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sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 5

NOVEMBER 2012 - JANUARY 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Gifts to make: Crocheted slippers Gorgeous apron Leather jewellery pouch Soothing herbal creams Homemade soaps Sock animals Cute toys www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Inspiring ideas for everyday living Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

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sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 5 November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Still not decked the halls? Don’t despair. Our Christmas issue is brimming with last-minute décor ideas to get you in the mood. I don’t know about you, but I love a handmade Christmas. Tons of tacky tinsel doesn’t do it for me. But stitching together my own Christmas stockings or felt ornaments gives a whole new meaning to the spirit of Christmas. Armed with a needle and thread, fabric remnants and some crafty ideas, anyone can create their own festive decorations. And it’s a low-cost, high impact way to show off your creative flair. We begin our creative festive cheer on page 10 with a fresh floral wreath. Even though it’s summer downunder, you can capture the magic of a frosty northern hemisphere’s Christmas Day with snow-white flowers. Or make an everlasting wreath with foraged pine cones, like the one on page 11. Then while you’re in the crafting mood, head to our handmade gift section, which begins on page 43. We have something for everyone – a gorgeous felt hat, a fun knitted polar bear hat, a fancy apron, a glamorous leather jewellery pouch, PJs for the whole family, homemade soaps and herbal creams – and more. Needle felting expert Barbara Allen shows us how to make an adorable little elf, and Sweet Living crochet expert Lisa van Klaveren provides step-by-step instructions for making lovely crocheted slippers. Also in this issue, we bring you a kids’ activities section to keep your youngsters busy during the school holidays (from page 63), but keep an eye on our website for lots more crafting projects for both kids and adults.

Join us on Facebook to get the latest Sweet Living updates, and sign up for our free weekly newsletter from our website.

In the meantime, Merry Christmas and happy New Year!

Jane

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contents 6

New, views, tips & snips

Latest updates, inspiring ideas, thrifty tips and websites we love.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

workshop 10 Santa’s Get ready for the festive season.

Make your own crafty decorations and download your free Christmas tags.

41 Issue 5

17

25A collection of delightfully good-

to make 43 Gifts Create gorgeous prezzies for

DIY napkin holders Make your own classy napkin holders for the festive season.

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20

For bookworms

We’ve scoured the bookstores for crafty new releases ideal for gifts.

Incredible edible gifts

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friends and family.

for kids 63 Crafts Keep your youngsters busy this

azine.co tlivingmag www.swee

holiday season with fun crafty projects.

sustainability 73 Backyard Grow your own fresh herbs year round.

looking and suitably scrumptious sweet treats for Christmas. Contacts www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Editor: Jane Wrigglesworth Designer: Geoff  Fitzpatrick, grafix@fitzi.co.nz Editorial enquiries: jane@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Advertising enquiries: admin@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Readers’ tips: tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Join us on Facebook

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sweetliving

news, views, tips & snips

Best natural deodorant

If you’re worried about all those parabens, triclosan and aluminium salts found in commercial deodorants, then try making your own. We’re not talking a slap of baking powder or cornstarch. We mean a proper deodorant stick made from beeswax, shea butter, cocoa butter and essential oils. It’s so delicious you’d think it was a bought one. Click through to The Everything Soap Blog for the recipe.

Blooming great gifts

Dress up a potted plant by adorning it with handmade felt flowers. Insert lengths of paper-covered wire (available from craft suppliers) into the pot to form hoops, then add a bow for a finishing touch.

Feeling sluggish? Smell a lemon

Citrus scents apparently boost energy and increase alertness. It may also lift your mood. Sniffing a lemon has been found to boost the production of the feelgood hormone serotonin as well as reduce the level of the stress hormone norepinephrine. Scientists at the Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University discovered a link between depression and our sense of smell, and found that citrus fragrances – in particular, lemon – affected neurotransmitters. Start the day with lemon-scented shampoos, soaps or lotions, or put a few drops of lemon essential oil on a handkerchief to sniff while at work.

Get a good night’s sleep Having trouble sleeping? Try inducing sleep by painting your walls in pinks and purples or blues and greens. Pink, violet and purple are calming for the body and mind. Both bring sleep and soothe emotional and mental stress, so they’re ideal for the bedroom. So are blues and greens, which produce a calming effect. If you don’t wish to paint your walls, try a soft pink light bulb or pink or blue sheets instead.

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Zoo in a toilet roll

We’re totally enamoured with artist Anastassia Elias’ toilet roll creations. Anastassia uses manicure scissors to cut the small shapes, and tweezers to manipulate them. Such fine work requires patience, we’re sure, but perhaps this is something you and the kids could try at home. Visit Anastassia’s website for more amazing toilet roll creations. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Homemade dog and cat snacks

Give your four-legged friends a healthy Christmas treat this year with Rodale’s tasty pet snacks. Bacon-Chip Cookies, Liver Snaps, Pupsicles, Fishy Snacks and Catnip Mice – if we were of the furry kind we’d be drooling right now. Click through to Rodale’s website for the recipes.

5 websites we

Christmas montage

Here’s the perfect gift for grandma, grand-dad or friends overseas. A photo montage of bubs or the kids. It doesn’t cost the earth to send overseas, even less if you email it!

1. Felt

The absolute best online marketplace for handcrafted goodies in New Zealand. Whether you’re looking to buy or sell, Felt is the place for you.

2. Knot Garden

This site is no longer being updated but there are some gorgeous crochet patterns for you to try. There are absolutely stunning designs here. A must look.

3. Home Shabby Home

We love this blog. It features fab craft DIYs and shabby chic interior design. It’s in Italian. But don’t let that deter you. Use Google Translate, or simply look at the beautiful images.

4. Honest Fare

Good-looking healthy food. A cook by profession, Gabrielle shows us how to turn a fresh set of ingredients into something beautiful (in both flavor and appearance) that’s worth sharing. Also features homemade baby food.

5. Calendar of the month club Sign up to receive your free printable calendar on a monthly basis. These aren’t your typical calendars. They involve cutting and folding to make three-dimensional masterpieces. December’s calendar features a 3D snowman.

Herb bouquet

Place freshly picked herbs in jars on the dinner table for guests to help themselves. Not only can guests choose their own flavouring, a delicious herbal aroma will permeate the air. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

The thrifty cook Readers’ tried and true tips for saving money in the kitchen.

Plenty of pasta?

Homemade meat paste

Leftover pasta can be used as a base for a frittata. Just add eggs to bind the pasta, line your pie dish with it, then top with leftover veggies and grated cheese, and bake.

Make a meat paste with leftover roast meat, adding a bit of margarine or butter and salt and pepper. This is great for spreading on toasted sandwiches.

Chelsea Lewis

Leigh Cuff

Use up mushrooms

Deter pantry moths

To save money on mushrooms, buy them by the bagful when on special, use what you need that day, then chop and sauté the rest, freezing in small bags. You can add to any egg dish, mince recipes, omelettes or casseroles.

To stop weevils and pantry moths in your cupboards and pantry scatter bay leaves on the shelves.

Lesley Hansen

Salad greens starting to go yellow? Before they go slimy, stir-fry them with oil and garlic and serve on the side.

Fruity sauce Use up ripe fruit by making a fruity sauce for meat dishes. Chop fruit into small pieces and blend into a paste. Add to chicken or vegetable stock and use on hot roast meats or cold cuts. Julie Wagner

Lois Hampstead

Salad to stir-fry

Li Leung

Keep lettuce longer

• 3 cups dried chickpeas • milk • lemon juice • soya sauce • garlic • ground cumin • salt

Sharon Hampson

Fiona Morris

This is a great treat for the kids – like a chocolate-dipped banana ice block. Cut bananas in half at the middle then push an ice cream stick into the flat end of each banana. Place on wax paper and freeze for several hours. Make a chocolate or caramel sauce and dip the tops of the frozen bananas in it just before eating.

New take on carrot cake

sweetliving Issue 5

Our family loves this recipe and it’s great for snacks for the kids as well as guests. Three cups uncooked chickpeas equals 8 ½ cups cooked chickpeas. This recipe makes approximately 7 cups of chickpea spread. I put the spread in small containers and freeze it until needed.

Here’s a quicker, healthier version of carrot cake. Add grated carrot, vanilla essence, cinnamon, ginger and mixed spice to your pancake batter and serve with a dollop of cream cheese. If you don’t like the carrot idea, use grated apple instead.

Marnie G

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(aka hummus sans tahini)

Soak the chickpeas overnight in plenty of water. Drain and place chickpeas in stockpot with fresh water – again, plenty of it – and bring to the boil. Simmer for 2 ½ hours. Drain. Place 2 cups of cooked chickpeas in a blender. Add 4 tablespoons milk, 3 tablespoons lemon juice and 2 teaspoons soya sauce. Blend until smooth. Add 4 cloves crushed garlic, ½ teaspoon cumin and ½ teaspoon salt and blend again until all mixed in. Pour your mix into a container, then make your next batch, using the same quantity of ingredients.

To keep lettuce crisper for longer, store in a plastic container with a damp paper towel on the bottom and top.

Frozen bananas

L. Welch

Low-fat chickpea spread

November 2012 - January 2013

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Homemade tahini paste

Egg substitute

Tahini is great for homemade hummus and baba ghanoush but it’s quite expensive to buy. So these days I make my own. It’s so easy and requires only two ingredients: sesame seeds and olive oil. Toast 1 cup sesame seeds in oven or dry frying pan until golden brown. Remove from frying pan and allow to cool. Place seeds in food processor and grind roughly. While food processor is still running, drizzle in ¼ cup olive oil. Continue to grind until a smooth paste forms. Pour into an air-tight container and store in the fridge. You can make larger or smaller quantities according to your needs.

