Café. “[It was] being in the right place at the right time,” Joel said. They decided they didn’t want to appeal to exclusively vegans, and would make their target audience simple: omnivores. Being the only vegan spot in town at the time, they knew it would be a “no brainer” to bring in the business of vegans. So, they decided to make their food taste so good that it would also appeal to those who weren’t vegetarian or vegan, making sure everyone felt comfortable with the menu choices. Nick and Joel agree that only about 10 percent of the Strong Hearts Café customer base is vegan. The duo takes pride in serving the dishes their customers like best, offering monthly specials, pizza Fridays and even vegan cupcakes. Some of their famous dishes are the Reuben sandwich and the chicken salad sandwich — all vegan, of course. As their success continued, the strong foundation and booming customer base

led to the opening of a second location in December 2013 at 720 University Ave., in the former Syra-Juice Juice Bar & Eatery space. When they learned the owner was selling the business, Nick and Joel jumped to make an offer. The new eatery had some built-in perks, coming with its own frequent customer base. The duo preserved some of its value by keeping a few of the items on the menu. As one can imagine, running two locations can present challenges. However, Nick and Joel have a system that makes it work. Nick oversees one location, while Joel oversees the other, which makes it all come together. “We are fortunate to be two owners with two locations,” Joel said. Strong Hearts Café was founded with vegan beliefs, but that’s not the only passion Nick and Joel share. They also fight for social justice, aiming to raise awareness and make a difference. They wanted to do something positive with their business by giving back to the community. “Our vision and mission include everyone,” Joel said. Last year, the duo ran a monthly Social Justice Charity campaign day. One day each month, they donated half of all proceeds from the day’s sales to a local charity, totaling more than $6,000 given to local nonprofits organizations in 2017. The charities included Vera House, InterFaith Works and Cuse Pit Crew. The theme of social justice extends to the Strong Hearts Café menu, too. Some of the most popular sellers are the milkshakes, which the duo named after some of their favorite heroes, including Harriet Tubman, Malcolm X and Caesar Chavez. Naming the milkshakes after their heroes was “pushing the vegan agenda, but also a look at these great people who took a stand,” Nick said. And that’s what Strong Hearts Café is all about. SWM

From left: Strong Hearts Café co-owners/cofounders, Joel Capolongo and Nick Ryan, in the restaurant’s location on East Genesee Street in Syracuse.

Visit Strong Hearts Café at 719 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, and Strong Hearts on the Hill at 720 University Ave., Syracuse. For menus, specials, hours, merchandise and more, visit strongheartscafe.com, strongheartsoth.com, facebook.com/StrongHeartsCafe or facebook.com/strongheartsonthehill.

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WBOC LEADING WOMAN Nancy Aureli

Creating Community Resources By Lorna Oppedisano

“I

need a change,” Nancy Aureli thought, as she sat at a training by FranklinCovey, the company behind The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Earlier in the day, Nancy — a geologist who worked 50- to 60-hour weeks in a male-dominated industry — had a blast introducing herself as Nancy-of-10-yearspast. A decade ago, she’d been finishing college at the State University of New York at Fredonia, ready to take on and change the world. After the break, she was asked to introduce herself again. But this time, it was 10 years in the future. Maybe she’d be married and have children, she said hesitantly. “I don’t think I work where I work now,” Nancy predicted. A naturally caring and empathetic person, Nancy opted for nursing, a career that’s led to entrepreneurship. Recently, she started her own business, Advance Care Planning of New York, as well as Community Living Advocates, a website designed to be a resource guide for seniors, caregivers and those with disabilities. Nancy earned an associate’s degree in nursing — the most difficult task she’s accomplished, she said. She spent about five years working in oncology, before switching to telehealth. After that, she looked for an opportunity to work with seniors, a passion of hers. She found that a new facility devoted to transitional care — helping patients 65 and older rebuild their strength before returning home — was being built. It was a perfect fit. During this time, Nancy had an idea: what if she could design a tablet specifically for seniors, to help them stay in touch with their families, stay aware of the news and find seniors discounts and events? She began to sketch out her idea, and showed the designs to her former geology partner. He told her she had something, and encouraged Nancy to connect with people in the area who could help her get the idea off the ground. At around the same time, she started Advance Care Planning of New York, a business devoted to helping people sort through advance care planning. It’s a topic people don't always want to talk about.

“When you need it, you need it,” Nancy said, “and you need somebody who can help you.” Then, about four years ago, Nancy spent months trying to find services for her grandmother who had suffered a stroke. Being a nurse, she assumed it would be easy. It wasn’t. The family had a negative experience with a nursing home, and Nancy’s grandmother didn’t qualify for hospice. “That was exceedingly difficult,” Nancy said. “I said to myself, ‘When this is over, I’m going to make a resource for people, so that if they ever get in this situation — and most people unfortunately do — they will be able to figure out what to do.’” Nancy transformed her original tablet idea into a pared down version — a website, Community Health Advocates. It’s a onestop shop for caregivers, seniors and people with disabilities to find services, resources, classes, events, volunteers opportunities, job opportunities and more, she explained. The site also links to Advance Care Planning of New York. Nancy credits the WISE Women’s Business Center with helping her realize that the simple website format might be the best way to pursue her dreams. She also joined Women Business Opportunities Connection, which she’s found to be a solid support system. “It’s been really good just to be around other businesswomen,” she said. “And it’s really great to have that outlet of just being in a room with a whole bunch of other people who are like you.” Visit Community Living Advocates at communitylivingadvocates.com. For more information on Advance Care Planning of New York, visit acpofny.com. Women Business Opportunities Connection (WBOC) is a non-profit organization that has been supporting the Syracuse and CNY area for more than 20 years. To become a member, visit wboconnection.org or follow the organization on Twitter at @WBOConnection. Syracuse Woman Magazine is a signature sponsor of the WBOC.

It’s been really good just to be around other businesswomen. And it’s really great to have that outlet of just being in a room with a whole bunch of other people who are like you.” — Nancy Aureli, Advance Care Planning of New York & Community Living Advocates 14

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HEALTHY WOMAN Healthy Lifestyle

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healthy woman Rethink Your Drink

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Rethink Your Drink By Peggy A. Thomas

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old winter days make it hard to get excited about cool refreshing drinks. Despite the chilly weather outside, it’s always good to break some old habits and rethink your drink. One healthy habit families can take on together is changing the approach to what they drink. According to the American Heart Association, sugary drinks have a powerful impact on the health of Americans. As a mother, wife, sister, friend, nurse and member of the AHA, my goal is to help educate others on how changing one simple thing can enhance their health and the health of those they care about. Sugary drinks are the leading source of calories in the American diet and contribute to the obesity epidemic we’re currently facing. Literature shows that the average American consumes 39 pounds of sugar per year from sugary drinks. That’s roughly a quarter cup of sugar per day. One 20-ounce cola drink packs 16 teaspoons of sugar. Energy drinks that are promoted as healthier choices can be just as damaging, packing 13 teaspoons into a 16-ounce beverage. The effects of this high calorie consumption are alarming. Studies have linked it to weight gain and increased body mass index. Right now, more than one third of adults are obese. Nearly one in three kids and teens is overweight or obese.

