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C O N T E N T S

July

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR......................................................6 CONTRIBUTORS ...........................................................................6

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PAST EVENTS ................................................................................7 FASHION Fashion Forward: The Art of Charcuterie ............................8

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FOOD Syracuse Eats: The Ice Cream Stand................................. 11 WISE WISE Woman: Debbie Titus............................................... 16 HEALTHY WOMAN The Health and Beauty Benefits of Grapes ..................... 18 Fitness: Learning to Run...................................................... 20 QUEEN OF ARTS Fem Works Collective ......................................................... 22

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ON THE COVER Danielle Mercuri....................................................................... 26 RECIPES Soleil Syrup ................................................................................ 35 Spiced Naan.............................................................................. 35 Roasted Beet Apple Goat Cheese Salad ........................ 36 Greek Tzatziki Sauce .............................................................. 36 Gluten- and Dairy-Free Peanut Butter Cookies ............ 39 Summer Sangria ...................................................................... 39

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INSPIRE Clara Cedeno ........................................................................ 41 Renee Duffy........................................................................... 45

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UPCOMING EVENTS ................................................................ 48 MOVERS AND SHAKERS ........................................................ 50

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The Food & Wine Edition


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LETTER from the Editor S

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OUR TEAM

appy July! This edition holds a special place in my heart. Not only do I love food, but I know

I wouldn’t be writing this letter today if it wasn’t for the time I spent working in restaurants. You might ask: How did working in restaurants lead to being an editor? The story starts years ago. When I was younger, if you’d told me I would end up talking to people for a living, I’d have raised my eyebrows and politely smiled. Then, I’d have hid behind whichever book I had in my bag that day. To say I was a shy kid is an understatement.

Publisher

Steven J. Pallone Alice G. Patterson Kristen Shepard

David Tyler

Editor Lorna Oppedisano

Design Andrea Reeves

Photography Edges Photography Alexis Emm Nichole A. Cavallaro

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Nichole A. Cavallaro Susie Ippolito Joanne Lenweaver Lorna Oppedisano

Once it was time for college, I had inched slightly out of my shell. Working as a camp counselor during the summers helped with that to an extent. But I was still pretty shy. Then, one morning, I was out for breakfast with a couple friends at a local diner,

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The All-Night Egg Plant. I noticed a sign on the door. They needed a weekend hostess.

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I needed money. Perfect. So, during college and after graduation, I spent my Saturday and Sunday mornings at The All-Night Egg Plant. When I started, I pretended to be outgoing and bubbly. Before long, I was. And I loved it. My favorite part of the job was seeing the regulars every weekend. When I had downtime at work, I would catch up with them, my Egg Plant family. I loved hearing stories about their lives — what had happened that week, where they were headed after breakfast, what family was coming into town soon. Really, it was my intro

Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month. The publication is available free of charge.

to interviewing. Now, I’m in a position where I don’t just talk to people every weekend, but almost every day. I get to talk to people about their lives, families and passions. And it goes one step further; I get to share those stories with you. I hope you enjoy them as much as

CONTACT OUR HOME OFFICE 315.434.8889 | 2501 James Street, Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206 info@syracusewomanmag.com

I do!

Lorna ON THE COVER: Danielle Mercuri was photographed by Alice G. Patterson of Alice G. Patterson Photography at The Rise N Shine Diner in Syracuse. Special thanks for Jillain Salomone, owner of J.Luxe Salon, for Danielle’s makeup styling.

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The magazine is published 12 times a year by Syracuse Woman Magazine, LLC and Eagle Publications, 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206 Copyright © 2018 Syracuse Woman Magazine, LLC. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or republished without the consent of the publishers. Syracuse Woman Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts, photos or artwork. All such submissions become the property of Syracuse Woman Magazine, LLC and will not be returned.

The Food & Wine Edition


PAST SWM Events

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1 + 2) The Junior League of Syracuse celebrated its spring fundraising event, “Cork, Forks, Brews and Chews” at Beak & Skiff Apple Orchards in LaFayette at Saturday, May 5. Photography by Kristen Shepard. 3) The Chef & The Cook recently opened in Baldwinsville. 4 + 5) The American Heart Association held the annual event, Handbags Helping Hearts, Wednesday, June 13, at the Stickley, Audi & Co. showroom in Fayetteville. Photography by Edges Photography. 6 - 8) Owera Vineyards hosted a fundraiser for the WISE Women’s Business Center on Wednesday, May 16. 9 + 10) Baldwinsville business owners organized A Cause to Celebrate to benefit Vera House North on Friday, May 4. Photography by Edges Photography.

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FASHION FORWARD The Art of Charcuterie

Grazing in the Summer

Photography by Nichole A. Cavallaro

By Nichole A. Cavallaro

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or this month’s Fashion Forward, we’ve decided to look at the art of charcuterie. Lifestyle blogger Nichole A. Cavallaro shows us how.

As the days get longer and the weather gets warmer, meals tend to be lighter and more fresh. I must confess I’m a fan of snacking and grazing. I like to graze in the mid-afternoon, on weekends, and at gettogethers. I even graze after Thanksgiving dinner. (Who doesn’t graze after an early 2 p.m. dinner?) Grazing is a perfectly healthy habit. If cows in the pasture and toddlers can do it, why can’t I? I’m the one with the busy life! So, in honor of being busy and still providing snacks for everyone else, I present you with an elevated snacking option. No more settling for the Cheez-Its and Goldfish. Enter my modified version of a charcuterie board. It’s the horn of plenty, sans the horn. Instead of smoked and cured meats and pâté, I’ve included family-friendly options, as well as a few grown-up ones. I certainly can’t snack on delicate and rich meats, as I need to stay awake all day and don’t want to fill up on sodium. Plus, there are young people who’d want in on the fun, too. Nonetheless, I’m a sucker for all kinds of cheese and a variety of fruits. With this colorful and inexpensive modality of snacking, it’s also beautiful to look at in its bountiful glory, and even better when you have leftovers to pack away for the next day. 8

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For this compilation of good food, I’ve chosen the following cheeses: bleu, gouda, sharp cheddar, Havarti and brie. The cheddar is kidfriendly, of course. I’ve included the following seasonal or dried fruits: cherries, dried apricots, dried figs, raspberries and strawberries. All fruits are kid-friendly, too, with the exception of the cherries, as they have pits. I’ve also included Kalamata olives, bleu-cheese-stuffed green olives, jalapeno- and garlic-baked cashews, red cherry tomatoes, butter crackers, pre-sliced salami, pepperoni and imported strawberry preserves. I bet I could have added some French bread in there, as well! To sip while I snack, I prefer a sweet rosé, a variety of different moscato, or possibly a riesling or light and fruity white. While I’m not as much a fan of red, I’m sure they’d work, but not as well as the sweet wines, in my opinion. The thing I like about grazing is it’s a controlled and consistent option. It’s not too much, nor is it barely scratching my appetite’s surface. Not only do I feel healthier and less indulgent as I would consuming say, a huge hot fudge sundae, but if it’s laid out neatly and beautifully for me to dig into, I feel that much more eager! A pretty spread is like a work of art just waiting to be enjoyed. Here’s to sunny weekends, delicious grazing and responsible sipping! SWM Nichole A. Cavallaro is a Syracuse-based fashion blogger. Read more of her work at eneverythingnice.blogspot.com. The Food & Wine Edition


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syracuse eats The Ice Cream Stand

AMANDA HUGHES

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

THE ICE CREAM STAND OWNER

The community’s been so supportive and just really excited about our presence, which just feels really great.” — Amanda Hughes, The Ice Cream Stand owner

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SYRACUSE EATS The Ice Cream Stand

Bringing Syracuse Year-round Sweetness By Lorna Oppedisano

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Sea salt caramel truffle ice cream

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The Food & Wine Edition

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

bout three years ago, Central New York native Amanda Hughes discovered a new favorite spot in her hometown: Hanover Square. Amanda had returned home after attending college at Duke University and earning an MBA in marketing from LIU Brooklyn. She wasn’t sure of her next step, but found herself drawn to that area. “There’s obviously something really beautiful, but there was something about the space that was so peaceful to me,” she said. “It was a great place to just collect my thoughts and be, with everything else that was going on — with the transition, moving back home and figuring out what’s next.” Now, a few years later, the entrepreneur calls downtown home and recently opened The Ice Cream Stand at 200 W. Water St., giving Amanda, her employees and her customers a year-round view of Hanover Square. When she initially moved back to Syracuse, Amanda hadn’t expected to stay. But then, she had an opportunity to open The Ice Cream Stand at its original North Syracuse location. Coming from a family of business owners, Amanda always expected to eventually run her own business.