Run out of eggs, or just don’t eat them? When baking, substitute with 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed (linseed) mixed into 2-3 tablespoons water.

Louise Mayhew

Gluten-free mince pies

Prevent mould on cheese

Makes 18

These days it’s cheaper to buy you cheese in large blocks. To prevent it going mouldy before you get to the end of it, wrap it in a napkin soaked in salt water and store in the fridge.

• 200g (7 ounces) gluten-free plain white flour • 1 tsp Xanthan gum • 2 tbsp icing sugar (powdered sugar) • 75g (2.5 ounces) ground almonds • 1 pinch of salt • 125g (4.5 ounces) butter • 1 large egg, lightly beaten with 1 tbsp water • 359g (12.5 ounces) high quality mincemeat filling • marzipan [see our recipe on page 40 - Ed] • 1 tbsp icing sugar (powdered sugar) for dusting

Gillian Russell

Vegetable stock Save the water used to cook your vegetables. It can be used in soups, sauces and stocks. Or pour it into a watering can and use it to water your veggie garden. Dorothy Nairn www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Jeff McLaren

Baking soda for splinters Need to remove a stubborn splinter? If tweezers don’t work, use ingredients from your pantry. Make a paste of baking soda and water, apply it to the skin and leave for several minutes until the splinter comes to the surface. Michelle Bently

Issue 5

Place all the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl, add butter and use your hands to mix until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Or use a food processor to save a bit of time! Make a well in the centre of your dry ingredients and add the egg and water. Combine mixture with a wooden spoon, then knead by hand to form a ball of dough. Cover with cling film and place in refrigerator for at least an hour before continuing. Roll out marzipan to 5mm thick. Cut out marzipan snowflakes (use a plunger cutter) and leave to one side. If you let your marzipan snowflakes dry for a while, they spread out less whilst cooking and you are left with a clearer looking snowflake. Lightly grease a 12-hole cupcake tin with butter. Roll out the pastry so it is about 2mm thick. Cut out circles. Now line the cupcake tray with pastry, and gently press into each hole. Spoon a heaped teaspoon of mincemeat into each case. Place snowflake marzipan on top and lightly press. Cook in pre-heated oven for 10-15 mins. Take out of tray and leave to cool. Dust with icing sugar. Torie Jayne Visit Torie’s blog for more info

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sweetliving

Santa's Workshop Get ready for the festive season. Make your own crafty decorations.

Nothing is more beautiful than a fresh-flowered wreath at Christmas time. Use a sphagnum moss-filled wire frame or floral foam as your base. Insert foliage first, filling the entire wreath with a green background. Then insert your flowers, keeping the stems short. If the flower stems are too soft, wrap floral wire around them and insert into moss/foam. Page 10

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Santa's Workshop

Pine cone art

Pine cones are just the thing for rustic-looking wreaths. There’s no need for a wreath base with this style. Simply position pine cones in a circle and glue together using a glue gun. Ornaments may be glued onto the wreath as well.

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sweetliving

Rustic wreath

Add a touch of shabby chic to your Christmas dĂŠcor with this easy-to-make square wreath. Simply knock together some pieces of reclaimed wood and adorn with festive ornaments.

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Santa's Workshop Make-shift tree No room for a full-sized Christmas tree? Paint some small branches white, silver or gold and decorate with baubles.

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sweetliving

All wrapped up No need to buy new gift boxes or gift-wrapping paper. Cover old boxes with scrap paper and bits of lace and trim. Tins and old plastic containers can be used too.

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Santa's Workshop

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sweetliving

Christmas card holder Use old coat hangers and wire to fashion a Christmas tree card holder. Use two wire coat hangers for the top two tiers, then fashion a similar shape, slightly larger, out of wire for the bottom tier. Take a length of thinner wire and wrap it around a jar to form rings. Remove from jar and stretch out the wire to fit the length of a tier, then flatten the rings against one another. This is what holds your cards. Attach with wire to bottom tier. Make two more lengths of rings for the other two tiers. Take another piece of wire and create a trunk. Then insert cards!

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Santa's Workshop

Retro stockings

Vanessa Brady’s space-age stockings will delight anyone who’s a fan of sci-fi. Vanessa says all members of her family are big fans, so these felt creations fit right in with her Christmas theme. Click through to her website, Tried & True, to find out how to make them.

See website for instructions on making these felt cards.

Old charmer

A felt stocking is very easy to make. Simply cut two stocking shapes from felt, embellish one side, then stitch the two sides together. We’ve used buttons (we covered our buttons with old embroidered tray cloths), bobbly ribbon for the stocking trim, and snowflake stickers.

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sweetliving

Deer oh deer

If you’re handy with a jigsaw, make some hanging wooden ornaments out of thin plywood. Draw your design onto the plywood then cut it out with a jigsaw. Use sandpaper to smooth edges.

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Santa's Workshop Needle felted snowman

Needle felting is a fun craft for all ages. Create this adorable snowman using the needle felting techniques described on page 52.

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sweetliving

Handmade charm

Hand-stitching your own Christmas decorations is a cinch, and an ideal project for children.

Decorative details In hand Add bling in the form of sequins and sparkly cord to simple felt mittens.

A stuffed felt Christmas tree is decorated with felt holy and simple stitches.

Build a snowman Use scraps of different coloured felt to create Snowy. Use black beads or a fabric pen for the eyes and mouth.

Gold star Use fusible webbing to fix the gingham shapes to these festive felt fixtures.

Appealing characters Paint simple reindeer shapes onto Christmas balls then glue the heads of cheap plastic toys to the body.

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Santa's Workshop

Stocking filler Make a stocking out of felt then decorate the edges with lace or pre-cut felt from craft stores.

Oh, Christmas tree

Heart and soul Turn a wooden heart into a work of art by drilling holes through the wood and threading wool or ribbon through them.

Recycle old woollen fabric into decorative ornaments. Add a fluffy trim and a felt tree to the centre.

Treescape

Turn garden trimmings into miniature trees to create a festive table setting.

Christmas stuffing Stuff a fabric Christmas tree and give it a tree trunk made from pruned branches. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Gift tags

No need to spend money on labels. Download your free Christmas gift tags here.

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Christmas Gift Tags 1

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Free

ads o l n dow

We’ve made it simple. Just click on the link provided, download the PDF, then print your gift tags on white card stock. Or print them on adhesive paper for self-adhesive labels.

sweet living

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Christmas Gift Tags 2

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sweetliving The Toymaker’s printable gift box Marilyn Scott-Waters, aka The Toymaker, is a whizz at creating beautiful paper toys. Head over to her website and you’ll find fairy houses, puppet theatres, animals, birds and butterflies - all to download for free. She also designed this adorable gift box for you to download. Click here to download it for free. Make sure you check out Marilyn’s amazing books too. They’re full of great paper toys for you to make.

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sweetliving

Incredible edible gifts A collection of delightfully good-looking and suitably scrumptious sweet treats for Christmas.

Chocolate candymen

Make chocolate treats for decorating gift boxes. These white chocolate gingerbread men are easy to make. Simply melt white chocolate chips, pour into chocolate moulds and, when set, pipe details onto the body with chocolate icing.

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sweetliving

Plum brownies These sinfully decadent bars make a delicious treat for guests or a great gift for friends. Recipe on page 40.

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Incredible edible gifts

Cherry on top

You don’t have to be a professional cake decorator to ice a Christmas cake. It’s easy as pie. Buy ready-made marzipan and fondant icing, or make your own. Then, with a few iced decorations for the top, your cake will be the star of the show. See marzipan recipe and ideas on page 40.

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sweetliving

Berry cakes At the peak of the berry season, these mini berry cakes will go down a treat. Serve with fresh berries and cream or yoghurt. See recipe on page 40.

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Incredible edible gifts

Apricot tart

This sweet tart combines a crisp, buttery short crust pastry with perfectly ripe apricots – a true taste of summer.

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Christmas cupcakes

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Incredible edible gifts

These fondant-covered cupcakes are embellished with fondant snowmen and holly. Buy readymade fondant and use food colouring to produce different hues. First spread cupcake with buttercream (the buttercream acts as an adhesive – see recipe page 40), then apply a layer of fondant. Then shape small pieces of fondant into snowmen or berries. Use a plunger cutter for the leaves. For fancy Christmas cupcake wrappers, head to The Pretty Baker

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sweetliving

Vanilla and rosewater marshmallows These deliciously light and fluffy marshmallows are extremely easy to create and make a fabulous sweet gift or party favour. See recipe page 40.

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Incredible edible gifts

Quick & easy dessert Need to whip up a dessert or sweet treat in a hurry? Pour honey-flavoured yoghurt into small bowls or jars, supply chocolate sprinkles and store-bought wafer sticks and let guests help themselves.

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sweetliving

Christmas tree marshmallows

Paint your marshmallows with a simple milk and food colouring mix. First make your own marshmallows (this method doesn’t work well on store-bought marshmallows). Use the recipe for Vanilla and Rosewater Marshmallows on page 40 but omit the final dusting of cornflour and icing sugar. For the colouring, place 1 tablespoon milk in a shallow bowl and add a couple of drops of green food colouring. Cut out tree shapes with a cookie cutter, then paint.