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HEALTHY WOMAN Healthy Lifestyle The benefits of limiting sugary drinks go beyond the waistline and can affect skin, memory and overall energy levels. Since sugary drinks are the No. 1 source of added sugar to our diets, a simple swap can have extremely positive effects on one’s own health and the health of those we care about. As easily as it can be added, it can be subtracted with some simple tricks to enhance the flavor of healthier choices. As a busy working mother and wife, I know the challenges of satisfying the cravings while watching the waistline and grocery bill. Tricks that are easier in the summer maybe more challenging in the long winter months when a nice cold glass of water doesn’t seem so appealing. I’ve tried several appeals to my family to drink up when it comes to healthier choices. Some have failed, but some have been successful. I found it best to start with the visual. With the help of heart.org, you can find tools like the Sugar Shuffle game to play with children or Sugar Sweetened Handout to share with teens and help create awareness about the amount of sugar in the drinks we consume. Making better choices easier has worked best for my family. We skip the soda aisle at the grocery store and load up on water, with additions ranging from cucumber to mint to berries to freshen our drink. The internet is full of information on how to spruce up your drink and target specific health features based on the fruits,

herbs and/or vegetables you add. Mixing water with favorable additions and having it ready in the fridge makes the choice that much easier for a busy family. Having fun cups with straws for home and several travel bottles for on-the-go helps push the water choice, as well. The addition of ice cubes to a simple glass of water has also been known to give it a little more appeal. For younger children, reusable ice cubes in various shapes can add another layer of interest to the choice. And water isn’t the only choice out there to Rethink Your Drink. Fat-free and low-fat milk, as well as teas and diet soft drinks, can add some variety while skipping the sugar. Obesity is a continued battle for Americans and is related to several chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Making the simple swap from a quarter-cup of sugar to a glass of water with some ice and lemon could have a lasting impact on you and your family’s health. Habits put into place today with younger family members will stay with them for many years to come. As mothers, wives, sisters and friends, it’s time to help those we love put down the sugar and Rethink Our Drink. SWM Peggy A. Thomas MSN, RN, is the administrator of periop and invasive services at St. Joseph Health and an American Heart Association board member.

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heALTHY WOMAN Tobacco 21

Envisioning a Tobacco-Free Future for Onondaga County By Deb Mendzef

Effective Jan. 1, 2018, Onondaga County became the 15th municipality in New York state to ban the sale of tobacco-related products to anyone younger than 21 years old. Deb Mendzef, coordinator for the CNY Regional Center for Tobacco Health Systems, located at St. Joseph’s Health Hospital, and the woman behind the local Tobacco 21 workgroup, explains the significance of this community-supported initiative.

W

e all deserve to live in a community free from tobacco addiction and the risks associated with it. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of the organizations and individuals of the Tobacco 21 workgroup, Onondaga County is one step closer to a tobacco-free future. Together, members of the group worked for more than a year to educate elected officials and the community on a regular basis about the importance of supporting Tobacco 21 legislation, which sought to raise the minimum age for sale of tobacco, e-cigarettes and other tobacco-related products to 21. The legal age for purchasing tobacco products in Onondaga County had been 19 since 2009, when the Onondaga County legislature voted to increase the age from 18. Nearly a decade later, Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney signed Tobacco 21 legislation into local law on Dec. 26, 2017, raising the minimum age for sale to 21, effective Jan. 1, 2018. “This decision is ultimately about public health,” Joanie said. “The data is clear and illustrates that when people avoid smoking before they are 21, they are significantly less likely to ever start.” Smoking is the most preventable cause of death. Nearly half of all adult smokers in Onondaga County are young adults, ages 18 to 24. The annual health care costs attributed to smoking are upwards of $10 billion in New York state.

Kristy Smorol, communications director for the American Heart Association’s Syracuse office and member of the Tobacco 21 workgroup, agrees with the county executive. Kristy said close to onethird of deaths from coronary heart disease are linked to smoking and secondhand smoke, noting that smoking is the primary risk factor for young people. She is confident that as more localities implement measures such as Tobacco 21, these statistics will improve. Raising the minimum age to 21 does work to reduce the number of young smokers. In 2005, Needham, Mass., experienced a 47 percent drop in the rate of smoking among young people following the implementation of the law that year. Onondaga County Health Commissioner Dr. Indu Gupta anticipates the new law will help prevent tobacco addiction in Onondaga County as well. “I am very pleased that County Executive Joanie Mahoney signed T21 into law for Onondaga County,” Indu said. “T21 puts Onondaga County in a leadership position with several other counties in New York state to protect the health of our youth.” She went on to explain that tobacco is the leading preventable cause of premature death in the county, citing recent data showing that 20.3 percent of Onondaga County adults smoke, a figure higher than the state rate of 15.6 percent. MAKING CHANGE HAPPEN The nationwide success of the Tobacco 21 campaign is due in part to its focus on taking action at the local level, resulting in Central New York’s own Tobacco 21 workgroup. An offshoot of the Tobacco Action Coalition of Onondaga County, the workgroup is a collaboration of nine Onondaga County organizations focused solely on advocating to increase the age of purchase for tobacco sales to 21 in Onondaga County.

What is Tobacco 21? Commonly referred to as T21, Tobacco 21 is a

nationwide initiative focused on raising the minimum legal age for the purchase of tobacco and nicotine products to 21. Unique to T21 is the focus on making change happen at local levels. The initiative is made possible by the Preventing Tobacco Addiction Foundation, and supports legislative action at the local level.

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By the Numbers

1 in 5 11 GRADERS TH

in Onondaga County has smoked cigarettes

smokers start 95% ofbefore the age of 21 90%

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of tobacco products used by youth are supplied by adults ages 18 to 21

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HEALTHY WOMAN Healthy Lifestyle

Through coordinated outreach to public officials, including Indu, Joanie, County Legislator and Health Committee Chair Danny J. Liedka and several other county legislators, the workgroup made the case for Tobacco 21 heard, and spurred action on the part of elected officials and the community. A November 2016 GOP survey, inspired by a Tobacco 21 workgroup presentation and spearheaded by Danny, revealed that a majority of community respondents were in favor of raising the age of sale for tobacco products, and agreed that e-cigarettes should be included as a tobacco product in relation to any tobacco control laws. To further demonstrate support for legislation, the group undertook a community campaign that included petitions and media outreach to bring awareness to the Tobacco 21 initiative. In addition to community residents, the workgroup sought support of decision makers in the business community, collecting signatures on a letter of support from nearly 50 prominent local businesses and organizations. Together, these efforts helped secure the Onondaga County legislature’s vote in favor of raising the legal age to buy tobacco in the county to 21 in early December, paving the way for the bill to become law. “Tobacco usage affects everyone in the community. The collaborative nature of our Tobacco 21 workgroup made it possible for us to efficiently and effectively reach and educate multiple stakeholders and to garner support for the legislation,” said Martha Ryan, public health advocate formerly with the American Cancer Society. “The survey, coupled with the group’s efforts to rally business leaders and residents, helped send the message to elected officials that their constituents wanted the kind of legislation that Tobacco 21 offers.”

