Course Description Catalog

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Luke 2:52

2023-2024
Course Description Catalog
S U
C H RISTIA N A C ADE M Y
"And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man." -
M M I T

Dear SCA Students and Parents,

We are thankful you have chosen Summit Christian Academy to educate your student with a Christ-centered perspective and a firm biblical foundation. Our curriculum and courses have been designed with our mission statement in mind, “To inspire students to achieve their God-given potential through excellent academics and Christian training in a compassionate environment. ” We believe the courses offered along with the activities and athletic programs at SCA will fully prepare your student for the distinct call that God has placed upon his/her life

Please take the time to review this course description catalog so you understand the graduation requirements, prerequisites for courses, policies, and the various classes offered to prepare your student for a bright future Courses selected should build an educational plan, which will fulfill graduation requirements, explore areas of interest, and prepare students for career goals and college entrance requirements The major responsibility for developing a good five-year plan belongs to the students and parents, but our staff is here to guide you through this important process If you need assistance, please set up an appointment by calling our office at (816) 525-1480

As you begin the course selection process, please keep these things in mind:

1. Take the four-year plan seriously in order to stay ahead of any potential issues. The plan can be adjusted along the way.

2. Know the graduation requirements and whether you are currently meeting them. Compare the graduation requirements to your student’s transcripts.

3. Always look closely at the prerequisites necessary for certain courses.

4. All courses are subject to change. Course offerings are dependent upon available resources and student demand.

5. Questions concerning the course registration process should be directed toward the student’s advisor.

6. Approval is required for any class changes following the start of a semester.

May God direct you as you look at the class options and pray for discernment on the classes that God would have you take! He is faithful and just to guide and direct

Blessed to Serve Christ with you,

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Table of Contents

Course Description Guide 4

Junior High Requirements 5

Senior High Graduation Requirements 6 High School Procedures 7

Junior High (7th - 8th grade)

Bible 8

Communication Arts 8-9

Communication Arts Electives 9 Math 10 Science 11 Social Studies 11 Computer 12 Fine Arts 12-13 World Language 14 Physical Education 15 Electives 15

High School (9th-12th grade)

AP/Dual Credit Course Enrollment Requirements 17 Dual Credit Course Offerings 18-19 Advanced Placement Course Offerings 19

Bible 20-22

Communication Arts 23-27

Communication Arts Electives 28-29 Math 30-33 Science 34-37 Social Studies 38-41 Business and Technology 42-43 Business 43-45

Fine Arts (Visual Arts) 46-48 Fine Arts (Theater Arts) 49-51 Fine Arts (Music) 52-55

World Languages 56-59

Physical Education 60-62

Practical Electives 62-63

Discovery Program 64 Summit Tech & Missouri Innovation Campus 64 Part-time Students 65

Appendix A- Seal of Biliteracy 67-72

Appendix B - Pre-Approved Homeschool Courses 73-74 for High School Students

Appendix C - Forms 75-79

Appendix D - Philosophies 80-124

“And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28)
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Course Description Guide

Making Course Selections

Students are encouraged to choose classes after creating an academic plan in conjunction with their parents and the school academic advisors. The overarching framework for the academic plan is SCA’s graduation requirements (see page 7). Choosing an academic plan will also entail discussion on career goals, college plans, and student personal interests. Scheduling conflicts may prevent a student from taking a course of choice. Courses may be canceled if enrollment or staffing changes do not permit the offering. Depending on class enrollment, other courses may be combined or regrouped. Administration reserves the right to adjust a student’s schedule. Student schedules are not guaranteed to keep the same teacher or period from semester one to semester two.

Course Changes

Class schedules are determined for both semesters of the upcoming school year prior to the end of the current school year Student schedules are mailed home in August To request a schedule change for an academic course, students must fill out a Schedule Change Request Form This form requires administrative and parent approval Approved schedule changes may be made through only the first two weeks of each semester

After the deadline student requests for schedule changes will not be considered without academic penalty Courses dropped after the deadline will result in a grade of WF (Withdrawal/Failing) or WP (Withdrawal/Pass) Withdrawing from courses may affect athletic eligibility; therefore, athletes must obtain withdrawal approval from the principal, athletic director and college and career advisor If the course dropped is a year-long course, the entire course may need to be retaken.

Application of Outside Credits (while enrolled at SCA)

No outside course (either through online, summer school, homeschool, or some other method) that is already offered at SCA may be taken for satisfaction of SCA’s requirements without extenuating circumstances and administrative approval. The acceptability of outside courses for SCA credit will be evaluated for accreditation and on its course syllabus, objectives, and expectations. When an outside course is completed, an official record (transcript) must be provided to the College and Career Advisor before it is applied to the appropriate graduation requirement and the student’s official SCA transcript

As a matter of integrity, it is our philosophy that an SCA diploma must reflect an SCA-provided education. It will be rare that an outside course can replace an offered course.

Policy for Recovering a Failing Grade

Junior High

Core courses must be made up for an additional fee. Credit recovery courses are during summer break. Attempts to make up a required class outside of SCA must be administratively approved.

High School

Failing a class has at least two serious implications: It drops the cumulative percentage average and eliminates the earning of .5 credit. Although the failing grade cannot be removed from the transcript, repeating the course will count as credit toward that required subject. Whether the class must be taken again is usually dependent on graduation requirements. If the failing grade was in an elective category for which the credit was not needed to meet graduation requirements, the course need not be retaken However, if the failing grade was in one of the core subjects (Bible, English, Science, History, Math) for which credit is necessary to graduate, then the class must be retaken Credit recovery courses are during summer break Attempts to make up a required class outside of SCA must be administratively approved

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Junior High Requirements

The information below lists the number of classes in each subject area that are required for junior high from Summit Christian Academy.

Bible 2 English 2 Math 2 Science 2 Social Studies 2 Digital Citizenship 0.5 Physical Education 2

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Bible 4 English 4

Math/(If Summa or Magna Cum Laude) *Algebra I may only count toward 4 credits required in magna/summa honors in administratively approved circumstances. 3/(4) Science/(If Summa or Magna Cum Laude) 3/(4) Social Studies 3 Fine Arts 1 Physical Education 1 Electives (this includes a recommended 2 credits of world language for college prep) 9 Speech or Debate 0.5 Technology Applications (Requirement may also be met through Digital Citizenship in Junior High) 0.5 Personal Finance 0.5

Total Credits 29/(30)

The information below lists the number of credits in each subject area that are required for graduation from Summit Christian Academy

The curriculum framework is structured to provide a strong background in the core disciplines, with specific elective requirements to best prepare students for all aspects of life following high school Students and parents are reminded to check each prospective college for specific admission requirements as their requirements may necessitate additional classes Students must have taken digital citizenship in junior high (or transfer a like course) If digital citizenship has not been taken, students will be required to take technology applications

SENIOR HIGH REQUIREMENTS
Subject Credits Required
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NCAA Clearinghouse Statement

High School Procedures

Many college sports are regulated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), an organization founded in 1906 that has established rules on eligibility, recruiting and financial aid. The NCAA has three membership divisions – Division I, Division II and Division III. Institutions are members of one or another division according to the size and scope of their athletic programs and whether they provide athletic scholarships Any student wanting to participate at an NCAA school needs to go through the NCAA Clearinghouse NCAA Clearinghouse information and applications are available at www ncaaclearinghouse net Should a GPA be required for scholarships and/or college purposes, the NCAA grading system will be used The NCAA system is as follows: 90-100= 4 0, 80-89=3 0, 70-79=2 0, 0-69 = 1 0

Academic Letter

Students in grades 9-12 are eligible to receive an Academic Letter for a cumulative percentage of 90% in a semester with a full schedule (8 classes).