The Ice Cream Stand is located at 200 W. Water St. in downtown Syracuse. Hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday; noon to 10 p.m. Saturday; and noon to 7 p.m. Sunday. Connect with the shop via email at amanda@theicecreamstand.com, phone at 315-458-4848, or online at theicecreamstand.com.

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

which just feels really great,” she said. The Ice Cream Stand opened May 4, the weekend of the downtown Crawfish Festival and just about month before the Taste of Syracuse. One advantage of the space is the proximity not only to summer festivals, markets and concerts, but also the ice skating rink and tree lighting during the winter. While the new location still has a lot of moving pieces to work out, Amanda’s been thrilled with the opportunity to partner and work with other local businesses. With the exception of the hard ice cream, which comes from a family-owned business in Maine, all other products are locally sourced. In the coming months, Amanda plans to add more menu items, additional signage and decor. High on the priority list is outdoor seating, as well. Additionally, she plans to continue a partnership with KMase Products for the KMase & Cones summer music series. Having put her marketing background to good use in creating The Ice Cream Stand, one might assume Amanda would have her heart set on opening more locations. But that’s actually something she specifically doesn’t plan to do. She’d rather have time to work on other projects to enliven Central New York and put her all into this location. “That’s the fun thing for me,” Amanda said, “really taking this to the next level.” SWM

Chocolate & vanilla twist with rainbow sprinkles

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

“When you grow up with that kind of experience and that’s what you’re seeing, it’s pretty powerful, from a lot of different perspectives,” she said. While it’s a lot of responsibility, it’s a burden she enjoys bearing, Amanda said, adding she wouldn’t trade the schedule flexibility for anything. After two successful seasons of The Ice Cream Stand at the original location, she started getting offers to open in downtown Syracuse. Amanda was honored people thought the eatery would be a good addition to the growing downtown community — a community she supported and loved — but wasn’t sure about the move right away. After all, for those first two seasons, she’d been learning business ownership from the ground up. Eventually, after the opportunity presented itself a few times, she agreed to simply look at the space. When she walked in, she was met with a simple room, stripped down to bare bones — no walls, no floor, just wide open space. And then, Hanover Square came into view. “I just had this feeling. I could see it all,” Amanda said. “I knew I was supposed to be here. I think things happen for a reason. When I walked in and I saw it, I thought, ‘Oh, OK, I get it.’” Once she ran the numbers and realized it was a feasible next step, it was just about making it happen and “getting to the finish line,” she said. Her original goal was to open last fall, but once the moving pieces were set in motion, she realized spring of 2018 would be more realistic. All the while, the community was behind her. “It’s been overwhelmingly positive and the community’s been so supportive and just really excited about our presence,

Campfire S’mores with a toasted marshmallow

KMase & Cones Visit The Ice Cream Stand every Wednesday from 5 to 7 p.m., starting July 11, for live acoustic music, presented by KMase Productions.

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11 july 18 july 25

SERA BULLIS BEN WAYNE w/ JESS NOVAK ANDREW HALLDAY & MIKE MAWHINNEY

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1 aug 8 aug 11

KHLOEY DANES BILLY HARRISON & ASHLEY ROSE

END OF SEASON BASH!

Follow @KMaseProductions on Instagram for more details. July 2018

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healthy woman The Health and Beauty Benefits of Grapes

The Power of Grapes By Susie Ippolito

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e are fortunate to live in Syracuse, where fresh fruits and vegetables are abundant, accessible and affordable. The lines at the farmer’s markets prove the local popularity of produce. New York state is known for exceptional apples, dairy products and maple syrup, to name a few of our fair state’s top products. And, thanks to the humid breeze that blows off the Finger Lakes, we also proudly boast some of the best grapes in the world.

The great grapes Phytonutrients and antioxidants fuel the power of the grape. According to Amy Doyle, a board-certified nutrition specialist and owner of Whitestone Wellness, we need these to fight free radical damage to our bodies. “Free radicals are unstable molecules in the body that wreak havoc by damaging DNA, cell membranes and tissues,” Amy said. “Problems arise when the level of free radicals in the body exceeds the level of antioxidants available to handle them.” Grapes contain resveratrol, a powerful antioxidant that benefits everything from brain health to skin health and protects us against free radical damage. Amy pointed out that while our bodies are able to protect us from free radicals, we need to bolster that protection by living a healthy lifestyle that includes foods like grapes.

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Beauty and the grape These days, we are as likely to hear the words free radicals and antioxidants at the beauty counter as often as we see them in the vitamin aisle. Local makeup artist, esthetician and owner of Green Beauty Bliss Erica Abdo reminded us that “proper hydration is an extremely important ingredient to glowing skin, shiny hair and overall health.” Erica also pointed out the benefits that phytonutrients have on our skin, stating they “provide protection against ultraviolet light radiation and free radical damage,” which cause dehydration, fine lines and dark spots. Grapes also contain vitamin B-6, which, according to Erica, “plays an important role in supplying oxygen to your hair follicles to assist in healthy hair growth.” Most of the antioxidants are found in the grape skin and grape seeds, which Amy pointed out “is why you often seed grape seed extract in supplement form” as well as in skincare products. Depuff, destress and fortify! Inflammation causes additional issues to any number of health issues. Inflammation can be caused, in part, by free radicals interfering with our body’s process. We encounter free radicals throughout our day. This is only partly within our control. “Some common culprits are mental and physical stress, a diet high in refined sugars, under-exercising, over-exercising, pesticide exposure, cigarette smoke and even sunburns,” Amy said. Consuming foods like grapes can help to take that stress off of our bodies and aid in its efforts to repair itself.

The Food & Wine Edition


What to buy, how to eat, how to use Amy recommended purchasing organic grapes, “as grapes contain some of the highest pesticide residue over other fruits and vegetables” and, considering that most of the health benefits are found in the skin and seeds, she suggested eating them fresh and whole. Even though their skins are potent, they’re thin and susceptible to quick deterioration and loss of nutrients. When buying grapes, look for flexible, green stems with the grapes firmly attached. The fruit should be firm and kept dry to maintain optimal flavor and health benefits. “On a positive note, none of the phytonutrient content of grapes is lost when they are made into wine,” Amy added. Lucky for us, grapes pair well with cheeses like bleu cheese and goat cheese, as well as almonds, pecans and walnuts. Sounds like a perfect combination for a responsibly enjoyed wine tasting party! Erica told us many of the organic products in her salon use grape seed oil “to create soft, smooth, even vibrant skin.” Look for grape seed oil in moisturizers, scrubs and serums to bump up your skincare regime. Both Amy and Erica agree that overall diet and wellbeing have a big impact on our health and the results show in our skin and nails. Be sure to grab a bright bunch of grapes at the next farmer’s market and have a healthy, hydrated summer. SWM Read more from Susie Ippolito at susieippolito.com.