WHAT’S NEXT Raising the age of legal purchase of tobacco products to 21 is an important step in curtailing tobacco use and reducing negative health outcomes related to tobacco use, but there’s more to be done. TACO has offered to be a resource for Onondaga County throughout implementation of the new law, and continues to advocate and educate the community. A significant part of TACO’s work moving forward is data evaluation – specifically youth tobacco usage. The group has the ability to monitor the 18 to 21 age group and adult usage statistics, explained Dr. Leslie Kohman, board chair of the Greater Upstate American Cancer Society. She added that education, coupled with factors like legislation and policy, can help reduce tobacco addiction. “What’s important going forward is that we use this data to identify and implement evidence-based approaches that will further reduce tobacco use and improve our ability to live healthier lives,” Leslie said. SWM

T21 could save $212 billion in medical costs Learn more about the Tobacco Action Coalition of Onondaga County and its ongoing efforts in Onondaga County by visiting tcisyracuse.org/tobaccoaction-coalition. Get help quitting the use of tobacco products with resources and support from the CNY Regional Center for Tobacco Health Systems at St. Joseph’s Health Hospital. Visit sjhsyr.org/tobacco-cessation.

T21 Workgroup Members

The members of the workgroup represent a wide array of organizations that remain committed to education and advocacy about the dangers of smoking.

American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network American Heart Association Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids Crouse Health HealtheConnections St. Joseph’s Health Upstate Medical University Tobacco Free Network of CNY Transforming Communities Initiative Syracuse and Community Advocates

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healthy woman Deciphering Cholesterol

Cholesterol: What Is It and What Can You Do About It? By Riya Chacko

H

eart disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States, the culprit behind one third of deaths of American women. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart disease, a disease chiefly caused by cholesterol plaque that deposits in arteries. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that travels in blood on carriers called lipoproteins. Nearly half of American women have high cholesterol. In fact, more women than men have high cholesterol in the United States. It’s important to understand what your cholesterol means – both the good and the bad — what contributes to it and the things you can do to improve it. First, how do you know what your cholesterol level is? Have your fasting cholesterol/lipid panel checked with your doctor. The American Heart Association recommends all adults older than 20 have their cholesterol checked at least every four to six years. Then, get to know your numbers. A desirable total cholesterol level is less than 200 mg/dL. Your total cholesterol takes into account your high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides. You want your high-density lipoprotein — good cholesterol — to be high. You want your low-density lipoprotein — bad cholesterol — to be low. A high low-density lipoprotein is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Triglycerides are the most common form of fat in the body, and their level should also be low. What causes high cholesterol? Inactivity, obesity, poor dietary habits and genetics, to name a few things. What raises your high-density lipoprotein? Exercise, good dietary fats and moderate alcohol consumption. What raises your low-density lipoprotein? A chief cause is saturated and trans fat in your diet. Examples of foods with high saturated fat are: coconut oil (12 grams/tablespoon), cheese (6 grams/tablespoon), butter (7 grams/tablespoon) and shortening (12 grams/tablespoon). A fat that is solid at room temperature is likely high in saturated fat. Limit your saturated fat intake to less than 12 grams per day. Trans fat is found in animal fat, vegetable shortening, commercially baked goods containing partially-hydrogenated oils and fast food. Trans fat not only raises your bad cholesterol (the low-density lipoprotein), but also lowers your good cholesterol (the high-density lipoprotein). It also increases the risk of

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inflammation, which contributes to cardiovascular disease. For every two percent of daily calories obtained from trans fat, your risk for heart disease increases by 23 percent. What causes high triglycerides? Excess carbohydrates or cheese and high levels of alcohol, for example. What are things you can do to improve your cholesterol? Eat a heart-healthy diet and increase your daily activity. A heart-healthy diet includes more fish, mono and polyunsaturated fats, legumes, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains with less sugar, saturated and trans fat (less than five to six percent of your total calories). Have good fats — monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — instead of saturated fats. Monounsaturated fats include olive oil, canola oil, avocados and most nuts. Polyunsaturated fats include omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in salmon, mackerel, sardines, walnuts, canola oil and flaxseed. They decrease your low-density lipoprotein and reduce inflammation. Omega-6 fatty acids are found in vegetable oils like sunflower oil, soybean, safflower and corn oil. What are the benefits of exercise? Moderate exercise has been shown to reduce cardiovascular events by as much as 30 percent. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology recommend 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week and 75 minutes of vigorous activity. The American College of Cardiology estimates that moderate exercise reduces your low-density lipoprotein by three to six mg/dL on average. If diet and exercise don’t improve your cholesterol to target levels, your doctor may recommend medication. It’s important to understand the importance of heart disease in women’s health and how to prevent it. More women than men die of heart disease each year. It kills one American woman every minute. Understanding what cholesterol is, what your numbers mean and how you can make simple changes with diet and exercise can dramatically affect your risk of developing coronary disease. SWM Learn more at heart.org. Riya Chacko, MD, is an American Heart Association board member and cardiologist with Crouse Health.

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in her own words Q&A with Evelyn Carter

This year, Evelyn Carter, director of community relations for Wegmans Food Markets and past SWM cover woman, once again takes the helm of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign. We caught up with her to talk about her plans for the campaign, the AHA’s Silent Discos and how Evelyn stays heart healthy. SWM: Congratulations on being named chair of the American Heart Association's Go Red for Women campaign! This is going to be your second tenure as chair. You helped lead a successful campaign in 2015. What do you think led to that success?

Evelyn: Thank you for your well wishes. I was very pleased at the outcome of my first time as chair. We had a diverse group of women who participated. We also exceeded our financial goal. I’m very proud of those achievements. The success was due to the fact that it was a team effort. It wasn’t me; it was the team. The team included my executive leadership team,

my employer, Wegmans, the many men and women in Central New York who participated in one capacity or another and organizations I have personal affiliations with. It was everyone. We have great people in our community who recognized the need and did whatever they could to help. SWM: How did you become the 2018 Go Red chair?

Evelyn: That’s a great question. I simply was asked to consider serving as chair… again. The again part is funny to me. Typically, this is a one-term, one-time role. We had other people in mind to serve in this capacity who weren’t able to fulfill the role this year, due to other commitments. So when asked if I would consider serving again, after a little contemplation and a few calls to make sure I would have the support needed, I said yes. SWM: What did you learn from your time as chair in 2015 that you plan to apply to this year?

Evelyn: We have a community

of phenomenal men and women who will do what is needed when asked. I had friends and colleagues who I simply asked for a check for $1,000 to support our community. They didn’t even know exactly what it was for when I first asked. But they trusted me enough to believe in whatever the effort was. I got several donations that way. They became Circle of Red participants and very involved in the campaign. That level of support is a true indicator of the power we have as a community. Just ask. SWM: Is there anything new on the horizon for this year's campaign? Evelyn: I want to continue to build on the momentum of previous campaigns, while ensuring it remains inclusive. There are a few untapped markets I would like to explore. My goal is to help establish a foundation in these markets that can be built upon in subsequent years. I also want the Go Red luncheon in October to be both a true celebration of goal achievement and a must-

attend event. SWM: Your employer, Wegmans, has been a big supporter of the American Heart Association. How do you balance your time between work and community efforts?