Honor Roll

Principal’s Honor Roll - Students must maintain a 90% average or above in all subjects for the semester Honor Roll students must receive an 80% in every class for the semester The honor roll is published in the school, on Sycamore, and the summit-christian-academy org website and Facebook

High School Athlete Eligibility

High school athletes must meet criteria of age and academics in order to participate in interscholastic competition. For further details, please reference the athletic handbook or contact the athletic director. You may also visit www.mshaa.org.

Repeating High School Course(s)

Students receiving a grade lower than their expectation may choose to repeat that course A record of the first attempt of the course will remain on the student transcript, along with the record of the second attempt of the course Once a course is repeated, the final grade from the first attempt will no longer count into the Cumulative Average or towards credit taken. Transcripts will note that fact. Credit for successful completion of a course will be counted only once toward meeting graduation requirements.

Weighted and Non-weighted Grades

Students enrolled in specified advanced classes receive a weighted value A percentage of 10% will be added to the final percentage of the semester course within the cumulative percentage scale

Credit Recovery

Should a student fail a required course, credit may be recovered through SCA’s summer credit recovery program. See your advisor for details. The final grade will be changed to a 60% and credit will be restored.

Students may opt to repeat the entire course (semester) to replace the failing percentage with the newly earned percentage

Loss of Credit for Attendance

Once a student reaches 11 absences in Life Prep or as a Student Aide, credit may not be recovered as credit is issued solely on attendance.

Should credit be lost in a graded class, the grade will stand and be calculated into the cumulative percentage, but credit will be lost Students may take credit recovery in the summer or select a course from resource strategies should they need or desire to restore credit Courses may also be repeated the following semester or school year If the student has too many absences, the transcript will reflect a grade but “0” credit due to absences Students wishing to appeal loss of credit should refer to the student handbook

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Junior High (7th - 8th Grade)

Wisdom Literature & Biblical Leaders

Required, 7th Grade, Full Year

BIBLE

Students survey the Old Testament through a study of Old Testament poetry and wisdom literature, with a primary emphasis on the wisdom of God in Proverbs. This course also offers an overview of various Old Testament historical books, characters, and themes.

Curriculum: Teacher-generated materials, Bible

Bible Truths

Required, 8th Grade, Full Year

Students will study the gospels and the early church to understand the life and times that Jesus experienced as He began His ministry. They will also learn the basics of theology of the modern day church.

Curriculum: Teacher-generated materials

Strategies: English 7 7th Grade, Full Year

Additional Fee Required

COMMUNICATIONARTS

After academic testing, students may be placed in Strategies: English 7. This small group setting will enable students to study an English curriculum designed specifically for their current academic level. Strategies: English 7 replaces English 7.

Curriculum: Varies according to student level

Strategies: English 8 8th Grade, Full Year

Additional Fee Required

After academic testing, students may be placed in Strategies: English 8. This small group setting will enable students to study an English curriculum designed specifically for their current academic level. Strategies: English 8 replaces English 8.

Curriculum: Varies according to student level

English 7

Required, 7th Grade, Full Year

The seventh grade language arts curriculum consists of the following major units of study: literature, writing, grammar/usage skills, and vocabulary enrichment. Students analyze stories, apply the elements of literature, identify figures of speech, and develop critical reading skills. Working through the writing process, students will create sentences, paragraphs, and compositions. Students will also study parts of speech and practice correct usage in their written work.

Curriculum: A Beka, Spelling, Vocabulary, Poetry I

Novels: Witch of Blackbird Pond

A Beka, Grammar and Composition I Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Out of the Dust Animal Farm

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English 8

Required, 8th Grade, Full Year

The eighth grade language arts curriculum consists of the following major units of study: literature, writing, grammar/usage skills, and vocabulary enrichment. Students analyze stories, apply the elements of literature, identify figures of speech, and develop critical reading skills. Working through the writing process, students will create sentences, paragraphs, and compositions. Students will also study parts of speech and practice correct usage in their written work.

Curriculum: A Beka, Grammar and Composition II Novels: The Old Man and the Sea Prentice Hall, Literature, gold level

Tom Sawyer Prestwick House, Inc.,

Romeo and Juliet Vocabulary from Latin and Greek Roots: Level VII

King Arthur - Green The Pilgrim’s Progress

COMMUNICATIONARTS ELECTIVES

Junior High Speech

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, Semester

This course introduces the student to the basic techniques of speech writing, delivery, and style while doing a variety of types of speech. Students will study communications theory as a basis for refining their own listening skills and for analyzing audience needs. They will also receive an introduction to competitive speech, dramatics, and debate.

Curriculum: BJU Press: Sound Speech

Junior High Debate

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, Semester

This semester course is designed as an introduction to competitive debate focusing on the principles and practices of Public Forum Debate. This format demands that the clash of ideas be communicated in a manner persuasive to the non-specialist or "citizen judge," i.e. a member of the American jury. Each student will be expected to attend one after school tournament.

Curriculum: Lightning Bolt Press, The Great Debate: A Handbook for Policy Debate and Public Forum Speak Out: Debate and Public Speaking in the Middle Grades

Junior High Competitive Speech and Debate

Prerequisite: Junior High Speech or Debate or Administrator approval

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, Semester

This course is designed as an introduction to competitive forensics and debate. Speech concepts will focus on informative, persuasive, impromptu speeches and interpretation of literature while debate will emphasize focusing on the principles and practices of Public Forum Debate. This format demands that the clash of ideas be communicated in a manner persuasive to the non-specialist or "citizen judge," i.e. a member of the American jury Students will be expected to participate in two after-school tournaments in the event of their choice.

Curriculum: Ultimate Package from West Coast Publishing, (New York Times)

Idea Press, Speak Out! Debate and Public Speaking in Middle Grades Membership into National Speech and Debate Association

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Strategies: Math 7

7th Grade, Full Year

Additional Fee Required

After academic testing, students may be placed in Strategies: Math 7. This small group setting will enable students to study a math curriculum designed specifically for their current academic level.

Strategies: Math 7 replaces the math course assigned for the year

Curriculum: McGraw Hill, ALEKS Online Program

Strategies: Pre-Algebra

8th Grade, Full Year

Additional Fee Required

After academic testing, students may be placed in Strategies: Pre-Algebra. This small group setting will enable students to study a math curriculum designed specifically for their current academic level.

Strategies: Pre-Algebra replaces the math course assigned for the year.

Curriculum: McGraw Hill, ALEKS Online Program

7th Grade Math

Required, 7th Grade, Full Year

General Math covers a variety of topics including fractions, integers, ratios, proportions, percents, decimals, geometric measurements, functions, equation solving, probability, and problem solving strategies. Note taking skills will be stressed. The purpose of this class is to prepare the student for Pre-Algebra.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Fundamentals of Math

Pre-Algebra

Required, 7th/8th Grade, Full Year

Pre-Algebra covers a variety of topics including variables, expressions, integers, solving equations, multi-step equations and inequalities, factors, fractions, exponents, rational numbers, ratios, proportions, probability, percents, linear functions, real numbers, right triangles, measurements, area, volume, data analysis, angle relationships, and transformations. Note taking skills will be stressed. The purpose of this class is to prepare the student for Algebra 1.

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Pre-Algebra

Algebra I

Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra Required, 8th Grade, Full Year

Students must successfully complete Pre-Algebra before taking Algebra I. In this class, emphasis is placed on solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities. Students also study exponent properties, quadratic equations, factoring, and radicals.

