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September C O N T E N T S

Letter from the Editor.............................................................. 6

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Past SWM Events...................................................................... 7 Fashion Forward: Get a “Legging Up” on Fall.................... 8

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Platter Chatter: Eleven Waters............................................. 10 WISE Woman: Kathyn Adams............................................. 15 CNY Latina: Tere Paniagua .................................................. 16 For a Good Cause: Ms. Orange Fan Luncheon ............... 18

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Cover Story: Jess Novak....................................................... 25 Special Feature: Women in Music....................................... 29

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New in the ‘Cuse: Élan Hair Artistry ................................... 32 Inspire: Susan Fix................................................................... 34 Inspire: Kyle Robertson......................................................... 36

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Inspire: Jessica Posner.......................................................... 40 Upcoming Events.................................................................. 44

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LETTER from the Editor

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hen I was in high school, no weekend was complete without a local ska show. My friends and I would pile into my parents’ car — shout out to them both for their bottomless, saint-like patience — and head to the show. Most nights that meant the Westcott Community Center, A.K.A. “The Westcott.” Then it was a few hours of the most humid, least airconditioned room I have ever encountered, packed with adolescent “ska kids.” I could go on for pages about the history of ska and its significance and sound, but I’ll keep the description short and sweet. Imagine if pop punk and reggae had a baby; that’s ska. I don’t think I’d be the same without those sweat-drenched nights. The ska scene was my first encounter with a local music community in Syracuse. Sure, I’d been to concerts before; but that always meant get in the car, drive an hour or two, see a nationally-touring band, maybe get an autographed ticket stub and head home. At our shows, there was no barrier between the band and the sea of kids jumping to the beat. If someone tripped while dancing — which is fondly known amongst ska lovers as “skanking,” by the way — about seven hands reached down to make sure the kid was back up and at it before the singer got the next word out. Now, a decade later, I’m still friends with the bassist from my old favorite ska band, Razbari Sumthing. It felt like a tight-knit community, but welcomed anyone interested in testing the musical waters. While I don’t attend ska shows anymore, I do think those same values hold true for any local music or art scene. And I think these communities are an integral part of Syracuse. In the past, this issue has been devoted to our city’s fashion scene. This year, we’ve decided to expand the conversation to include music and art. It’s my belief that these three sectors work hand-in-hand to support and nurture Syracuse’s culture. Our cover woman this month is local musician and writer Jess Novak. Jess always knew she was destined for the music industry, and shared with us the story of her path there. Being an accomplished journalist as well, Jess lent her writing chops to a discussion of what it means to be a female artist in Syracuse. Fashion and art intertwine with this month’s New in the ‘Cuse, Élan Hair Artistry, as owners and friends Tracy Hemingway and Jennifer Lavoy Wadsworth give us a look into their new entrepreneurial venture. We explore a couple aspects of fashion this edition with two of our Inspires, designer Susan Fix and model Kyle Robertson. Both women talk about what it’s like to be a part of the local fashion scene and involved in Syracuse Fashion Week. This month’s third Inspire features local artist, musician and professor Jessica Posner. Jessica discusses using art to tackle feminist issues and make the world a better place. To celebrate this month of Style, we invite you to join us at House of S. Jaye on Sunday, Sept. 11 from 6 to 9 p.m. for live music from some of the area’s best female musicians, as well as local art and more.

Stay stylish!

Lorna On our cover: Cover woman Jess Novak was photographed by Alice G. Patterson of Alice G. Patterson Photography at Alice’s Baldwinsville studio. Special thanks to Jillain Pastella Salomone, owner of J.Luxe Salon, for makeup and hair styling.

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OUR TEAM Publisher

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Editor

Samantha Colton Alison Grimes Kailyn Jennings Jess Novak Lorna Oppedisano Gabrielle Reagan Ann Marie Stonecypher Lindsay Wickham

David Tyler

Lorna Oppedisano

Design

Andrea Reeves

Photography John Carnessali Alexis Emm Sara Felice Peter Levin Photography Steven J. Pallone Alice G. Patterson Lindsay Wickham

Advertising sales

Linda Jabbour Renee Moonan 315.657.0849 315.657.7690

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Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month. The publication is available free of charge.

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PAST SWM Events

The fifth annual Philanthropic Foodies event was hosted by SKY Armory on Sunday, July 31. More than $50,000 was raised for five local nonprofits: Friends of Dorothy House, CancerConnects, Inc., The First Tee Syracuse, On Point For College and Samaritan Center. Photography by John Carnessali of Syracuse and CNY Professional Portrait and Wedding Photography Studio.

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FASHION FORWARD Get a “Legging Up” on Fall

The Rules of Fall Fashion By Ann Marie Stonecypher

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Photography by Peter Levin Photography

love my leggings. For us ’80s and ’90s gals, it’s like someone gave us back our stirrup pants, without the stirrups. Comfortable and easy to wear. Or are they? As with certain other articles of clothing, they have their own set of controversy and rules. In the case of leggings, breaking the first rule can give us an almost intimate knowledge of someone with whom this level of familiarity was never supposed to occur — you know what I am talking about here. So let’s get right to rule No.1: Leggings are not, have never been and will never be pants. Here is the easiest way to remember: leggings are designed to show your legs, not the parts that Victoria wanted kept secret. That’s really the only rule; the rest are just fun fashion guidelines.

It’s a shoe-in

Once you have rule No. 1 committed to memory, you can learn easy ways to rock your leggings. They look great with boots, flats, booties and chunky heels. They look the least current with a rounded toe pump. I liken that particular mix of business and casual to the mullet. If you really want to wear your leggings with a pump, a sharp, pointed pump is your ticket to making this chic, not shabby. One of the reasons everyone loves their leggings is the comfort paired with the multitude of options on top. A lot of it depends on your taste, size and comfort level; but it’s a myth that you need to wear an obnoxiously large top with leggings. Try wearing your leggings with more streamlined clothing, as we have done on our models. Terilyn is wearing her leggings with a long black sweater and a striped shirt to create a long, slimming effect. We kept her high boots black as well, giving her a monochromatic, lean look. Noelle is wearing a slim, sleeveless sweater. We chose a contrasting bootie for her feet — instead of the easy black choice — to add a little interest. This shoe choice also ties in with the beads in her necklace. Our petite model Jessica is wearing hers with a floral dress and short jacket, finished with a stylized military boot. The styles are different, but none make the models look like they’re wearing a tent. You can also wear a classic mens’ style shirt with feminine accessories, a sweater and scarf. There are many options, as long as you remember Rule No. 1! Shake up your legging-look by trying them in different fabrics and textures. Leather or faux leather is a huge trend; it even made Martha Stewart look pretty chic.

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Ribbed versions are also nice options, and they even make fleecelined leggings for added warmth. Genius! But take note: if your leggings have lost their color and snap from over-washing, ditch ’em. Like any other article of clothing, if it looks worn, let it go.