Evelyn: Wegmans’ support has been HUGE. I would not be able serve as chair without their support. Wegmans’ support has included being a company sponsor and giving me the flexibility to serve in this capacity, allowing me to do what is necessary to be both effective and impactful. Several Wegmans leadership team members also participated in Circle of Red. The great part is my role at Wegmans includes community engagement, so that allows me to fulfill the role of chair and a portion of my job responsibilities simultaneously. SWM: What’s your advice to busy women who want to give back to their communities? Evelyn: My advice is find ways to fulfill multiple priorities at the same time. One can do this

Evelyn would like to thank her Go Red executive leadership team members: Aminy Audi, Stickley, Audi & Co.; Mara Charlamb, United Radio; Susan Crossett, Harris-Beach; Bea Gonzalez, Syracuse University; BridgetAnn Hart, Kinney Drugs; Amy Kremenek, Onondaga Community College; Renee Lane, C&S Companies; Angela Lee, Hill-Rom; LaVonda Reed, Syracuse University; Caeresa Richardson, National Grid; M. Catherine Richardson, Retired, Bond Schoeneck & King, PPLC; Laura Serway, Laci’s Tapas Bar; Kimberly Townsend, Loretto; Barbara Huntress Tresness, CHAT Collective; Gwen Webber-McLeod, Gwen, Inc. 24

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by finding ways to incorporate family time into community service activity. My son, Austin, has participated in numerous community activities with me. Wegmans is very supportive of this, so while I’m working in the community, I’m spending time with my son, as well. It’s a definite win-win. SWM: Silent discos have been a successful way to raise awareness for the Go Red campaign. Talk about how they help bring together the community to fight for heart health. Evelyn: The silent disco is a great way to have fun and get exercise at the same time. It highlights the fact that exercise doesn’t have to be grueling and can have the same physical impact traditional exercise does. Music is universal. It brings people together. We may enjoy different genres of music, but we all like music of some sort. The silent disco lets you “dance to your own beat.” You pick the style of music you want to listen to and start dancing. SWM: What’s your favorite song to dance to at silent discos? Evelyn: I don’t have a favorite song, but I love music. Listening to music is an integral part

of my day. My favorite genres of music are contemporary gospel and old school rhythm and blues. I’m not the greatest dancer, but I can keep the beat. That’s all you need to be able to do to participate. SWM: What do you do to keep your heart healthy? Evelyn: I try to incorporate healthy eating habits into my daily life. It’s a work-in-progress because I have a few favorite foods that are hard to totally eliminate from my diet. So, I focus on moderation. However, Wegmans makes healthy eating easy, which is very helpful to me. I’ve also found that having fresh fruit visible in the house encourages more fruit intake. When kept in the refrigerator, it’s almost hidden and forgotten. However, when I put a bowl of fruit on the counter, I’ve noticed even my son eats it more frequently. I also regularly monitor my blood pressure and am conscious of my salt intake. I get a little exercise in when I can, but could definitely improve in that area. SWM Answers have been edited for length and clarity.

Mark your calendar The American Heart Association’s next Silent Disco is slated for April 21 at the SRC Arena, Onondaga Community College, 4585 W. Seneca Turnpike.

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St. Joe's Full Page ad

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COVER story Janice Turner

janice turner

FIRST LADY OF BETHANY BAPTIST CHURCH

February 2018

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

You have to have something that will help center you, so that you can see things clearly.” — Janice Turner, first lady of Bethany Baptist Church

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cover STORY Janice Turner

Shifting Your Paradigm Toward a Healthier Heart By Lorna Oppedisano

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anice Turner, the first lady of Bethany Baptist Church, has a calming presence. Her warm smile and steady voice, each syllable and word carefully thought out, would surely put anyone at ease. Women are often in “fix-it mode,” Janice said, explaining that they tend to take on other people’s worries, problems and drama, resulting in an “inordinate amount of low-grade stress.” But you have to learn to “shift your paradigm,” she advised. “You have to have something that will help center you, so that you can see things clearly,” she said.

And, in terms of heart health, she added, “you’re going to be a nervous wreck.”

Venturing from the comfort zone

Along with her composure and good conscience, Janice and her siblings inherited other, more physical traits, from their mother; health issues like diabetes and high blood pressure run in their family. Despite health complications, Janice’s mother lived until she was 89. She passed away from a stroke. Before her mother’s passing, Janice learned a handful of health lessons from her. Her mother had started to shift her Learning to let go early paradigm, Janice remembered, walking for exercise at Shopping Town Mall long before anyone else Janice grew up in Syracuse, a middle had. She also began making more child with eight other siblings. soups and developing healthier “Our mother was the epitome of cooking habits. patience,” she said. “She rarely, rarely, If you start shifting your paradigm to Traditional comfort foods — rarely got overwrought.” valuing your body, then you’re more dishes typically rich in butter, Along with calmness and fat and salt — can get people stuck composure, Janice’s mother taught likely to make those positive changes in a cycle of caring for, or her children to have a conscience, in your health.”— Janice Turner, “comforting,” others, and falling Janice remembered. If she or her short of valuing themselves and their first lady of Bethany Baptist Church siblings misbehaved, their mother own health. Eventually, it becomes would talk to them “in a way that discomfort, Janice explained. would [make you] think, ‘Please, just One of the tenets she tries to give me a spanking and be done with bring to friends, family and the church congregation is the it,’” Janice remembered with a laugh. importance of breaking out of your comfort zone and trying Her mother taught them to remember their actions would different, perhaps healthier, cuisines and habits. always affect others, a lesson Janice carried with her through a “So, now you have to shift your whole paradigm of what career in teaching. comfort is, and that’s where the spiritual part helps,” she said. Growing up, Janice was never particularly drawn to one career “If you start shifting your paradigm to valuing your body, path over another. So, in college, when it was time to choose a then you’re more likely to make those positive changes in major, she took a chance on teaching. your health.” Following a successful career of 17 years in the classroom and While Janice herself focuses on teaching about spiritual 18 years in administrative roles, such as literacy coordinator heart health, Bethany Baptist Church hosts a variety of health and staff development person, that decision has proven to be and wellness workshops, organized by the church’s health a fruitful one. and wellness committee, a group of health care professionals. Thinking back to those childhood lessons, Janice remembered Janice became acquainted with the mission of the American a few house rules that she followed in the classroom, too. Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign a few “You didn’t tease each other. You didn’t fight. You had to years ago when her church hosted an event. The survivors’ forgive,” she said, adding that those are “prerequisites” for testimonies — the life changes they made and seeing them in a career in teaching. full recovery — drew her to Go Red, she said. One of her favorite things about leading a classroom was the fact “And that’s where I decided to do my best, be it in small that at the end of each school day, she could bid her students a pleasant evening, and the next day, everything started anew, fresh. groups of individuals or with family, by telling people the importance of getting your heart ready, or taking care of your As a teacher, it’s important to not take things personally, and never spiritual heart,” Janice said, “so that we can do the work that hold onto negativity from one day to the next, she advised. your physical heart needs to be healthy.” Children are perceptive and notice if you hold onto things, Janice said. As a teacher, she said, you’ll end up dreading each Continued on page 30 day, too. 28

