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sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 12 December 2015 - April 2016

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Inside: Knit a child’s hooded sweater Crochet & knitted gifts Make a lavender salve Homemade herb gifts Creative kids’ activities Printable colouring pages Delicious sweet treats www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 12

December 2015 - April 2016 sweetliving

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sweetliving Issue 12

December 2015 - April 2016

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sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 12

December 2015 - April 2016

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From the editor It’s Christmas already! And before you know it, it’ll be a brand new year. Which is why we have not focused on Christmas in this issue (too fleeting). Rather, we’ve directed our attention towards fun activities for you and the kids during the school holidays. Though that’s not to say we haven’t included lots of ideas for handmade gifts. There are several quick solutions for last-minute handmade Christmas gifts, plus some bigger projects that will keep you going throughout the holidays. Toys, clothes, accessories, edibles - we’ve got the lot. Plus we’ve got printable colouring pages (the biggest craze right now) for you to download. And if you’re feeling a little handy in the garden, you could plant the herb gotu kola for health purposes, and some succulents to make a very cool star planter. My very best wishes for a fantastic Christmas. Happy holidays.

Jane www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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34 32 8

contents 6 8 11 23

4 ways with... lavender

29 44 51

Handmade gifts

Medicinal and edible recipes.

Cake decorating

Make a super cute bear cake.

Sweet treats

Recipes for cakes and sweets.

Handmade home

Quick decorating techniques and chic recycled décor for the modern home. Be inspired by these beautiful handmade gifts.

Kids’ activities

Fun, creative activities for the school holidays.

Backyard sustainability

Grow gotu kola, plus succulents.

48 Contacts www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Editor: Jane Wrigglesworth Designer: Geoff Fitzpatrick, grafix@fitzi.co.nz Editorial enquiries: jane@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Advertising enquiries: admin@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Readers’ tips: tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Join us on Facebook

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4 ways with…

Lavender salve

Herbes de Provence

Lavender has antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, so this soothing salve is ideal for sores, cuts and inflamed skin. First, make an infused lavender oil. See instructions here.

This mixture of dried herbs is typical of the region of Provence in France. It can be sprinkled into omelettes and stews or over meat, fish and poultry before cooking. Or mix with vinegar, oil and a little Dijon mustard to make a salad dressing.

• • •

• • • • • • • • • •

15g beeswax, roughly chopped or grated 100ml lavender-infused oil (see instructions above) 10-20 drops of lavender essential oil

Place beeswax and lavender oil in a double boiler and heat on low until the beeswax has melted. Check consistency. Pour 1 tablespoon of mixture onto a saucer and place in freezer for 1-2 minutes. Remove from freezer. For a thicker consistency, add more beeswax. For a softer consistency, add more oil. Once you have it at your desired consistency, remove from the heat and add the lavender essential oil. Pour into small jars.

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December 2015 - February April 20162016

1 teaspoon dried lavender flowers 2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried rosemary 2 teaspoons dried sweet marjoram 1 teaspoon summer savory 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon dried mint 2 teaspoons dried basil 1 teaspoon dried sage 1 teaspoon fennel seeds

Place herbs in a food processor or blender and process until finely chopped. Store in an airtight container. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Free

d nloa dow e lavender fre e Your bels her la

Bath Salts

DIY deodorant

Lavender bath salts

Lavender is calming on the skin and, together with its delicious aroma, is a great ingredient for homemade deodorant.

Make some relaxing bath salts for yourself or a friend. These are great for adults and kids.

• • • •

To make: Mix together 1 cup Epsom salts, ½ cup sea salt, 3 tablespoons baking soda, ¼ cup dried lavender flowers and 8-10 drops lavender essential oil. Mix well so the essential oil blends in. Store in a sealed jar. Use ⅓ cup per bath.

2 tablespoons baking soda 2 tablespoons cornflour (cornstarch) 2 tablespoons coconut oil 7 drops each of lavender and peppermint essential oils

Mix baking soda and cornflour together. Mix in the coconut oil, then add the essential oils. Mix well then pour into a small glass jar. To use, dab a small amount on your underarms and spread to a thin layer. A little goes a long way.

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sweetliving

Bear necessities Make this cute cake for a little one’s birthday party or special occasion. Cake decorating icon Leslea Matsis explains how.

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Cake decorating tips

Teddy Head Secure a wooden dowel to a large polystyrene ball with a hot glue gun. Cover the ball with some rolled out fondant in a teddy bear brown shade. Create some ears by rolling balls of the same coloured fondant and attach them to the covered ball with some sugar glue. Roll a large ball of pale brown fondant into an oval shape, then attach to form the nose/mouth then mark a centre line with a sharp knife. Roll small balls of black fondant to form the eyes and nose. You can leave the teddy bear at this stage, but to create the furred effect roll out some brown gumpaste very thinly and cut into small squares. Round off the squares slightly, then finely fringe with a small pair of scissors. Using some sugar glue, attach these small pieces to the polystyrene ball starting with the nose section first. Make sure the pieces overlap one another for a seamless, fluffy look.

Teddy Arms Create two sausage-shaped pieces of gumpaste. Let them firm up for a few days. Once this is achieved, cover the arms with fur pieces also.

Teddy Cake Bake a 15 or 18cm (6 or 7 inch) square cake, then cover with a ganache or buttercream crumb coat and then a layer of fondant. Cut rectangular pieces of gumpaste, slightly taller than the cake itself, to form the box sides. Let the side pieces firm up in the freezer, then attach with water. Make stripes for the box by using a variety of coloured gumpaste cut in different widths for effect. For a lid, cover a thick cake board with fondant, then, using the same colour in gumpaste, create rectangles for the edges of the lid. Once they are dry, attach to the rest of the lid with royal icing. Decorate with gumpaste dots. To assemble, place the polystyrene head into the completed (cake) box and attach arms with royal icing. Make a large bow out of gumpaste and secure around the neck of the teddy with royal icing.