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Incredible edible gifts Honey & pistachio nougat If ever there was a confection for folk with sweet teeth, nougat must be it. It may not be good for the waistline, but it’s a superb gift for candy-lovers. Try the recipe at The Kitchn.

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sweetliving

Frozen Christmas pudding

The perfect ‘cake’ for a downunder Christmas. Come to that, it’s the perfect cake for ice cream lovers anywhere in the world. From The Australian Women’s Weekly, The Christmas Collection (ACP Books, RRP $29.99). Available from bookstores or online at Bookreps.co.nz See recipe on page 40. See book review on page 42.

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Incredible edible gifts

Cheat’s frozen Christmas pudding This festive pud is not only delicious it’s super easy to make. Serve with choc-orange sauce. From The Australian Women’s Weekly, The Christmas Collection (ACP Books, RRP $29.99). Both both recipes, see page 40. Available from bookstores or online at Bookreps.co.nz

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sweetliving

Grand Marnier fruit cake

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Incredible edible gifts

This exquisite cake has all the bells and whistles – plus a delectable flavour to boot. From The Australian Women’s Weekly, The Christmas Collection (ACP Books, RRP $29.99). Available from bookstores or online at Bookreps.co.nz See recipe on page 40. See book review on page 42.

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sweetliving

sweet living Recipes

Recipes

Plum brownies

Base • 120g butter ed • 185g dark chocolate, chopp • 1 cup caster sugar • 2 tablespoons brandy • 2 eggs, lightly beaten • 1 cup all-purpose flour, sifted ½ cup chopped walnuts

Plum Purée fresh plums • 8-10 large, dark-skinned • 3 tablespoons sugar

Download all recipes here.

Filling • 2 medium-size eggs • 3 tablespoons lime juice • 1 cup white granulated sugar ½ cup all-purpose flour, sifted

• • ¼ teaspoon salt • 2 cups plum purée

living sweet Recipes

Free

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rt Apricot ta pastry

3. Mix in egg yolk. sugar then 4. Dust hands with icing bowl knead the marzipan in the . Add until it forms a firm dough is too extra icing sugar if the mix soft. onto a 5. Turn the marzipan out sugar. icing bench dusted with sifted h and Knead until mixture is smoot no longer sticky. Wrap in plastic until required.

ater

and rosew

gC. 1. Preheat oven to 180de square cake 2. Grease a 20cm x 20cm with pan, line the base and sides paper. baking paper and grease the and 3. Make the base. Melt butter medium chocolate in large bowl on in sugar heat in the microwave. Stir and and brandy, then eggs, flour prepared walnuts. Pour mixture into s, or until pan and bake for 30 minute oven and just cooked. Remove from let cool. purée. Remove 4. Meanwhile, make the the stones, chop roughly, leaving an. skins on, and place in saucep has Cook on low heat until sugar e mushy dissolved and plums becom from heat (10-15 minutes). Remove and allow to cool slightly. sor and 5. Add plums into food proces auce. purée to a consistency of apples Set aside. bowl, add 6. Make the filling. In a large until lightly beat eggs and sugar and mix with mixed. Add lime juice and flour and wooden spoon. Add sifted of plum cups 2 in Fold mix. salt and at a time. purée with a spatula, ½ cup on top of base and bake 7. Pour filling lowfors 30-35 minutes or until al m sh oven in ar m allow set. Remove from oven and removing to cool completely before from pan.

Cherry on top

sional cake You don’t have to be a profes cake. It’s easy as pie. decorator to ice a Christmas an and fondant You can buy ready-made marzip and with a few iced icing (or make your own) cake will be the star decorations for the top, your of the show. apply a layer of With a fruitcake, it’s best to fondant coating. marzipan before adding your hours and up to a Leave it to dry for at least 48 t covering. fondan the apply week before Marzipan • ½ cup (125ml) water • 2 ½ cup white sugar (330g) (200g) 1 ¼ cup ground almonds

To make cherry decorations moulding Marzipan can be used for desired into decorative shapes. Create Dip colours with food colouring. and a toothpick in the colouring an (a little smear that onto the marzip an goes a long way). Knead marzip colour is with your fingers until the colour evening distributed. Add more redif necessary. Then simply roll for your coloured marzipan into balls leaf shapes cherry shapes and cut out an. Pipe on from green-coloured marzip a stem with chocolate icing.

• • 1 egg yolk • icing sugar for kneading

in saucepan and boil 1. Place water and sugar 115degC on a until temperature reaches meter. candy thermo mix in ground 2. Remove from heat and almonds.

Berry cakes

Makes 10-12 cakes r’s) sugar, sifted • 1 2/3 cup icing (confectione sifted • ¾ cup all-purpose flour, cheaper option use a • 1 cup almond meal (for ground almonds) r • 1 teaspoon baking powde eggs) • 5 egg whites (medium-size • 100g butter • Fresh mixed berries

Buttercream • 115g butter, softened r’s) • 2 ¼ cups icing (confectione sugar 2 teaspoons boiled water

until pale Place butter in bowl and beat a little at a and fluffy. Beat in icing sugar, time. Beat in water

sifted flour, 2. Place sifted icing sugar, r in almond meal and baking powde large mixing bowl and mix. in separate 3. Lightly beat egg whites and stir. bowl, then add to cake mix or microwave, 4. Melt butter in saucepan then add to dry mix and stir. mixture into 5. Add berries, then pour 20-25 fluted tart pans and bake for with sifted dust and Cool s. minute ed icing sugar. Serve with whipp cream or yoghurt.