The bottom line

Leggings have emerged and re-emerged as one of the most versatile and comfortable articles of clothing, and I don’t see them going anywhere. When it comes to wearing leggings, my bottom line this time is that you keep a close eye on your bottom line and — most importantly — keep it covered. SWM

Ann Marie Stonecypher is an award-winning business woman and the owner of AMS Models & Talent. She is also a stylist, inspirational speaker, two-time breast cancer survivor and freelance writer. She lives in the Syracuse area with her children Taylor and Steven, and her dog Cocoa. If you have any style questions or comments, email Ann Marie at info@amsmodels.com. Photography courtesy of Peter Levin Photography. Clothing courtesy of Lord and Taylor Destiny Mall. Thank you to Greenwood Winery for the beautiful location! Models Jessica Joyce, Noelle White and Terilyn Maxwell courtesy of AMS Models & Talent. Styling by Ann Marie Stonecypher.

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PLATTER CHATTER Eleven Waters

Eleven Waters

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

We are going to turn the lights back on here, and then the lights will start going on in this whole neighborhood. It can be the heart of Syracuse once again. We are ready to lead the way.”—Daniel Burchill, Eleven Waters food and beverage manager

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ELEVEN WATERS

Turning on the lights By Gabrielle Reagan

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n the corner of South Warren and Onondaga, a local construction crew tasked with demolition of the $70 million historic Hotel Syracuse renovation began blasting cement walls. Suddenly a shine caught their eyes: a tiny metal faucet with two star-shaped fixtures optioning hot and cold. The team worked quickly, uncovering former barber stations, cabinetry and reception area, complete with a once-operating paging system and a thick layer of dust blanketing the original barber shop floor below. Come September, guests of the newly named Marriot Syracuse Downtown will have an opportunity to experience the hotel’s historic barbershop in all its original glory. But there is a twist. Purchase the Buzz Cut and you get handmade Bee Vodka, fresh lemon and honey-lavender syrup, served straight up with, as promised, a twist. This ground floor barbershop bar — with a menu featuring New York spirits, Finger Lakes wine on tap and cocktails playfully themed to a bygone era — leads guests directly into a new locallyinspired bistro: Eleven Waters. “You don’t always have to go north for your dining and nightlife needs,” said Chuck Anthony, Director of Food and Beverage for Eleven Waters. “It’s important for us to be a catalyst for that.” Set to open in early September, the restaurant’s menu will offer a variety of locally-sourced and locally-inspired dishes like the Regional Market Salad, made with greens from Main Street Farms in Homer, and the Lamoreaux Merlot Braised Short Ribs, featuring local Finger Lakes winery Lamoreaux Landing. Even the Syracuse Salt Potatoes consist of local potatoes, butter, rosemary and salt from Syracuse Salt Company. Meals will be served on Syracuse China, a nod to Hotel Syracuse’s tradition of featuring the famous brand. In addition to its cheeky craft cocktails, Eleven Waters plans to offer local craft beer from Empire Brewing Company, Ithaca Beer Co. and Middle Ages Brewing Company.

Hometown pride is at the heart of the restoration project spearheaded by primary owner and lead developer, Ed Riley. Placing restaurants at street level to encourage foot traffic and foster a community atmosphere is just one of many goals for Ed and his team. Eleven Waters bistro, bringing food inspired entirely by New York to the area, is the first step to achieving that dream. “It’s about community spirit,” Chuck said. “It is just another perspective, another part of the renovation.” Opening its doors in August 1924, Hotel Syracuse was once a community-owned entity; folks living in the area could actually buy and sell stock in the hotel. But it fell on hard times. Technically closing in 2004, 90 percent of the hotel’s doors had been locked in the late ’80s. The once grandiose hotel had once handed room keys to the likes of John F. Kennedy, Elvis Presley and John Lennon. It was slowly being reduced to a mere catering house in a flailing neighborhood. “Good things come from hard places, right?” suggested Syracuse native Daniel Burchill, food and beverage manager for Eleven Waters. “We are going to turn the lights back on here, and then the lights will start going on in this whole neighborhood. It can be the heart of Syracuse once again. We are ready to lead the way.” The team hopes to be the catalyst for change, Chuck explained. “The whole idea is to activate the streets and get people comfortable walking around this block again,” he said. SWM

Eleven Waters is located on the ground floor of the Marriot Syracuse Downtown at 100 E. Onondaga St. and is slated to open Sept. 1. For more information on the bistro, bar or hotel events and accommodations please call 474-2424 or visit marriottsyracusedowntown.com.

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WISE WOMAN Kathryn Adams

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CNY LATINA Tere Paniagua

Point of Cultural Contact By Alison Grimes

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I feel a sense of responsibility to my community and I can imagine no greater reward than when I hear student testimonials.”—Tere Paniagua

Photography courtesy Tere Paniagua

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or some people, the month-long span between Sept. 15 and Oct. 15 is just a handful of weeks when the leaves start to turn. For Tere Paniagua — executive director of Syracuse University’s Office of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community — it’s much more than that. It’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, when the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States are recognized. Heritage and cultural ties are celebrated. Throughout the month, generations of families and friends share their experiences and traditions. Upon graduating from Syracuse University’s telecommunications program in 1982, Tere began a 25-year career in journalism and public relations, building her life and portfolio in New York City, Puerto Rico and Los Angeles. “I’ve always gravitated to the arts and to showcasing culture,” Tere remembered with a smile. Journalism offered Tere the creative opportunity to share her passion with others, but it lacked stability, she explained. “My three children were with my mother in Puerto Rico,” she reminisced, “and I wanted to have them with me to create that sense of family.” In 2002, she was presented an opportunity at her alma mater, and returned to Syracuse University to teach as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Language, Literature and Linguistics. As soon as she was acclimated, she didn’t hesitate to get involved with the campus and community. She assisted Silvio TorresSaillant, the director of Latino and Latin American studies at the time, in creating and launching editorial projects. Being as involved as she could didn’t stop Tere from creating a sense of family for her children. She taught them at a young age that community matters, bringing them to the university and community events. Around the same time that Tere connected with Silvio, her old professor Pedro Cuperman introduced her to the Point of Contact gallery in downtown Syracuse. “When I first heard that Pedro Cuperman was still around, I couldn’t believe it,” Tere said. “He was truly a gifted mind. [He was a] maestro [and] scholar. You cannot help but feel inspired by him, his work and his vision.” Although Pedro has since passed away, Tere fondly remembers him as “one of those professors that even when the years go by, you never forget,” she said. There’s no doubt that he made an impact on his students’ lives, in the classroom and through his work with the gallery. The Point of Contact — also known as Punto de Contacto — gallery began as an editorial project, and has since spawned into a 40-plus-year-old gallery dedicated to showcasing the work of Latin American and international artists. In her role as director of the Office of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community, Tere manages the gallery, along with La Casita Cultural Center,

a home that celebrates Latino and Hispanic culture between students and the local community. Tere’s job also includes working with hundreds of Syracuse University students and employees. Today, Tere proudly looks back on her career with enthusiasm and excitement for the future. She’s melding home and work-life as her children Sebastian and Sofia help to build and contribute to one of La Casita Cultural Center’s most successful displays, El Balcón Criollo. Each year, Tere and her team work tirelessly to set up this display. It stays up throughout National Hispanic Heritage Month. In the piece, Tere celebrates not only her work, but her own family’s Latino heritage of Puerto Rican descent, as well as that of many friends and beloved community members. Now celebrating six years with La Casita Cultural Center and more than 10 years with Point of Contact, Tere shares: “I feel a sense of responsibility to my community and I can imagine no greater reward than when I hear student testimonials, even from international students. They tell me they feel right at home.” SWM This article was provided by the CNY Latino newspaper, the only Hispanicoriented publication in Central New York. The Spanish version of this article can be read in the September edition of CNY Latino, in both the traditional paper version and the digital format at cnylatinonewspaper.com.