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Algebra I

Algebra IA

Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra Required, 8th Grade, Full Year

Students must successfully complete Pre-Algebra before taking Algebra IA. In this class, emphasis is placed on basic algebra concepts as well as solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities. Class pace will emphasize review and mastery of concepts before moving on. Students will be required to take Algebra IB the following year

Curriculum: McDougal-Littell, Algebra I: An Integrated Approach

MATH
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SCIENCE

Life Science

Required, 7th Grade, Full Year

The life science curriculum helps students think like scientists and see life science from a biblical perspective. It gives students hands-on opportunities to explore God’s creation as they survey the structures and functions of living things such as plants, animals, and human beings. This course examines scientific methodology, classification, cells, genetics, biblical creationism, evolution, the five kingdoms, the environment, and human body systems. Through investigative activities such as dissections, presentations, constructing edible DNA, extracting DNA, ethics discussions, and creating 3D biomes students will gain a greater understanding of God and the divine purpose evident in all creation.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Life Science 5th Edition

Earth Science

Required, 8th Grade, Full Year

Emphasizing natural sciences in the light of our divine Creator, the earth science curriculum uses a hands-on approach to give students a greater knowledge of our earth and the universe around them. Units focusing on the Tectonics, astronomy, geology, the atmosphere and weather, oceans, and natural resources. Using the scientific methods of research, students will come to appreciate the need for being good stewards of the world around them. Students will take a field trip to experience an earth science environment and will be expected to participate in an evening observatory experience.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Earth Science, Nature Unbound: The Impact of Ecology on Missouri and the World Multiple labs

SOCIALSTUDIES

Modern World History

Required, 7th Grade, Full Year

Analyzing world cultures throughout time, this course will enable students to define how to love their neighbors from all over the world. Through study of culture, history, and geography, we will intentionally build bridges that enable cultural connections that foster the Great Commission.

Curriculum: BJU Press, World Studies 4th edition Text and Activity Manual

American History to 1865

Required, 8th Grade, Full Year

Students learn how God has blessed our country and played a vital role in its foundation. Students study the foundation of our country with its beginnings as a haven for the pilgrims to the divisions of the Civil War. The course includes a comprehensive study of the Revolutionary War, the Founding Fathers, and other Christian leaders of the day. An in-depth analysis of the Constitution will be conducted using several primary source documents from the era. The year-long course will continue the march through America's history up through 1865.

Curriculum: BJU Press, The American Republic Textbook and Activity Manual

Christian Liberty Press, Foundation for Freedom: A Study of the United States Constitution Textbook

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Digital Citizenship

Required, 7th/ 8th Grade, Semester

Digital citizenship will equip students to be morally responsible, competent, and creative users of technology. This class covers use of SCA technology; technology safety (i.e. cyber bullying, information security, social media, etc.); Google Apps for Education; keyboarding skills; the basics of Microsoft Windows and Office 2010. This course is delivered via the Canvas Learning management system.

Multiple individual and collaborative projects will be used for assessment.

Curriculum: TestOut

Junior High Art - Intro to Art

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, 1st Semester

FINEARTS

Students in this course will deepen their skills and knowledge in art technique, drawing, painting and mixed media. It will cover the principles and elements of art and how to incorporate these principles into the artwork. Each student will build up their own portfolio as an example of their artistic progress. This class is the best transitional art class between elementary art and high school art.

Curriculum: Crystal Productions, Elements of Design & Principles of Design Videos & Workbook

Junior High Art - Discover the Wonderful World of Art History

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, 2nd Semester

Through this course, students learn the contributions artists and art have made to society and culture. Through the study of art history, students learn about works of art from around the world, how to look at art using the right vocabulary and concepts; and how to express themselves by creating their own artwork. Students are going to build their own portfolio of work inspired from art through the ages.

Curriculum: Crystal Productions, Elements of Design & Principles of Design Videos & Workbook

Exploring Theatre

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, 1st Semester

Overcome stage fright! Do daily activities (ok, games) designed to develop your skills, and cause your nerves to relax, as you perform with your friends. Your confidence will soar and extend to other social and classroom activities for years to come. Through improvisation, pantomime, vocal exercises, monologues, duet acts, and group scenes, your acting skills will prepare you for auditioning for shows, “taking the stage” when required for other classes, and making memories.

Curriculum: Basic Drama Projects, Monologues for Teens by Mike Kimmel, Famous Fantasy Character Monologues, Scenes for Teens by Mike Kimmel, The Scenebook of Values and Virtues, Acting with Character by Patrick Rainville Dorn, Theatre Games for Young Performers by Maria C. Novelly The Drama Teacher’s Survival Guide #2, by Margaret F. Johnson, Theatre Machine I, II, Spirit Productions by Karen Baker, various scripts, and a variety of teacher-generated materials.

Acting Experiences

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, 2nd Semester

Excel with confidence! Refine skills in acting, improvisation, character development, artistic appreciation, and awareness of career possibilities that can expand to business, project development, and communications. Competition opportunities may become available for some participants, and alternate assignments, as needed, are an option.

Curriculum: Basic Drama Projects, Fractured Fairy Tales for Young Actors, by Jan Peterson Ewen, Acting Games by Marsh Cassady, Improvisation Starters by Philip Bernardi, 62 Comedy Duet Scenes for Teens, by Lauri Allen, Theatre Games for Young Performers, by Maria C. Novelly, Theatre Machine I, II, Winning Monologues for Young Actors by Peg Kehret, Spirit Productions by Karen Baker, various scripts, and a variety of teacher-generated materials.

COMPUTER
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Junior High Band

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, Full Year

Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply.

Junior high band meets daily as an academic class. Junior high band is designed for students who are in grades 7 and 8 and have had at least one year of experience on their instrument. Students will continue to develop the essentials of ensemble playing, as well as improve their technique and skills, both inside the classroom and through home practice. The Junior High Band will have opportunities for multiple school-wide performances, field trips, contests, and participation in the Worlds of Fun Festival of Music. Grades are based on practice, quizzes, written tests, class participation, playing tests, and performance attendance.

Curriculum: Tradition of Excellence Book Two by Bruce Pearson and Ryan Nowlin and Kjos Music

Allegro Strings

Elective, 7/8th Grade, Full Year

Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply.

Allegro strings meets daily as an academic class. Students in this class are expected to have a minimum of one year of experience on their string instrument either through private lessons or allegro JR. Students in allegro strings will learn the essentials of ensemble playing, as well as improve on their technique and skills, both inside the classroom and through home practice. Students in allegro strings will have multiple school-wide performances, field trips, participate in the Worlds of Fun Festival of Music, and in mentoring opportunities for the students in allegro JR. Students who continue with their string instrument will have an entire world open for them (including college scholarships) upon graduation from this program.

Curriculum: String Basics: Steps to Success for String Orchestra Book 3 by Terry Shade and Muller Rusch String Method, Book 3, Kjos Music

Beginning Strings

Elective, 7th/ 8th Grade, Semester, 0.5 High School credit

It is an introduction to string instruments. Students will choose a string instrument and learn it in a group setting. Daily practice at home is expected in order to improve skills. After one semester, the student may be ready to join Allegro Strings.

Curriculum: Learn to Play a Stringed Instrument, Books 1-3 (Matesky and Womack), Alfred Music; Smart Music

Junior High Choir

Elective, 7th/ 8th Grade, Full Year Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply.