Teddy Cupcakes Bake cupcakes using your preferred recipe. Cover with a mound of buttercream and smooth with a hot knife. Roll out some fondant and cut with a circle cutter. Place the circles of fondant onto the wetted cupcakes and firm up overnight. Create teddy related decorations using gumpaste or fondant.

Visit Leslea’s Facebook page to see more of her beautiful designs – or to book a cake decorating workshop. See more about her workshops and classes and purchasing flower cutters on her Facebook shop here.

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Sweet treats

A collection of delightfully goodlooking and suitably scrumptious sweet treats for Christmas.

Chocolate baubles

Decorate your cakes this festive season with chocolate and gold baubles. Use edible glitter paint or luster dust to create festive colours like silver or gold, or whatever your chosen colour scheme is. For the chocolate baubles, you’ll need a hemisphere mould. Find out how to make these chocolate baubles on page 20.

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Blueberry cake This delicious cake, filled with fresh blueberries, takes on another dimension when topped with blueberry glaze. Recipe download on page 20.

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Sweet treats

Vanilla cupcakes Just the thing for a quick fix, these easy-to-make, go-to cupcakes are topped with vanilla and raspberry-swirl icing. Recipe download on page 20.

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Chocolate banana cake Just add chocolate for a posh twist on the good old classic banana cake. Top that with chocolate ganache and you have a crowd pleaser. Recipe download on page 20.

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Sweet treats

Mocha cupcakes Chocolate and coffee go hand in hand. These grownup cupcakes are just the ticket for a fancy afternoon tea. Recipe download on page 20.

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sweetliving Cranberry coconut cake This cake can be made a day ahead if time is short. It’s the perfect coffee cake, to be shared with friends or family. Recipe download on page 20.

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Sweet treats

Brandy balls

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No party would be complete without rum or brandy balls. These are incredibly easy to make and a complete winner in the taste department. They make perfect gifts too. Recipe download on page 20.

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Baked doughnuts These doughnuts are truly delicious – nobody will have a clue that they are baked instead of deepfried. Recipe download on page 20.

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Sweet treats

Nutty baklava parcels Author, food writer and food scientist Michelle Tchea whips up some sweet sticky treats for guests. Get the recipe here.

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sweetliving

Sweet treats recipes

Free

d nloa w o d eats

et tr ALL swe s here recipe

Chocolate baubles Decorate your cakes this festive season with chocolate and gold baubles. Use edible glitter paint or luster dust to create festive colours, like silver or gold, or whatever your chosen colour scheme is. For the chocolate baubles, you’ll need a silicone hemisphere mould. Use tempered chocolate and pour into mould. Spread it out so that it covers the sides. Turn over the mould and let the excess chocolate fall out. The sides of the mould will still be covered. Place the mould flat, right-side up, and scrape excess chocolate off the top of the mould with a spatula. Then turn the mould over and leave the chocolate to set, upside down. When set, push on the mould so the chocolate is released. Take one of your chocolate hemispheres and press it on the base of a warmed cookie sheet or saucepan for a couple of seconds to melt the edges slightly. Place the hemisphere on top of another hemisphere to form a ball. Wipe the excess chocolate off from the outside seam and let the ball rest in a cool spot, or refrigerate for 10 minutes. Confused? Watch this video to see how it’s done. For the chocolate gingerbread cake, see our recipe in Issue 9.

Blueberry cake

175g butter, room temperature 1 cup caster sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 3 large eggs 1 ¾ cups self-raising flour ½ teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup sour cream 200g fresh or (thawed and drained) frozen blueberries

Blueberry glaze 2 cups icing (confectioner’s) sugar 2 teaspoons freeze-dried blueberry powder 3-4 tablespoons warm water

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1. Preheat oven to 180deg C (350deg F). Grease a ring cake pan. 2. In a large bowl, cream butter, sugar and vanilla with an electric beater until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Add flour and baking powder and combine with a wooden spoon. 3. Mix in the sour cream, then fold in the blueberries. 4. Pour the batter into your prepared pan. Bake for 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. 5. To make the glaze, place icing sugar and blueberry powder in a mixing bowl, then mix in 3 tablespoons of the water. Add another tablespoon of water if necesssry. Pour glaze over cake and allow to drip down the sides. Optional: Decorate with sugar flowers and a sprinkle of coconut.

December 2015 - April 2016

Vanilla cupcakes

125g butter, softened 1 cup caster sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 eggs 2 cups self-raising flour, sifted ¾ cup milk Pinch of salt

Icing 2 cups icing (confectioner’s) sugar 1 teaspoon butter 2-2 ½ tablespoons boiling water 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 teaspoons freeze-dried raspberry powder 1. Preheat oven to 190deg C (370deg F). Line a 12-cup muffin pan with paper cupcake cases. 2. Cream the butter, sugar and vanilla

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extract with an electric beater until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time. 3. Fold in half the flour and half the milk, plus the salt, then fold in the remaining flour and milk. Pour the batter into the cupcake cases until two-thirds full. Bake for 12-15 minutes until golden on the top and the centre of the cupcake springs back when pressed. Cool. 4. To make the icing, place icing sugar and butter in a small mixing bowl. Pour the boiling water onto the butter to melt. Add the vanilla extract and mix everything together. In a separate bowl, mix the freeze-dried raspberry powder with a little water. 5. Ice the cupcakes. While still soft, dip a skewer into the raspberry mix then swirl the skewer on the top of an iced cupcake to create a pattern. Continue until all cupcakes are decorated.

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Chocolate banana cake

1 ¾ cups self-raising flour 1 ½ cups sugar ½ cup cocoa powder 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda ½ teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1 cup (2-3) mashed bananas 1 cup lukewarm water ½ cup milk ½ cup canola oil 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

Chocolate ganache 270ml (9 fl oz) cream 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 250g (9 oz) dark chocolate, roughly chopped 1. Preheat oven to 180deg C (350deg F). Issue 12

Grease a large ring cake tin. 2. I n a large bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder and salt. In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs, mashed bananas, water, milk, oil, and vanilla extract. 3. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until combined. Pour the batter (it will be fairly thin) into your prepared pan and bake for 40-45 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. Serve cold with chocolate ganache. Chocolate ganache Heat cream and butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan until just hot. Pour cream over the chocolate and leave, untouched, for 3 minutes, then stir to combine.