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cover story Janice Turner

Shifting Your Paradigm Toward a Healthier Heart from page 28 Bringing it down The American Heart Association does a great deal of work to get the word out about effects of heart disease and stroke on women in the United States. A lot of people know which physical signs they should be on the lookout for, and how to stay heart healthy, Janice said. In her role as small group leader at Bethany Baptist Church, she hopes to help people to know and read their bodies better through spiritual heart health. When her husband attended seminary, Janice decided to go along and audit the classes. She’d been an educator, and had a natural curiosity. She found herself particularly drawn to the spiritual formation class. Janice liked the fact that this class encouraged care of one’s spiritual life, teaching centering and contemplative prayer, discipline and practice. “That was a big turning point for me,” she remembered. It was there she learned how to “bring it down,” she said with a smile, giving example with a long, centering exhale. Without being centered — having spiritual health, as Janice explained — physical heart health won’t come easy, she said. “I don’t think [physical health] really becomes applicable unless you are ready to do that,” she said. “And that means that you really have to have your heart and a mindset that you value your temple. So, that’s where the spiritual formation [comes in].” For women, many of whom are in that constant “fix-it mode,” as Janice said, one of the challenges to overcome is learning to better value oneself, she said. Take a step back, learn to know the

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signs in your body and be willing to make changes to benefit you both physically and spiritually, she advised. Along with that paradigm shift of cuisine change, moving is equally important. “When you become more comfortable with your own humanity, you will want to get up,” Janice said, suggesting walking and yoga, her two go-to activities. “I like yoga, because it makes you pay attention to your physical and your spiritual self.” It wasn’t until about two years ago that Janice moved yoga from her bucket list to her daily routine. It had been a goal, merely words in her journal, until one day, she worked up the courage to walk into a class. That first day, she had no idea where to find her mat or what the foam blocks were for, she admitted with a laugh. But, thanks to the kindness of her classmates, she quickly learned the ins and outs of the class. “That’s the value of coming out of your paradigm and finding things,” she said. Janice’s advice is to stay away from drama — “I’m allergic to drama,” she chuckled — continue to move, try new things and always strive to keep your heart soft. A fair number of churchgoers in their 80s and 90s follow these guidelines, and happily drive themselves to service each week, she said. Janice added that while you might be predisposed to heart disease, it’s how you choose to live while enduring it that matters. “Quality of life doesn’t mean longevity,” Janice said. “It means how you live in the moment.” SWM

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Quality of life doesn’t mean longevity. It means how you live in the moment.”— Janice Turner, first lady of Bethany Baptist Church

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FOR A GOOD CAUSE Little Hats, Big Hearts

Hats for Healthy Hearts Every February, volunteers join the American Heart Association and The Children’s Heart Foundation to knit and crochet red hats for babies born this month in participating hospitals. According to the AHA, they aim to empower mothers and children to lead heart-healthy lives. We talked with some people involved in the annual project to learn more.

Allison Mitura

Heart Walk Events Coordinator, American Heart Association SWM: How did you get involved with the American Heart Association? Allison: I developed a serious heart condition and decided to change careers and engage in more personally impactful work. SWM: In a few sentences, describe how the Little Hats, Big Hearts program works. Allison: The American Heart Association recruits knitters/crocheters to donate red hats. The AHA also recruits hospitals or organizations to distribute hats to newborns during the month of February. The campaign raises awareness of congenital heart defects, the No. 1 birth defect in the world. SWM: How many hats are donated each year? How does the distribution work? Allison: We are still collecting for this year, but our goal is 3,500. Last year, we collected 2,915 hats. Hospitals provide us with the average number of births in February, and we provide them with the hats and support information. Nurses manage the distribution of the hats post-birth. SWM: Share with us a memorable story from your time involved with the program. Allison: Many of the stories we receive are about the knitters, since we have direct contact with them. These knitters will spend countless hours knitting in memory of a loved one or lost child who was affected by heart defects or heart disease. SWM: The AHA focuses on the "why." What's your why? Allison: My why is my daughter. As a survivor of heart disease myself, my pregnancy was high-risk and was a strain on my heart. But I was blessed with a happy and healthy daughter (who suffered a brief heart condition herself at birth). With research and awareness, I hope that heart disease and heart defects can impact less families every year.

Patricia Gridley Volunteer

SWM: How did you get involved with Little Hats, Big Hearts? Patricia: I got involved two years ago. I’m a knitter and knitted two baby hats for a friend of my daughter’s in Connecticut. She was familiar with the program and sent information to me. I contacted the AHA in Syracuse and learned that the program didn't exist in the Syracuse area. So, Allison and I talked about what needed to be done to start it here. I started knitting hats and recruited other knitters, Allison did all the administrative work, and Little Hats, Big Hearts was born in Central New York!

Photos courtesy the American Heart Association

SWM: What is your role as a volunteer in this program? Patricia: At this point, my role is to knit hats, pick up and deliver hats from other knitters in my area and support Allison and the program in any way she might need. I once taught Brandon Roth from Channel 3 to knit during a live broadcast of the Today in Central New York show. SWM: What’s your favorite memory of being part of Little Hats, Big Hearts? Patricia: My favorite memory is seeing the piles and piles of hats in the AHA office. SWM: The AHA focuses on the “why.” What's your why? Patricia: My “why” is: because I can help spread the word!

Deirdre Aureden Volunteer

SWM: How did you get involved with Little Hats, Big Hearts? Deirdre: Allison Mitura reached out to the Schweinfurth Art Center and asked if we would like to be involved. Exhibits and classes at the Schweinfurth often involve quilting, knitting and other types of fiber art, and we have an active group of knitters and crocheters who meet here on Tuesdays. SWM: Did you have a connection to the American Heart Association prior? Deirdre: Our connection is with Allison! She used to work at the Schweinfurth before she began working at the American Heart Association. SWM: What is your role as a volunteer in this program? Deirdre: Allison contacted me, and I reached out to our knitting and crochet group who meet here weekly. They were very excited to be involved. I also reached out to a larger group of crocheters and knitters who helped create a 32-foot wide crocheted mural of Harriet Tubman in the spring of 2017 that was installed on the front of the Schweinfurth. SWM: What’s your favorite memory of being part of Little Hats, Big Hearts? Deirdre: We held a special “knitting and crocheting night” for Little Hats, Big Hearts on Dec. 7 at the Schweinfurth. The volunteers had such a fun time being together and imagining all the little babies wearing their hats. SWM: The AHA focuses on the “why.” What's your why? Deirdre: Our mission is to create a vibrant community through the arts, and providing a fun forum for volunteers to use their artistic skills to create needed hats seemed like a perfect fit. SWM For more information, visit heart.org.

Answers have been edited for length and clarity.