This course provides students the opportunity to develop their musical potential and understanding through singing in a choral ensemble. Course study includes the production of beautiful tone, aesthetic awareness, the ability to read music, the building of technical skills, team spirit, and responsible rehearsal habits. Students will also be encouraged to strengthen listening skills and their ability to analyze and evaluate music and music performances. Sight singing technique practiced on a daily basis. Phonetics of various languages and a variety of musical styles are presented. Required performances include at least three evening concerts per year—Grandparents’ Day, Midwest Christian School Festival, and the Festival of Music (at Worlds of Fun).

Curriculum: Variety of instructor-selected resources used for theory, history, and listening.

Choral literature is chosen by the instructor each year for performance.

Patti Dewitt Co: The Singing Musician; Music Literacy for Singers

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Junior High Introduction to Spanish

Elective, 7th/ 8th Grade, Full Year

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of Spanish and develops their abilities to communicate through writing, reading, listening, and speaking Students will learn to greet and introduce others and talk about their classes, family, and pastimes Learning fundamental grammar topics and present tense verb conjugation will enable students to formulate sentences and dialogue Cultural activities and discussions will accompany language lessons, acquainting students with topics such as food, holidays, and customs. Classes will discuss God’s heart for the world and how to show His love in how we interact with people of other nations and cultures.

Curriculum: Vista Higher Learning: Descubre 1A

Junior High Intermediate Spanish

Prerequisite: Junior High Introduction to Spanish or entrance exam.

Elective, 7th/ 8th Grade, Full Year

This course will reinforce the vocabulary learned in Introduction to Spanish. Students will learn biblical terms, vocabulary, and will be introduced to culture, geography, historical figures, and literature from the Spanish-speaking world Students will build upon the foundation laid in the first year Test into Spanish II

Curriculum: Vista Higher Learning: Descubre 1

Spanish I

Prerequisite: Must have a 90% average in English (averaging both semesters together to get the 90 is also ok)

Must have an 85% average in classes overall.

Elective, 8th Grade, Full Year

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of Spanish and develops their abilities to communicate through writing, reading, listening, and speaking. Students will learn to greet and introduce others and talk about their classes, family, daily routine, food, clothes, and pastimes. Learning fundamental grammar topics and conjugation of present and preterite verb tenses will enable students to formulate sentences and dialogue. Cultural activities and discussions will accompany language lesions, acquainting students with topics such as food, holidays, and customs. Classes will discuss God’s heart for the world and how to show His love in how we interact with people of other nations and cultures.

Curriculum: Vista Higher Learning: Descubre 1

Mandarin Chinese I

Prerequisite: Must have a 90% average in English (averaging both semesters together to get the 90 is also ok) Must have an 85% average in classes overall.

Elective, 8th Grade, Full Year

Chinese I is an introductory course in the fundamentals of Chinese The course is designed to teach cumulative grammar concepts, deepened by studies in Chinese culture, literature, and the Bible It provides a foundation for those interested in continuing a study of Chinese

Curriculum: Joint Publishing, Chinese Made Easy, Level 1

French I

Prerequisite: Must have a 90% average in English (averaging both semesters together to get the 90 is also ok)

Must have an 85% average in classes overall.

Elective, 8th Grade, Full Year

French I is an active class that gives the beginning student the vocabulary necessary to communicate on a basic level with French speakers on a variety of familiar subjects such as school, home activities, etc. The student will learn how to formulate sentences and dialogues through listening, speaking, reading and writing. French translations of familiar Bible verses will be incorporated throughout the course. Cultural activities will accompany language lessons to acquaint students with food, artistic expression, and diversity of the francophone world.

Curriculum: EMC; Vista: Chemins 1

WORLD LANGUAGES
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Junior High Physical Education

Required, 7th/ 8th Grade, Full Year

All students in junior high are required to take Physical Education to develop skill and coordination through vigorous activities. Students learn to practice fair play and sportsmanship, whether winning or losing in a competitive environment. Courses are divided by gender.

ELECTIVES

Logic

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, Semester

This course is an introductory class on the use of Logical thinking in making decisions and developing each student’s worldview, with emphasis on how to seek truth and know what you believe as a Christian and why you believe it. This course will define what logic is, how to reason your way through an argument or a decision, and how to discover truth through reasoning with your mind. This is a highly interactive class, where student participation is as important as test results and homework assignments.

Curriculum: The Discovery of Deduction (An Introduction to Formal Logic) by Hodge, Larson and Johnson.

Life Prep

Elective, 7th/8th Grade, Semester or Full Year SCA’s mission is to enable students to meet their God-given potential. In supporting this goal, Life Prep class has been created to honor the uniqueness of each student. Time may be spent to facilitate music lessons, study for classes, obtain tutoring, or take advantage of ministry opportunities. Students are encouraged to bring their ideas for Life Prep time to their Life Prep instructor Grades given will be Pass/Fail

Life Prep Plus

Elective, 7th/ 8th Grade, Semester or Full Year Additional fee may apply SCA’s mission is to enable students to meet their God-given potential. In supporting this goal, Life Prep Plus class has been created to honor the uniqueness of each student. Time may be spent to facilitate music lessons, study for classes, obtain tutoring, or take advantage of ministry opportunities. Students are encouraged to bring their ideas for Life Prep Plus time to their Life Prep instructor. Students will meet weekly with the teacher to look at grades, upcoming assignments, and to discuss strategies to improve academic skills. This is a small group setting. Fees may apply Grades given will be Pass/Fail

Student Aide

Prerequisite: Approved applications Applications may be picked up in an advisor’s office Elective, 7th/ 8th Grade, Semester or Full Year Students have the opportunity to work in a variety of settings as an aide. They will be asked to help with an array of tasks under the supervision of SCA faculty or staff. Aide positions are available in the following areas: elementary classrooms, the elementary library, and school offices. Grades given will be Pass/Fail

PHYSICALEDUCATION
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Senior High (9th - 12th Grade)

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Summit ChristianAcademy

AP/Dual Credit Course Enrollment Requirements

*Dual Credit Classes are offered at an additional cost and are billed by the college.

SBU charges - $75 per credit hour

MBU - $69 per credit hour / Evangel - $65 per credit hour

* Prices subject to change based on college determination

SCA Philosophy of Admission into AP/Dual Credit Classes

SCA currently offers dual credit through Southwest Baptist University, Missouri Baptist University, and Evangel University.

The ability to take a class for AP/dual credit at the high school level is to be considered an earned privilege for those students whose attitude toward study reflects a collegiate level of maturity. Prior to enrollment in the initial AP/dual credit class, students and parents will be required to attend a short meeting in order to review college and classroom expectations. Dual credit requirements are established by the Missouri Coordinating Board for Higher Education.

Course Requirements for all students

In order to preserve the integrity of the collegiate environment within these classes, the following restrictions will apply:

● Students should have achieved an overall SCA cumulative percentage 80% or higher

● Students must meet ACT/SAT guidelines as named by the college.

o SBU Guidelines

▪ English students must have an 18 on English portion of ACT or a grade of 80% or higher in English III.

▪ Math Students must have an 18 on Math portion of ACT

● Students will achieve a 70% or higher on the initial class exam

● Students new to SCA will take a writing exam

Summit Technology Dual Credit

Once students are accepted into Summit Technology, they may be assigned a dual credit course through the University of Central Missouri, the Missouri Community College System, the Missouri University of Science and Technology, or the University of Missouri-Kansas City. SCA recognizes all assigned courses through STA as weighted courses.

AP Courses

Currently, SCA offers 3 AP courses: AP Chemistry, AP Calculus AB, and AP Physics. Students may take the AP course exam at the end of the year but are not required to do so. AP students may have prerequisite courses and are approved by the instructor.

Dual Credit Course Requirements for Freshmen and Sophomores

Freshmen and sophomores may be considered to enter dual credit courses; however, guidelines for entry are much more stringent. Students must first qualify.