July 2018

By the Numbers • Grapes are 80 percent water, which is essential to all aspects of our health • Grapes contain vitamins D-2 and D-3, which are essential for women’s bone and breast health • Vitamins B-6 and B-12 in grapes work to boost our brain, skin and blood health • Vitamins A, C and E protect our skin, strengthen it and bolster our immune systems

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fitness Learning to Run

From 5Ks to Half-Marathons

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ave you ever wanted to learn something new, but were a little too nervous? Sometimes those first few steps are the most difficult. Patricia Kawryga wasn’t a runner. That all changed when a friend encouraged her to join a training program and run a 5K race. Now, miles and miles later, Patricia has completed not only dozens of 5Ks, but six half-marathons. For this month’s Fitness column, she shared her story and inspiration with us. SWM: Did you run much before the No Boundaries program? Patricia: No, I was not a runner before joining No Boundaries. I was never very athletic growing up and hid in the locker room during phys ed! As an adult, I enjoyed walking to stay active, but that was all the activity I really did for many years. SWM: What prompted you to start the program? Patricia: In March 2013, a friend of mine, Sandy Tucker, told me about a Fleet Feet program she had heard of called No Boundaries. She explained that it teaches people how to run and, at the end of the training, we should be able to run a 5K. Sandy was thinking of signing up and encouraged me and my daughter, Erin, to join, too. Against my better judgement, Sandy, Erin and I all decided to give it a shot. On the first day, we were put into groups based on previous activity. I was in a strictly walking group. After the first week, I switched myself into one of the running groups to be with Sandy. SWM: Was running initially difficult? What was the biggest challenge? Patricia: Running was difficult. Saying that it was hard is an understatement! The No Boundaries training is very gradual; you start with small run/walk intervals and build each week. When I first started, we had to run for just one minute. It was the longest minute ever! As the weeks progressed, more running was added. My first coaches were Alan and Kate. Week after week, they put up with my whining as we began to run more and walk less. They were so encouraging and helpful throughout the training, I didn’t want to quit or let them down. The biggest challenge was convincing myself I could actually run a 5K. Our coaches assured us that if we did the training and our “homework” runs, we would be successful. In June 2013, I completed the Runapalooza 5K at 57 years old! I crossed that finish line in about 55 minutes. Since that first 5K, I’ve done dozens of 5Ks, with a personal best of about 34 minutes. SWM: Did you have an a-ha moment during your initial training, when you knew you wanted to run more than the 5K? Patricia: After my first 5K, I signed up for No Boundaries about 10 more times! I always felt a little too slow for the “advanced” programs and often went back to No Boundaries, where I was comfortable. I got a lot of teasing from the coaches about how many times I did the program. Coach Mallory, who is in charge of No Boundaries, told me I couldn’t sign up anymore! Of course, she was joking, but I started to wonder what I should do next. It was around that time that my daughters decided to sign up for the Syracuse Half Marathon. I hate missing out, so I decided I would sign up, too, and moved on to distance training. SWM: Tell us about distance training. Patricia: I signed up for the distance training program in January 2016. I was placed in Coach Tish’s group with other runners around my pace. The great thing about distance training is there are groups for people of all paces; nobody is left out or left running alone.

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Distance training is a lot different than what I was used to. We had speed workouts on Wednesday nights and long runs on Sunday mornings. We ran in the cold, snow, wind, sleet, rain and darkness. The first week, we started out running four miles and, to my surprise, I did it! Week after week, we added miles. And, week after week, I amazed myself by completing it. There were always coaches running with us. Their encouragement and support is what got me through. SWM: Tell us about the moment you crossed the finish line of your first half-marathon. Patricia: The day of the Syracuse Half Marathon arrived — April 3, 2016 — and it was a blizzard! As my daughters and I made it to the OnCenter for the start, my nerves started to get the best of me. Even though I’d trained, I had no idea if I could actually run 13.1 miles. We had some time to kill before the start, so everyone was waiting inside the OnCenter, trying to stay warm. Out of nowhere, a guy walked up to me and nudged my arm. I turned around and was shocked to see my brother, Bill, who lives in Virginia, standing in front of me. He had driven up to surprise me and run his first half-marathon, too! When it came time to go outside and line up, I started to get nervous again. I had never been so afraid of anything as I was of not finishing in time and being asked to move off the course. When the race began, I knew it wasn’t going to be easy. The conditions were bad; there was snow, wind, hail, sleet and rain. The roads were slippery and visibility was poor.

Somewhere along the course, I met up with Coach Tish and we ran together, encouraging each other not to quit. As I neared the finish line with Coach Tish, I saw my brother, Bill. He had already finished, but came back to run the last quarter-mile of the race with me. As I neared the finish line, my emotions started to kick in and I could feel my eyes tearing up. I crossed the finish line with Bill and Tish and immediately cried! My husband and daughters were waiting at the finish line and we all hugged and cried. My time was horrible — 3 hours and 14 minutes — but, considering the conditions, I was happy to finish and get that medal. I have now done six half-marathons and completed my goal of finishing in less than three hours! SWM: What’s your advice for someone just learning to run? Patricia: Know you can do it. Don’t give up and stick to your goals. Trust in your training. I’m a perfect example of that; I know I will never win a race, but I’ve crossed every finish line of every race I’ve done! Most of all, it’s important to have fun and enjoy the process. It’s not going to be easy, but it’s worth it! SWM For more information on Fleet Feet’s training programs, visit fleetfeetsyracuse.com/ training.

This interview was edited for length and clarity.

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queen of arts Fem Works Collective

Creating Space for Community Collaboration

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ood food sparks good conversation and collaboration. Ryland Heagerty, manager at Pastabilities Restaurant, proved that true when she fostered friendships into Fem Works Collective. According to the collective’s website, “through the lens of intersectional feminism, Fem Works Collective supports and cultivates an inclusive setting for artistic collaboration, dialogue, community engagement and social justice within Syracuse.” This month, the women involved in Fem Works Collective told us about the group’s founding and mission.

I have great relationships with all of the women on this initial planning team. We all trust and respect one another. While working toward these first projects, it’s been really special to share roles, decision-making and experiments. Daily practices to honor and serve myself, my friends, my neighbors and our city are deeply important to me. I say this as a citizen, an artist, a witch and a feminist. I hope Fem Works can offer opportunities to better the lives of anyone who needs support. Jen Eldritch Purchaser at Syracuse Cooperative Market Radio cohost of The Witching Hour on Spark Syracuse

I joined Fem Works Collective because I love the idea of fostering an inclusive and accessible creative community in Syracuse. It’s my hope our workshops can be gathering places for people to be introduced to new ideas and skills and meet community members with whom they can network and collaborate. I’ve always been interested in the democratization of creative work. Ryland Heagerty I believe creative self-expression is a birthright; the development of necessary skills should be available to those who may not be able to Founder of Fem Works Collective access formal training or education. Workshops Manager at Pastabilities Restaurant and skill shares can be a starting place. As we, Quiet painter, poet, object maker, individuals, integrate creative acts into our collaborator everyday lives, our experiences and connections I have been dreaming of something like become increasingly beautiful and meaningful, Fem Works Collective for a long time. and our community is strengthened and After experiences in the fields of art education, empowered. expressive art therapy, nonprofit cultural I’m so excited to be working with this talented, institutions and the restaurant industry, I began progressive group of women, and can’t wait to see my inclinations pointed toward something to meet everyone who attends our summer that looked like an experiment in art education The Fem Works Collective’s Summer workshop series! event planning. Workshop Series is slated for July 26 After trying my hand at a micro-workshop through 29 at Stone Totem Yoga Studio. Celine Rahman series called Dreamland last summer, I saw Workshop topics include: art, knitting, Founder of Cup Of Rahman more clearly what I wanted to do: to offer local the intersections and obstacles of Wardrobe stylist skill shares and workshops led by folks in the creativity and motherhood, feminism, After forming my business last year, I was community and beyond; to make every event collaboration, health and more. fortunate enough to work with a group of free, public and accessible; to bring together a The group hopes to organize regular women who create products that empower team of smart, politically engaged, communityprogramming throughout the year. other women in New York City. Being part of oriented, empathic feminists; and to develop a this collective made me wonder if I could be mission statement declaring our commitment to Stay tuned at facebook.com/ part of something similar here in Syracuse. intersectionality, equity and belief in the vigor of femworkscollective. My experience working with women has been creative collaboration. incredibly uplifting, and I’m thankful to call We will be a safe and serious space that holds dialogues on the subjects of inclusion, intersectional feminism, activism, the women of Fem Works my sisters. Being a part of this group is an mental health and creativity. We will also be a collaborative and flexible extension of my mission to empower creativity and self-expression. With our mission to spread creative awareness and social justice, space to experiment with new mediums and methods of expression. We I believe we can expand what may have been a small, curious hope to become a trusted, permanent resource for our community. community in the CNY area into a self-empowering movement. Reina Apraez Gabrielle Reagan Artist Yoga instructor & Pastabilities server SCSD substitute teacher S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications graduate Hostess at Otro Cinco Occasional Syracuse Woman Magazine contributor/ Radio cohost of The Witching Hour on Spark Syracuse freelance writer Ryland and I have been arty and party cohorts since we were teens! I’ve had the pleasure of working alongside Ryland in the restaurant Last year, she asked me to help her talk through her visions for the for several years. When she inspired us with her vision for last Dreamland workshop retreat and offer some practical suggestions. summer’s Dreamland workshop, I was eager to get involved. We have a shared passion for community-focused art making and My contribution is yoga. both dream of using our skills towards beautiful and special creations for Syracuse. 22