SWM: Did you have a connection to the American Heart Association prior? Patricia: I certainly knew about the AHA and had used their resources to educate myself about heart disease, but otherwise, had no affiliation. 34

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ADVERTORIAL

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Inspire Kristy Smorol

kristy smorol

Photography by Mary Grace Johnson

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

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Defining Inspiration By Lorna Oppedisano

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Because of her experience with cancer, Kristy was selected to be f you’d have asked Kristy Smorol if she was inspirational when the telethon spokesperson for the Children’s Miracle Network, she was 8 or 9 years old, she’d probably have told you she was which included an interview, photo shoot and on-air time. just living her day-to-day life. Kristy was a natural. Reporters like Carrie Lazarus even joked Day-to-day life meant visits to doctors and hospitals, chunks of with her, telling Kristy she’d take their jobs one day. time out of school and rounds of chemo treatments for not one, So, when it came time for college, S.I. Newhouse School of but two, childhood cancers. Public Communications, a top-rated journalism school in her Now, as communications director for the American Heart hometown, was a perfect fit. Association, she gets to work with survivors every day. Many of When she got there, though, Kristy realized she wanted to take them are asked to be inspirational nominees for the AHA’s annual a slightly different direction of study. She loved being behind the Heart Walk. Sometimes, they say they’re not inspirational. camera even more than being in front of it, and opted to become Maybe it sounds cheesy, Kristy said, but to hear what they’ve a producer. She was hired at CNYCentral shortly before been through and are going through is inspirational to her. graduation, and spent seven years there as a newscast producer. “I think inspiration’s in the eye of the beholder,” Kristy said. Eventually, Kristy wanted to settle down in a job with more “I might think my story is whatever, or they might think their typical work hours. She was drawn to the nonprofit sector, and, story isn’t that much, but their story might be what somebody with her background of health complications as a child, the job at needs to hear.” AHA was a great fit. It was due to her childhood battles While it took her time to get used with cancer that Kristy ended up to the office atmosphere — “I found working for a nonprofit. It was a It’s been really great to be part of that I couldn't make phone calls in the “winding road,” though, she said. quiet office,” Kristy said with a laugh When she was 8 years old, Kristy these sweeping changes and make — the position as communications couldn't breathe out of her nose. a huge difference.” — Kristy Smorol, director gives her more time to spend After a myriad of sinus medicines, with her husband and, as of last year, specialists and diagnoses, it was decided American Heart Association newborn son. that a polyp, or growth, was blocking communications director In her last five and a half years with her airways. During surgery to remove the AHA, one of her main takeaways is it, they realized it was actually a tumor, the truly huge impact of the heart. and couldn’t be removed. “Your heart is connected to everything,” she said, adding that She was diagnosed with b-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and even though she’s been in remission for 24 years, she still had to underwent seven weeks of chemo and half a year of maintenance. see a cardiologist when she was pregnant with her son. Then, the night before one of her appointments, Kristy slammed As communications director, Kristy’s been involved with a her foot on a linoleum tile, bruising a small bump that had number of projects, including Tobacco 21, which you can read already formed. At first, it was thought to simply be a plantar’s more about on page 18, legislation for mandatory hands-only wart, but after examination, it was found to be a rare type of CPR training into schools and legislation for mandatory screening cancer, called primitive neuroectodermal tumor, or PNET. of newborns to detect congenial heart defects. While the disease is usually found in the brain or bones, “It’s been really great to be part of these sweeping changes and Kristy’s case, along with another patient’s at the time, caused make a huge difference,” she said. “We talk about the fact that doctors to create another branch of classification, called peripheral you can educate someone, but you’re only reaching that person. neuroectodermal tumor, since it was in soft tissue. It was a lot for her mother, father and brother, Kristy said, but for Whereas if you can do policy change or environment change, her go-with-the-flow family, “it kind of became normal life. It went then you’re really reaching hundreds or thousands of people. And you can really make a big difference that way.” SWM on for so long, since it was two cancers,” she said. “It was a long period of time of just, that was what we did.” For more information on the American Heart Association, visit heart.org.

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INSPIRE Jean Phillips

jean phillips

Photography by Alexis Emm

HEART DISEASE SURVIVOR AND AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON PASSION SPEAKER

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Keeping Your Health in Mind By Samantha Leader

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ean Phillips, a retired Syracuse City School District educator Jean’s recovery included three months of cardiac rehab, and administrator, was familiar with the impact of heart taking into account diet, exercise and future ways to prevent disease. Her sister passed away from a heart attack at age 61, heart disease. She was happy to have people guide her through and her brother passed away from heart disease. Conscious of her the healing process, Jean said, noting the nurses were own health, Jean kept current with regular stress tests, ate heartespecially helpful. healthy foods and walked regularly. For a while, the doctors monitored her heart every three So, when the day came that she needed quadruple bypass months. Now, a year and a half later, Jean is back to yearly surgery, Jean was surprised, to say the least. Like many other checkups. survivors, when her own struggles with heart disease began, Living through a major health complication like Jean’s is an she didn’t realize what was happening. eye-opening experience. Now, she’s even more conscious about Walking around New York City, her diet, exercises at least four or five times on a trip with a few friends, Jean began a week, always listens to her body and to experience shortness of breath. at the doctor. Going through this experience asks“Ifquestions “[It was] very unusual for me,” Jean said, you go to the doctor and they showed me the support that recalling it was the only symptom don’t find anything wrong, ask them to she experienced. run that second or third test,” Jean said, I had from my friends and When she arrived home, Jean returned explaining that it doesn’t mean you don’t family.” — Jean Phillips, to her normal routine. But her friend, trust your doctor; it just means you Debbie, couldn’t shake the fact that trust your instinct about your body. heart disease survivor and something seemed wrong. She stressed the importance of American Heart Association “She would call me, asking if I went keeping your own health off the back to the doctors,” Jean said, “but I told Go Red for Women Luncheon burner. Women tend to fall into the role her I was going to wait until my yearly of caregiver, making sure their family passion speaker [appointment].” eats healthy, exercises regularly and Eventually, Debbie didn’t take no for makes necessary trips to the doctor. an answer. She was taking Jean to the When it comes to their own health, emergency room. Rounds of overnight tests led to a week of though, sometimes they fall short. testing, and then, before she knew it, Jean was having quadruple Be aware of your whole body, Jean suggested. She advised bypass surgery. that women go to physicals and discuss everything, continue Half a year before her experience, Jean had lost her husband to to exercise — walking is her favorite — and listen to family cancer. When she returned home for recovery, it was to an empty and friends. house. She was happy to find many people were happy to check “Live every day to the fullest, don’t sweat the small stuff in on and support her. and be thankful to God,” she said. SWM “Going through this experience showed me the support that I had from my friends and family,” she said. For more information on maintaining your heart health, visit heart.org.

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INspire Patti DePaulis

PATTI DePAULIS

What I would tell people is to listen to your body … and act immediately, while you still have your senses.” — Patti DePaulis, stroke survivor and American Heart Association inspirational honoree

Photography by Alexis Emm

STROKE SURVIVOR AND AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION INSPIRATIONAL HONOREE

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Getting Back to the Peak of Health By Carol Radin