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Mocha cupcakes

140g (5 oz) butter, softened 90g (3 oz) chocolate 4 large eggs ¾ cup caster sugar 1 cup self-raising flour 2 tablespoons cocoa powder Pinch salt 2 teaspoons finely ground hazelnut flavoured coffee (or regular coffee) Icing (confectioner’s) sugar for dusting 1. Preheat oven to 190deg C (375deg F). Grease 15 fluted cupcake tins. 2. Melt the butter and chocolate in a double boiler. Set aside to cool. 3. Beat the eggs and caster sugar with an electric beater until pale and thick. Sift the flour, cocoa powder, salt and coffee into the egg mixture and mix together with a wooden spoon. Gently fold in the chocolate mixture. 4. Pour batter into your prepared tins and bake for 12-15 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre of one of the cupcakes comes out clean. When cool dust with icing sugar.

Cranberry coconut cake

125g (4 ½ oz) butter ¾ cup caster sugar 2 teaspoons orange zest 2 eggs, separated ¾ cup dried cranberries ½ cup coconut 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 cups self-raising flour 2/3 cup orange juice Icing (confectioner’s) sugar, for dusting

6. W  hen cool, dust with icing sugar and serve with plain yoghurt.

Chocolate brandy balls

1. Preheat oven to 180deg C (350deg F). Grease a 20cm (8 in) round springform pan. 2. Cream butter, sugar and orange zest with an electric beater until light and fluffy. Add egg yokes and mix well. 3. Transfer mixture to a large bowl and add cranberries, coconut and brown sugar. Add the flour and orange juice and mix in well. 4. Beat egg whites in a separate bowl until soft peaks form. Fold into the batter. 5. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake for 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. Page 22

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200g (7 oz) dark chocolate 25g (2 tablespoons) butter, melted 1 egg yolk 2 tablespoons brandy 1 cup icing (confectioner’s) sugar, sifted Coatings: freeze-dried raspberry powder, desiccated coconut, chopped pistachios, cocoa powder, etc. 1. M  elt chocolate in double boiler. Remove from heat and add melted butter, egg yolk and brandy. Mix until combined, then add icing sugar. Mix to a soft, smooth consistency. 2. Roll into balls, then roll the balls in your chosen coating.

Baked doughnut balls 1 egg 1/3 cup canola oil ½ teaspoon salt

December 2015 - April 2016

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder ½ cup brown sugar ¼ teaspoon nutmeg ½ cup milk 50g (1.7 oz) butter ⅓ cup white sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon Strawberry jam

1. Preheat oven to 180deg C (350deg F). Grease a 12-hole round-bottom cupcake pan. 2. In a large bowl, mix together egg, oil, salt, flour, baking powder, brown sugar, nutmeg and milk until smooth. 3. Fill your prepared cupcake pan until half full. Bake for 15 minutes. 4. Melt butter. In a small bowl, mix together sugar and cinnamon. Roll each ball in the melted butter then the sugar mixture. Push a skewer into the centre of each doughnut and, using a piping bag, pipe strawberry jam into the centre. 5. Eat while still warm.

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Handmade home Quick decorating techniques and chic recycled dĂŠcor for the modern home.

Mix & match Mix stripes with zigzags and warm colours, such as light-coloured timber with cooler greys and blues, to achieve eclectic appeal. You can make your own quilt cover to complement your scheme by sewing lines onto it. Select your fabric and cut two pieces to size. Place a piece of batting the same size on top of one piece of fabric, on the wrong side. Place the other piece of fabric on top, with the right side showing, and pin in place. Then sew straight lines across your fabric. Fold the edges under neatly and hem around them.

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Handmade accessories

Decorating a child’s room doesn’t mean you have to scrimp on style. Make your own fun accessories from inexpensive timber.

Whether it’s a girl’s bedroom or boy’s one, all kids love simple shapes. Buy wood cutouts from a craft store and paint them in bold or pastel colours. String them up for a striking mobile. You can craft a rug with matching patterns too. Cut a piece of thick felt or carpet into your desired shape then, using fabric paint, stamp or paint patterns onto it.

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Create cloud-shaped shelves from inexpensive wood, such as pine. For the back, draw the shape of a cloud onto the wood, then cut it out with a jigsaw. Cut a shelf to fit across the width of the cloud. You can either keep the front edge of the shelf straight or cut out scallops. Then cut out two brackets. Screw the shelf and brackets to the cloud base from the back. Paint your cloud shelves white.

Make hexagon shadow boxes to shelve items or provide fun shapes. Using dressed timber, cut 6 sides 180mm x 115mm x 19mm. For a bigger or smaller shadow box, simple cut your sides longer or shorter. Cut a 60-degree mitre (30-degrees on the mitre saw) at both ends of each panel. Apply wood adhesive to each end and use small nails to join the sides together. Place the hexagon onto a piece of plywood and trace the shape onto it. Cut it out, apply wood adhesive to the edges, then nail it to the back of the hexagon. Paint your shelves.

December 2015 - April 2016

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Handmade home

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Owl seat cushion

Design a comfy back cushion to fit any size chair.

Materials • 1 chair • Brown paper (for drawing pattern) • Assorted fabrics (for body, wings, eyes and nose) • Old jeans (for pockets) – optional • Felt (for pupils) • Sewing thread • Sewing machine • Cushion stuffing • Scissors • Pins

1

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Measure the height and width of the back of your chair. Add 1.5cm (5/8 inch) for seams. Use these measurements to draw a square/ oblong onto brown paper. Add an extra 8cm (3 inches) to the top of your square/oblong to allow for ears. Cut out the square/oblong.

sweetliving Issue 12

December 2015 - April 2016

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Handmade home

2

3

Fold the paper square in half and draw an ear at the top of the paper, curving down the side. Cut out. Draw some wings, an eye and a beak onto additional paper and cut out.