Vanilla ated sugar gC (350degF). Short crust nul 1. Preheat oven to 180de e flour • 500 g gra n liquid glucose s all-purpos • 1 ¼ cup on salt 1 tablespoo • e.co.nz ar spo tea sug d ½ ter www.sweetlivingmagazin nulate • cm pieces n white gra • 380 ml wa ns powdered gelatine cut into 2.5 - January 2013 • 1 tablespoo chilled, and Issue 5 November 2012 sweetliving alted butter, • 2 tablespoo Page 2 ites • 115g unsl ice water wh • 2 egg ns rose water • 30-60m ract • 3 tablespoo s vanilla ext • Filling dium-size apricots • 2 teaspoong sugar • 10-12 me ons caster sugar, or to taste icin ½ cup • spo tea ) 2-3 ur nal tio nflo • ns kirsch (op ter. • ½ cup cor 190ml of wa ter • 2 tablespoo the gelatin in remaining 190ml of wa bowl, soften dissolves. heat the • Garnish ered almonds 1 In a small il the sugar cepan, gently unt sliv g sau rin m cup of ¼ stir diu • m the sides id glucose, 2. In a me fro liqu es and nul ar cess any sugar gra increase heat and with the sug cessor and pro pastry: push down dissolved, dy To make the salt and sugar in food pro process again has e a spatula to can ar Us a sug on r, and Once the ches 121° Place the flou Add the chilled butter ne the saucepan. ring until the syrup rea th the machi ed. . t stir until combin embles fine crumbs. Wi the feed tube and il dissolved boil withou minutes. x res re and stir unt r, about 10 through until the mi t hold gelatin mixtu stiff peaks form. With thermomete jus 30ml water the r d uld pou Ad sho t. wly Increase whites until . The pastry ve from hea ary. in. running, slo mo ugh ess egg up Re do nec the syr t if 3. soft ke a ing water pour the hot ing mixer, bea Beat in process to ma 1 hour. Add remain 10 minutes. 4. In a stand a medium speed, slowly ll for about en pinched. cool, about together wh wrap and chi and roll into a the mixer on m-high and beat until ugh in plastic face diu Wrap the do ugh onto a floured sur speed to me baking paper. a 26cm flan h line wit r. y to ate do tra try rosew ington of 1 Turn out the m across. Use the pas vanilla and Cover and m x 30cm lam t with a mix 28c e and sides. and line a 20c lightly with oil and dus istmas circle about into the bas 5. Grease g sugar. g the dough Cheat’s frozen Chr ing paper lespoon icin stand dish, pressin Spray the bak ur and 1 tab evenly. Let nflo ead cor spr of n and ares in Pudding chill. tablespoo fe. Roll squ into the tray ing). Serves 8. kni t freez llow (+ we tes a ma h k marsh s wit Prep time 30 minu ts in ce on wire rac into square 6. Pour the filling : . Place aprico ange hours. Cut x to coat. Pla container in a la ice cream, softened To make the half and remove stones until set, 2-4 sugar and cornflour mi er. Arr ight • 1 litre (4 cups) vanilgolden fruit cake, in g re in an airt s gently to cov oven icin sto tos n ing ds) and the ain Cut apricots rs rem hou • 700g (1½ poun ar and kirsch in preheated oven couple more bowl with sug e up. Cook to dry for a er. from ice cream maker, crumbled pastry, cut-sid es. Remove 4 Pour custard into on baking pap y or rum apricots on facturer’s ut 25 minut with ice-cream or single layer Page 3 according to manu brown, abo • ¼ cup (60ml) brand churn s in until golden h almonds. Ser ve warm ction living t instru ee follow 3 sw wit instructions (or - January 201 2 into 201 and garnish r p (180ml) moulds with cream mbe 1 Line eight ¾-cu Issue 5 Nove see right). Spoon ice am. tips, cre ed ipp plastic about 3cm wh about 1 hour plastic wrap, extending pudding basin; freeze of moulds. spatula, thickly (1¼ inches) over edge o.nz or until firm. Using a and brandy until ; gmagazine.c cake , cream ice ivin cream with etl ice ess basin we 2 Proc www.s coat inside of cream mixture into to freezer. combined. Spoon ice cover with foil, return e ic wrap then foil; lds. Cover with plast , make chocolate orang mou while Mean 5 Grand Marnier fruit cake freeze overnight. ice cream. 1 Combine fruit, nuts and Prep + cook time 5 hours y baking-paper-lined a cavit onto rind in large cream ings 40 minutes ice pudd 3 Turn down. Mix a little white icing 6 Fill brown sugar bowl. (+ standing & cooling) plastic, transfer and cold e ice cream; tray. Gently peel away boiled water to a sticky paste. with chocolate orang 2 Cook caster sugar in large plates. Spread r with foil; frying • 3 cups (500g) sultanas puddings to serving about 2 tablespoons of this smooth surface. Cove sauce or pan over low heat, withou mixture Serve with chocolate t stirring , stion: • 1½ cups (250g) mixed peel sugge ight. ng overn Servi e into freez the centre of a sheet of baking until it begins to melt, then . r in freezer. stir until • ¾ cup (120g) coarsely chopped raisins the choc-orange sauce paper about 5cm (2 inches 7 Chill serving platte sugar is melted and brown r; ) larger platte than onto ed lightly. • ¾ cup (120g) coarsely chopped seeded the cake; position cake upside Turn pudding basin Remove from heat, slowly down damp cloth. stir in dried dates on paper. cover basin with a hot, juice; return to low heat, stir to ease pudding until 8 Using spatula and small • ²⁄³ cup (140g) coarsely chopped seeded Gradually pull plastic toffee dissolves (do not boil). pieces of c. g plasti din rd Stir in pud disca r; as prunes white icing, patch any holes onto platte liqueur. Frozen Christm on cake. ice cream hours (+ cooling, 9 Brush egg white evenly • ½ cup (125g) coarsely chopped glacé Chocolate orange 3 Pour syrup over fruit mixtur Prep + cook time 2 over cake. boil e. Cover Serves 10. , milk and rind to the ing). cream Knead white icing on surface apricots freez Bring & with plastic wrap; store mixtur ning chur dusted Remove from e in a with icing sugar until smoot in medium saucepan. • ²⁄³ cup (150g) coarsely chopped glacé cool, dark place for 10 days, h; roll to smooth. vanilla bean until 1 stirring stir ; • olate 6mm (¼-inch) thickness. pineapple heat, add choc every day. pouring cream Lift icing yolks and sugar • 2½ cups (625ml) onto cake with rolling pin, Meanwhile, whisk egg 4 Preheat oven to 150°C • ½ cup (70g) slivered almonds smoothing /300°F. Line gradually • 1 cup (250ml) milk icing over cake with hands in small bowl until pale; re. Stir base and sides of deep 22cm • ½ cup (60g) coarsely chopped walnut dusted mixtu (9yolks cream egg 4 hot s into with • k icing n whis sugar. Using sharp knife, inch) round or deep 20cm • 1 tablespoon finely grated orange rind g, about y packed light brow firml boilin (8-inch) ut g) (110 witho cup cut excess icing away from •½ over low heat, sauce square cake pan with one base of • ½ cup (110g) caster (superfine) sugar Choc-orange olate layer mixture thickens sugar cake. sauce is the perfect 10 minutes or until of brown paper and two layers Strain • ¼ cup (60ml) orange juice This decadent choc tmas of ice cream the back of a spoon. 10 Mix scraps of white icing nge coats ora cheat’s frozen Chris and te baking paper, extending papers cola and cold Cho accompaniment to roof bowl • ½ cup (125ml) Grand Marnier 5cm heatp cream large ing into boiled rd pour water custa (2 inches) above edge. to a sticky paste. Spread pudding, opposite. • 1¼ cups (310ml) Cover surface • 250g (8 ounces) butter, softened about 2 tablespoons of paste set over bowl of ice. 5 Beat butter and brown Makes 2 cups tes. (180ml) milk cup minu in cold. ¾ centre 15 sugar until time • in small stand • ½ cup (110g) firmly packed light brown Prep + cook of board; centre cake on prepar with plastic wrap; grated orange rind bowl with electric mixer until ed cream maker*, just dark eating (semi• 2 teaspoons finely sugar board. Move the cake to the Pour custard into ice chopped dark combined; beat in eggs, one • 400g (12½ ounces) correct at a ped coarsely manufacturer’s • 100g (3 ounces) finely • 5 eggs position on the board; using churn according to sweet) chocolate, chop time. Stir butter mixture into sharp ctions (semi-sweet) chocolate g instru eatin fruit follow r, chopped coarsely (or s butte • 2 cups (300g) plain (all-purpose) flour craft knife or scalpel, carefu instruction mixture. Mix in sifted flour; • 30g (1 ounce) extract lly cut n ice cream spread • 3 egg yolks away excess baking paper extend • 2 tablespoons Grand Marnier, extra vanilla in tips, see right). Spoo sugar oon mixture into pan. Tap pan rfine) teasp 1 (supe rum, r • nas, ing caste firmly on in sulta • ¹⁄³ cup (75g) ing cream around base of cake. into large bowl, stir • 1kg (2 pounds) ready-made white icing bench to settle mixture into nas • 1 cup (250ml) pour e-flavoured liqueur chocolate. pan; 11 Secure ribbon around • ¼ cup (40g) sulta or brandy cherries, peel and extra level cake mixture with wet • 1 egg white, beaten lightly cake using pins spatula. • 2 tablespoons orang have an ice (remove before cutting cake). * Note: If you don’t 6 Bake cake about 3½ hours. • 1 tablespoon rum ered glacé cherries • ½ cup (80g) pure icing (confectione re Push mixtu rd Remov custa e rs’) cachous gently into icing in butter in medium cream maker, pour cake from oven, brush with • ¼ cup (50g) quart chopped mixed peel sugar, sifted the design 1 Stir chocolate and with foil and extra of your choice. medium saucepan of into shallow pan, cover liqueur; cover hot cake with • ¼ cup (40g) finelyfinely chopped dark • 25cm (10-inch) round covered cake heatproof bowl over Chop ice foil then board smooth. freeze until almost set. Extract from The Austra turn upside down to cool • 50g (1½ ounces)et) chocolate, extra • decorative ribbon simmering water, until lian Women’s large bowl in overnight. beat and ly ur. Serve rough Weekly, The Christmas Collecti cream 7 Trim top of cake with sharp eating (semi-swe extract, cream and lique in until ss, Stir • silver cachous 2 on (ACP proce knife to or r, Books, RRP $29.99). Availab with electric mixe ensure it sits flat when turned e . le ing freez from warm upside p) metal pudd bookstores or online at th. Return to pan and smoo 1 Grease 2-litre (8-cu . Bookreps.co.nz. ss once more ic wrap; place in Page 4 again, repeating proce basin. Line with plast sweetliving Issue 5 November 2012 - January , then allow to 2013 Freeze about 1 hour freezer. n ice cream into www.sweetlivingmagazin sugar ice cream, split soften slightly; spoo e.co.nz 2 To make brown e scrap s, additional hway pudding basin (or add vanilla bean in half lengt the recipe. saucepan. Add pod, ingredients) and follow seeds into medium l cartons of to the boil. 300m bring three pan; use to to milk It’s fine cream and e, rather sugar recip and this yolks for k egg pouring cream 3 Meanwhile, whis carton for the gradually whisk than buying an extra in small bowl until pale; re. Stir over low ional 35ml. addit into hot cream mixtu alian Women’s alian Women’s g, about 10 minutes heat, without boilin Extract from The Austr Extract from The Austr Collection (ACP Collection ens and coats the Weekly, The Christmas able from Weekly, The Christmas Available or until mixture thick n custard into large s, RRP $29.99). Avail Books, RRP $29.99). Book (ACP back of a spoon. Strai . ice; online at e at Bookreps.co.nz large bowl of bookstores or onlin from bookstores or heatproof bowl set over of custard surface Bookreps.co.nz. discard pod. Cover cold. until Page 5 stand ; living with plastic wrap 2013 sweet

sweet living

Recipes

g sweet livin Recipes

Photo credits: Pages 19, 20 & 26: Laperla; Page 21 Ekaterina Nikitina; Pages 22 & 23 Ruth Black; Page 24 Vikarayu; Page 25 Natalia Larina; Page 27 Oxana Afanasyeva; Page 28 Brigitte Bonaposta; Page 29 Scerpica. Page 40

sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

Issue 5

November 2012 - January

agazine.co.nz www.sweetlivingm

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Free

Felt napkin holders

d nloa w o d ere

Make your own classy napkin holders for the festive season.

h click d your free

loa to down er template old h in napk

These napkin holders are super easy to make. Download the template and print onto light card stock. Cut out and use as a pattern to cut felt leaves. Cut a slit in the top leaf big enough to fit the bobble at the other end. Spray felt with starch and iron to stiffen. Join several leaves together and you can make a decorative table runner too.