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his isn’t happening to me,” Patti DePaulis told herself. “Can I still run?” she asked aloud. A successful account executive, marathon runner and “Patti, you have to run!” the doctor insisted. weekend mountain climber, she was at her peak physical It was the answer Patti needed to hear. For the next six months, and mental performance. Patti carried on through a day that started she threw herself into her physical therapy regimen. Two weeks with a four-mile run, sales meeting at work and two-hour service after the stroke, she got on the treadmill. appointment for her car, even though the slackness in her left side “I didn’t care if I scuffed,” she said. “I was going to get on that treadmill.” and tongue, lack of concentration and extreme fatigue were telling Three months later, she was running on the treadmill. She also her body to stop. She was having a stroke. returned to work shortly after being released from the hospital. Patti, the inspirational honoree for the American Heart Though she floundered at times, she believes the mental and social Association, knows she is lucky. She is here. She can look back demands of the job helped restore her concentration. on the stroke and still look forward. Above all, she credits her husband — her lifeline, she said — “At first, you think you will lose yourself,” Patti said. “Things might be a little different, but you can still be the who monitored her food, exercise and medications when she could person you know.” not. Together, they understood how important it was to Patti that On the day her stroke occurred, Patti started her daily routine. she become a strong woman once again. She noticed, though, that her left leg felt odd. For the rest of her life, Patti will have to The night before, she’d gotten a severe cramp pay close attention to signs of an oncoming in that leg after her gym workout, something stroke. It can happen to anyone and the risks of that hadn’t happened before. Then, the next paralysis or fatality are very real, she explained. morning, she felt as if it was “swiveling out “What I would tell people is to listen to your body,” she said, “not just to know your away” from her. Dressed for running, she paused Know the signs body, so that you know when it’s acting at the top of her staircase. of a stroke: differently, but to listen, and act immediately, “I just looked down and had this sense of, Face drooping ‘Was I ever going to get down?’” Patti while you still have your senses. I should have remembered. listened to my body that morning while I was Arm weakness It took her five minutes. When she called her in the driveway in my car.” Speech difficulty dog, her tongue felt “five times its size,” She shared this acronym for warning signs of she recalled. She was sure she was slurring a stroke: FAST — face drooping, arm weakness, Time to call 911 her words, but was determined to go on. speech difficulty, time to call 911. In addition, She made it through both her run and workday. she stressed the value of maintaining good Though she thought she was slurring words at a sales health, physical fitness and healthy eating meeting, she second-guessed herself when her colleagues gave practices, as well as regularly monitoring cholesterol, blood no indication something was off. pressure and other vital functions. Patti regained her function Finally, after a car service appointment and harrowing drive — and athleticism at the pace she did thanks to her healthy physical the highway appeared to be dropping off to the left, condition prior to the stroke, she said. Patti remembered — she went home and collapsed on the sofa. Patti is back to running, snowshoeing and climbing. Recently, she and Mark climbed Mount Esther, the 28th highest When her husband, Mark, found her there, he immediately took peak in the Adirondack Mountains. Their goal is to scale all 46 her to the hospital. Adirondack High Peaks. Since the stroke and her recovery, The doctor told Patti she’d had a major stroke and had lost Patti’s perspective has changed in positive ways, she said. function on her entire left side. “I am grateful,” she said. “Every day, when I open my eyes in Questions raced through her mind. A mother of four grown bed, I move my hands, I move my feet — I feel so blessed.” SWM children, she wondered if she would ever enjoy life with them again. Would she climb the Adirondack peaks with her husband For more information, visit the American Heart Association at heart.org. again? Would she even be able to take walks with him again?

FAST

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UPCOMING SWM Events Saturday, Feb. 3 Glitter Gala

When: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 5:30 to 9 p.m. What: Fifth annual event to benefit Make-A-Wish CNY and Cpt. Kyle Schneider Foundation. Cost: $50. Where: Drumlins, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse. Info: cnyglittergala.com.

Tuesday, Feb. 6 Women United quarterly meeting

When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. What: Theme is The Role of Women in Philanthropy and the Economy. Cost: Women United members, free; guests, $25. Where: Eric Mower + Associates, 211 W. Jefferson St., Syracuse. Info: unitedway-cny.org; Emily Winiecki, ewiniecki@unitedway-cny.org.

Wednesday, Feb. 7 WBOC Monthly Meeting

When: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. What: Part one of two-part Maximize Your Strengths series, Understand Yourself & Others, is a highly interactive workshop that is all about You! Learn how to use your strengths to enhance leadership, communication and persuasion. Cost: Member, $10; guest, $25; all access member, free. Where: Genesee Grande Hotel, 1060 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Info: wboconnection.org.

Thursday, Feb. 8 Creating a Positive Work Environment

When: 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. What: Presented by Pinnacle Human Resources, LLC. Cost: Members, $10; nonmembers, $20. Where: The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: centerstateceo.com; kdejoseph@centerstateceo.com.

Friday, Feb. 9 Snow Leopard Soirée

When: 6:30 to 11 p.m. What: Friends of the Zoo’s annual black-tie gala and winter fundraiser includes gourmet dining, music, live and silent auctions and animal greeters. Cost: $220 per person. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: Reservations required; register online at rosamondgiffordzoo.org/soiree or call 315-435-8511 x132.

Saturday, Feb. 10 Sled to Protect Beds

When: Check online for details. What: Proceeds benefit homelessness and eviction prevention. Event includes games, food, beverages, live music, raffles and more. Sponsored by Housing Visions. Cost: Check online for details. Where: Check online for details. Info: cnybj.com/sled-to-protect-beds. 48

Saturday, Feb. 10 Sled for Red!

When: 4 to 7 p.m. What: Cardboard sledding derby to benefit ACR Health. Cost: Each sled team needs to raise a minimum of $250. Where: Four Seasons Golf & Ski Center, 8012 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville. Info: sledforred.greatfeats.com/home.

Saturday, Feb. 10 Symphoria Pops: A Night at the Oscars

When: 7:30 p.m. What: Conductor Sean O’Loughlin leads Symphoria in music from thrillers, dramas and Hollywood classics. Cost: $38 to $81. Where: Mulroy Civic Center, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. Info: experiencesymphoria.org/concert/a-night-at the-oscars.

Saturday, Feb. 10 Sweet Cabaret 2018

When: 7 to 11:30 p.m. What: Annual fundraiser for Father Champlin’s Guardian Angel Society includes dancing, basket raffles, buffet, entertainment by the DeSantis Orchestra and more. Cost: $95. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. Info: guardianangelsoc.org.

Sunday, Feb. 11 Sweet Treats

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. What: Watching the animals receive Valentine treats and heart-shaped enrichment items throughout the day. Cost: Free for members and with zoo admission. Snow Leopard Days half-price admission applies. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Monday, Feb. 12 Myths of Motherhood and Mental Wellness

When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. What: Discussion on maternal mental health with licensed master social worker, Stephanie Straub, presented by CNY Doula Connection. Cost: Free to attend. Where: CNY Healing Arts, 195 Intrepid Lane, Syracuse. Info: Registration recommended, 607-483-8284; cnydoulaconnection.com.

Thursday, Feb. 15 Docent-led Tour: From Funk to Punk

When: 6 p.m. What: Tour of “From Funk to Pink: Left Coast Ceramics” guest curated by Peter Held. Cost: Free Third Thursday admission from 5 to 8 p.m. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org/connect/events/docent-led-

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Thursday, Feb. 15 Miss Syracuse Winterfest 2018 Pageant

When: 7 to 9 p.m. What: The winner of Miss Syracuse Winterfest 2018 will represent the spirit of winter in CNY as ambassador for Syracuse Winterfest festivities (slated for Feb. 15 through 25). Hosted by SocietyGurl and the Salt City Belles and Beaus. Sponsored by Syracuse Antiques Exchange and Michelle McGrady Photography. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown Grand Ballroom, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. Info: facebook.com/events/828876530643277.