Students should be aware that they will be in courses that are predominantly upper-classmen. Although intellectual abilities may be high, social/emotional maturity will be evaluated by administration.

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Summit ChristianAcademy Dual Credit Course Offerings

Southwest Baptist University

Course # Course Name

College Credit

● ENG 1113 Coll English I 3

● ENG 2213 Coll English II 3

● GEO 1103 Coll Geography 3

● HIS 1113 Coll Western Civ: Early Man to Ren 3

● HIS 1123 Coll Western Civ: Ren to Present 3

● HIS 2213 Coll American History 3

● HIS 2223 Coll Am Hist 1877-Present 3

● MAT 1195 Coll Calculus 5

● SPA 1114 Coll Spanish I 4

● SPA 1124 Coll Spanish II 4

● SPA 2213 Coll Inter Spanish I 3

● SPA 2223 Coll Inter Spanish II 3

● POLS 1113 Coll American Government 3

Saint Louis University

Course # Course Name College Credit

● FREN 1010 Coll French I 3

● FREN 1020 Coll French II 3

Missouri Baptist University

Course # Course Name College Credit

● MATH 133 Coll Algebra 3

● MATH 243 Coll Probability and Statistics 3

● MATH 155 Coll Precalculus 5

● MUHL 153 Coll Music Appreciation 3

● PSY 133 Coll General Psychology 3

● CPHS 433 Coll World Religions 3

● COM 103 Coll Speech Communications 3

● MUTH103 Coll Fundamentals of Music 3

● BIOL 103 Coll Principles of Biology with Lab 4

● BIOL 213 Coll Anatomy and Physiology I 4

Course #

Evangel University

Course Name College Credit

● ENG 123 Coll Introduction to Literature (British) 3

Total Number of Credits Offered 83

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Dual Credit Course Fees

SBU – A per credit hour fee is assessed upon enrollment. Check must be enclosed with registration form. Balance must be paid in full by the end of the semester via the student’s MySBU online portal. Questions concerning billing should be directed to Mr. David Marsch at dmarsch@sbuniv.edu. The college will send a bill in the mail/email for any remaining balance. Courses are $75.00 p/credit hour with a deposit due at registration.

MBU - Students taking courses from Missouri Baptist University will submit payment online via the college’s website. Courses are $69.00 p/credit hour.

Evangel U. - Students taking courses from Evangel University will submit payment online or by phone. Courses are $65.00 p/credit hour.

Fall tuition is due December 1; Spring tuition is due April 1.

Advanced Placement Course Offerings

APCalculusAB

APChemistry

APPhysics I

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Introduction to Christianity

9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

The course will consist of two distinct components. The first semester will be a traditional overview of the Bible, emphasizing the Old and New Testaments' teaching of foundational concepts, as well general Bible knowledge such as how to use a Bible. The second semester will be more discussion-driven lessons exploring the ideas of man as a spiritual being, the concepts of worldview, truth, and faith, and apply what is covered in the first semester

Curriculum: Wheaton Press, Foundations of Faith: Student Workbook One; Wheaton Press, Foundations of Faith: Student Workbook Two; Wheaton Press, Reflect: Christ-Centered Design; Josh McDowell, More than a Carpenter

Bible I: Old and New Testament Survey

Required, 9th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course helps students explore the world of the Bible in depth, with the main goal being to understand the central and unified message the Bible tells about who God is and what he has done in creating and redeeming the world through Jesus Christ. Students will learn what nearly each book of the Bible is about while also understanding each book’s contribution in moving forward the story of God’s redemptive plan. Students will also learn important interpretive tools and methods that will help them to better interpret the Bible for the rest of their lives. Finally, students will develop skills for applying the timeless message of the Bible to their daily lives

Curriculum: NIV Bible

Teacher-generated Material

Bible II: Christian Theology and Spiritual Disciplines

Required, 10th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Christian Theology and Spiritual Disciplines is a course that surveys what the whole counsel of God in Scripture teaches on the major Doctrines of the Christian Faith. This will include: Scripture, God, Creation, Humankind, Sin, Salvation, the Church, and Last Things. Special focus will be given to how each area of Christian thinking applies to the lives of believers for both faith and practice. Scripture memory will be required as well as an incorporation of other spiritual disciplines that help shape their knowledge of scripture and their ability to apply it to everyday life.

Curriculum: Zondervan, Christian Beliefs: 20 Basics Every Christian Should Know NavPress, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life Zondervan, Charts for Teaching Theology and Doctrine

Bible III: Religions of the World (MBU, CPHS 433, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Students taking dual credit must have a cumulative high school cumulative average of 80% or higher Required, 11th Grade, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 3 college credits This course will explore the key figures, concepts and practices of the major world religions, emphasizing their historical development and contemporary manifestations. Moreover, we will concentrate on three thematic questions throughout the course: (1) What are the different approaches to the problem of evil and suffering? (2) How do the major world religions promote peace and/or violence? and (3) How do major world religions compare and contrast with the truth of Christianity, most familiar to students in the United States. We will also attend to other salient themes such as: religion and ecology, ethics, politics and women. This course will be weighted only when taken for dual credit.

Curriculum: Huston Smith, The World’s Religions

Wayne House, Charts of World Religions

NIV Bible

BIBLE
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Bible IV: Apologetics

Required, 12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course is designed to teach students a systematic defense of the Christian worldview using archaeological and historical evidence coupled with rational arguments for God’s existence. Students will learn philosophical language and concepts to understand and explain major worldview systems: atheism, agnosticism, deism, pantheism, polytheism, postmodernism, and theism. Students will gain a basic understanding of the historicity of Jesus’ life, Christianity, and the Bible. They will also learn principles of argumentation and the use of logic.

The senior mission trip is the capstone of our Bible curriculum. Students are expected to financially plan for it and attend. Should extreme circumstances prohibit participation, students and parents will be required to meet with the school principal and plan twenty hours of alternative service.

Curriculum: Dean Hardy, Stand Your Ground: An Introductory Text for Apologetics Students C S Lewis, Mere Christianity

Worship II

Prerequisites: Worship I Bible, Fine Arts, or Elective Credit; 10th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

The purpose of Worship II is to enable students to continue deepening their personal relationship with Christ in order to promote personal service to the body of Christ. Deep knowledge of Scriptural passages concerning worship will be increased through study of Scriptural commentary and writings of current and past worship leaders. Students will learn to build music sets, which are intentional and theme-based. They will write an analysis of readings and chosen music lyrics, synthesizing information they have gleaned from their studies. Greater service through community outreach and a willingness to demonstrate leadership skills within a team through both speech and actions will be expected, as students become true servant leaders. Students taking Worship II for fine arts credit will be expected to perform with the worship team and will demonstrate knowledge of transposing music and creating a worship team with balanced vocals and instrumentation. Mastery of a single instrument should be accomplished and a comfort level for performance with a secondary instrument will be expected. Fine arts students in Worship II will also be expected to compose/arrange a worship song. This course may be repeated for elective credit only.

Curriculum: How to Worship a King, Neese (author); How to Lead when you are not in Charge, Scroggins (author)

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English I: Grammar and World Literature

Required, 9th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course focuses on language mechanics, literature, vocabulary enrichment, and composition. Students use their foundation in language mechanics to present their ideas clearly and concisely through formal essay composition. Analysis of literature and poetry requires students to think critically through the elements of fiction and poetry and to support their ideas with elements from the text while upholding a biblical worldview. Students refine and enhance their spelling and vocabulary through selected supplemental material, literature, and classroom discussions.