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Photography by Alexis Emm From left: Ryland Heagerty, Shauna Roloff, Celine Rahman, Reina Apraez, Gabrielle Reagan

I’m honored to provide movement and breath practices at our upcoming workshop series this summer. More so, I’m honored to be part of and consistently inspired by the transformation Ryland’s initial vision has undergone. I’ve always had a thing for the underdog, and Fem Works is a united voice for just that. I’m honored to take a role beyond my mat, collaborating with such amazingly intelligent, innovative, empathetic and responsive women to help foster connections within the Syracuse community. In tandem with connections, we’re aiming to make real change. We’ve all felt the shift; things are changing, for better and for worse. I think Fem Works is a beacon, part of a larger recalibration of perspective and values, an accession of voices. I am beyond humbled to be a part of it. Shauna Roloff Registered nurse

Last year, I was able to participate in a series of workshops hosted by Ryland. The event coincided with a transitional time in my life, serving as an emotional learning experience for me. Having that supportive space and collaborative energy was very important and helped me heal in a way didn’t even know I needed at the time. I joined Fem Works Collective this year to support Ryland and help make these workshops happen again for myself and others. I think intersectionality is a central value held by all of us at Fem Works. One of the things I’m most excited about this year is the opportunity to learn from the individuals leading the workshops.

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My hope is we will leave the workshops feeling inspired and energized, ready to foster change within ourselves and our community. It’s been a gift to collaborate with the other members of this collective. I’m impressed by their dedication and ability to organize. I’m so excited to share a space at Stone Quarry Hill Art Park and see how the events this year take shape. Anastasia Selby English teacher, writer and nanny Recent Syracuse University graduate, with an MFA in creative writing

I lived with Ryland for a year and saw how well her Dreamland workshops went, so, when Ryland asked me to be part of Fem Works, I was thrilled to be included. I’m an advocate for body neutrality, fat positivity, eating disorder recovery and suicide awareness. I believe frank and open discussions about mental health issues are essential to a healthy society. Having lost my mom to suicide, I’ve seen firsthand the devastation alcoholism and inaccessible mental health care can cause. As a nontraditional student at Syracuse University from a lowerclass economic background, I was also stunned to see the disconnect between the smaller communities in our larger community of Syracuse, especially across racial lines. I hope Fem Works can help connect communities that don’t often interact with one another by creating accessible classes and workshops for everyone. SWM Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

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The Food & Wine Edition


July 2018

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COVER story Danielle Mercuri

danielle mercuri THE RISE N SHINE DINER OWNER

Pete [The Rise N Shine Diner’s original owner] showed me those skills you just don’t get to learn in your own home kitchen, [the skills you] you learn on a cook line.” — Danielle Mercuri, The Rise N Shine Diner owner

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The Food & Wine Edition


Photography by Alice G. Patterson

First Time at Rise N Shine?

The menu is extensive, but fear not. We asked Danielle what one item a first-time customer should try. “Oof. Oh. Really?” she replied with a chuckle. She went on to tell us about a few new items, including the Dirty D Sandwich, a CNY-twist on Rochester’s garbage plate concept. She also recommended a couple of staples: the Big Daddy Pancake Wrap and Spicy Avocado Bacon Wrap. “Our omelettes are amazing,” Danielle said. “Gotta have home fries.” She paused. “‘Come back and try some more,’ that’s what I would say,” Danielle told us with a laugh. “Have one thing and then be back.”

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COVER story Danielle Mercuri

Learning to Rise N Shine By Lorna Oppedisano

D

anielle Mercuri didn’t know what to do or where to turn. She’d been on unemployment for a while. Utilities were being shut off. And she had three daughters to raise. Then, the phone rang. The timing was impeccable. “This was probably five minutes prior to me being literally on my knees crying because I was so upset,” she recalled. Danielle’s stepfather was on the line. His friend, Peter Hennessey, owned The Rise N Shine Diner, a small eatery tucked away behind Valvoline Instant Oil Change on Thompson Road near Carrier Circle in Syracuse. Danielle had never heard of the restaurant, let alone met Pete before. Her stepfather suggested she work as a server at the diner. She had experience serving — almost a decade’s worth — but wasn’t thrilled at the prospect of revisiting the experience. But she needed a job, and Pete was hiring. “And that’s how I found this place,” she said, gesturing to the modest, bustling, colorful restaurant. Danielle, now the owner of The Rise N Shine Diner, grew the business from an average trucker’s diner to a Syracuse staple, a destination visited by people from around the world. “We’re going on our sixth year,” she said. “It feels like yesterday. It’s amazing.”

Learning the diner basics When Danielle began serving at Rise N Shine, it was means to survival, to keep the lights on at home. Before long, it became more than that. Danielle brought a background in fashion design with her to the new job, adding a flair of creativity. Eventually, she took on some managerial responsibilities. Pete even began teaching her to cook. While she’d had experience cooking creative dishes at home — “weird stuff,” she recalled with a laugh — it wasn’t until she was in the diner that she expanded her knowledge. “Pete showed me those skills you just don’t get to learn in your own home kitchen, [the skills you] you learn on a cook line,” she explained. It was under unfortunate circumstances that Pete enlisted her help on the line. While at the time, he simply thought he was sick, Pete eventually learned he was suffering from leukemia. Some days, he couldn’t even stand. Soon, it became clear someone else would have to take the reins at Rise N Shine.

Business behindthe-scenes In November 2012, Danielle went to see Pete in the hospital. She expected it to be a simple visit, to check on the man who’d become like an uncle to her. 28

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But, when she arrived, she was met with a roomful of lawyers and an accountant. She soon learned Pete planned to sign the restaurant to her. “Are you sure?” she asked him. “Are you serious? Is this what you really want to do?” Pete wasn’t much of an emotional man, Danielle recalled. His response was simple and straightforward. “Yes,” he said. “This is what you’re going to do.” For those first few months, Danielle talked to Pete on the phone almost every night about her new business. They assumed he’d recover and continue to coach her through the process from Florida, but that wasn’t the case. Pete passed away in February 2013. So, there Danielle was, a new business owner with no business background. She had learned a lot from Pete in her time at Rise N Shine, but wasn’t familiar with the behind-the-scenes inner workings of the business. “Where do you buy things? Where do you go? Who are the vendors? I know nothing,” she remembered thinking at the time. However, Danielle had two important skills on her side: perseverance and customer service. “I know how to treat customers. I know what they want. That’s actually my thing,” she said, adding she also thrived off the creative aspect of designing a menu and making food. During that same time, Danielle faced challenges in her personal life, as well. Being a business owner helped instill in her the confidence to make other changes in her life. “I felt that these moves — even though they were bad in a sense, with a man dying — these moves were changes in my life that helped me grow,” she said. “And I wanted to make sure I did it the right way.” The first couple of years were tough, Danielle admitted. She and her daughters were essentially homeless for a time, living in a hotel for a summer. Her family helped her a great deal, offering financial backing and advice. They’re still by her side today. Despite the challenges she faced, there was no going back, Danielle remembered thinking. “I kept saying, ‘I’m not giving up. I’m not giving up. I can’t let this go,’” she said, admitting it was tough to build the business. “It’s crazy. From what I did then to what I do now, I would have never imagined it.”