Thursday, Feb. 15, through Wednesday, Feb. 28 Downtown Syracuse Dining Weeks

What: Special dining deals and menus in various Syracuse restaurants. Presented by Downtown Committee of Syracuse and Visions Federal Credit Union. Cost: Check online for menus. Where: Check online for details of participating restaurants. Info: downtownsyracuse.com/diningweeks.

Friday, Feb. 16 Winter 2018 Exhibitions Opening Night Reception + Artist Talk

When: 5 to 7 p.m. What: Includes music, hors d’oeuvres and cash bar. Everson curator of art and programs, DJ Hellerman, to talk with artists Edie Fake and Sheila Pepe at 6 p.m. Cost: Members, free; nonmembers, $15. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org.

Saturday, Feb. 17 Mad Hatter Tea Party

When: 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. What: Tea party with Alice and the Mad Hatter includes finger foods, fruits and pastries, Fairytale Punch and teas, games and more. Cost: Members, $18; nonmembers, $20, includes zoo admission. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: Reservations required; register online at rosamondgiffordzoo.org or call 315-435-8511 x113.

Sunday, Feb. 18 Blowout 2018: Superheroes & Super Villains

When: 3 to 6 p.m. What: Models will strut the most outrageous, over-the-top looks over 70 feet of runway to benefit ACR Health. Cost: $25; VIP tickets, $50. Where: Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Info: acrhealth.org/events/blowout. The Go Red Edition


Sunday, Feb. 18 Salt City DISHES

When: 5 p.m. What: Five groups will present their community project ideas and compete for a $2,000 first prize and a $500 second prize, collected from the event ticket sales and awarded to the audience favorite. Cost: $20. Where: Bishop Harrison Diocesan Center, 1342 Lancaster Ave., Syracuse. Info: facebook.com/SaltCityDISHES.

Wednesday, Feb. 21 Teddy Bear Clinic

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. What: Children are invited to bring their teddy bear or other plush friend to a special Teddy Bear Clinic to get a checkup at the zoo. Cost: Free for members and with zoo admission. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Thursday, Feb. 22 Africobra: Art for the People Film Screening

When: 6 to 8 p.m. What: Film screening of AfriCOBRA: Art for the People and talk with AfriCOBRA artist Napoleon Jones-Henderson. Cost: Members, free; nonmembers, $8. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org/connect/events/africobra-art people-film-screening.

Friday, Feb. 23 A Night Under the Stars

When: 7 to 11 p.m. What: Fundraiser to benefit Make-A-Wish CNY includes cocktail hour, silent auction and raffle, plated dinner, speakers and present ations, dancing, entertainment, cash bar and more. Cost: $75.95. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. Info: cny.wish.org.

Saturday, Feb. 24 Taste of History

When: 6 to 9 p.m. What: Includes craft brewers, local vineyards, restaurants and hometown boutiques. Benefits Barnes Hiscock Mansion. Cost: $65; couple, $100. Where: Barnes Hiscock Mansion, 930 James St., Syracuse. Info: grbarnes.org/event/taste-of-history.

Saturday, Feb. 24, & Sunday, Feb. 25 Super Hero Weekend

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. What: Children are invited to dress as their favorite super hero. Cost: Free for members and with zoo admission. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Saturday, March 3 65 Roses Dinner When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

6 to 10 p.m. Fifth annual Cystic Fibrosis Foundation fundraiser includes dinner, dancing, live and silent auctions and more. $100. Sheraton University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse. centralny65roses.eventscff.org.

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movers AND Shakers

St. Joseph’s Health named one of America’s best hospitals St. Joseph’s Health Hospital is the only hospital in Central New York to be named one of America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics, Bariatrics, Obstetrics and Heart Care by the Women’s Choice Award. St. Joseph’s Health is one of 422 hospitals that have met the highest standards for bariatric surgery across the country. This puts St. Joseph’s in the top 9 percent of 4,812 U.S. hospitals reviewed the America’s Best distinction. St. Joseph’s Health is also in the top 9 percent of 4,812 U.S. hospitals offering heart care services. According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American women, causing 1 in 3 deaths each year—approximately one woman every minute. St. Joseph’s Health is one of 452 hospitals that have met the highest standards for obstetrics across the U.S. and is in the top 17 percent of 2,720 U.S. hospitals offering obstetrics. St. Joseph’s Health is one of 357 hospitals that have met the highest standards for orthopedics care in the country, placing St. Joseph’s in the top 11 percent of 3,230 U.S. hospitals offering orthopedics services.

organization that provides services to the community. Romano Toyota and the Romano Auto Dealerships supported the CNY Diaper Bank through the #HolidayHopeProject with a check for $2,500, which purchased 20,000 diapers and will keep 400 local babies clean, dry and healthy next month.

EL&L Marketing names partner EB&L Marketing, a niche marketing firm, has named Molly Mahoney as partner and vice president, effective Jan. 1. Molly joined EB&L Marketing at its inception in 2001 and has held various leadership roles within the company for more than 17 years. EB&L Marketing provides a full range of custom and turnkey marketing tools to HVAC contractors, distributors and manufacturers. A new division providing speakers for classes and HVAC industry events, EB&L Educates, was added to their service offering in 2017. More information on contractor marketing and education can be found on the company’s website at ebandlmarketing.com.

SUNY Upstate physician awarded

TACNY accepting nominations

A SUNY Upstate doctor has won the 2017 ANITA Award from Hospice of Central New York. Suman A. Swankar, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and the assistant director of palliative care joins a list of local physicians recognized for outstanding commitment to patients. Each year, Hospice of CNY asks the public to nominate a physician who is attentive to their patients, communicates openly, honestly and sensitively, respects patient decisions and remains actively involved with the patient in their final journey. This year’s nomination came from a hospice nurse and the team she worked with. Dr. Swarnkar received the award in January.

Technology Alliance of Central New York is now accepting nominations for the TACNY Celebration of Technology Awards. Nominees need not be active members of TACNY or other participating societies, but professional membership in such a society will be given consideration. Award winners will be recognized at the 19th Annual TACNY Celebration of Technology Awards Banquet on Monday, April 9, at the Holiday Inn, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool. Visit tacny.org for award categories, criteria and nomination form. Deadline for nominations is Friday, March 2, 2018. Questions can be directed to celebration@tacny.org.

ARISE art exhibit at Hospice of CNY Artists from ARISE present an exhibition of paintings, photography and poems for the January/February Art Exhibition at Hospice of Central New York. For nearly 40 years, ARISE has provided opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in the community and live independently.

#HOLIDAYHOPEPROJECT The CNY Diaper Bank, a local nonprofit that collects diapers for local families in need, recently received its largest shipment to date of 107,000 diapers at its location in Shopping town Mall, thanks to donations from the 100 Women Who Care and

Romano Auto Dealerships. The CNY Diaper Bank was chosen by 100 Women Who Care, a Central New York group, from several nonprofits competing to receive $100 from the 100 women, $10,000 total, for their 50

The exhibit is free and open to the public at Hospice of Central New York, 990 7th N. St., Liverpool. Visit weekdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., through the end of February.

All content has been edited for length and clarity. To submit content for our Movers and Shakers section, please email information to editor Lorna Oppedisano at laoppedi@gmail.com

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