Curriculum: A Beka; Vocabulary, Spelling, Poetry IV

Novels: Homer, The Odyssey Holt, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Grade 9 Edith Hamilton, Mythology Holt, Elements of Language, Third Course William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar Prentice Hall, Timeless Voices; Timeless Themes Elie Wiesel, Night B Trimmer, Guide to MLA

English II: Grammar and American Literature

Prerequisite: English I

Required, 10th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course emphasizes grammar, literary analysis, and vocabulary enrichment. Students read and write about works of American literature from exploration through the Civil Rights movement. Grammar and editing skills are reinforced in essays and a research paper. Students practice correct spelling and usage of interdisciplinary words.

Curriculum: SCA: Interdisciplinary Vocabulary for Sophomores

Novels: The Scarlet Letter Prentice Hall; Timeless Voices; Timeless Themes, The Red Badge of Courage The American Experience A Raisin in the Sun Holt, Elements of Language, Fourth Course Holt, Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Fourth Course Trimmer: Guide to MLA

English III: Grammar and British Literature

Prerequisite: English II Required, 11th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course emphasizes grammar, academic writing, and literary analysis. Students read and write about British texts from the Middle Ages through the Victorian period. Students practice the usage of vocabulary words from Latin and Greek origin.

Curriculum: Holt, Elements of Language, Fifth Course

Novels: Frankenstein Holt, Grammar, Usage, Mechanics Macbeth Prentice Hall; Timeless Voices; Timeless Themes, Tale of Two Cities British Literature Pygmalion Prestwick House, Vocabulary from Latin and Greek Roots

College Introduction to Literature (British) (Evangel U., ENG 123, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Completion of English III semester 1 and a cumulative percentage of 90% or higher Elective, 11th Grade, 2nd Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Cultural Conflict and Social Justice. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres – including nonfiction, poetry, and fiction – the course engages students in historical and literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

Curriculum: Same as Eng II (above) with additional writing assignments

COMMUNICATIONARTS
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English IV: Grammar and Contemporary Literature

Prerequisite: English III

Required, 12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course focuses on improving skills in grammar, punctuation, and rhetoric as well as developing the skills needed to analyze the written word. This will be accomplished through reading, discussing, and analyzing a variety of texts. Texts will include different genres such as poetry, prose, short stories and articles. Requirement may be met through English 1113 & 2213.

Curriculum: A Beka, Handbook of Grammar and Composition

Holt; Elements of Language, Sixth Course

Holt; Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Sixth Course

Houghton Mifflin, Write for College: A Student Handbook Vocabulary from Latin & Greek Roots - Sixth Course Instructor generated exercises and writing prompts Lord of the Flies

Fahrenheit 451 A Christmas Carol

College English I (SBU ENG 1113, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Existing students must have a recommendation by an English III teacher, an 80% cumulative percentage, and an 18 or higher on the English portion of the ACT.

Required, 12th Grade, First Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

This is a semester college freshman composition course that enables students to develop correct and proficient writing skills. Special emphasis will be placed on the writing process, organization, and development of a technique that is clear, specific, and interesting to the reader. Various essay genres will be used and students will be involved in learning groups to explore topics of interest. Upon successful completion of this class and a score of 18 or higher on the English portion of the ACT, students will receive three college credits through SBU. Requirement may be met through English IV

Curriculum: Longman, LB Brief Handbook

Sarah Skwire, Writing With a Thesis: A Rhetoric Reader

Note: Transfer students must provide a writing sample to be approved for admission. A fee will apply.

College English II (SBU ENG 2213, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: English 1113 with a percentage of 70% or higher

Required, 12th Grade, Second Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

This is a semester college freshman composition course that focuses on expository writing in connection with the study of imaginative literature (drama, fiction, and poetry). Students learn analytical skills and gain proficiency in writing, with special emphasis on literary analysis. Students learn and use literary criticism in the writing process. Upon successful completion of this class and a score of 18 or higher on the English portion of the ACT, students will receive three college credits through SBU. Requirement may be met through English IV.

Curriculum: Longman, Literature: An Introduction to Fiction Poetry and Drama

Novels: The Great Gatsby Hamlet

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Strategies: English I

9th Grade, Full Year, Additional Fee Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: English I. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study an English curriculum that is parallel to the core English I course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This English course meets core English discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the English discipline.

Curriculum: Varies according to student level

Strategies: English II

10th Grade, Full Year, Additional

Fee Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: English II. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study an English curriculum that is parallel to the core English II course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This English course meets core English discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the English discipline.

Curriculum: Varies according to student level

Strategies: English III

11th Grade, Full Year, Additional Fee

Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: English III. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study an English curriculum that is parallel to the core English III course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This English course meets core English discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the English discipline.

Curriculum: Varies according to student level

Strategies: English IV

12th Grade, Full Year, Additional Fee

Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: English IV. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study an English curriculum that is parallel to the core English IV course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This English course meets core English discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offerings in the English discipline.

Curriculum: Varies according to student level

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Creative Writing

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester or Full Year, 0.5 or 1 credit

This course is offered annually dependent upon student enrollment. Students will both read and create different types of writing, such as reflections, poetry, short stories, dialogue, and narratives. Students will keep a daily journal, as well as read and edit their peers’ pieces. The year ends with students creating a personal anthology of their favorite literature. This is a writing-intensive course.

Curriculum: Random House, Poetry 180: A Turning Back to Poetry Writer’s Digest Books, The Writer’s Book of Wisdom Various handouts and excerpts from novels and poetry

High School Speech

Required, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This course is an in-depth study of communication to develop critical thinking, persuasion, and delivery skills. They will participate in small group activities and practice the skills of informative, persuasive, interpretation of literature impromptu and extemporaneous speeches. They will learn the rules of competitive forensics (speech and debate). Requirement may be met through Introduction to Debate or Debate I.

Curriculum: Teacher’s Public Speaking Resource Book, New York Times

College Speech Communications (MBU, COM 103, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: HS Speech or HS Debate

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

Students are introduced to principles of effective public speaking and provided with opportunities to develop public speaking skills. In addition, standards of evaluation for public communication are established for use in evaluating their own and other's public speaking performances.

Curriculum: Public Speaking: Concepts and Skills for a Diverse Society by Cengage

Introduction to Debate

Required, 9th -12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This course is designed to teach and develop the skills of analysis, research, reasoning, and persuasion. Students will learn to logically develop and organize rational arguments on both sides of controversial subjects and defend those arguments thoughtfully and articulately from the attack of others. Students will be introduced to speech events that take place during competitive tournaments. Requirement may be met through High School Speech or Debate I.

Curriculum: West Coast Publishing Ultimate Package

Debate I

Required, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course is designed for those who wish to further develop skills in speech and debate for the purposes of competing as a member of the SCA Speech and Debate Team. Students are expected to participate in MSHSAA/NSDA-sponsored debate and forensics tournaments throughout the year. Participation in two tournaments per semester is required, with events and competition level to be determined by the instructor. After school practices are required and Friday/Saturday tournament participation is expected to meet the tournament requirements. Requirement may be met through High School Speech or Introduction to Debate.

Curriculum: West Coast Publishing Ultimate Package

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Advanced Competitive Speech & Debate

Prerequisite: Debate I or Administrative approval

Elective 10th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit. Students may take the class up to three times. This course is designed for those who wish to further develop their skills in speech and debate beyond the novice level. Students will compete as a member of the SCA Speech and Debate Team. Students are expected to participate in MSHSAA/NSDA-sponsored debate and forensics tournaments throughout the year. Participation in two tournaments per semester is required, with competition level to be determined by the instructor. After school practices are required and Friday/Saturday tournament participation is expected to meet the tournament requirements. Students will also serve as mentors to students in the Junior High, Intro to Debate, and Debate 1 classes, including judging at novice level tournaments.