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For bookworms

sweetliving

Great book ideas for Christmas

The Australian Women’s Weekly, The Christmas Collection ACP Books, RRP $29.99 As the subheading says, “All the recipes you need for the festive season”. It features breakfasts, drinks, finger food, starters, the big Christmas main course, Christmas puddings, Christmas cakes, mince pies, chocolates, edible gifts – even recipes for Christmas leftovers. A great book, available from bookstores or Bookreps.co.nz

Animal Hats 25 fun projects to crochet, knit and appliqué | Rachel Henderson Kyle Books, RRP $34.99 Rachel Henderson’s new book, Animal Hats, is packed full of fun projects. It doesn’t matter if you’re a total beginner or an experienced stitcher, there are designs suitable for all – a fox, a dragon, a lamb, a polar or a panda bear. Distributed by New Holland, available from bookstores.

Sew Your Own Rag Doll Cath Kidston | Quadrille, $34.99 This book contains everything you need to sew your own cloth doll. It contains a length of specially printed cotton that, when cut and sewn, makes a delightful doll and a special dress-up outfit. And if you want to make her outfits even more special, there are additional Page 42

sweetliving Issue 5

ideas for embroidery to make your doll completely unique. Suitable for anyone aged 8 and upwards, this is the perfect kit to learn the basics of both machine sewing and hand embroidery. Available from bookstores or Bookreps.co.nz

Cath Kidston Collection Quadrille, RRP $64.99 Three of Cath Kidston’s bestselling books are now available in a special presentation slipcase, creating the ultimate gift for crafters. This trio of craft titles offers ideas and instructions for over 100 projects, including sewing, patchwork, cross stitch and needlepoint projects, all in Cath Kidston’s signature style. Also includes fabric for a shoulder bag. Available from bookstores or Bookreps.co.nz

The Home-Sewn Home Vanessa Arbuthnott with Gail Abbott CICO Books, RRP $39.99 Soft furnishings – from curtains and cushions, to bed and table linen – can provide the perfect finishing touches to a room. If you’re renovating or you’ve just bought a new home, this is the book for you. Includes 50 inspiring projects for creating your own home furnishings and a comprehensive basic techniques chapter. From bookstores or Bookreps.co.nz

November 2012 - January 2013

Shabby Chic Interiors Rachel Ashwell CICO Books, RRP $39.99 This is a re-release of Rachel Ashwell’s extremely popular book – though this time it comes with a soft cover. As the name suggests, the book celebrates all that is Shabby Chic, with flea-market finds, pretty vintage objects, and objects of pure functionality. Romantic florals, ruffles, pure white linen, vintage fabrics and accessories, and bleached floorboards, this is a great book for anyone who loves the Shabby Chic style. Available from bookstores or Bookreps.co.nz

Granny Chic Tiff Fussell & Rachelle Blondell Kyle Books, RRP $45 If you have a fondness for scraps of pretty paper, bits of yarn and vintage fabric and other forgotten finds, this book will be just your cup of tea. Granny Chic offers inspiration to keen crafters hoping to breathe new life into fabrics and secondhand objects. From handmade notebooks to lacy lampshades and peachy pinnies, each of the craft ‘recipes’ brings the granny chic look to life while allowing you to give them your own personal twist. Distributed by New Holland, available from bookstores. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Gifts to make Hand-crafted gifts are extremely fashionable. Create gorgeous prezzies for friends and family.

Make a felt hat Here’s the ultimate gift for a friend. A beautiful felt hat. Professional milliner Magdelaine Snowden of MadgeHatter says anyone can make a hat and with very little equipment. “I use a hat block, a kettle and sheer muscle power. Start by steaming the felt cone [available on Trade Me or Ebay] over the kettle, then stretch it over the block and hold it in place with pins. Once dry, trim the excess felt off, fold the edges under and sew Petersham ribbon around the edge to hide the cut-off edge. Then decorate with whatever takes your fancy. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

“For professional looking flowers like these, milliners use a millinery flower iron. You place the cut fabric shape onto a foam pad covered with fabric and then you press it with the iron. This should mould the fabric into a petal shape. “Finally, sew a hair comb onto the underside. That’s used to secure the hat into place (I do not use hat elastics as these can usually be seen in the hair, which is unattractive). The comb is completely obscured by hair and hat.” Visit Magdelaine’s website, MadgeHatter. Issue 5

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Tutu cute What little girl wouldn’t love a tutu? There are hundreds of no-sew tutu tutorials online, but we thought this one here was more traditional-looking. And it rather cleverly recycles some old curtains. We love this flouncy tulle skirt too. Or for an even more flouncy, fluffy tutu for your little one, try this fairy tutu dress here.

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Gifts to make Crocheted ballet slippers

Free

Sweet Living crochet expert Lisa van Klaveren designed these gorgeous ballet slippers to keep your tootsies snug. We love the soft, pretty colours, though they’d look equally fine in bright hues. Our free pattern gives instructions for all sizes, so you can whip up a pair for the whole family. Check out Lisa’s website, Holland Designs, for more patterns, but first download your free one here.

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sweetliving

Knitted Polar Bear Hat Rachel Henderson’s new book, Animal Hats, features 25 fun hats to knit, crochet or make from fleece. If you like knitting in the round, this sweet polar bear hat is the perfect project for you, and it’s ideal for when conditions are arctic.

Free

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table For prin

Size: Adult (one size) Materials NEEDED:

~ Yarn A: 1 x 50g ball of Rowan Cocoon shade 801, Polar. ~ Yarn B: 1 x 50g ball of Rowan Cocoon shade 802, Alpine. Page 46

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~ Oddment of black yarn. ~ Round marker. ~ Stuffing or toy filling.

November 2012 - January 2013

Needles:

~ 1 set of 5mm (US 8) double-pointed needles. ~ 5mm (US 8) 40cm/15 ½ in circular needle. ~ 4.5mm (US 7) crochet hook.

Tension:

19 sts and 25 rows to 10cm/4in square over st st using 5mm (US 8) needles.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

Pattern:

Earflaps (make 2): Using 2 x 5mm (US 8) dpns and yarn A, cast on 5 sts. Row 1: k1, kfb, k1, kfb, k1 (7 sts). Row 2: and every alt row: p to end. Row 3: k1, kfb, k3, kfb, k1 (9 sts). Row 5: k1, kfb, k5, kfb, k1 (11 sts). Row 7: k1, kfb, k7, kfb, k1 (13 sts). Row 9: k1, kfb, k9, kfb, k1 (15 sts). Row 11: k1, kfb, k11, kfb, k1 (17 sts). Row 13: k1, kfb, k13, kfb, k1 (19 sts). Row 14: p to end. Continue straight in st st until earflap measures 9cm/31/2in. Leave sts on spare needle.

Hat:

Using 5mm (US 8) circular needle and yarn A, cast on 8 sts. With RS facing, knit across 19 sts of first earflap, cast on 23 sts, k across 19 sts of second earflap, then cast on 8 sts (77 sts). Join into a circle and place round marker. Work in the round in st st (k every round) until hat measures 14cm/51/2in from cast on edge. Begin shaping. (Change to dpns when necessary.) Round 1: *k5, k2tog, rep from * to end (66 sts). Round 2: and every alt round: k to end. Round 3: *k4, k2tog, rep from * to end (55 sts). Round 5: *k3, k2tog, rep from * to end (44 sts). Round 7: *k2, k2tog, rep from * to end (33 sts). Round 9: *k1, k2tog, rep from * to end (22 sts). Round 10: *k2tog, rep from * to end (11 sts). Round 11: k2tog to last st, k1. Break off yarn, thread it through the remaining sts and fasten off securely.

Making up:

Weave in all ends. Using 4.5mm (US 7) crochet hook and yarn B, work 2 rows of double crochet (see page 30) around the edge of the hat and earflaps. Position the ears on the sides of the hat 5cm/2in from the centre-top, using the picture opposite to guide you, and attach them to the hat using an overstitch. Stuff the muzzle with toy filling. Position it on the front of the hat using the picture opposite to guide you, and attach it using an overstitch. Embroider the nose and mouth using satin stitch and backstitch. Embroider the eyes using satin stitch. Make 2 I-cords (see below), each 25cm/10in in length, using yarn A. Attach a cord to each earflap. Using yarn B, make 2 pom poms (see page 39), each with an 8cm/31/4in diameter. Attach 1 pom pom to the end of each cord.

I-cords:

Cast on the required number of stitches onto 1 of your dpns and knit all stitches. Now slide all of your stitches worked to the other end of the dpn in your right hand and transfer that needle to your left hand. With the working yarn at the back of the work, insert your right needle into the first stitch on the left needle. Pull the working yarn tightly up to the tip of the right needle and knit that stitch. Continue to knit the rest of the stitches along the row. Repeat in this way until you have the required length of fabric.

Knitted mouth:

Using 4 x 5mm (US 8) dpns and yarn A, cast on 24 sts (8 sts on each of 3 needles). Join into a circle and place round marker. K 4 rounds. Round 5: *k2tog, repeat from * to end of round (12 sts). Round 6–7: k to end. Round 8: *k3tog, repeat from * to end of round (4 sts). Break off yarn, thread it through the remaining sts and fasten off securely.