Sprucing up the menu From day one of business ownership, Danielle knew she’d need to change the menu to be successful. The changes ended up being extensive. “At first, it was, ‘Tweak a burger, tweak a sandwich.’ And then, ‘Screw it, let’s do the whole thing,’” she remembered with a laugh. The one item she didn’t alter at all is the home fries recipe, Danielle said proudly. Down to the type of potato, seasonings and cooking method, Pete’s staple breakfast food has remained the same. Change isn’t always easy — for anyone involved. In an industry often dependent on regulars, that can present a challenge. Danielle began experimenting by adding influences from Spanish and Mexican foods, as well as following culinary trends from places like New York City or New Jersey. The Food & Wine Edition


Many of the diner’s regulars, older men who’d been friends with Pete, told her, “This is silly. You’re crazy.” But that didn’t stop Danielle. Now, the menu boasts pages and pages of unique and innovative breakfast and lunch offerings, ranging from immense omelets to the pancake factory to the green leafy stuff, to borrow wording from the menu itself. For a complete list, visit risenshinediner.com/menu. “I hate to even say sometimes we’re a diner, just because we bring so many different things here,” Danielle said.

Growing the Rise N Shine family Along with expanding the menu, Danielle also slowly expanded her team. She’s grown the employee base from about five people when she inherited the business to 17 people currently.

July 2018

That includes two of her three daughters, both of whom want to follow their mother’s culinary footsteps, as well as her sister. Danielle’s sister was hired as a dishwasher shortly before Pete’s passing, and now works as Rise N Shine’s head baker, responsible for breads, cookies and cinnamon rolls. People come from all over just for the rolls, Danielle said. Danielle admitted it can be a love-hate relationship at times, and wouldn’t recommend working with family to everyone, but it works well for them, she said with a smile. She’s also brought on staff she’d met at other local diners over the years, including current manager Kellie Vadekas, who previously owned The No Name Diner. “They come with their own entourage,” Danielle explained. “They have their own regulars who they have from back in the day.” Along with regulars from other diners, Danielle has worked to attract many new Rise N Shine regulars since taking over in 2012. Continued on page 30

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COVER story Danielle Mercuri

Learning to Rise N Shine from page 29 It was initially a difficult task, since the restaurant was tucked away with little signage. At the beginning, on days when their small sandwich board blew down, the restaurant would see few customers. Now, thanks to the location near the New York State Thruway and the power of social media, there’s hardly a need for any physical signage. On most weekend mornings, customers are willing to wait upwards of an hour for a seat at Rise N Shine. “We get people from all over the world,” Danielle said. “It’s amazing.” Many photos people come across on social media — on Yelp, Google and TripAdvisor, just to make a few — are taken by customers, Danielle said. Because of people’s propensity to snap before they eat, she’s always keeping that next photo in mind when making and plating the food. “That’s another huge thing of mine: presentation,” she said. “Quality [is] first and foremost, but presentation is key.”

The future of The Rise N Shine Diner Now in her sixth year as owner, Danielle admits she’s thought about opening another location of The Rise N Shine Diner, possibly in the Central New York area or even out of state. There’s demand for it, she said. But, regardless of what happens, the original location will forever be her baby. “I feel like that right moment will come, just like coming to here,” she said, thinking back to that original life-changing phone call. “So, I’m waiting for that moment, that a-ha moment.” SWM

We’re going on our sixth year. It feels like yesterday. It’s amazing.”— Danielle Mercuri, The Rise N Shine Diner owner

The Shiny Details The Rise N Shine Diner is located at 6393 Thompson Road in Syracuse, near Carrier Circle. The restaurant serves breakfast and lunch from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. every day. While reservations are not accepted, customers are encouraged to call for call-ahead seating, especially on weekends. The Rise N Shine Diner can be reached at (315) 432-5510. For more information, visit risenshinediner.com.

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The Food & Wine Edition


Ladies' Playlist IN THE SHOWROOM Sat., 7/28 | Katey Sagal & The Reluctant Apostles Thurs., 7/12 | Grit N Grace Sat., 7/14 | Shawn Smith Sat., 7/21 | Mark Nanni Sat., 7/28 | Joe Whiting

TASTING & TUNES SUNDAYS 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. July 2018

Wed., 7/4 | 2PM Beach Party Boys Fri., 7/6 | 8PM The Legendary Temptations - R&B Thurs., 7/26 | 8PM Chippendales Fri., 7/27 | 8PM Pat Benatar, Neil Giraldo & Rick Springfield Sun., 7/1 | Matt Grainger Sun., 7/8 | Hal Puffer** Sun., 7/15 | Lisa Lee** Sun., 7/22 | Kevin Alexander** Sun., 7/29 | Max Scialdone ** new to Tailwater!

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The Food & Wine Edition


July 2018

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The Food & Wine Edition


recipES

Soleil Syrup

(honey-cinnamon flavor) By Soleil Café

Ingredients:

½ cup honey ¼ cup water 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Directions:

1. Combine honey and water in a saucepan on low heat. 2. After three minutes, remove from heat and add cinnamon. 3. Stir and enjoy in your favorite coffee beverage! Lasts up to four weeks refrigerated in a sealed container. Note: The syrup tastes like Cinnamon Toast Crunch in an iced latte! For more about Soleil Café, visit soleil-cafe.com.

Spiced Naan

By The Chef & The Cook’s DeAnna Germano Makes about 20 pieces.

Directions:

1. Mix together yeast, warm water and sugar. Allow yeast to foam. 2 teaspoon yeast 2. Add cream and egg, and mix. 1 cup warm water 3. Add spices and flour, and slowly mix together. ¼ cup sugar Add salt after flour. 3 tablespoon cream 4. Kneed about 15 minutes. Allow to rest at room 1 egg temperature for 30 minutes, covered with a coat 2 teaspoons salt oil and a cloth. 4½ cup flour 5. Once dough has doubled in size, cut apart 2 tablespoon turmeric into 20 pieces. 1 teaspoon cinnamon 6. Pull and press each piece into a disc. 1 teaspoon curry powder 7. In a hot pan with oil, shallow fry each piece of naan.

Ingredients:

Note: Great for filling with grilled chicken, dipped in seafood, or with a little oil. For more about The Chef & The Cook, visit facebook.com/thechefthecook.

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RECIPES

Roasted Beet Apple Goat Cheese Salad

By Laci’s Tapas Bar’s Cindy Seymour

Ingredients:

2 red beets 2 Empire apples ½ cup goat cheese Olive oil 2 cups balsamic vinegar

Directions:

1. Peel and chop beets into small pieces, about the size of a dime. 2. Parboil beets. 3. Place beets on baking sheet and sprinkle with olive oil.

4. Roast until slightly browned, set aside and let cool. 5. Make balsamic reduction: In a small pan, bring two cups balsamic vinegar to a low boil and reduce. Set aside. 6. Cut up apples, roughly the same size as the beets. 7. Combine apple, beet and goat cheese. Form into two-inch balls and drizzle with balsamic reduction. 8. Enjoy!

For more about Laci’s Tapas Bar, visit lacistapasbar.com.

Greek Tzatziki Sauce

By the team at King David’s Restaurant

Ingredients:

8 ounces yogurt 4 ounces sour cream 1 cucumber, partially peeled 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 garlic cloves 1 teaspoon oregano 1 teaspoon salt Directions: 1. Partially peel a medium cucumber (striped) and chop into small pieces or prep in a food processor. 2. Sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt (to release liquid) and set aside in a strainer to remove excess liquid.

3. Finely crush or mince two cloves garlic. 4. Add salt, oregano and lemon juice to garlic. 5. Add to yogurt and sour cream. Mix well. 6. Add strained cucumbers. Mix again. 7. Refrigerate approximately two hours and serve cold. Note: If you like fresh mint, chop up a couple sprigs to top off the sauce!

For more about King David’s Restaurant, visit kingdavids.com.

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The Food & Wine Edition


July 2018

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The Food & Wine Edition


recipES

Gluten- and Dairy-Free Peanut Butter Cookies By Cafe 19’s Casey Galloway Makes 18 Cookies 1 cup creamy peanut butter ²/3 cup dark brown sugar 1 ½ teaspoon real vanilla extract 2 eggs ²/3 cup gluten-free oats ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda ²/3 cup Lily's Premium Baking Chips (gluten-, sugar- and dairy-free)

3. In another bowl, mix together oats, baking soda and salt. 4. Add oat mixture to peanut butter mixture. Blend until just incorporated. 5. Fold in chocolate chips with a spoon. Be careful not to over-mix them. 6. Use a 1-ounce cookie scoop to shape cookies. Place them on a greased parchment-lined sheet tray. 7. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until just golden around the outside.