5 6 7

Place the wing pieces right sides together and stitch around the edges, leaving the bottom open. Turn right side out and stuff. Pin wings to the right side of the front body piece that has the eyes and nose. Sew in place.

Pin the paper templates to fabric and cut out. You need 3 x body pieces, 4 x wings, 2 x eyes and 1 x nose. Cut out 2 small circles from felt for pupils.

8 9 4

Add optional jeans pockets at this point if you wish. On our second version, we also hand-stitched half circles to the eyes and a ruffle to the wings (both cut from jeans fabric) later on.

Fold the back and front pieces under 1.5cm (5/8 inch) at the bottom. Place the back piece onto the front piece, right sides together. Then place the second front piece on top of the back piece, with the wrong side facing out. Stitch together, leaving the bottom open. Turn right side out and stuff the front pieces. Sew the bottom front edges together.

On the right side of 1 body piece, sew on eyes using a zigzag stitch. Sew on the nose, also using a zigzag stitch. (We used a contrasting thread to stand out.) Hand-stitch felt pupils onto the eyes with a double thread. (We stitched a cross shape on each pupil.

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sweetliving

Gift &

activities guide Save time, save hassles – do all you shopping at home at these great online stores. Check out these activities ideas too.

Join the fun!

Guiding commences in February. Visit www.girlguidingnz.org.nz/join-us to register your interest or phone 0800 22 22 92 to find a unit near you.

Italian Seeds Pronto Handmade Gourmet Condiments Gift packs and baskets made to order – any price, any size

www.peplers.co.nz Email: sales@peplers.co.nz

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A range of high quality handmade vegetable soaps. Deliciously fragrant. Visit www.cameronjamesdesigns.co.nz to check out the cutest range of

www.italianseedspronto.co.nz knitting patterns and kits.

December 2015 - April 2016

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Handmade gifts Stuck for beautiful gift ideas? Be inspired by our handmade goodies for family and friends.

Cheeky monkey Stuffed animals always elicit smiles from tots, and this cute little monkey is no different. Worked in crochet, it’s easy to craft and provides lots of handmade fun. This pattern is based on ChimuChimu’s monkey pattern – to get it, click via this link here, then click the link in the left-hand column entitled ‘pattern of crocheted monkey’.

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Free

Knit a hoodie What little child wouldn’t love this hooded sweater? Suitable for both boys and girls, it’s knitted in Wendy yarns.

This hooded sweater, from Naturally Yarns, is knitted in Peter Pan Merino Baby DK. It can be crafted with or without the teddy face and ears, from a range of different colours. Check out the colour range here.

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Handmade gifts sweetliving

Sew a dress in an hour

girl’s frock

Once you’ve made your pattern, you can whip out a dress for your little one (or yourself) in under an hour. This adorable pattern and instructions come from a 1931 newspaper that is now in the public domain. Download the pattern, left.

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When the fabric of a little girl’s frock is charmingly quaint or amusingly gay, the style of the dress itself may be of the simplest sort. In a single day you can make eight or 10 little dresses like the one sketched here.

d nloa e dow her

ern the patt

Free

The amount of material needed for each frock will be twice the length the dress is to be from the top of the shoulder to the bottom, plus twice the hem allowance. Here are all the dimensions needed to make a good kimono sleeve dress pattern to exactly fit the child. Take a piece of paper as long as the dress, plus the hem allowance, and as wide as one half the all-round chest measure. Divide the paper lengthwise into fourths, as shown here by the dotted lines numbers one, two, and three. Measure down from the top of the paper one-fourth the chest measure, and mark line number four across the paper at this point. Point A is halfway between the top of the paper and line four. B is one half inch below A. C is one and one half inches below the upper right-hand corner of the paper. Determine the slant of the shoulder seam by drawing a line from the top of line one to point C. Outline the back neckline with a curve drawn from A to the top of line one. The front of the neckline is drawn from B to the top of line one. Point D is one inch up from the lower right corner of the paper. Determine the line of the bottom of the skirt by drawing a curved line from this point to the bottom of line 2. Mark E one inch in from D on this line. Draw a line from point D to the intersection of lines 2 and 4. This determines the flare of the skirt for the front of the dress. Shape the underarm line with a curve from the D line to the intersection of lines three and four as you see it here. A line from the base of this curve to point E will give the right flare for the back of the skirt. The bottom of the sleeve follows line three from line four to the shoulder line. The left edge of this pattern is placed on a fold of the goods in cutting.

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sweetliving Issue 12

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Handmade gifts

Knit a cosy hat This cosy hat is knitted using two hanks of Amuri DK. It’s light, soft and warm. Knit it for yourself or as a gift for someone special. Thanks to Naturally Yarns, you can keep yourself cosy on cool days and nights.

d nloa dow rn here

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Free

Check out the Amuri DK range here, or drop by your local retail knitting store to check out the available colour range.

Using 3.75mm (US 5) needles, cast on 108 sts.

NR - *K2, p1, k3; rep from * to end.

Row 1 (RS) - *K3, p3; rep from * to end.

NR (RS) - *P3, k1, p2; rep from * to end.

Row 2 - *K3, p3; rep from * to end. Rep last 2 rows 7 times more. Change to 4mm (US 6) needles.

NR - *K2, p1, k3; rep from * to end. Rep last 2 rows twice more.

NR (RS) - *K1, [M1, k1] twice, p3; rep from * to end - 144 sts.

NR (RS) - *P1, p2tog, k1, p2tog; rep from * to end - 72 sts.

NR (WS) - *K3, p1, k3, p1; rep from * to end.

NR - *K1, p1, k2; rep from * to end.