Ears (make 2):

Using 4 x 5mm (US 8) dpns and yarn A, cast on 30 sts (10 sts on each of 3 needles). Join into circle and place round marker. K 6 rounds. Round 7: *k2tog, repeat from * to end (15 sts). Rounds 8–10: k to end. Round 11: *k2tog, repeat from * to last st, k1 (8 sts). Round 12: k to end. Round 13: *k2tog, repeat from * to end (4 sts). Break off yarn, thread it through the remaining sts and fasten off securely. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Extracted with permission from Animal Hats by Rachel Henderson, published by Kyle Books and distributed in New Zealand by New Holland, RRP $34.99. Issue 5

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sweetliving

Free

d nloa w o d ere h click d your free

loa to down pattern. ro p a n

Make a fancy apron Use the classic Dresden plate quilting technique to create this vintage-look apron.

Materials: • Fabric for apron: 2m x 112cm • Floral fabric for trim: 10cm x 65cm • Lace for trim: 10cm x 65cm (or similar width) • Scrap pieces of fabric for Dresden plate • Sewing thread

1

Print template onto lightweight card stock and cut out. Use template to cut 20 Dresden wedges and 1 circle.

4 5

To make apron cut a piece of fabric 65cm wide x 60cm long. Hem bottom of apron, folding over raw edge 1cm, pressing, then folding over another 1.5cm. Press and stitch.

Take floral fabric and fold over top and bottom edges 1cm. Press. Position on apron with top edge about 18cm up from hemline, depending on the width of your lace (you want your lace to come just below the hemline). Topstitch the top edge. Overlap lace about 1cm on bottom edge of floral fabric so lace comes just below hem. Topstitch. Fold sides of apron over 1cm, press, then turn over another 1.5cm. Stitch.

2

Make the wedges for Dresden plate. Fold a wedge in half lengthwise with wrong side of fabric together. Stitch 6mm seam across the top. Cut corner as shown in diagram 1 on PDF. Place wedge so wrong side of fabric is facing you, pull top corners down to form a point in centre and iron seam allowance open.

3

Stitch wedges together along long edges to form a circle. Sew from top to bottom, as any irregularity at bottom edges can be hidden behind the circle.

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6

To make waistband and ties, cut a strip of fabric 175cm x 10cm. Fold in half lengthwise with right sides together. Stitch around open edges with 6mm seam, leaving 60cm in middle of band open (this is where the apron will fit). Turn right side out and fold under the open edge to form a neat edge. Insert top of apron into band and topstitch all around band.

7

Make circle for centre of Dresden plate. Sew a gathering stitch around circle 6mm in from raw edge. Make a cardboard template the size of the finished circle. Place on wrong side of fabric and gather thread so seam allowance forms a circle around template. Press, remove template, then press again.

8 November 2012 - January 2013

Position circle of wedges on apron and top stitch around pointed edges. Stitch circle in centre. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

Weave your fabric The very talented Gédane created this amazing bag after crafting her own woven fabric. What a perfect Christmas gift for someone special – or make it for yourself! Once the fabric is woven, it’s just a simple matter of stitching it to a back piece and adding a zip. Head on over to Gédane’s website for step-bystep instructions and photos on how to weave fabric. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Leather jewellery pouch This leather pouch is ideal for storing your jewellery when travelling.

Materials • Leather offcuts in rose, tan and cream (we bought cheap leather offcuts from an emporium store) • Dressmaker’s scissors • Pinking shears • Leather hole punch • Air erasable pen • Fabric glue • 18mm wide button Cutting measurements Rose leather: • Front piece: 250mm x 340mm • Tie: 750mm x 12mm • 4 x thongs: 450mm x 3mm; 650mm x 3mm; 20mm x 3mm; 6mm x 3mm • Small coverlet: 60mm x 40mm Tan leather: • Inside lining: 250mm x 340mm • Large pocket: 215mm x 950mm • Flap for large pocket: 215mm x 450mm • Smaller pocket: 215mm x 70mm • Ring band: 230mm x 20mm Cream leather: • Front trim: 250mm x 45mm Page 50

sweetliving Issue 5

1

Take small pocket and large pocket flap and cut curves with pinking shears as shown. Then use pinking shears to cut around the edges.

Free

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ta For prin

November 2012 - January 2013

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Gifts to make

2

On pockets and pocket flap, punch holes for threading thongs, with each hole 10mm apart and 10mm away from edges. Glue edges of pockets and press onto inside lining. Let dry then punch holes through existing holes to pierce the inside lining.

7

Punch holes along top edge of front trim, then glue to front piece, with the scallop hanging just below the bottom edge. Punch holes through existing holes of trim to pierce the front piece. Thread thong through holes.

8

Cut two slits in centre of front piece big enough to fit ties. Thread though ties. Then pink edges of small coverlet, and punch holes around the edges. Glue coverlet over slits and ties and let dry. Punch holes through existing holes of coverlet through to front piece then thread throngs through holes.

3

Thread thong through holes. The easiest way to do this is to cut one end of the thong to a point and thread it through the holes by hand. At the last hole, take thong to underside, cut off and glue end piece flat.

4 5

Glue pocket flap above large pocket, let dry, then punch holes through existing holes, piercing the inside lining. Thread thong through holes.

To make the ring band, cut the designated piece of leather into the shape pictured below. The thin piece measures 4mm wide and 60mm long. Glue the wrong side of the leather, fold over the thin piece to form a loop, taking it about 10mm onto the wider bit of leather on the wrong side. Fold the long edges of the band over to meet in the centre, covering the loop end, and weight down until leather adheres. Position ring band on lining, punch two holes on either side of band end and thread through thong. Attach button at other end and place loop around it.

6

9

Glue inside lining to front piece.

Draw a scallop edge on the front trim with an air erasable pen then cut out with pinking shears. Punch decorative holes with hole puncher.

Optional idea

You can replace the scallop trim with a fancy diamantĂŠ buckle available from craft shops. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Fumblenut

Barbara Allen’s adorable Christmas elf, designed especially for Sweet Living readers, is simply to-die-for. Needle felted with carded wool, this happy chappy does double duty as a decoration and child’s toy. Barbara has written two books on needle felting, Needle Felting Magic and The Ashford Book of Needle Felting. She has also developed a range of needle felting kitsets.

Free

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

Crochet a doll Sarah Garrod, aka Annaboo of Annaboo’s House, created these cute little crochet dolls, which we reckon are just the ticket for crafty Christmas gifts. So we’re ever so pleased that she’s also supplied a free pattern for all to download. Head on over to her website, Annaboo’s House, to find free patterns for these cheeky monkeys and adorable doll.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

Materials • 2 contrasting fabrics • Sewing thread • Brown paper for pattern • Tracing paper • Sewing machine • Buttonhole foot

Free

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His and her PJs Using this simple technique, you can make pyjama pants for the whole family.

3

Take pattern again and draw a line 12cm up from the bottom edge. This is your cuff line. Using tracing paper, trace the entire cuff outline. Cut out and place pattern on contrasting fabric (on fold). Cut out.

5

Turn pants right side out and fold the top of the waist down 60mm at front and 40mm at back. Trim so the folded fabric measures 350mm all around.

6

Create two buttonholes for the ties. Position them 15mm on either side of the centre seam on the front of the pants and starting about 5mm down from the top of the waist. Make the buttonholes 15mm long.

1

Grab a pair of pyjama pants that fit the recipient. Fold PJs in half, place on brown paper and trace around the outline. If PJs are elasticated at waist, stretch them out to get the full length. Add a seam allowance to the pattern. Allow an extra 10mm at hemline; 20mm on sides and crotch, and 60mm at top edge.

2

Place straight edge of pattern on fold of fabric and cut out. Fold fabric again and cut another pant leg. Page 54

sweetliving Issue 5

4

Take pant pieces and line up cuff to bottom edge, placing the right side of the cuff fabric to the wrong side of the trouser fabric, as shown. Pin. Stitch a 10mm hem, then turn cuff fabric over so wrong side of cuff sits on top of right side of pant leg. Iron flat. Fold over top edge of cuff by 10mm, press, then top stitch. Stitch pant sides together. Overlock or zigzag edges. November 2012 - January 2013

7 8

Make the casing. Fold under the bottom edge of the folded down fabric at the waist to create a 25mm casing. Topstitch.

To make the tie, cut a piece of fabric 1.5m x 40mm (or a suitable length for the size of the recipient). Fold long edges into centre, then fold in half and top stitch. Attach a safety pin to one end of the tie and thread through the casing via the buttonholes. Tie knots on ends. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

Free

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Felt picture cube A soft cube with a different picture appliquéd on each side is the perfect gift for babies and toddlers.

Materials • 6 x felt squares in different colours 120mm x 120mm each • Selection of different coloured felt for animals • Embroidery thread • Foam cube

1

Download the PDF, and print onto light cardstock. Cut out, then use patterns to cut out animal shapes from felt.

2

Appliqué animals onto felt square using straight stitch or blanket stitch. Use French knots for eyes and a single feather stitch for the fish scales.

3

Stitch felt squares together, using blanket stitch, to form a cube. Leave one side open. Insert your foam cube and stitch final square in place. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

Homemade soaps Make fun-shaped soaps for kids and adults in next to no time.

Materials • Glycerin melt-and-pour opaque soap base (available from Amor Aromatherapy) • 20 drops orange essential oil (or your choice of essential oils) • Silicone moulds (we used inexpensive muffin moulds) • Microwave safe jug Optional Materials • Dried flower petals • Oatmeal (for exfoliating) • Honey • Food colouring

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

The melt-and-pour method is very easy. Simply chop the soap base into 2cm cubes and place in your microwave jug. Microwave on medium until melted, about 5 minutes. Remove mixture from microwave and add essential oil and optional ingredients. Mix, working quickly. Pour into moulds and allow to set (it takes less than an hour). And that’s it! If using silicone moulds, the soaps simply pop out.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

For each bag you need: • 500mm long x 160mm wide piece of fabric (use fabric that doesn’t fray too much) • 1.25m cord • Sewing thread • Safety pin to thread cord • Felt, fabric or embroidery thread for embellishing

Drawstring bags Make a simple drawstring bag for each soap, decorating each bag with a similar pattern to the soap inside. Finished bag size: 180mm x 140mm.