Curriculum: West Coast Publishing Ultimate Package NSDA Membership

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Algebra IA

Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra

Required, 9th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Students must successfully complete Pre-Algebra before taking Algebra IA. In this class, emphasis is placed on basic algebra concepts as well as solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities. Class pace will emphasize review and mastery of concepts before moving on. Students will be required to take Algebra IB the following year. Requirement may be met through Algebra I.

Curriculum: McDougal-Littell, Algebra I: An Integrated Approach

Algebra IB

Prerequisite: Algebra IA

Required, 9th/10th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Students must successfully complete Algebra IA before taking Algebra IB. In this class, students study systems of equations, exponent properties, quadratic equations, factoring, radicals and rational expressions. Class pace will emphasize review and mastery of concepts before moving on.

Requirement may be met through Algebra I.

Curriculum: McDougal-Littell, Algebra I: An Integrated Approach

Algebra I

Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra

Required, 9th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Algebra I covers a variety of topics including expressions, equations, functions, solving and graphing linear equations and functions, solving and graphing linear inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, exponents and exponential functions, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and functions, data analysis, and probability. Note taking skills will be stressed. The purpose of this class is to prepare the student for Algebra 2.

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Algebra I 2012

Algebra II

Prerequisite: Algebra I (may be taken concurrently with Geometry)

Required, 9 -12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Algebra II is offered to students who have successfully completed Algebra I. Topics studied include interpreting & manipulating algebraic functions (linear, absolute value, quadratic, higher-degree polynomials, exponential, radical, logarithmic, and rational). Students will be able to solve and simplify algebraic expressions using a variety of representations by hand and with the use of graphing calculator technology

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Algebra II 2012

Geometry

Prerequisite: Algebra I (may be taken concurrently with Algebra II)

Required, 9th -12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Geometry is offered to students who have successfully completed Algebra I. Topics studied include reasoning and logic, applying properties of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional geometric figures, transformations, measurements, and an introduction to right triangle trigonometry.

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Geometry 2012

MATHEMATICS
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College Algebra (MBU, MATH 133, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Algebra II & Geometry with a grade of 80% or higher and a cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher Students must have an 18 in the math portion of the ACT and a 21 composite

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 3 college credits

This course provides a brief review of algebraic essentials, graphs, functions and their graphs, linear and quadratic functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of linear equations

Curriculum: Pearson, College Algebra, Blitzer, SixthEdition Ebook

College Pre-Calculus (MBU, MATH 155, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Algebra II and a cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher Students must have an 18 in the math portion of the ACT and a 21 composite

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, Full Year, 1 credit, 5 college credits

Pre-Calculus covers functions, graphs and models; modeling with linear and quadratic functions; polynomial and rational functions; modeling with exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; trigonometric identities and conditional equations; additional topics in trigonometry; additional topics in analytic geometry; and parametric equations.

Curriculum: Pearson, Pre-Calculus , Blitzer, Fifth edition Ebook.

AP/ College Calculus AB (SBU MATH 1195, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: 80% or higher grade in Pre-Calculus and a cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher. Students must have an 18 in the math portion of the ACT and a 21 composite Elective, 12th Grade, Full Year, 2 high school credits, 5 college credits

Calculus builds on the foundation that students received in Pre-Calculus. This course is recommended for any student interested in engineering, business, mathematics, pre-med or other related fields. This course studies: limits and continuity, differentiation, definition and fundamental properties, composite, implicit, and inverse functions, contextual applications of differentiation and rates of change, analytical applications of differentiation including analysis of functions, integration and accumulation of change, differential equations, and application of integration

Curriculum: Prentice Hall, Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, by Finney, Demanal, Waits, Kennedy, Fourth edition

College Probability and Statistics (MBU, MATH 243, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: 80% or higher grade in College Algebra or Pre-Calculus and a cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher Students must have an 18 in the math portion of the ACT and a 21 composite Elective, 11th/12th Grade, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 3 college credits Data production and analysis; probability basics, distributions; sampling, estimation with confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test; correlation and regression; cross tabulations and chi-square. Students learn to use the statistical package such as R. Two semesters in the same academic year.

Curriculum: Stats: Data and Models by Bock, Velleman, DeVeaux, MyLab Statistics

Strategies: Algebra IA

9th Grade, Full Year,

Additional Fee Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: Algebra IA. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study a math curriculum that is parallel to the Algebra IA core course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This math course will meet core math discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the math discipline.

Curriculum: McDougal-Littell, Algebra I: An Integrated Approach Holt McDougal Larson, Pre-Algebra

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Strategies: Algebra IB

10th Grade, Full Year, Additional Fee Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: Algebra IB. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study a math curriculum that is parallel to the Algebra IB core course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This math course will meet core math discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the math discipline.

Curriculum: McDougal-Littell, Algebra I: An Integrated Approach

Strategies: Algebra II

11th/12th Grade, Full Year, Additional Fee Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: Algebra II. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study a math curriculum that is parallel to the Algebra II core course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This math course will meet core math discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the math discipline.

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Algebra II 2012

Strategies: Geometry

11th/12th Grade, Full Year, Additional Fee Required

After having academic testing, students having documented learning difficulties may be placed into Strategies: Geometry. This small group or individual classroom setting will enable students to study a math curriculum that is parallel to the Geometry core course with the additional benefit of having instruction designed specifically for their current academic level and learning style. This math course will meet core math discipline requirements for graduation and is substantially comparable, both quantitatively and qualitatively, to the similar course offering in the math discipline.

Curriculum: Holt McDougal Larson, Geometry 2012

Accounting I

Prerequisite: Introduction to Business or Personal Finance, Understanding of Excel Elective, 11th/12th Grade, Full Year, 1 Credit

This course is designed to build a basic understanding of manual and automated accounting principles, concepts, and procedures. Activities include using the accounting equation, completing the accounting cycle, entering transactions to journals, posting to ledgers, preparing end-of-period statements and reports, managing payroll systems, completing banking activities, calculating taxes, and performing other related tasks.

Curriculum: Cengage Learning, Mindtap.

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Biology

Required, 9th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course examines God's creation through a Biblical Worldview. Students will study the scientific method, cell structure and function, mitosis/meiosis, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis and genetics. Students will use microscopes, create a cell model, a DNA keychain, and a 3D printed model. The study of the Theory of Evolution will be done by an extensive look at the Animal Kingdom and God's perfect Creation. In fulfilling the Dominion Mandate, students will participate in the following dissections: jellyfish, clam, starfish, sand dollar, crayfish, perch, shark, turtle and pigeon.

Curriculum: Glencoe, Biology

Physical Science

Required, 10th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course covers introductory topics in chemistry and physics and prepares students for upper level courses in these areas. Topics covered include scientific method, measurement, force, motion, machines, heat, electricity, magnetism, nuclear reactions, kinetic theory, and atomic structure, classification of matter, chemical bonds and chemical reactions. Many lab activities give students first hand knowledge of the laws and principles covered in this course. Requirement may be met through Chemistry.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Physical Science

Chemistry

Prerequisite: Physical Science or Biology and Algebra I

Required, 10th-12th Grades, Full Year, 1 credit

This course requires a good grasp of Algebra. Students study measurement, significant figures, atomic structure, atomic theory, elements, compounds, mixtures, solutions, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, molecular geometry, energy, heat, temperature, acid-base chemistry, and gas laws. Many labs give students an opportunity for hands-on experiences. Requirement may be met through Physical Science.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Chemistry

College Principles of Biology with Lab (MBU BIOL 103, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Biology

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 4 college credits

BIOL 103 is an introduction to biology with emphasis directed toward an understanding of the basic characteristics, processes and activities of living organisms. Evolutionary theories and controversies will be discussed. This course is divided into 6 units. Each unit has 2-4 chapters within it. Each chapter may have assigned worksheets, lecture quizzes and/or an Achieve homework quiz to complete. Each unit will end with an exam. Students will choose a presentation topic, approved by the instructor, to research. A final cumulative exam is given.