NR(RS) - *K5, p3; rep from * to end.

NR (RS) - *P2, k1, p1; rep from * to end.

NR - *K3, p1, k3, p1; rep from * to end.

NR - *K1, p1, k2; rep from * to end. Rep last 2 rows twice more.

NR (RS) - *K5, p1, [M1p, p1] twice; rep from * to end 180 sts. NR - *K5, p1, k3, p1; rep from * to end. NR (RS) - *K5, p2, k1, p2; rep from * to end. NR - *K2, p1, k2, p1, k3, p1; rep from * to end. Rep last 2 rows 4 times more. NR (RS) - *K1, k2tog, k2, p2, k1, p2; rep from * to end - 162 sts. NR - *K2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1; rep from * to end. NR (RS) - *K4, p2, k1, p2; rep from * to end. NR - *K2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1; rep from * to end. Rep last 2 rows 7 times more. NR (RS) - *K1, k2tog, k1, p2, k1, p2; rep from * to end - 144 sts. NR - *K2, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1; rep from * to end. NR (RS) - *K3, p2, k1, p2; rep from * to end. NR - *K2, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1; rep from * to end. Rep last 2 rows once more. NR (RS) - *Slip 2 tog, k1, pass the 2 slipped sts over, p2, k1, p2; rep from * to end - 108 sts.

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NR (RS) - P2; *k1, p3tog, k1, p3; rep from * to last 6 sts, k1, p3tog, k1, p1 - 54 sts. NR - [K1, p1] twice; *k3, p1, k1, p1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k2. NR (RS) - P2; *k1, p1, k1, p3; rep from * to last 4 sts, k1, p1 k1, p1. NR - [K1, p1] twice; *k3, p1, k1, p1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k2. NR (RS) - P2tog; *k1, p1, k1, p3tog; rep from * to last 4 sts, k1, p1, k1, p1 - 37 sts. NR - K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end. NR - P1, *k1, p1; rep from * to end. NR - K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end. NR (RS) - K1, *k2tog; rep from * to end - 19 sts. P 1 row. Break yarn, leaving longer end, thread end through rem sts, pull tight, secure end. Join back seam.

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These fun lions, designed by Australian Country Spinners, are easy enough for beginners to crochet.

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Handmade gifts

Lion toy Easy Crochet

Measurements Lion measures approx 30cm across

Patons cotton blend 8 ply 50g balls colourway 1 Main Colour (M – 26 Coral) 1st Contrast (C1 – 6 Yellow) 2nd Contrast (C2 – 16 Apple Green) 3rd Contrast (C3 – 2 Black)

4 1 1 1

Colourway 2 Main Colour (M – 24 Fresh Green) 1st Contrast (C1 – 22 Amethyst) 2nd Contrast (C2 – 25 Flamingo) 3rd Contrast (C3 – 2 Black)

4 1 1 1

Colourway 3 Main Colour (M – 7 Orange) 1st Contrast (C1 – 26 Coral) 2nd Contrast (C2 – 17 Aqua) 3rd Contrast (C3 – 2 Black)

4 1 1 1

d nloa w o d

FULL

the here pattern

Free

Use only the yarn specified. Other yarns are likely to produce different results. Quantities are approximate as they can vary between crochet workers. Check the ball bands to ensure all yarn is from the same dye lot.

Hook and extras • • • •

3.50mm (UK 9) crochet hook. polyester fibre filling. piece of cardboard or medium pom pom maker. wool needle for sewing seams.

Tension Correct tension is not essential for this toy. With correct yarn, your toy will look like our photograph.

Abbreviations Note – Australian/UK terminology is used throughout. ch = chain; cont = continue; dc = double crochet; dtr = double treble; htr = half treble; inc = increase, increasing; lp/s = loop/s; rep = repeat; sl st = slip stitch; st/s = stitch/es; tr = treble; yoh = yarn over hook.

Special abbreviation dec = * yoh and draw up a lp in next st, yoh and draw through 2 lps, rep from * in next st, yoh and draw through all 3 lps on hook. Note – We recommend parental supervision for children under 3 years as this toy has small parts which may present a choking hazard. For yarn colours and stockists, go to www.patonsyarns.com.au www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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Darling sheep purse Kinga Erdem, from My Hobby is Crochet, created this gorgeous purse. She shares her pattern here.

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Handmade gifts Finished Size: 23cm wide x 20cm high (without handle) Gauge: 15 sc x 17 rows = 10cm x 10cm

Materials: • one skein of Aran, 10 ply (heavy worsted) weight yarn; used here Purl Essence Sincerely Everyday, Solids, colourway Cream. • small amount of (soft) pink, brown and black (worsted weight yarn) • 6mm crochet hook for purse • 4.5mm crochet hook for eyes • yarn needle to sew in the ends • scissors Stitches, Terms (US) and abbreviations used: ch: chain sc: single crochet hdc: half double crochet sl st: slip stitch blo: back loop only MC: main color Special Stitches: psc: picot single crochet/ granule stitch (see video tutorial by Moogly here) standing sc: standing single crochet

Sheep Purse Pattern Front Side: With a 6mm crochet hook and MC, chain 24.