4

2

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Overlock or zigzag short edges, then fold overlocked edges under 70mm and press. About 10mm up from edge, sew a double row of stitching 10mm apart to make a casing to thread the drawstring. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Decorate the front of the bag with felt, fabric or embroidery then, with right sides together, stitch a 10mm seam down the sides. Sew a zigzag stitch or use pinking shears to trim along the sewn edges. Turn bag right side out.

3

Snip a small hole on each side of your bag close to the seams, making sure you penetrate only the top or outside of the casing and not the back side of the casing. Issue 5

Cut cord in half and attach a safety pin to one end of one length of cord and thread it through one of the openings in the casing. Feed the cord through the casing, bringing it back out the same opening. Attach the safety pin to the other length of cord and thread it through the opposite opening in the casing, bringing it back out the same opening.

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

Homemade herbal gifts

Anti-wrinkle eye make-up remover This rich, silky, anti-wrinkle oil blend is very effective at removing make-up, eye shadow and mascara while enriching the delicate eye tissue in this sensitive area.

Cedar & juniper aftershave This recipe makes enough for 3 x 100ml bottles of aftershave. It has antiseptic and astringent properties plus a deep woody and masculine fragrance without any nasty chemicals for the man in your life.

Recipe by Donna Lee of Cottage Hill Herb Farm. Materials • 20ml organic cold pressed castor oil • 1 teaspoon shea nut butter • 1 teaspoon coconut oil (solid type) • 10ml organic rosehip seed oil • 10ml oat infused oil • 8 drops geranium pure essential oil

Recipe by Donna Lee of Cottage Hill Herb Farm.

Melt shea nut butter and coconut oil in a cup placed in hot water. Once melted remove from hot water and cool well. Slowly add to the other oils, stirring briskly to prevent clumping. Add essential oil, place in a pump bottle and shake well.

Materials • 200ml vodka (38 – 40% proof) • 2 tablespoons juniper berries (infuse these two together for at least 3 weeks or more if possible. Strain the juniper berries from the alcohol) • 100ml witch hazel extract • 40 drops cedarwood essential oil • 10 drops juniper essential oil • 12 drops sweet orange essential oil Place the alcohol extract into a large bottle or jar. To this add 100ml witch hazel extract, 40 drops cedarwood essential oil, 10 drops juniper essential oil, 12 drops sweet orange essential oil. Shake vigorously and bottle into a spray bottle or suitable aftershave container.

While essential oils go a long way, the initial cost may seem expensive. Go halves with a friend to make your money go further too. Page 58

sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

Free

d nloa w o d ere h click instructions

table For prin

Garden herbal balm Tania Cottew of Amor Aromatherapy whips up a soothing balm with herbs picked from the garden.

Materials • 15g beeswax • 85ml vegetable oil (grapeseed, apricot kernel or sweet almond) • Handful of garden herbs (I’ve use lavender, rosemary and thyme) • Double boiler or saucepan with a saucer in the base that you can sit a glass jug on, or saucepan with a glass or metal bowl that will sit over the top • Spoon for stirring (I prefer a silicone spatula) • Funnel with built-in filter or use a coffee filter/muslin/cheesecloth in a funnel. • Glass jar (sterilised) for balm

Step 1 Place herbs in double boiler and just cover with oil. Gently heat until herbs lose their colour – this means their active constituents (medicinal properties) have been absorbed by the oil. This recipe took 20 minutes as rosemary is woody. Step 2 Strain the oil to remove herbs. Step 3 Melt the beeswax over a low heat, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the herbal oil to the beeswax and stir. Pour into glass jar.

Herbal properties • Rosemary – antiseptic, deodorising, healing, improves blood circulation. • Thyme – antiseptic, antibacterial, heals wounds, cuts, sores and acne. • Lavender – insect repellent, relieves itching, soothes dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis and sunburn.

Makes about 100g. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

Page 59


Natural Bodycare Products & Ingredients NZ’s widest range of cosmetic micas

Did you enjoy reading how to make your own balm? Go a step further and convert it to a lip balm by pouring it into a 10ml cosmetic pot or a lipstick tube. Add colour with food colourings, mica or even some leftover lipstick of your favourite colour. You can also add some food essence if the flavour needs improving. If it doesn’t work as expected, don’t panic and send me an email thru my website. Would you like to know how to make your own lotions and potions? Always wanted to know how to make Mineral Cosmetics? Want to be able to buy all your ingredients and supplies in one place? Come shopping at Amor’s online store for essential oils, vegetable oils, lotion, balm, bodywash, shampoo and soapmaking supplies, mineral cosmetic supplies & DIY kits, books with recipes, and a wide range of glass & plastic bottles, jars, pots and cosmetic containers.

I

f making Body Washes feels a bit daunting, come and browse our BeSpoke range where you can custom scent/exfoliate/ moisturise our base wash for your specific needs. We have 3 different packaging options too, as some showers like it tall, others short and squat, some people like a disc cap, others prefer a pump.

O W

ur natural gentle wash base is made with water, cocobetaine, coco glucoside, honey and potassium sorbate. It is honey coloured and has a lovely texture, and is suitable for all ages, even new babies, and can be pH balanced to suit.

ith the BeSpoke blends you have the option of adding coloured jojoba exfoliating beads and/or moisturising cocoa butter or shea butter. One of my friend’s told me the Shea Butter & Jasmine option “smells like Summer, is very creamy and looks like honey ice-cream”, when she came to stay and I put some in the Guest Suite. Which option appeals to you?

www.AmorAromatherapy.co.nz Page 60

sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Gifts to make

Herbal creams labels

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www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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Freshen up your next paint job with Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free, which combines the popular low sheen of Resene Zylone Sheen without the unwanted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for better indoor air quality. Improved air quality can help prevent headaches, asthma, nausea, respiratory complaints and allergic reactions. And to suit all tastes, Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free is available in a wide range of popular Resene colours using Resene non VOC tinters. Now that’s fresh thinking. Available exclusively from Resene.

0800 RESENE (737 363) www.resene.co.nz

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Crafts for kids Keep youngsters busy this holiday season with fun crafty projects.

Free

d nloa w o d ere h click ad your

lo to down ad man re b r e g in g pattern

Good enough to eat can be This lovable doll is very easy to make and sewing easy an It’s n. -sew hand or hed machine stitc project for kids. paper or First, download the PDF, print it onto pattern the out cut then k, stoc card lightweight shown on as pieces. Join the pieces with sticky tape ic. fabr from the PDF, then cut two body shapes

embroidery On one piece of fabric, stitch a face with . thread or apply buttons or safety eyes right sides Take both pieces of fabric and, with body, leaving together, sew a 6mm seam around the Machine n. the feet and one side of the body ope all corners Nick . feet stitch or hand-sew foot pads to out, stuff, side t righ doll with scissors before turning . ther toge ning ope y then topstitch the bod

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

Paper Christmas tree Make a cheap and easy Christmas tree decoration out of cut paper. Take a piece of reasonably thick A4 paper and fold in half. On the fold, draw the shape of a Christmas tree. Within the shape, draw diamonds, squares and other shapes. Don’t make these shapes too intricate as you will need to cut them out. Fold another piece of A4 paper and put it underneath the first piece of paper, with the edges lining up. Cut out your Christmas tree shape, making sure you cut through both papers. Cut the internal squares and diamonds with a craft knife. Unfold the Christmas trees, and mark the halfway point in the centre of the tree from top to bottom on the fold line. Take one piece and, from the top, cut down to the halfway point. Take the other piece and cut, from the bottom, up to the halfway point. Then slot the two trees together.

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Crafts for kids

Origami critters Take one piece of paper, fold, and fold again, and voila!… a sculptural masterpiece. Origami is fun, easy and inexpensive, and, whether you’re creating a classic crane bird or a more exotic parrot, it’s highly addictive! Delve into the art of sculptural paper folding with these fun projects. You will find a video on how to put together this exotic macaw parrot over on You Tube; click through to the Origami Resource Center for a selection of butterfly projects; Origami Art has a tutorial on how to make a flower bouquet like ours. The Origami Resource Center has a selection of flower projects too. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

Deluxe paper hats This project calls for some masterful cutting and a side serving of patience. It will keep older children occupied for hours.

Free

load n w do re he click ad your

Download the PDF and print out your pattern. Then, using a craft knife or small scissors, cut around the edges. Cut the patterns inside the animal shapes too if you’re feeling particularly crafty. Join the two bands together with glue or sticky tape and your hat is ready.

lo to down pattern at paper h

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Crafts for kids

Cutting edge Make beautiful handmade cards or one-of-a-kind wrapping paper with just a few snips.