1. Preheat oven to 350 ° Fahrenheit. 2. In a stand mixer, beat together peanut butter, brown sugar, eggs and vanilla until smooth.

Note: Some nice variations I’ve tried with this recipe include substituting white chocolate chips for the chocolate, using almond butter instead of peanut butter and adding craisins.

Ingredients:

Directions:

For more about Cafe 19, visit xixcafe.com.

Summer Sangria By Olive's Eatery

Ingredients:

6 ounces Pinot Grigio 2 ounces orange-mango juice 1 ounce lemon-lime soda

Directions: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Mix together ingredients Garnish with a sugared peach and strawberry. Serve over ice. Enjoy on a hot summer day!

Note: The team at Olive’s Eatery recommends Nantucket Nectar for the orange-mango juice! For more about Olive’s Eatery, visit oliveseaterybville.com.

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The Food & Wine Edition


INSPIRE Clara Cedeno

CLARA CEDENO LA PATRIA CAFÉ OWNER

Photography by Alexis Emm

As a small business owner, you start to learn what your level of commitment truly is to the business. You learn that it is tiring. It’s frustrating. Then, you have to figure out — how do you keep the dream alive while not overtiring yourself to the point where you hate what you’re doing?” — Clara Cedeno, La Patria Café owner

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INSPIRE Clara Cedeno

Finding Yourself with Food By Lorna Oppedisano

“I

never see anything that I do as a waste of time,” Clara Cedeno said, “because once you start seeing things as a waste of time, you start having all these regrets.” You can learn something from every experience, she explained. Clara’s journey brought her from a financially secure career in technology to the world of small business ownership. She plans to open a Latin-American restaurant, La Patria Café, at 115 Green St. in the Hawley-Green Historical District later this summer or early fall. Though Clara moved to Syracuse in 2012, the New York City transplant didn’t truly get to know the city for a few years. Running global partner services for a technology company, she was working from home or traveling most days. So, she was slightly reluctant to embrace her new hometown, and not quite sure what to embrace, she remembered. As time went on, passion for her job began to wane. “I found myself in this place of having almost an existentialist crisis in some form or fashion,” Clara said. She began wondering what her purpose was. As a single mother, her daughter had been Clara’s driving force and motivation behind her hard work in the technology field. Each time a potential promotion came up, she faced fear; but she had a daughter to provide for, Clara explained. “As females, it’s very easy for us to find our purpose in our families, in our children,” she said. “We sometimes forget that we have a life to live for ourselves.” She found herself wondering what she wanted to be when she “grew up,” Clara joked. She felt she needed to reconnect with herself.

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In the midst of this existential quandary, she applied for Syracuse University’s online MBA program. Furthering her education might help her technology career, she thought. It might awaken a renewed spirit and purpose. The process was difficult. She had to juggle competing priorities of family, work and online coursework. Not wanting to disappoint herself or anyone around her, she didn’t give up. All the while, a dream was simmering on the back burner. The idea of running a restaurant had been on Clara’s mind for a long time. She’d enjoyed working in restaurants in New York City. As she climbed the corporate ladder in technology, though, it never grew to be anything more than a dream. It was a pleasant thought — she’d always loved entertaining — but she didn’t think of it as more than a hobby. “But, then, as it started to continually creep up, all of the sudden, it was at the forefront of my mind,” she said. “And I was like, ‘Oh, this is what I want to do.’” The prospect of leaving her comfortable and reliable career in technology terrified her, though. Before long, Clara found herself browsing potential properties online. She found a few options, but then one jumped out: 115 Green St. in Syracuse, across from Laci’s Tapas Bar. It belonged to Laci’s owners, Laura Serway and Cindy Seymour. As a customer at Laci’s, Clara was familiar with the local business owners, but didn’t know them well. The location intrigued Clara, so she made an appointment to see the space. She invited her boyfriend — now fiancé — to come along. After seeing the space, she asked for his feedback.

He admitted he didn’t see anything positive about the space. While Clara wasn’t completely sold on it yet — “the fear was still there,” she remembered — his response crushed her. The next day, Clara knew she needed some alone time to clear her mind. She got in the car and started driving. She had no particular destination in mind, but found herself back in the Hawley-Green District at Laci’s, asking if Laura or Cindy was available. Laura came down and recognized Clara as a past customer. “What transpired next, I would have never, ever imagined happening,” Clara said. “She brought me across the street. We sat out in the back. I told her what my concept was, and she said, ‘I love it.’” Laura told her to think about funding and make an offer. Then she added, “I will tell you right now that you have to have skin in the game.” “Well, in my opinion, there’s no other way to do anything than to have skin in the game,” Clara replied. “We’ll mentor you,” Laura said. “Whatever you need.” Laura and Cindy have stayed true to their word, helping Clara with everything from reviewing her business plan to making neighborhood introductions and connections to advising on financials. Once she worked out the financing, Clara made an offer and closed on the property in late October. Since then, it’s been “a hell of a rollercoaster ride,” Clara said with a laugh. When deciding on La Patria Café’s concept, she knew she wanted to stay true to her roots. Her family is from the Dominican Republic and Clara was born in the United States. She’s a proud Latina and proud American,

she said. Her first hometown was New York City, and now she’s falling in love with Syracuse. “So, how can I bring all these things together?” she asked herself. Clara immediately decided she wanted to open a Latin-American restaurant, to entertain her fellow Syracusans and introduce them to flavors they might not know yet, “in an environment and ambiance that is casual yet elegant; fun yet social,” she said. She’s planning to use her own recipes. Guests can expect primarily Latin-American and Latin-Caribbean dishes, such as ceviche, Cuban sandwiches and black bean soup. In the process of creating her new business, Clara’s partnered, brainstormed and collaborated with a number of people in the area, including CNY Latino’s Marisol Hernandez and Hugo Acosta, members of the HawleyGreen community, the city of Syracuse and the WISE Women’s Business Center. As she’s waited on approval from the city for various pieces of the project, Clara’s worked on whatever details she can herself, from painting to landscaping to sanding the floor. “As a small business owner, you start to learn what your level of commitment truly is to the business,” she said. “You learn that it is tiring. It’s frustrating. Then, you have to figure out — how do you keep the dream alive while not overtiring yourself to the point where you hate what you’re doing?” She’s learned to switch things up and be flexible, Clara said. For example, she added, she’s had to prioritize competition of certain restaurant spaces over others and arrive at her ideal place in a different way than she’d first anticipated. As she’s gleaned knowledge from her entrepreneurial experiences thus far, Clara’s moved The Food & Wine Edition


closer to determining an opening day, but she’s remaining flexible on the specific date at this point. At the time of publication, she’s anticipating opening La Patria Café in late summer or early fall. The most recent lesson she’s learned is one the world of technology introduced her to: the importance of sense of urgency. “Nobody else is going to have the sense of urgency that you have,” Clara explained. “You have to make it come across in one way or another to get people on board with you, to get what you need in a timely fashion. It’s your concept. It’s your business. It’s your passion.” SWM

= Want to follow Clara’s entrepreneurial journey and get updates about La Patria Café? We’ve got you covered! Follow Syracuse Woman Magazine on social media! Connect with us today at facebook.com/ SyracuseWomanMagazine.