Back Side:

Row 1: 1 sc in 2nd chain from hook and 1 sc in each ch across, ch1, turn. (23 sts) Row 2: 2sc in first st, 1 sc in each st till last st, 2sc in last st, ch1, turn (25 sts) Row 3: 1 sc in each st across, ch1, turn (25 sts) Row 4: 2sc in first st, 1 sc in each st till last st, 2sc in last st, ch1, turn (27 sts) Row 5: 1sc in each st across, ch1, turn (27 sts) Row 6: 2sc in first st, 1 sc in each st till last st, 2sc in last st, ch1, turn (29 sts) Row 7- 23: 1sc in each st across, ch1, turn (29 sts) Row 24: (On the wrong side): 1sc in first st and 1 sc in each of next 6 sts, (1psc in next st, 1sc in next st) x8 times, 1 sc in each st till end of row, ch1, turn. Row 25: (On the right side): 1sc in each st across, ch1, turn. (29 sts) Note: Work behind the psc sts from previous row, pushing them to front. Row 26: (On the wrong side): 1sc in first st and 1 sc in each of next 5 sts, (1psc in next st, 1sc in next st) x9 times, 1 sc in each st till end of row, ch1, turn. Row 27: (On the right side): 1sc in each st across, ch1, turn. (29 sts) Row 28: (On the wrong side): 1sc in first st and 1 sc in each of next 4 sts, (1psc in next st, 1sc in next st) x10 times, 1 sc in each of next 3 sts, ch1, turn. Row 29: (On the right side): 1sc in each st across, ch1, turn. (29 sts) Row 30: (On the wrong side): 1sc in first st, *1psc in next st, 1sc in next st, repeat from * across, ch 1. Do not turn! Continue to work granule stitch on the wrong side around the face: 1sc in first st, *1psc in next st, 1sc in next st, repeat from * around, with 2 sts into corner sts, continue the same way till you reach to top. Cut yarn. Fasten off.

Rows 24- 29: Continue working as row 23, sc in each st across. Row 30: (On the wrong side): 1sc in first st, *1psc in next st, 1sc in next st, repeat from * across, ch 1. Do not turn! Continue to work granule stitch around, the same way as for the front side. Ch 1 and cut the yarn leaving a long tail to join front & back pieces together.

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Repeat as for the front side till row 23, inclusive row 23.

Joining the front & back side together: Turn both front and back pieces on the wrong side and place them one on top of each other. With the long tail of the back piece, join the pieces together, slip stitching through both top loops of each side, pushing the psc sts through to pop out on the right side of the purse.

Want to create a cute lamb bib? Get Kinga’s instructions here Issue 12

December 2015 - April 2016 sweetliving

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Ears: With 6 mm crochet hook and soft pink yarn work 9 chs. R1: 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook and 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in each of next 2 chs, 1dc in each of next 3 chs, 3 dc in last st. Do not turn! Continue working in the round on the opposite site of foundation chain: 1 dc in each of next 3 chs, 1 hdc in each of next 2 sts, 1 sc in next ch, 2 sc in same ch used for the first sc at beg of round, sl st to top of first sc. Cut yarn. Fasten off. R2: Join MC with a standing sc into back loop of first sc of previous round. Continue working only into back loop of stitches: 1 sc into same st as the standing sc, 1 sc in next st, 1 hdc in each of next 3 sts, 1 dc in each of next 2 sts, 2 dc in each of next 3 sts, 1 dc in each of next 2 sts, 1 hdc in each of next 3 sts, 1 sc in next st, 2 sc in each of next 2 sts, join with sl st to top of first sc. R3: ch1, 2 sc in first st and 2 sc in each of next 2 sts, 1 hdc in each of next 6 sts, 1 sc in each of next 4 sts, 1 hdc in each of next 6 sts, 2 sc in each of next 5 sts, join with sl st to top of first sc. Cut yarn leaving a long tail. Fasten off. Eyes: With a 4.5 mm hook and black yarn make a magic ring. Round 1: work 6 sc into ring, sl st to top of first sc. Cut yarn. Fasten off leaving a tail to embroider later the eyelashes with. Round 2: Join brown yarn with a sl st to top of a sc of previous round, ch1, work 2 hdc into same st as the sl st and 2 hdc in each of next 4 sc, at the half of the last hdc change to white, finish the stitch and continue with white 2 hdc in last st, sl st to top of first hdc. Cut yarns, leaving a long tail to sew the eyes onto purse.

Attaching the pieces Before sewing the ears onto purse, pinch the end together and sew a few stitches together. Sew the ears and the eyes, embroider the nose, the mouth and the eyelashes referring to the main picture. Pinning the pieces in place will be a great help. Sew the handle to the inside of the purse, putting your strap down about 5 cm to the inside (on both sides). Sew in all ends.

Handle: With MC ch 72, leaving a long tail at the beginning. (Will be used later for sewing one side of the handle onto purse) R1: 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook and 1 sc in each ch across, ch 1, turn. (71 sts) R2: 1 sc in first st, * 1 psc in next st, 1 sc in next st, repeat from * till last st, work 3 sc in last st. Do not turn anymore! Continue working on the opposite site of the foundation ch: * 1 sc, 1 psc*, repeat from * to * so that the psc stitches of the sides are perfectly aligned like in a mirror, ending with 1 sc in last st. Cut yarn leaving a long tail to sew the other side of the handle onto purse.

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Flower applique You can find the free Dahlia Flower pattern here. I haven’t used any button to close the purse, but if you like, you could leave the flower out and sew a button in the middle of the top front side and work a button loop in the middle of the edge from the back side: join yarn and work as many chain sts to fit your button, sl st into same st as the joining. Cut yarn and fasten off. Written instructions and pictures copyright 2015 Kinga Erdem. For more free crochet patterns and tutorials, visit Kinga’s FREE crochet pattern page.

December 2015 - April 2016

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Handmade gifts Knitted facecloth Wrap one of these softas-silk facecloths with a scented soap and you have a beautiful gift for a friend or loved one.

Materials • 1 x 50g ball cotton yarn (for our two facecloths, we used Moda Vera Portsea Cotton in Burgundy and Camel) • 1 x 50g ball cotton yarn in cream, for trim • 3 ¾ mm (UK9/US5) knitting needles • 2.3mm crochet hook

Facecloth To make the facecloth, cast on 60sts and knit, in garter (knit) stitch, as many rows as necessary to complete a square. Cast off.

Picot trim (Pattern is in US terms) Join yarn at right hand corner of square by inserting hook into knitted stitch, pull yarn through. Round 1: 1 ch, 2 sc into corner, continue 1 sc evenly along the four edges of the knitted square (in each corner work 2 sc). Join the round with sl st into the first ch. Round 2: *3 ch, sl st into 3rd ch from hook (picot made), 1 sc into each of next 2 sc, repeat from * around the four edges ending with 1 sc into last 2 sc of first round. Fasten off with sl st.