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FOR A GOOD CAUSE Ms. Orange Fan Luncheon

Making Orange Dreams Come True By Samantha Colton

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ake-A-Wish Central New York strives to make dreams come true. Twenty-five years ago, Syracuse University Men’s Basketball Coach Jim Boeheim had a dream of his own: for his team to help the organization in their mission. Together, they created the Ms. Orange Fan Luncheon. Now celebrating a quarter-century of partnership, this year’s luncheon is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 23 at the Oncenter. The luncheon is a ladies-only event that provides attendees the opportunity to dine with the team players, coaches, cheerleaders and the Sour Sitrus Society, the university’s student-run pep band. Selling out almost every year, the event benefits children in the Central New York area living with life-threatening conditions. “It is a great event that is welcoming to all women in the community,” event chair Wanda Michalski said, adding that last year’s luncheon drew more than 600 women and raised more than $100,000 for the foundation. The Ms. Orange Fan Luncheon is slated to feature a silent and live auction, appearances by Otto the Orange and photo opportunities with the team and cheerleaders. Tickets are $70 per person. Doors are scheduled to open at 10 a.m., with pre-event tailgating starting at 9 a.m. in the Oncenter parking garage. SWM

For more information, call 475-9474 or e-mail dsimon@makeawishcny.org. Photos provided by Make-A-Wish Central New York.

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COVER STORY Jess Novak

JESS NOVAK

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

SINGER/SONGWRITER, MULTI-INSTRUMENTALIST AND MUSIC JOURNALIST

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COVER STORY Jess Novak

The Search for a Sound By Lorna Oppedisano

“I

’m about to hit this stage at #LaidBack with @DevonAllman. @JasonIsbell just crushed and @OfficialGreggAllman is next. #MindBlown #Rock #Allman #OhMyGod”

She eventually realized what the problem was: ranking. Few children want to perform for the sake of always trying to be first chair and potentially being told they’re not good enough, she explained. But then her older brother — one of her top musical influences — started to play bass. An entirely new world opened up to Jess. “And that’s when it was like, this makes sense,” she said emphatically.

There aren’t too many local musicians who could post a photo overlooking thousands of people from the Nikon at Jones Beach Theater accompanied by those words. Jess Novak might be the only one. “My life has this way of taking crazy, dark, fast turns,” the singer/ songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and music journalist said, telling When it came time for college, Jess picked public relations and the story of meeting Devon Allman — son of the legendary Gregg music industry. Studying music professionally might have been an Allman — a couple years ago when he played with the Royal Southern Brotherhood in Syracuse. The evening ended with Devon option, but the idea of the pressure and stress of juries and being in multiple school bands wasn’t for her. and Jess jamming to the Allman Brothers Band’s “Melissa” — “Because I knew I loved it, but not like that,” she said. “So it was Devon on guitar, Jess on violin — in Jess’ living room. just this whole life of trying to figure out, ‘What was my music?’” Then, a few months ago, out of the blue, Devon texted Jess. Once she got immersed in undergrad, she reached a familiar She was on vacation with family in New Jersey, and after a bit of conclusion: her current path wasn’t exactly what she wanted. chatting, they realized that his band was playing later that day She was involved in radio, which she soon found to be a mean about an hour away from where she was. business. In regards to the public relations work, she didn’t like the “And I said jokingly, ‘You want a fiddle player? I know a girl.’ idea of “spinning stories” for the rest of her life, she said. And he was like, ‘Yeah. Yeah, come down.’ And I was like, ‘Oh my Around that time, her brother started god,’” Jess said, still in awe of the exchange. writing editorials, once again illuminating “So I got ready and went down. And after Jess’ options. Writing skills ran in the I played, he was like, ‘Dude, you went So it was just this whole life family, Jess explained; along with being a from good to freak. So… you want to visual artist, her mother was an English play with us tomorrow at Jones Beach of trying to figure out, ‘What teacher, and her brother is still a writer now. opening for my dad?’” was my music?’” — Jess Novak, “So I started writing about the music. Needless to say, true to character, And then once that got rolling and I got she answered yes. singer/songwriter, multimore involved in it all, meeting all these “I can’t say what’s going to happen, but instrumentalist and music people, it was like this,” she said, “this is there’s potential obviously,” Jess said when journalist exciting to me. This is what I want to do.” we talked the following week. “That was She followed the passion to graduate really exciting.” school at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, and then to the positions of music editor at the Syracuse New Times and DJ at the radio station The Rebel. Jess comes from a long line of musicians — save her mother All the while, she never stopped playing violin; she never had the Melodie, ironically enough. Jess was destined to enter the music intention of turning the hobby into a professional craft either. industry in one form or another. “So the theme was always music,” she said, “but just not playing When Jess was younger, she planned to “be everything” when because I didn’t think I was ever good enough.” she grew up. She was going to be President. And the youngest first place winner in the Olympics. And in the Air Force. But instead, she started playing violin. Piano would have been her first choice, but since a violin teacher lived five minutes away, During her time as a professional journalist, she met local event that’s where Jess’ musical journey began. She took one-on-one production manager Stacey Waterman, and Stacey learned that lessons, and also played with the teacher’s orchestra, which gave her Jess played violin. the opportunity to perform in Europe when she was 11 years old. In 2012, Stacey was working on organizing an event called the Despite those experiences, even at that young age, Jess knew she Salt City Waltz, a live musical program that aimed to recreate hadn’t found her niche. Martin Scorsese’s “The Last Waltz.” She needed a violinist for the “It was totally insane. I was 11, and going to the Louvre and song “Evangeline” and asked Jess. playing in Paris and London,” she said. “So that had a big effect on “So I said yes,” Jess said. “And I had no idea what I was doing. me, but in such a weird way. I still couldn’t figure it out. What’s my In classical music, you just read it. And there was nothing to be problem? I love all this, but why is it not clicking?” read. You just go up and play.”