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The Food & Wine Edition


INSPIRE Renee Duffy

RENEE DUFFY

We look for charities that are doing really good work under the radar. So, they might not take government funding. They may have no staff [or] be completely run by volunteers, but they’re making an impact.” — Renee Duffy, Philanthropic Foodies cofounder & CXtec and TERACAI vice president of marketing

July 2018

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Photography by Mary Grace Johnson

PHILANTHROPIC FOODIES COFOUNDER AND CXTEC AND TERACAI VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING

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INSPIRE Renee Duffy

Food for a Cause By Lorna Oppedisano

A

little more than seven years ago, self-proclaimed foodies Renee and Tim Duffy were sitting with local chef Kevin Gentile, pitching him an idea that would eventually become Philanthropic Foodies, the annual event that’s raised more than $270,000 for local nonprofits. “It was a bit of a harebrained idea in the beginning,” Renee said, thinking back to that initial conversation. “Hey, Kevin,” they’d asked, “if we get 20 people, will you come to our house and cook and we’ll donate money to charity?” Kevin agreed. As they started planning, the number of people kept increasing. Before long, they had 100 people interested in attending. “You can’t do it at your house,” Kevin told them. “The logistics that are involved are just crazy.” He challenged them to attract 200 people to the event. Kevin agreed if they hit that magic number, he would close his restaurant on a Sunday and donate the space to the charity event. The couple worked with fellow executive committee member Paula Miller to achieve the goal. “So, he pushed us,” Renee said. “It was just kind of a crazy idea and we were like, ‘OK, let’s do it.’” That year, they raised $27,000 for Samaritan Center and Friends of Dorothy House. The funds donated to Friends of Dorothy House essentially provided the nonprofit with half of 2012’s operating budget. Renee became familiar with the Central New York area when she moved from New Hartford to study communication design at Syracuse University. She met her husband and decided to stay. About six months after graduating, she took a job at CXtec in graphic design. With the exception of a few years working for The Eventful Group, Renee’s spent the majority of her career with CXtec. She’s currently the vice president of marketing at CXtec and TERACAI. It’s thanks to her time at CXtec that Renee is so invested in the local nonprofit community. One of the company’s core values is commitment to the community, she explained. That commitment also guided Renee to Leadership Greater Syracuse. “Those things really spurred my passion for giving back to the community,” she said. Working various positions at CXtec gave Renee an appreciation for everything it takes to get a job done, she said. Those few years away from the company also

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instilled in her new knowledge, too. “Leaving is not always a bad thing, I’ve learned,” she said, explaining that her time in events production taught her about relationship building, networking, meeting the right people and making connections on a different scale. “I wouldn’t have been prepared for the job I’m doing now without having that experience.” It was during her time with Eventful that Philanthropic Foodies was born. During that first “harebrained” year, the cofounders established a committee, something that’s been invaluable over the years as the event has grown and evolved. They’ve also maintained the partnership with Friends of Dorothy House each year. “They’re huge supporters,” Renee said. “As much as we are supporting them, they are supporting us and networking and getting it out in the community.” Along with Friends of Dorothy House, Philanthropic Foodies has benefited six other area nonprofits over the years: The Samaritan Center, On Point for College, CancerConnects, Signature Music, The First Tee Syracuse and GiGi’s Playhouse. “We look for charities that are doing really good work under the radar,” Renee said. “So, they might not take government funding. They may have no staff [or] be completely run by volunteers, but they’re making an impact.” The Philanthropic Foodies organizers hope to not only raise funds for their nonprofit partners, but also raise awareness. In its inaugural year, Kevin Gentile recruited two local chefs to participate: Eva’s European Sweets’ Eva Zaczynski and Scotch ‘n Sirloin chef Yann Guigne, formerly of L’Adour. Since the beginning, the committee has had no trouble attracting and retaining chefs willing to be involved each year. With new restaurants and culinary endeavors opening in the area quite frequently, Renee hopes the event will help show Central New Yorkers — selfproclaimed foodies and novices alike — the myriad of options the region has to offer. “It’s Syracuse, N.Y., and that may not scream ‘food destination,’” she said, “but the chefs are really great and they’re doing creative things.”

The Food & Wine Edition


eat. drink. give back. Philanthropic Foodies' Impact throughout the Years

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

$27,000

$35,000

$46,000

$59,000

$50,000

$51,000

Attendees: 150 Amount Raised: Beneficiaries: Samaritan Center & Friends of Dorothy House

July 2018

Attendees: 230 Amount Raised: Beneficiaries: Friends of Dorothy House & On Point for College

Attendees: 240 Amount Raised: Beneficiaries: Friends of Dorothy House, Signature Music & CancerConnects

Attendees: 250 Amount Raised: Beneficiaries: Friends of Dorothy House, Stupid Dumb Breast Cancer (a fund of CancerConnects) & The First Tee of Syracuse

Attendees: 230 Amount Raised: Beneficiaries: Friends of Dorothy House, CancerConnects, First Tee of Syracuse, The Samaritan Center, On Point for College & Signature Music

Attendees: 260 Amount Raised: Beneficiaries: Friends of Dorothy House & GiGi's Playhouse Syracuse

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UPCOMING SWM Events Tuesdays, July 3 through 31 Downtown Farmers Market When: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. What: Outdoor market includes more than 50 farmers and produce dealers selling fresh, seasonal vegetables, fruits, nuts, eggs, cheeses, baked goods, flowers, plants, handcrafted items and more Cost: Free admission. Where: Clinton Square, downtown Syracuse. Info: downtownsyracuse.com/farmersmarket.

Saturday, July 14 Corey A. Hill Celebration of Life When: 1 to 6 p.m. What: All proceeds benefit Corey A. Hill Memorial Scholarship & Foundation. Cost: $20. Where: Benjamin’s on Franklin, 314 S. Franklin St., Syracuse. Info: coreyhill.org.

Wednesday, July 4 1 Million Cups When: Doors open, 8:30 a.m.; presentation, 9 to 10 a.m. What: Presentations by local early-stage startup companies aim to draw feedback from peers, mentors, educators and advisors. Open to the public. Cost: Free admission. Where: Syracuse CoWorks, 201 E. Jefferson St., Syracuse. Info: 1millioncups.com/syracuse.

Saturday, July 14 Empire Brewfest & Winefest When: 2 to 8 p.m. What: Includes sample craft beer and wine, music, food and more. Cost: In advance, $36; at the door, $46. Where: NYS Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Boulevard, Syracuse. Info: empirebrewfest.com.

Saturdays, July 7 & 14 Nia classes When: 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. What: Class to learn healing and stress reduction. Where: 6181 Thompson Road, E. Syracuse. Info: lifeforcesantuary.com. Sunday, July 8 Tour de Clear Path When: 50-mile ride, 8 a.m.; 25-mile ride, 8:30 a.m.; Fun Ride, 9 a.m. What: Community ride featuring three distance options: 50 miles, 25 miles and Fun Ride. Benefits Clear Path for Veterans. Cost: $65; day of, $75; ages 10 and younger, $10. Where: Clear Path For Veterans, 1223 Salt Springs Road, Chittenango. Info: clearpath4vets.com/TourDeClearPath2018. Monday, July 9 Childbirth Integrated Methods When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. What: Class provides overview of integrating care such as prenatal yoga, chiropractic care, acupuncture, massage and more. Cost: Free; registration recommended. Where: CNY Healing Arts, 195 Intrepid Lane, Syracuse. Info: CNY Doula Connection, (607) 483-8284. Thursday, July 12 through Sunday, July 15 St. Elias Middle Eastern Festival When: 4 to 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday; noon to 10 p.m. Saturday; noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. What: Includes Arabic food made from scratch, live Arabic music, dance performances and more. Cost: Free parking and admission. Where: Saint Elias Antiochian Orthodox Church, 4988 Onondaga Road, Syracuse Info: syracusemideastfest.com. Friday, July 13 ALZTogether: Berry Picking at Critz Farms When: 10 a.m. to noon. What: Presented by Alzheimer’s Association. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia must be accompanied by caregiver(s). Caregivers welcome to attend individually. Cost: Free admission. Where: Critz Farms, 3232 Rippleton Road, Cazenovia. Info: alz.org/centralnewyork. 48

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Tuesday, July 17 Chef Challenge Syracuse When: 6 to 9 p.m. What: A population-up, four-course mystery meal created by the SKY Armory teasing a mystery box of pastured meat and organic produce from Grindstone Farm. Cost: $15. Where: SKY Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. Info: officialchefchallenge.com. Wednesday, July 18 2018 Successful Business Women Event When: 8 to 10:30 a.m. What: Third annual event includes breakfast, inspirational speakers, exhibitors, networking, giveaways, distinguished program and more. Look online for honoree list. Cost: $35. Where: Embassy Suites by Hilton, 311 Hiawatha Blvd. W., Syracuse. Info: cnybj.com/2018-successful-business-women. Wednesday, July 18 100 Women Who Care When: Doors, 5:30 p.m.; program, 6 p.m. What: Members vote for which of three local nonprofit organizations should receive donations. Cost: heck online for membership details. Where: Drumlins, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse. Info: 100womencny.com. Thursday, July 19 Tech Meets Taste When: 5 to 7 p.m. What: Annual networking event includes opportunities to learn about local businesses, sample local food and more. Live music provided by KMase Productions. Cost: Members, $10; nonmembers, $20. Where: The Tech Garden patio, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: centerstateceo.com.