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Herbal gifts Donna Lee of Cottage Hill Herbs puts together some special blends for beautiful smelling and delicious tasting gifts. Sugar & spice topping This blend can be used to sprinkle over cakes, muffins, biscuits, custards and other desserts.

• • • • •

1 cup sugar 1 ½ tablespoons cinnamon powder ½ tablespoon ginger powder ½ tablespoon orange peel powder Combine well and store in a shaker for dispensing.

Herbal blend for homemade bread • • • • • •

4 parts rosemary, dried and slightly ground 2 parts sage leaf, dried and slightly ground 1 part marjoram, dried and slightly ground 1 part garlic powder 1 part thyme leaf, dried and slightly ground 1 part orange peel powder

Slightly grind the herbs listed, just enough to create a blend that is less fibrous but not completely powdered. Add to homemade breads in the amount of 1-2 teaspoons per loaf, depending on taste.

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Handmade gifts

Christmas lamb rub

Soothing anti-itch bath milk

• • • •

• • • • •

1 teaspoon rosemary powder ½ teaspoon marjoram powder ¼ teaspoon black pepper powder ¼ teaspoon thyme powder teaspoon teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix all herbs together and rub well into your lamb before cooking. The mixture also combines well with honey and/or red wine for rubbing into the lamb or for marinating it.

⅓ cup baking soda ⅓ cup full cream milk powder ⅓ cup coconut cream powder 6 drops chamomile pure essential oil (or turmeric essential oil, if preferred – both are extremely gentle and very safe for irritated skin)

Combine the powders well then, using a mortar and pestle or the back of a spoon, grind the essential oil into a small amount of the combined powders until all the drops are well mixed in. Add to the balance of the powder. Store in a glass container away from light. Use a generous 2 tablespoons per bath for a nourishing, soothing and relaxing soak.

Basic bath milk • •

1 part goat’s milk or full cream milk powder 1 part baking soda (please ensure that you use baking soda and not baking powder which would burn the skin)

This is a cost-effective, silky, soothing formula to which many other ingredients may be mixed if wished. You can use herbs like: Ginger: stimulating and warming Basil: stimulating, very energising Chamomile: soothing, calming and relaxing Oatmeal: silky and very skinsoothing for eczema, burns, etc.

Most ingredients are available from Donna’s online store, Cottage Hill Herbs. Click here

Fizzing fairy bath milk • • • •

1 cup full cream milk powder 1 cup baking soda ¾ cup citric acid 1 teaspoon sparkling mica

Combine ingredients thoroughly and package in a glass container. Use several tablespoons sprinkled over the bathwater for a lovely fizzing effect. Kids love this, as it acts like a powdered bath bomb.

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Lavender sugar This lavender-infused sugar is easy to make and is a wonderful gift. It’s perfect for using in shortbread or muffin recipes, or sprinkled over cakes before serving. Use English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) varieties as they have a lower camphor and resin content than other lavender types.

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Ingredients • 2 cups caster sugar • 3 tablespoons fresh (or 1 ½ tablespoons dried) lavender flowers Method 1. Mix the sugar and lavender flowers together, pour into a jar and seal. 2. Allow the flavours to develop for at least a week before using or offering as a gift.

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Handmade gifts

Solid perfume

Jane Wrigglesworth makes her own perfumes with essential oils.

These divine smelling solid perfumes are easy to make and can be presented as a gift in a locket or mirror compact. For these mirror compacts, I removed the bottom mirror to expose the cavity and left the top mirror intact. You can experiment with different essential oils to find your favourite blend.

Want more? Check out Jane’s online herb course – learn about herbs for stress, herbs for sleeping, herbs for beauty (make your own creams, spa products, perfume, etc), herbs for medicine (make salves, tinctures, etc), cooking with herbs (herb mixes, preserving herbs), herbs for cleaning, and growing your own herbs. Get more information here.

Materials for basic sold perfume • • •

3 teaspoons (15ml) sweet almond oil 40-50 drops essential oils of your choice 2 teaspoons grated beeswax, or beeswax pellets

Measure the almond oil in a mini glass measuring container. Add the essential oils and blend. Set aside. Melt the beeswax in a double boiler or a heatproof container placed in a shallow saucepan of boiling water. Once the beeswax has melted, remove from the heat and stir in the almond oil/essential oil blend. Immediately pour into your perfume container. Allow to set (30 minutes or less). Makes enough for one mirror compact.

Spicy perfume • • • • •

15 drops ylang ylang 6 drops sandalwood 11 drops rose geranium 9 drops sweet orange 4 drops neroli - (I used neroli essential oil in a 3% jojoba mix – pure neroli essential oil is very expensive)

Floral • • • •

6 drops rose geraminum 16 drops lavender 18 drops clary sage 20 drops jasmine (I used jasmine essential oil in a 3% jojoba mix. Use less if using pure jasmine essential oil)

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Kids' activities

Looking for some fun activities for the school holidays? Check out these kid-friendly ideas.

Baking mad Help your kids whip up a goofy cake or cute batch of cookies. The actual baking is just as fun as licking the bowl afterwards.

Teddy bear’s picnic Make some cute cookies to take on a picnic. Bake your favourite cookie recipe. Spread with jam or buttercream. Roll out some bearcoloured fondant and cut out a teddy shape. Place on top of the cookie. Create the facial features using gumpaste or fondant.

Masterchef Junior Give your kids their own chef digs so they look the part.

Animal farm Create fun animals using different coloured cookie batter. Divide the batter into several portions and colour each portion with a different food colouring. Use a round cookie cutter to cut out the face, then use your fingers to craft the ears, eyes and nose, etc.