A different route into the scene

Little rocker

An enlightening trip

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Photography by Alice G. Patterson August 2016 September 2016

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COVER STORY Jess Novak

The Search for a Sound continued from page 26 The first gig led to an offer to play with local musicians Chuck Dorgan and Mark Nanni, and although at the time, Jess felt like she was just winging it, she agreed to the next show. “My whole life, I just kept saying yes to the crazy things,” she joked. This marked a huge transitional period in her life, Jess said. Around the same time, she quit her jobs at the New Times and The Rebel. That year on her birthday — Jan. 7, 2012 — she took a train across the country to meet up with local band Sophistafunk and road trip back to the east coast with the musicians. That was the spark that ignited the next few years’ journey, Jess remembered. She brought along the guitar that she’d bought years before, and had just recently started playing. Contrary to what the man at the guitar store had said — “You play violin, guitar’ll be easy” — the instrument had alluded Jess for years, she explained. It was just before Salt City Waltz that she had picked it up again, taught herself to play “Waste” by Phish, and then shortly thereafter began to write her own music. Despite her developing guitar chops, Jess only played a few times that trip. “I was too afraid to play for them,” she said. It was more of an enlightening road trip filled with people blazing their own paths in life than a musical experience of her own. However, the trip did inspire Jess to give music more of a chance professionally. “I was like, ‘Why do I think I’m not good enough? Maybe I am good enough. Maybe I should just find out for the hell of it,’” she said.

More than good enough During the next couple of years, she started playing — and eventually singing — in front of crowds, and found out that she is good enough. She started playing with local band Master Thieves in July 2013, and around the same time, began working on her first solo album. Ironically, she still didn’t know how to solo. Sure, she’d been playing music for decades, and had no qualms about performing in front of a crowd, but learning to solo wasn’t part of the classical training regimen. So for a combined Christmas and birthday present, her friend and fellow Master Thief Mark offered her lessons on how to solo. “I think a lot of people never get past that hurdle, because you can’t unless you do it. And getting over being afraid of it, that was the biggest part,” she explained. “I remember the first few times, I was paralyzed because I was like ‘I don’t know how to start. Where do you start?’” It wasn’t the idea of playing in front of people that stopped Jess from soloing. From childhood, she’d been fearless, she explained; she never strived to be the center of attention, but always loved to entertain. There was just a disconnect between the strategy of playing engrained in her and the spontaneity of soloing. During the lessons, Mark broke things down into “what the scale is and what the pentatonic scale is and what works in certain songs,” Jess explained. Once the key was explained to her, she started hearing and understanding the music differently, and figured out how to translate that skill to violin. 28

After a while, Master Thieves evolved into a different creature. A handful of the members had full-time jobs. Jess and Brian Golden had different goals, though; they wanted to play every day and tour the east coast. So in June 2014, the Golden Novak Band formed. Through connections of Syracuse’s World of Beer to the location in Key West, they began to play in Florida. Granted, hundreds of musicians played the location, but the Golden Novak Band stood out. “Every single time, the people were like, ‘That’s the best music we’ve ever had here,’” she reminisced. “Every time. So it was that, and then once that booker started hearing that, she was like, ‘Dude. Anytime.’” Between the shows at World of Beer, Jess booked the band at other locations in the area, and they began to tour there frequently. In 2015, the band released an album, “Rodeo.” In early 2016, they began planning another. It was all happening. But, as the rock ’n’ roll gods would have it, nothing gold can stay.

The Jess Novak Band When the band toured, they would often stay with Brian’s friend Jim Frech, the founder of Nashville-based Mental Case, a touring equipment provider. Eventually, Brian knew he had to take a chance and move to Nashville. “So it just happened. He took it. He went and…” she said with a slight pause, “it sucked. But it’s good, you know? It was natural. And it’s also natural that when you’re with someone that much, it was hard. It was hard living a normal life and having other people in it, when you’re just with one person all the time.” Jess was faced with a challenge, and a learning experience. She needed a new guitarist. She needed that guitarist to learn the band’s roughly 200 songs. She needed to learn to lead a band. “And somehow everything just fell into place,” she said, “like unbelievably — which I think is a sign that it was right. It was all just going along with the plan.” Thanks to a connection at Armory Square’s Ish Guitars, Jess met Anthony Saturno, now guitarist for her new band, The Jess Novak Band. She reached out and reconnected with other local musicians for shows and the band’s upcoming album, slated for release this fall. She’s working with two licensing companies, so the band’s music has the potential to appear in national TV shows. And Jess still connects with her journalistic roots weekly as a freelance writer for the New Times, and occasionally for other publications. Playing at the Louvre at age 11 was quite a feat, but Jess is clearly surpassing it by a long shot. One of the songs on the new album — the live track called “Inches from the Sun” — sums up the rising star. Album artist Robyn Stockdale inspired the tune, Jess said. “[Robyn] said the sweetest thing ever,” Jess said with a smile, and quoted Robyn: “‘You defy gravity. You just overcome things, one after another. You just do it.’” SWM

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SPECIAL FEATURE Women in Music

Rocking Like a Girl By Jess Novak

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I originally started the whole piece with the most prevalent assumption I hear almost every day: “You must be the singer.” That assumes that I can’t possibly actually play an instrument. So when Sue Karlick, the crushing lead guitarist of Amerikan Primitive, mentioned that same comment in her own experiences, I felt both validated and disappointed. We’ve also heard the almost laughably predictable, “You’re pretty good – for a girl,” line more than any human should have to. “Ever since I was a teenager playing lead guitar in rock bands, I have heard this from other musicians, sound engineers, club owners, even people who see me play in the audience,” she said. “It wasn’t just in the rock genre, either. As a classical guitarist performance major in college, I got the same thing from my fellow students and even some of my instructors and professors. I could never understand what my gender had to do with how I play guitar.”

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

wrote this entire piece once. Then I asked some of the area’s most incredible female musicians about their experiences in the industry – and I rewrote the whole thing. Everything I had said, every point I wanted to make; these women were already there. Though we are all so very different, our situations all reflected many of the same experiences — both awful and fantastic. Anyone who knows Amanda Rogers knows she’s an unbelievable songwriter who can weave a tale so flawlessly in her music. If you know her, you also know that she’s a beautiful and petite girl who glows with kindness. So I loved hearing about how she would haul her heavy gear around to prove her “strength, capability, dedication, persistence and endurance.” She would sing louder, drink and eat more than the guys, and challenge them to arm-wrestling and push-up contests; much like I’ve done — my bandmates can attest to this. “To my own delight, their shocked faces and jaws dropped. ‘I can’t believe how strong you are for a girl,’ was a recurring comment I’d hear,” Amanda said. I can’t count how many times I’ve heard that as well.