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Fridays and Saturdays, July 20 though Aug. 4; Sunday, Aug. 5 Syracuse Summer Theatre at the OnCenter Presents Pippin When: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sunday. What: Syracuse Summer Theatre’s production of the Tony award-winning Broadway play. Contains adult themes; parental guidance suggested. Cost: $30. Where: Bevard Studio, 590 S. State St., Syracuse. Info: syracusesummertheatre.com. Saturday, July 21 Pig & Swig on the Canal When: 3 to 7 p.m. What: Sample craft beers from around the state. Entry includes sampling class and entertainment. Food available for purchase. Cost: $30; designated driver, $5. Where: Chittenango Landing Canal Boat Museum, 717 Lakeport Road, Chittenango. Info: chittenangolanding.com. Sunday, July 22 Remembrance 5K Run/3K Walk For HOPE When: Registration, 7:30 a.m.; race starts, 8:45 a.m.; walk starts, 9:30 a.m. What: Benefits Hope for Bereaved. Early packet pickup slated for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 21 at Fleet Feet, 5800 Bridge St., East Syracuse. Cost: Through July 6, $25; July 7 through July 21, $35; day of, $40. Where: Long Branch Park, Liverpool. Info: hopeforbereaved.com/events/remembrance-5k-run-3k-walk-hope. Wednesday, July 25 John Cleese Live On Stage When: 7:30 p.m. What: Live evening of conversation and audience question and answer. Cost: $41 to $61. Where: OnCenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. Info: johncleeselive.com. Friday, July 27, through Sunday, July 29 AmeriCU Syracuse Arts & Crafts Festival When: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. What: Includes artist, craftspeople, entertainers, live music, multi-cultural performances, activities and more. Cost: Free admission. Where: Columbus Circle, downtown Syracuse. Info: downtownsyracuse.com/syracuse-arts-and-crafts-festival. Friday, July 27, through Sunday, July 29 Arts Week at The Everson When: Noon to 3 p.m. each day. What: Includes art marking, artist and cooking demonstrations, dance performances and more. Cost: Outdoor activities, free; museum admission applies. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org/connect/events/arts-week-everson. July 2018

Sunday, July 29 Philanthropic Foodies: 7th Annual Culinary Showcase When: 4 to 8 p.m. What: Event includes live entertainment, variety of unique chef-created pairing stations, local food and beverage experts, beverage tastings, wine toss, live and silent auctions and more. Proceeds benefit Friends of Dorothy House and the Shamrock Animal Fund. Cost: $100; $125 at the door. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. Info: philanthropicfoodies.org. Sunday, July 29 Polo for Preemies When: 1 p.m. What: Includes activities, raffles, food, drinks and polo match at 3 p.m. Cost: General admission, $10, cash only; patron ticket, $100; ages 11 and younger, free. Info: crouse.org. Sunday, July 29 Donuts with Dinos When: 8:30 to 10 a.m. What: Includes donuts, coffee, juice, games, early access to the zoo and more. Cost: Members, $12.95; nonmembers, $17.95; ages 2 and younger, free. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events. Thursday, Aug. 2 CenterState CEO Clambake When: 4 to 8 p.m. What: Includes food, music and more. Cost: Through July 26: member, $70; nonmember, $80. After July 26, members, $75; nonmembers, $85. Check online for group pricing. Where: Hinerwadel's Grove, 5300 W. Taft Road, North Syracuse. Info: centerstateceo.com. Friday, Aug. 3 Brew at the Zoo & Dinos Too! When: 5:30 to 8 p.m. What: Friends of the Rosamond Gifford Zoo annual fundraiser includes regional and craft beer and wines, food, music, zoo exhibits and more. Cost: Before July 20, $55; group tickets (six or more) before July 20, $50; VIP, $95; after July 20, $65. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/brew-at-the-zoo. Thursday, Aug. 9 C&S Presents: Savoring Science When: Cocktails and auction at the MOST, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; seated dinner, wine and dessert at Citronelle, 7:30 p.m. What: Seventeenth annual fundraiser benefits the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology. Cost: Check online for pricing. Where: The MOST, 500 S. Franklin St., and Citronelle, Walton St., Syracuse. Info: most.org. SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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movers AND Shakers Women of the University Community presents scholarships The members of the Women of the University Community hosted a luncheon at the Genesee Grande Hotel on Saturday, April 14, to celebrate the organization’s 90th anniversary. They awarded scholarships to six young women, the recipients of the 2018-19 Mildred Eggers, Ruth Tolley and Beverly Whaley scholarships. The Mildred Eggers Award was presented to University College senior Lea Wolven, Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics sophomore Vadra Skinkle and University College junior Carrie Delvecchio. The Ruth Tolley Award was presented by Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics sophomore Christine Kudrewicz and junior Holly Terpstra. The Beverly Whaley Award was presented to SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry senior Sarah Calzada. For more information, visit wuc.syr.edu.

CNYWBA holds annual meeting and awards event On April 12, the Central New York Women’s Bar Association held its annual meeting and awarded its second annual Karen DeCrow Award. The award honors a member of the judiciary or legal profession who works to advance the principles Karen promoted throughout her life – justice, feminism and social equality for all races, creeds, ethnicities and sexual orientations. This year’s recipient was Janet Izzo, founder of Izzo Law Office. Janet is also involved with a number of local organizations, including Vera House, the Say Yes Pro Bono Clinic, the American Association for Justice, the New York State Academy of Trial Lawyers, the Onondaga County Bar Association, the Onondaga County Bar Foundation and the Women’s Bar Association of the State of New York.

hospital in the region equipped with two hybrid operating room suites, allowing the stroke team to provide the most advanced endovascular stroke rescue capabilities.

ABC Creative Group makes new hires As ABC Creative Group adds new media strategist Jane Brown to the team, former strategist Will Landry will transition to the role of Account Executive. Jane Brown, a recent graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology, will step in as ABC’s new media strategist. Jane brings a bachelor’s degree in new media marketing and a double minor in advertising and public relations, and international business to ABC Creative Group. Jane has become well-versed in all aspects of media through various internships.

Bryant & Stratton program accredited The physical therapist assistant program at Bryant & Stratton College’s Syracuse campus was recently accredited. The Commission on Accreditation on Physical Therapy Education granted the college accreditation for a period of five years. Graduates of accredited programs are eligible to sit for the national certification exam, making them eligible for licensure to practice. For more information or to enroll at Bryant & Stratton College, visit bryantstratton.edu or call (315) 472-6603.

Empower Federal Credit Union awards scholarships Empower Federal Credit Union awarded $10,000 in college scholarships to 10 high school seniors to help finance their college education. The students were chosen based on outstanding academic and extracurricular achievements. The students who received the awards were: Madison LaPoint, Clayton Markham, Mikeyla Bird, Grace Getman, Emma Bryant, Jenna Wike, Julie Silverman, Katherine Graziano, Tyler Young and Oliva Bird.

Crouse Health earns national designation Crouse Health received certification from DNV GL - Healthcare as a Comprehensive Stroke Center, reflecting the highest level of regional experience for the treatment of serious stroke events. The certification is based on quality standards established by the federal Brain Attack Coalition and American Stroke Association. With this latest designation, Crouse becomes one of 10 hospitals in the state to have earned certification. Crouse has been a New York State-designated Primary Stroke Center since 2007. Crouse is the only 50

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