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Bring in the clowns Use a clown cake tin (or animal or flower, etc) and make a funny cake with your kids. Divide the cake batter in half and add cocoa powder to one half. Fill in the facial features with the chocolate batter first, then add the remaining batter to fill the pan. December 2015 - April 2016

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Kids' activities

Glitz and glamour

Clay unicorn

Decorate a plain headband with cheap costume jewels found at thrift stores or dollar shops. Simply use a strong craft glue to fix them to the band.

This adorable unicorn is made out of gumpaste. But you could also follow the same instructions and make one from polymer clay. Check it out here.

Shoe party Decorate an old or cheap pair of shoes with fabric paint and beads. Use a needle and thread or strong glue to attach the beads.

DIY ring Use polymer clay to fashion your own jewellery. Roll the clay out to your desired shape, stamp a pattern onto it (in this case, a rolled up zipper was used as a stamp), then bake according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use superglue to fix to a ring base. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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Felt toys Simple felt toys are fun to play with ��€“ and to make. For smaller kids, cut out the felt shapes for them. Then give them a needle and embroidery thread and teach them how to stitch the shapes together, using a straight stitch or blanket stitch.

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December 2015 - April 2016

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Kids' activities

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December 2015 - April 2016 sweetliving

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Face Painting Use inexpensive face paints and have fun painting animals onto your children’s faces. Or let them paint one another’s faces. Be prepared for a sticky mess though.

Paper doll

Animal masks

Paper dolls are great for taking on holiday because they take up very little room. Download your free PDF here.

Throw a woodland party and give each child an animal mask. Download your free PDF here.

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Kids' activities

Colouring time These colouring-in pages will keep your kids occupied for hours. Simply download and print your free PDFs here.

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December 2015 - April 2016 sweetliving

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Freshen up your next paint job with Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free, which combines the popular low sheen of Resene Zylone Sheen without the unwanted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for better indoor air quality. Improved air quality can help prevent headaches, asthma, nausea, respiratory complaints and allergic reactions. And to suit all tastes, Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free is available in a wide range of popular Resene colours using Resene non VOC tinters. Now that’s fresh thinking. Available exclusively from Resene.

0800 RESENE (737 363) www.resene.co.nz

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December 2015 - April 2016

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sweetliving

Backyard sustainability Grow your own fresh produce, shrubs, trees and flowers.

Gotu kola – the brain herb It may be diminutive, but gotu kola (Centella asiatica) packs a mighty medicinal punch. It’s adaptogenic, antispasmodic, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, an adrenal strengthener, a blood purifier, a nervine, a sedative, a tonic – the list goes on – and its kidney-shaped leaves contain a cocktail of vitamins and minerals. They hold vitamins A, B, C, D and lots of vitamin K, as well calcium, chromium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silica and zinc. In addition, gotu kola contains compounds that are said to help heal wounds and soothe arthritis. But the herb is best known for its ability to improve memory and cognitive functioning. Known as the brain herb, research supports views that the gotu kola boosts memory, increases concentration, promotes clarity and mental alertness, and improves learning capabilities. In one study reported in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, gotu kola produced stronger cognitive function and reduced mood disorders in elderly patients. In another study, the concentration levels of 30 developmentally challenged children significantly increased after taking gotu kola extracts for 12 weeks.

Consuming gotu kola Eat 2-3 leaves about 3cm in diameter each day. After several weeks, increase this to 5-6 leaves. Arthritis sufferers may wish to slowly increase their daily intake to 10-12 leaves. You can consume the leaves in a sandwich, a salad or add to a smoothie.

Growing gotu kola Gotu kola is a creeping perennial that grows in a similar fashion to strawberries, forming small plantlets that root where they touch the ground. It thrives in subtropical areas, in swampy areas, alongside streams and pond margins. In the garden, dig in compost to enhance moisture retention. Plants can be grown in large pots too, but make sure you water well. Bring pots indoors over winter in frosty areas. Can be grown in sun or light shade.

Want more? Check out Jane’s online herb course – learn about herbs for stress, herbs for sleeping, herbs for beauty and medicine, herbs for cleaning, cooking with herbs, and growing herbs. Get more information here.

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Sensational succulents Succulents make great gifts, especially for non-gardeners, as you don’t need to have a green thumb to keep them alive.

Living wreath

Fold a piece of wire mesh into a wreath, line with sphagnum moss and fill with free-draining potting mix. Then poke succulent cuttings through the mesh to make a living wreath.

Succulent bouquets

Making up a posy for someone? Include succulents. Once the other flowers have died, the succulents can be planted out in the garden, making them an everlasting gift.

Rainbow container Buy a simple container and pot up succulent cuttings. Include different coloured succulents; these rainbow containers make pretty gifts.

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Backyard sustainability

Star containers

If you’re handy with a mitre saw, you can whip up these fine wooden stars for yourself or as a gift for a friend. We followed the plans of the Rogue Engineer, Jamieson Rantz, then added a couple of extra things to accommodate our succulents. Once you’ve made your wooden star, add a backing using marine-grade plywood. Place the made-up star on top of the plywood and trace the star’s outline. Cut out the back, then nail it to your star. Fill the star with free-draining potting mix (use a succulent potting mix), place a piece of sacking on top and, using a staple gun, staple the sacking to

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the top. Trim the edges of the sacking. Place some wire mesh on top of the sacking and staple that to the top as well. Trim the edges with a wire cutter. Cut pieces of thin wood to make a trim that covers the sacking and mesh, and nail it to the top over the sacking and mesh. Paint your star if desired. Gather a collection of succulent cuttings. Use a pencil to poke holes in the sacking and potting mix and push the cuttings into the holes until the star is covered. When roots have eventually established, the star can be hung on a wall or fence outdoors. Or you can use it as a table centrepiece. Issue 12

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next issue

sweetliving

out April 2016 • Crochet a blanket • Create beautiful handmade gifts • Handmade toys • Cake decorating tips • Spoil Mum on Mother’s Day • Delicious sweet treats • School holiday activities

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Sweet Living Issue 12