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SPECIAL FEATURE Women in Music

Rocking Like a Girl continued from page 29

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

Cathy LaManna, a world-class drummer who’s played with some often excluded. I felt that I wasn’t viewed or treated as a young up-and-coming jazz student. Rather, I felt like I was viewed of the best in the area, also faces those questions and assumptions as a potential sexual conquest; a member of the opposite sex; and even gets asked about her husband. an outsider. Even if I wanted to date someone in that circle, I felt “I’m asked if I’m the drummer’s wife when I’m seen carrying in a drum case,” she said. “I still feel that the female drummer thing I wasn’t free to do so. I would have been attacked by the disgusting is like a sideshow offering: ‘Step right up and double standard that so negatively affects see the bearded woman, the alligator-skinned women and praises men and it would man and the female drummer!’” have disrupted my career. When I was in a I felt that I wasn’t viewed or Then I talked to Melissa Gardiner, who I relationship with another jazz musician, treated as a young up-andrelate to in many ways. We’re both soloists as I felt I was always looked at as his girlfriend – coming jazz student. Rather, well as vocalists, multi-instrumentalists, songnot a musician in my own right.” writers and bandleaders. However, she has Similarly, even as I’ve come to front a band I felt like I was viewed as a the unique experience of being a female in called THE JESS NOVAK BAND, I still potential sexual conquest; a jazz, and one who went to Juilliard, one of get the question — “So, who do you date?” the most prestigious music schools in the member of the opposite sex; — as if I couldn’t possibly be part of a band, world. My assumption was that such a school even one named after me, without an outsider.” — Melissa that validation. Why? would be one filled with respect as well. Gardiner, jazz trombonist It’s amazing how powerful sexism can be. Melissa also brought up another point I’ve “I was the only female jazz grad student encountered endlessly. and I didn’t have any female peers who I could relate to,” “I’m sure it translates to anyone in a minority situation, but you Melissa reminisced. “All of my professors were male and I was wonder whether or not certain things happen to you because of

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Photography by Alice G. Patterson

your position as a minority,” she said. “I have asked myself, ‘Wear something a little shorter. Let us see your legs. We want ‘Did I not get that gig because I am female?’ Or, ‘Did I get that something to look up there.’” award because I am female? Do I really deserve this?’” Like several of these women, I also find it funny when people When other people apply those questions toward you, you lose assume my guitar is for show or my fiddle is just a sweet little trick. your validity, Melissa explained. “In contrast, a male jazz musician I can’t help but cringe when people say it’s amazing I can “keep up” with the guys or are blown away when I can trade a solo. And I will never be asking himself those very same questions,” she said. always love throwing my fiddle behind I’ve seen and felt this time and again. my head, just to see a jaw or two drop. Why is our validity at stake when we Men have been putting guitars behind their work just as hard – or harder – than our The first thing a promoter/club heads or playing with their teeth for decades. peers? I’m tired of people telling me that Why can’t I? I only get gigs because I’m “easy on the owner/potential customer asks However, for all the hard work it takes eyes” or because certain venue owners love is ‘What does she look like?’” to be an underdog, some women — myself women, even if they’re awful musically. — Joanne Troy Perry, singer/ I’d like to think I get gigs because my included — have also found the silver lining. band kicks ass and I’d like to think they “I actually felt like being a female singer/ songwriter play with me because they respect me. songwriter was more special,” singer/ And yet, it’s a sad fact that our looks are songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Ashley Cox so often more regarded than we’d prefer to believe. said. “There were a lot of male-fronted bands, but not a lot of girls “The first thing a promoter/club owner/potential customer asks and their guitars or their pianos, so I felt like I was making my own is ‘What does she look like?’” singer/songwriter Joanne Troy Perry little special place. I’ve had some haters out there, but it only made has found. “I know this from experience and I’ve been told, me work harder.” Joanna Jewett, a powerhouse singer who has run “Respect: CNY Celebrates Women in Music,” also found that there’s a particular camaraderie around women that men may not share. “That show featured 22 of the area’s most diverse and dynamic female artists,” Joanna said. “One of the many things I loved about that show was how there was no spirit of competition. We’re all so different and it was great to be in a room full of support and to see all of us cheering on our fellow performers.” It’s a give and take. While being a female who can rip can be advantageous, the “freak show” aspect is tiring. The idea that we do what we do for attention is insane. The idea that men are at a disadvantage because it’s “easy for a girl” is beyond absurd. And yes, these are all things I’ve heard. In the time since I entered the music industry — now about 10 years — I’ve been on all sides. I’ve worked in radio, promotion, booking, public relations, journalism, management, teaching and performance. And I’ve seen the same sexism over and over again. Perhaps the most disheartening was when I was music editor and my ratio was about 95 percent male-centered music stories to 5 percent female. I remember getting so excited when I talked to a woman who not only sang, but played and wrote songs and led her band; but it was so rare. I remember thinking that shouldn’t be the norm in the 2010s, and that was a major part of my motivation to start playing again. I had a burning urge in me to share what I knew I had and show that women could do it, too — and sometimes, when we worked hard enough, we could even do it better. SWM

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NEW IN THE CUSE Styling with Heart

Élan Hair Artistry

For most women, it’s not just getting a hair service. It’s ‘me time,’ and we wanted to be able to do more for them.”—Jennifer Lavoy Wadsworth and Tracy Hemingway, Elan Hair Artistry co-owners

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Photography by Alexis Emm

JENNIFER LAVOY WADSWORTH AND TRACY HEMINGWAY, CO-OWNERS

The Style Edition


Styling with Heart By Kailyn Jennings

Élan: French for energy, style and enthusiasm.

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t Élan Hair Artistry, Jennifer Lavoy Wadsworth and Tracy Hemingway strive to bring that great energy to their clientele and the surrounding community by encompassing them with love, strength and beauty through artwork and hair artistry. Jen and Tracy opened Élan on Onondaga Road on February 1. “Syracuse and Onondaga Hill is our home,” the ladies explained. “We have been here for years and couldn’t imagine a better place to plant roots.” The entrepreneurs went on to explain that the support and response from the community has made it clear that Élan is the perfect space for them. “It is truly humbling,” they wrote. The services the salon provides include cutting, styling, color and chemical services, as well as waxing. “From a child’s haircut to your bridal look, we do it all. Élan is a place where innovation, education and creativity all come together in a friendly, comfortable environment,” they wrote, adding that they strive to stay knowledgeable and up-to-date on new techniques as they become available. Jen and Tracy said they’re honored to help their clients see themselves as the world sees them. “For most women, it’s not just getting a hair service,” they explained. “It’s ‘me time,’ and we wanted to be able to do more for them.” Doing more starts the moment you enter the salon. Walk in the door, and your face reflects off the wall of decorative mirrors as you enter the warm, earth-toned salon. Buddha statues greet you as candles, flowers and bamboo light your path to rejuvenation. “The atmosphere is a huge focus for us,” they wrote, explaining that they want to take that intimidation factor out of the mix. “We want to show you not just our art but the creativity of the community. We want you to feel inspired while you’re spending your time with us.”

To spark that inspiration, Jen and Tracy display local artists’ work. “Art comes in so many forms,” they wrote, “and we want Élan to be a place of growth for everyone.” However, Jen and Tracy said they didn’t expect Élan to be so inspiring – not only for the community but also for the family that’s developed there. “[We] live in education. We are on a continuous cycle of hair shows and classes,” they wrote, “constantly sharing with each other ideas and new possibilities. We knew we had a highly driven team, but Élan has opened up so many new doors for us to grow as individuals, as a team and as a family.” Jen and Tracy hope the inspiration will help their salon continue to grow. “The future of Élan is to keep spreading love and energy through our connections with our clientele,” they wrote, “and to continue making Élan and everyone who walks through the door look and feel amazingly beautiful inside and out.” One thing still proves difficult for the ambitious duo, though. Jen and Tracy said they have to continuously remind themselves that they’ve reached their goal. They own a salon. They are happy. They live their dream. The new business owners said they now have to “[realize] that we are what we had only hoped to be and are living our life’s ambition.” SWM For more information on Élan Hair Artistry, visit facebook.com/Elanhairartistry.