These cut-out designs are easier to make than they look, and all that’s required is a pencil, paper, glue and craft knife. Use two contrasting coloured papers or card to make the design stand out. On one of the papers, draw a flower or butterfly (or other) design in pencil. It can be as simple or as intricate as you desire. Place the piece of paper on a cutting mat (or something to protect the surface you’re cutting on) and cut around the flower or butterfly outline with a craft knife, leaving part of the petal, leaf, body or antennae uncut so that it still remains attached to the paper. You can remove certain parts entirely, such as the stem of the flowers and grass outlines, to make them stand out more. Once cut, glue the paper to your contrasting coloured paper and lift out the petals, leaves and wings for a 3-D effect. You can fold the paper in half to form a card or frame it. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

Page 67


sweetliving Paint your own mug Hand-painted mugs make great gifts and is a fun activity for kids. All you need is a mug and some food-safe porcelain paint, such as Marabu Porcelain Paint (in pots) or Marabu Painters (pens), which are available from art supply stores. Marabu Porcelain Paint is completely dishwasher resistant without the bother of oven fixing. The odourless, water-based paint is ideal for children.

To paint your mugs Make sure the surface of your mug is clean. Wash with hot water and detergent then allow to dry completely. Draw your design on a piece of paper first as a mock-up. Once you’re happy with the design, it’s time to start painting. Using a thin paintbrush, copy your design onto the mug. Leave the paint to dry according to the paint manufacturer’s instructions (some porcelain paints require oven baking). Then it’s ready to use.

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Crafts for kids

Silly socks These mischievous sock cats are a breeze to make and will appeal to all ages – adults included!

Free

• You need one pair of socks per cat. Choose socks with short legs. We’ve used d nloa size 4-7 women’s socks. dow here • Turn socks inside out and lay flat with click ad your lo heels facing up. Download the cutting to down attern tp sock ca instructions PDF and, using an air erasable pen, draw cutting lines onto your socks. • On sock 1, cut out ear shapes. Machine sew or hand-stitch a narrow seam around ears and head. Turn right-side out. Stuff the head and ears. Allow for a short neck, and hand-sew a running stitch at the base of the head. Pull the threads at both ends tightly to gather, then tie knots to secure. • Draw a nose and mouth on the head with an air erasable pen and embroider. Sew on buttons and a patch for eyes. • Cut out legs on sock 2. Machine sew or hand-stitch a narrow seam around legs. Turn right-side out. Stuff right to the top. Put neck of sock 1 inside top of sock 2 and hand-stitch sock band of sock 2 to base of head. • Pinch the sides of the body where the arms will be and stitch from front to back to form the arms. • Make a tail from the remaining sock pieces you cut from sock 1 or 2. Hand-stitch to the back of your sock cat. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

Designer plane Use wooden ice block sticks and scrap pieces of wood to make trains, planes and automobiles. Glue pieces together using craft glue or wood adhesive.

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Crafts for kids

Recycled robots Got lots of bits and bobs and gadgets lying around? Put them to good use and turn them into robots. Spend a day with the kids making fun toys from recycled materials. Glue the materials together or help your children to screw them in place. Then download our robot face and body, print them onto white paper then glue in place. Alternatively, you can print them onto A4 adhesive paper, available from stationery stores.

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www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Backyard sustainability Grow your own fresh fruit year round

Play Russian roulette Want to play Russian roulette with your food? Eat a Padron pepper. These small green capsicums are mostly mild, but one in 8-10 is extremely hot. And it’s impossible to tell by looking at them which ones will sear your tongue. Fry them in olive oil, garlic and salt and serve them up to your guests, one at a time, to liven up a dinner party. Padron peppers are easy to grow. Plant in a sunny spot in the garden or grow in containers. Seeds are available from Italian Seeds Pronto

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

8 easy herbs to grow Chives

Oregano

Allium schoenoprasum Perennial

Origanum vulgare Perenial

Uses: Their mild onion flavour can liven up even the most humble foods. Even their pretty pink flowers can be eaten – scatter the delicately flavoured florets over fresh salads and cooked dishes or use to flavour vinegars.

Uses: Oregano is ideal for dishes requiring long, slow cooking, as it retains its flavour well. Use it on top of pizzas, in spaghetti sauces and casseroles, or in tomato, egg and cheese dishes.

Position: Chives grow best in full sun but benefit from a little shade during hot summers. They like a humus-rich soil, so dig in plenty of compost or well-rotted manure before planting. Soil must be freedraining otherwise bulbs may rot. Sow 10-20 seeds in a circle to form one clump. Plant a minimum of three clumps if harvesting regularly. When harvesting, snip no more than 5cm from the base. After harvesting an entire clump, feed with liquid fertiliser and leave to develop a new set of leaves.

Position: Plant in a sunny spot in rich soil. Good drainage is essential. The best flavours are produced where summers are warm and relatively dry. Oregano’s flavour changes during the growing season, its pungency in direct proportion to the amount of sun it receives. The plant’s oils are generally more concentrated in summer, and less so in autumn. If you’re planning on drying leaves for culinary purposes, harvest your plants during summer. The best flavour develops just after buds have formed but before flowering.

Sweet basil

Thyme

Ocimum basilicum Annual

Thymus vulgaris Perennial

Uses: Basil is the ultimate complement to tomatoes. Pair them in omelettes and salads, in pastas, and atop pizzas and bruschetta.

Uses: Thyme complements most meats and enhances the taste of many vegetables. Add it to homemade soft cheeses, patés and stuffing. Add a couple of tablespoons of chopped thyme to homemade bread, or make a herb butter.

Position: Basil’s greatest need is warmth. It won’t grow where temperatures drop below 10˚C, and a dip below 4˚C will kill plants. Plant in full sun, in free-draining soil that’s been enriched with compost. Where temperatures reach above 30˚C, a little midday shade is beneficial. Basil needs plenty of moisture but don’t overwater. Feed occasionally with liquid fertiliser. Continuously pinch off the growing tip to prevent flower production, which will slow down leaf growth. If plants become woody and stop producing, cut back by a third and feed to stimulate new growth.

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November 2012 - January 2013

Position: Plant in a sunny spot in free-draining soil. If planting in pots, use a mix that’s low in nutrients. Rich soil encourages softer plants and diminishes flavour. Plants in the garden grow best without rich fertilisers. An organic mulch or a little blood and bone sprinkled around each plant in spring is all that’s required. Although drought tolerant, thyme will benefit from occasional watering in dry spells.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Backyard sustainability Rosemary

Rosmarinus officinalis Perennial Uses: Goes well with roast meats, particularly lamb, and enhances many vegetables. Rosemary butter is a great accompaniment to bread, pasta, vegetables, and steak. When baking bread or scones, add a tablespoon of finely chopped leaves to the dough. Position: Plant rosemary in full sun or light shade, in freedraining soil. If waterlogged, plants may succumb to root rot. Rosemary likes a slightly limy soil. In acid soils, plants will benefit from the addition of lime. Rosemary is tolerant of wind and salt so it’s ideal for coastal conditions. Tips of plants may ‘burn’ in heavy frosts, so position in a sheltered spot. Prune plants lightly after flowering to maintain shape.

Coriander (cilantro) Coriandrum sativum Annual

Uses: Add leaves to dishes just before serving, as the taste and smell evaporates after prolonged cooking. For a spicy twist, use coriander leaves as a substitute for basil in pesto. Position: Coriander grows best in the cooler seasons. During hot weather, plants quickly go to seed. Grow from seed in spring or autumn. Sow seed directly in the ground every two to four weeks for a continuous supply. Full sun is best in cooler climates or when growing in early spring or late autumn. Part shade is best in hot spots and during the heat of summer. Feed regularly with liquid fertiliser to promote luscious leaf growth.

Rosemary butter Mix 2-3 cloves of chopped garlic, 1 tablespoon of chopped rosemary leaves, ½ teaspoon lemon zest, ¼ teaspoon red chilli pepper (can substitute with salt and pepper) into ½ cup of softened butter.

Mint

Mentha Perennial Uses: Can be chopped and added to vegetables such as peas and new potatoes, or use as a sauce with roast lamb. Position: Mint needs to be contained, as it spreads quickly. Plant in pots and either grow on your patio, or bury the pot up to its lip in the ground. Position in sun or part shade in well-drained, fairly rich soil. If plants are getting a little scraggly or leggy in summer, trim them back to promote new growth. Mint is prone to the disease rust, which appears as tiny orange spots. Remove infected leaves immediately and bin otherwise it will spread quickly. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Parsley

Petroselinum crispum Biennial Uses: There is little in the kitchen that doesn’t benefit from a few sprigs of parsley. Add to stews, sauces, vegetables, rice dishes, omelettes, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, fish, poultry, veal and pork dishes, and stuffing. The stalks, whose flavour is more intense than the leaves, can be used to flavour soups and stocks. Tie together for easy removal. Position: Parsley likes nutrient rich, moisture-retentive soil. Dig in plenty of compost or well-rotted manure before planting. Soil must be free-draining. Parsley likes sun, though in warm areas provide afternoon shade. After sowing seeds, never let the soil mix dry out. When seedlings are about 10cm high, feed monthly with a liquid fertiliser.

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November 2012 - January 2013 sweetliving

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sweetliving

next issue Out March 2013 • DIYs and crafts for the home - our home decorating issue • Make cushions, rugs, throws • Delicious cookie and cracker recipes • Homemade chocolates • Grow your own spices • Readers’ money-saving tips

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sweetliving Issue 5

November 2012 - January 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Sweet Living Magazine Issue 5  

Crafts, DIYS, delicious recipes, green living, backyard sustainability - a free online magazine

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