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INSPIRE Susan Fix

Susan Fix

Photography by Sara Felice

FASHION FIX DESIGNS OWNER AND FOUNDER

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A Fashionable Passion By Kailyn Jennings

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“It’s been pretty incredible,” Susan said regarding the support usan Fix owned The Funky Rose on Tipperary Hill for six she’s received. “I don’t know how else to explain it. It started out years, selling artwork, Irish goods and giftware. Three years with just family and teachers at school.” ago, though, Susan decided to try something new. And now, Susan presents her work at fashion shows. She painted a jean skirt. She’s planning to participate in two fashion shows – Syracuse The newly retired teacher finds nothing strange in painting. Style on Sept. 15, where she’s collaborating with Designer Susan taught art for 30 years at Chestnut Hill Elementary and Warehouse, and “Ladies Who Lunch,” the first fashion show at the Liverpool Elementary. She also founded MOYA — the Museum of Young Art at downtown Syracuse’s Lincoln Center — a not-for- newly-renovated Marriott Syracuse Downtown, on Sept. 25. “The [models] have so much fun in the process. They love profit organization displaying children’s artwork from local schools wearing the clothes. They own them, and they feel pretty and and agencies. good,” she said. “From the youngest little girls to the older people, However, despite being a freelance artist, clothing-specific they really enjoy the process of clothes and walking down the painting was a new hobby for Susan. runway. They have so much fun.” “My two loves are fashion and art,” she said. “So I thought, Despite success early on, Susan has plans for the future. She wants what a great combination: to have the two together. Those are the to learn to sew and produce her own clothing. She’d also love to see two things I’m most passionate about.” her clothing in a store, she said. When Susan paints clothing, she usually starts with either a “I don’t know if I want another storefront, though,” she pondered. vintage piece or a unique design. “It’s not out of the question, but right now, “I look at the lines of the clothing and I’d just like to concentrate on getting the decide on an interesting design that would clothing out there and finding a company I was surprised by how go with the flow of the clothing,” she said. willing to produce the clothing. Maybe they “Or I do a design on my sketch pad and accepting people were of could build not just one-of-a-kind pieces.” decide what piece of clothing I want it on.” it and that they loved the Susan also expressed interest in painting However, the paint’s reaction with different children’s clothing and bedroom decorations, fabric typically remains uncertain, so Susan designs. It validated the fact along with women’s couture. has to experiment. that this is what I wanted to At the moment, she said the most popular “But usually the experiments turn out clothes she paints are jean skirts and jeans, the best,” she said, explaining that as an do.”—Susan Fix, Fashion Fix along with hand-painted collars. artist, she usually has an idea of how typical Designs owner and founder “The hand-painted collars can be materials will take paint. “But when you’re worn with a sweater or t-shirt,” she said. working with fabric, you’re not always sure. “Almost like a necklace.” Sometimes the paint reacts in a different way, and you come up Susan loves them all. But her favorite part of painting clothes, with a different design to cover it. I don’t know if it’s difficult, regardless of the design, remains putting her art on clothing but it’s interesting.” people feel good wearing. The first time Susan wore something hand-painted, she didn’t “It’s unique, and no one else has it,” she said. “I see people know how people would react to her design. walking around in designs I created; basically [I] see people feel “I’m not sure if I cared what the reaction would be,” she said. good about themselves.” “But I was surprised by how accepting people were of it and that Susan enjoys the entire process – especially finding inspiration. they loved the designs. It validated the fact that this is what I “Everything I see is inspiration for what I do, as well as my wanted to do.” teaching art for 30 years,” she said. “Inspiration comes from Susan now designs colorful and fashion-forward clothing from everywhere. Inspiration comes from everyone I’ve ever met.” SWM home and calls her work Fashion Fix Designs. For more information or to place an order, visit fashionfixdesigns.com.

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INSPIRE Kyle Robertson

Kyle Robertson

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

PROFESSIONAL MODEL

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Hometown Confidence By Gabrielle Reagan

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In the harsh world of modeling, Kyle firmly believes a woman’s t’s a sunny day on Walton Street and Kyle Robertson is first line of defense is confidence. Going seven or eight months at a recalling — with an uncanny and quite contagious laugh — one of the first Aha! moments she had as a young model. time without a modeling job and living in New York, Kyle went on She’d booked a callback in New York City. While sitting patiently go-see after go-see after go-see. On one go-see in particular, a man in hair and makeup, she couldn’t help but notice everyone in the sat down with Kyle and began flipping through her book. Within room talking around her, not to her. seconds, he slammed the book shut. He told her she would never “I was like ‘I’m a human being, you can talk to me,’” she said. fit in with that agency because she was too pretty. The agency was “That’s me. I’m too real.” Wilhelmina. From a scrawny and admittedly awkward teenager walking the “He told me to go try out for Miss America,” Kyle said. “So I halls of Liverpool High School to a confident woman strutting walked out the door, went down the street and bought myself an down runways in New York, keeping it real has been Kyle’s main ice cream sundae. I always knew modeling was not going to be my mantra for the last 20 years. Now as a volunteer for Syracuse be-all-end-all. You’ve got to be OK with who you are.” Fashion Week, both behind the scenes and on the runway, it’s her Homesick, tired of New York and bored with living life as a mannequin, Kyle moved back to Syracuse at age 21. essential advice to any young girls hoping to one day step foot on The stars aligned when she met Syracuse Fashion Week the catwalk. Executive Director Lisa Marie Butler and walked for one of Lisa’s The runway wasn’t Kyle’s first choice. Immersed in singing as a youngster, she tried out for Star Search at the age of 12. first fashion shows for Inspire Design. In the tiny basement of the Despite being cut, Kyle made a lasting former OHM Lounge on Franklin Street, impression, and booked her first photo Kyle taught a small group of girls how to You’ve got to be confident. shoot through an agent in the audience. walk, deal with pre-show jitters and smile; all while her mom ironed their garments A few years later, she enrolled in J.C. There is always going to be to perfection in the background. Penney’s modeling school at the mall where someone who doesn’t think That night was the first in what is now she would eventually work her first runway. a group of major fashion events in the When she was 15 years old, opportunity you’re pretty enough. [If] you area, including the semi-annual Syracuse struck: she was offered a chance to move don’t fit the profile, [that] Fashion Week and the annual Syracuse Style. into a New York City loft filled with young Before meeting for our interview, models and no parents. She sat down at the doesn’t mean you’re not good Kyle had spent the night reminiscing, kitchen table to talk it over with her father. enough.”—Kyle Robertson, flipping through old photographs and “It sounded like a recipe for disaster, like Syracuse Fashion Week model laughing at the layer of dust she found being a child star,” Kyle reminisced. “I just covering her portfolio. What the humble wanted to be normal.” model didn’t mention was how tirelessly — and free of charge — So Kyle turned it down. Deciding to live in Syracuse with her she works for the Syracuse scene. parents and finish high school, she passed off the golden ticket and embraced life as a regular teen, a decision that no doubt “You’ve got to be confident,” Kyle said. “There is always going to be someone who doesn’t think you’re pretty enough. [If] you resulted in the confident down-to-earth persona she radiates today. don’t fit the profile, [that] doesn’t mean you’re not good enough.” After high school, Kyle enrolled in Manhattan College to study Syracuse Fashion Week promotes an always inclusive, English Literature and to model. Her first New York City runway never exclusive philosophy. According to Kyle, that’s the takeaway. show was set in an empty warehouse in Times Square, for the then Women look better when they look real; real women, real sizes, up-and-coming lingerie designer French Jenny. and of course, real confidence. SWM The runway was so long that Kyle still recalls feeling nauseous just looking down it. She was 18 years old, she was wearing a thong and her feet were too big for any of the stilettos. That meant she’d walk the runway barefoot. Terrified and at a loss for Syracuse Style, downtown’s annual free fashion event, is slated for confidence, Kyle spent two hours practicing alongside a Russian 7:30 p.m. on September 15 in the 100 block of Walton Street. model who spoke almost no English. Proceeds benefit the Food Bank of Central New York. For more information, visit syracusefashionweek.com. “I learned everything from her right then and there,” Kyle said. “I was totally confident after that.”

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INSPIRE Jessica Possner

JESSICA POSNER

Photography by Alexis Emm

INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTIST, PROFESSOR AND MUSICIAN

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Exploring the Butter Body Politic By Lorna Oppedisano

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essica Posner had big dreams. The feminist interdisciplinary the world,” she explained. “And as an artist, I think I still do that, artist, teacher and performer wanted to be the next New York but I’m also able to create really intimate experiences where people State butter sculptor. can shift something in themselves.” “It is maybe the most populous form of sculpture that I can The “Butter Body Politic” project is constructed of intertwining identify. People who are not associated or educated in an art field layer upon layer of research, writing, sculpture and performance. know the butter sculpture,” Jessica explained. “It’s figurative, but it’s After Jessica began to ponder the theory of object-oriented also made of this material that comes from a feminized body.” ontology, she learned a less academic phrase: “butter face.” Having already created sculptures with the aim of combining latent As it happens, the New York State butter sculptors are chosen objects with human bodies, Jessica saw an opportunity to explore from a closed system, so her wish wasn’t destined to come true; out of the handful of butter sculptors in the country, the New York the not-so-polite idiom. State butter sculpture is crafted by a couple from Pennsylvania. “If a ‘butter face’ is someone with a really hot body, but an ugly So Jessica approached the subject from a more familiar angle; face, and then a ‘pretty face’ is someone with a pretty face, but then and out of that process came a three-year-long undertaking, a fat body, what would happen if that fat body also came with a fat face?” she wondered. “But literal fat… so literal butter.” resulting in one of Jessica’s current projects, an experimental film So, sitting at her kitchen table with a stick of butter and a video called “Butter Body Politic.” “The focus of the film basically is to introduce and explore butter camera, she started sculpting the butter on her face. and the language of butter as a way of thinking about an alternative “I was just trying to figure out what would it mean to collapse this object with my body and the language way of living in our society,” Jessica said. “So what does it mean, for example, to value that I encounter in society that I find really fleshy bodies? What does it mean to have a sexist and problematic,” Jessica explained. So if we can start to see the soft body? What does it mean to melt into In her research for the project, Jessica came poetics in a stick of butter, one another? What does it mean to value across another important theory: the guns then maybe we can see the our social and emotional needs over guns? versus butter macroeconomic model. Most famously implemented by Nazis What does it mean to value a body in a beauty in each other.”—Jessica during WWII, the idea behind the model society that doesn’t value bodies?” Posner, interdisciplinary artist, suggests that nations had to choose between The thought process behind “Butter Body Politic” stemmed from Jessica’s study funding military and paying for civilian professor and musician into object-oriented ontology, a theory goods and needs. So that got Jessica thinking, as well: what would a “butter suggesting that objects have latent power body politic” look like? and agency in our society, independent of humans. While she The potential answers to that question led Jessica to develop was initially skeptical of the school of thought, she didn’t brush it choreography inspired by a butter body politic school of thought. aside completely. Always being open to experimenting and posing She plans to include that movement in her film. Jessica and her impossible questions — “almost everything I do is process-based team are in the process of shooting a variety of group choreoor experimental,” Jessica explained — she asked herself this: in a graphy, as well as closeups of performances, she explained. society that doesn’t always value women’s bodies as anything more The project is being funded by an individual artist commission than objects, what happens if the woman becomes the object? and project support grant from CNY Arts. Would she inherit some of that object’s power? “Butter Body Politic” — slated for a screening at ArtRage Having always identified with feminist struggles, Jessica wanted Gallery toward the end of this year — aims to tie together these to change the world long before she broke into the field of art. schools of thought, and perhaps shift the audience’s relationship When she moved to Syracuse in 2004 to study journalism at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, she had that to the world. goal in mind. But once she started her studies, she realized that “So if we can start to see the poetics in a stick of butter,” Jessica she needed a craft with more room for creativity. She ended up in suggested, “then maybe we can see the beauty in each other.” SWM the television, radio and film department, with a concentration Along with being an artist and writer, Jessica Posner is a professor at in sculpture. Syracuse University and Colgate University, and the lead singer of local riot “I was drawn to journalism or documentary filmmaking grrl band, Malvinas. To learn more about the band, visit malvinastheband. com. To get a glimpse of Jessica’s work, visit jessicaposner.com. originally because I wanted to show people what was going on in

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UPCOMING SWM Events Tuesdays in September Cocktails & Connections: Conversations with Purpose

Wednesday, Sept. 14 Civic Celebration Luncheon

Wednesdays in September 1 Million Cups

Thursday, Sept. 15 Syracuse Style Fashion Show

When: What: Cost: Where: lnfo:

When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

5 to 7 p.m. Networking event for women. Discounts and specials on food available. Outback Steakhouse, 3946 NY-31, Liverpool. Leisha@HerHeartBeat.com.

9 to 10 a.m. Presentations by local early-stage startup companies aim to draw feedback from peers, mentors, educators and advisors. Open to public. Free admission. Syracuse CoWorks, 201 E. Jefferson St., Syracuse. 1millioncups.com/syracuse.

Friday, Sept. 2 Urban Cinematheque 2016: Star Wars: The Force Awakens When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

7 to 11 p.m. Features local arts and cultural organizations, food trucks & more. Free admission. Everson Museum of Art Plaza, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. urbanvideoproject.com.

Thursday, Sept. 8 Green Drinks Syracuse When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Networking event geared toward people working on environmental issues, but open to all. Free admission. Greenwood Winery, 6475 Collamer Road, East Syracuse. webcards.vextster.com/packages/index.php?id=VFdwTk1VMW4&cid=688.

Saturday, Sept. 10 Symphoria Masterworks Series I: Ohlsson Plays Rachmaninoff When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Grammy award-winning artist’s interpretation of Rachmaninoff’s Third Piano Concerto. $20 to $81; ages 18 and younger, free. The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters, 421 Montgomery St., Syracuse. experiencesymphoria.org.

Saturday, Sept. 10 TEDxUtica: Spark When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

Noon to 5 p.m. Conference includes speakers addressing inspiration and creativity. $35. MVCC Theater, Mohawk Valley Community College’s Utica Campus, 1101 Sherman Drive, Utica. tedxutica.com.

Sunday, Sept. 11 City Market When: What: Where: Info:

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monthly market features antiques, art and more. Armory Square, Syracuse. citymarketsyracuse.com.

Sunday, Sept. 11 SWM September Release Party When: What: Cost: Where: Info: 44

6 to 9 p.m. Celebrate The Style Issue with music, art and more. Free admission. House of S. Jaye, 233 N. Clinton St., Syracuse. Check the SWM Facebook for more details.

When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

When: What: Where: Info:

Noon to 1:30 p.m. Presented by The Salvation Army. Includes special guest speaker Richard Gere. $150. The Oncenter, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. syracuseny.salvationarmy.org/SyracuseNY/Civic.

7:30 p.m. Annual downtown Syracuse fashion show. 100 block of Walton St., Syracuse. syracusefashionweek.com.

Saturday, Sept. 17 Second Book Sale Blow Out When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hundreds of rare, vintage, antiquarian, coffee table books and more. Free with museum admission. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. everson.org.

Saturday, Sept. 17 Sugarman Law Firm Wish Ball When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

5:30 to 11 p.m. Make-A-Wish Central New York’s annual event to honor volunteers and supporters of the organization. $150. Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. cny.wish.org.

Saturday, Sept. 17 & Sunday, Sept. 18 Farm Fun Days 2016 When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Second annual event includes pony rides, bounce house, live music, petting animals, face painting, vendors and more. $5 per person. Equuleus Acres, 7262 Oxbow Road, Canastota. perfectponiesllc.com.

Sunday, Sept. 18 Westcott Street Cultural Fair When: What: Where: Info:

Noon to 6:30 p.m. Twenty-fifth annual celebration of diversity and uniqueness of the Westcott neighborhood features arts, food, service organizations, activities and more. Westcott Street between Concord and Dell Streets. westcottstreetfair.org.

Sunday, Sept. 18 Color Me Rad 5K When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

9 a.m. Race registration includes race shirt, temporary tattoo, color pack and a Goo Guard phone case. $40; day before race, $50; day of race, $55. Onondaga Lake Park, 6851 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. colormerad.com/location/syracuse.

Monday, Sept. 19 Embrace Movie Showing in CNY When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

7:30 p.m. Film follows body image activist Taryn Brumfitt. $11.50 Regal Destiny USA Stadium 19 IMAX & RPX, 9586 Destiny USA Drive, Syracuse. gathr.us/screening/15458.

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Wednesday, Sept. 21 Successful Business Women Awards When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

7:30 to 11 a.m. Second annual event to celebrate women with outstanding businessleadership, success and achievements in CNY. Includes breakfast, networking reception, exhibitors, education, awards presentation, photos and free parking. $40. The Oncenter Convention Center, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. cnybj.com/BizEventz/BizEventzHome.aspx.

Wednesday, Sept. 21 Last Taste of Summer

When: What: Where: Info:

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Includes entertainment performed by Frenay and Lenin, tastings and complimentary cheese and cracker display. Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse. wboconnection.org.

Thursday, Sept. 22 Landmark Theatre Window Project When: What: Where: Info:

7 p.m. Presented by Syracuse Fashion Week. Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St., Syracuse. syracusefashionweek.com.

Thursday, Sept. 22 Red Hot. Red Heart. When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Part of American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign. Includes hors d’oeuvres, silent auction and live music. $50; pair, $80; table of 10, $350. Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. syracusegored.heart.org.

Thursday, Sept. 22 Intimate Evening with Syracuse City Ballet When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

7 to 8 p.m. Third annual performance premieres classical and contemporary works in an intimate setting. $24.73. The Oncenter Theaters, Bevard Studio, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. syracusecityballet.com.

Friday, Sept. 23 Opening Night for Fall Exhibitions When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

6:30 to 8 p.m. Celebrates opening of fall exhibitions, including New Works by Angela Fraleigh and Marie Lorenz’s Tide and Current Taxi. Includes live music, hors d’oeuvres and cash bar. Everson members, free; non-members, $15. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. everson.org.

Saturday, Sept. 24 Teal Ribbon Run and Walk When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

8:30 to 11: 30 a.m. Eighth annual event supports ovarian cancer research, local education and awareness and patient support. Presented by Hope for Heather. Sept. 1 to Sept. 16, $30; Sept. 17 to Sept. 22, $35; day of, $40. Lewis Park, S. Main St., Minoa. hopeforheather.org/TealRibbonRun.htm.

Saturday, Sept. 24 LadyFest Syracuse 2016 When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

5 to 11 p.m. Third annual all-inclusive feminist festival celebrates women, people of color and the LGBTQIA community. Proceeds support Vera House. Sliding scale of $5 to $10. Spark Contemporary Art Space, 1005 E. Fayette St., Syracuse. facebook.com/ladyfestcuse.

Sunday, Sept. 25 Fashions at the Persian Terrace When: What: Where: Info:

1 p.m. “The Ladies Who Lunch” brunch includes food, drinks, fashions and more. Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. Stay tuned for more details at syracusefashionweek.com.

Tuesday, Sept. 27 Savvy Women, Smart Investors Breakfast When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Taking charge of your Future with HerPath to Success. No admission. Lakeshore Country Club, 6777 Lakeshore Road, Cicero. Registration required; contact Leisha Dukat at Leisha@HerHeartBeat.com or (315) 663-1712.

Wednesday, Sept. 28 PEACE, Inc. Champions of Diversity When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

6 p.m. Fundraising event honors members of Syracuse community. $125. Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse. peace-caa.org.

Thursday, Sept. 29 BizBuzz Social Media Conference When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Event geared toward social media managers, content creators, marketing and communication managers, business owners and college students features sessions on video messaging, emerging apps and trends, inbound marking and sales, influence and authenticity, success stories and more. $132.87; students, $53.74. Sky Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. bizbuzzconf.com.

Thursday, Sept. 29 An Evening of Light When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

6 to 9 p.m. Includes dinner, dancing, silent auctions, raffle baskets and more. Benefits Vera House. $48.47. Traditions at the Links, 5900 N. Burdick St. #3, East Syracuse. eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-of-light-tickets-25509011139.

Friday, Sept. 30 He Said Beer, She Said Wine When: What: Cost: Where: Info:

6 to 9 p.m. Pairing event includes more than 20 dishes, wine, craft beer and wine cocktails. $64.29. Sky Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. skyarmory.com.

September 2016

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Style Edition


September 2016

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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48

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Style Edition

September 2016 Syracuse Woman Magazine  

The Style Issue

September 2016 Syracuse Woman Magazine  

The Style Issue

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