Curriculum: Concepts of Biology

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Forensic Science: Crime Scene Processing and Analysis

Prerequisite: Biology

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, 1st semester, 0.5 credit

Students will learn how to investigate the truth using evidence from a crime scene, which allows them to use those same skills when looking at God’s Word and the evidence for Christianity. Forensic Science is taught as a hands-on, problem-solving, investigative course that incorporates inquiry. It includes crime scene processing, hair analysis, DNA analysis, fingerprinting, soil analysis, and cause of death determination. Students are taught the proper collection, preservation, and laboratory analysis of various samples through lectures, lab activities and case studies. This course will include a field trip to the Kansas City Crime Lab. This class is appropriate for students interested in careers in criminal justice, medicine, or science research.

Curriculum: Cengage, Forensic Science: Fundamentals and Investigations, 3rd edition

Forensic Science: Physical Evidence

Prerequisite: Biology

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, 2nd semester, 0.5 credit

Students will learn how to investigate the truth using evidence from a crime scene, which allows them to use those same skills when looking at God’s Word and the evidence for Christianity. Forensic Science is taught as a hands-on, problem-solving, investigative course that incorporates inquiry. It includes forensic toxicology, forensic anthropology, blood spatter analysis, handwriting analysis, glass evidence, tool marks, tire and shoe impressions, and ballistics. Students are taught the proper collection, preservation, and laboratory analysis of various samples through lecture, labs and case studies. This course will include a field trip to Frontier Justice. This class is appropriate for students interested in careers in criminal justice, physics, chemistry, or science research. ?? (this bolded part was not included in the updated course description but maybe should still be there?)

Curriculum: Cengage, Forensic Science: Fundamentals and Investigations, 3rd edition

Environmental Science: Ecology and Conservation Science

Prerequisite: Biology

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, 1st semester, 0.5 credit

This course is the study of how living things interact with the environment, biomes, energy, renewable and nonrenewable resources. Course will also explore issues such as global warming, pollution, and other environmental concerns. Students will be encouraged and challenged to think about sustainable practices, environmental responsibility and global awareness. Projects will include an in-depth study of the land and how organisms interact and PowerPoint presentations. Students will have an in-depth opportunity to understand field science. Students will take a field trip to YaYa’s Alpaca Farm to study local, sustainable agricultural practices (2nd semester only).

Curriculum:

Environmental Science: Policy and Human Interaction

Prerequisite: Biology

Elective, 11th /12th Grades, 2nd semester, 0.5 credit

This course is the study of how living things interact with the environment, biomes, energy, renewable and nonrenewable resources. Course will also explore issues such as global warming, pollution, and other environmental concerns. Students will be encouraged and challenged to think about sustainable practices, environmental responsibility and global awareness. Projects will include an in-depth study of the land and how organisms interact and PowerPoint presentations. Students will have an in-depth opportunity to understand field science. Students will take a field trip to YaYa’s Alpaca Farm to study local, sustainable agricultural practices (2nd semester only).

Curriculum: Pearson, Environmental Science: Your World, Your Turn

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Human Anatomy and Physiology

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, Full Year, 1 credit

This course will examine the intricate design of the human body that God has fearfully and wonderfully created. Students will examine the structure and functions of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Hands-on labs included testing for macromolecules, a forensics bone study, preparation and evaluation of sunscreen, muscle fatigue, testing reflexes, blood typing, testing lung capacity, a urinalysis, and working with clay models to create muscle. Dissection labs include: brain, eye, heart, kidney, and fetal pig. Field trip to the Kansas Rockhurst University Cadaver Lab is included.

Curriculum: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Hole’s Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology

AP Chemistry

Prerequisite: Chemistry or Administrative Approval

Elective, 11th/12th Grades, Full Year, 1 credit

AP Chemistry requires students to attend 0 hour (7:00 am - 7:45 am) on Tuesdays and Thursdays. In addition, there will be 2 4-hour Saturday labs per semester, dates TBA by teacher.

This course requires a good grasp of Algebra. Students study measurement, significant figures, atomic structure, atomic theory, elements, compounds, mixtures, solutions, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, molecular geometry, energy, heat, temperature, acid-base chemistry, and gas laws. Many labs give students an opportunity for hands-on experiences. To receive college credit, students must take and pass the AP exam in the spring. A field trip to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago in October is included. This is an additional expense.

Curriculum: Cengage, Zumdahl, Chemistry

AP Physics I

Prerequisites: Chemistry (with a grade of 80% or higher) and Algebra II (may be taken concurrently with administrative approval)

Elective, 11th/12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course will examine the laws and principles God has designed that govern the physical universe. Through project-based inquiry students will discover these laws in a study of mechanics that includes motion, forces, gravitation, and momentum. The study of energy will investigate work, machines, thermal and states of matter. At the end of the year, we will cover electrical circuits and touch on subatomic physics. Twenty-five percent of our time will be in hands-on labs. This course is algebra, not calculus, based and has been designed with input from a number of colleges and universities to prepare our students for college physics and the rigors of the hard sciences. A field trip to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago in October is included This is an additional expense.

Curriculum: McGraw-Hill Openstax, AP Physics

College Anatomy and Physiology I (MBU, BIOL 213, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: High School Anatomy and Physiology OR College Biology

11th/12th Grades, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 4 college credits

BIOL 213 Anatomy and Physiology I is a study of the structure and function of the human body, including cells; tissues. Integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and special senses. This course is divided into 4 units. Each unit consists of material from 3 chapters. Each chapter within the units, has a Connect Homework Quiz and Pre-Lecture assignments that are required to be completed. At the end of each unit, a unit exam will be given. There will be a cumulative final exam.

Curriculum: Hole's Human Anatomy & Physiology 16th edition

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SOCIALSTUDIES

Ancient World History

Required, 9th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course is designed to bring students to a more in-depth understanding of Creation, and the Ancient World. Based on the textbook, the teacher-generated PowerPoint presentations are used to study the great movements of God throughout history – as well as why civilizations rise and fall. An appreciation for how archeology has changed over time (especially now in our current high-tech world) will also be incorporated. Lessons from the Bible are an easy fit with most units and are used as regular supplements to lessons.

Curriculum: Teacher-generated curriculum

American History from Reconstruction to the Present

Required, 10th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

American History is designed to provide each student with an overview of the American experience from Reconstruction through the Cold War Era. Students will study the impact Christianity has had in the maturing of our country and become familiar with the impact of Americans from a variety of ethnic, national, and racial backgrounds on the “complete picture” that is our history and heritage. Students will be taught how professionals work with the different types of “evidence” that historians examine, such as primary and secondary documents, visual images, diaries, maps, statistics, etc. In the process, students will have the opportunity to enhance their critical thinking and communication skills. Instruction and assessments will be varied in order to give each student an opportunity to develop his/her potential.

Curriculum: BJU, United States History, supplemental material The Hiding Place

American Government

Required, 11th/12th Grades, Semester, 0.5 credit

This course is designed to teach an appreciation for America’s God-given heritage of liberty, how the U.S. government is Constitutionally-organized, and how it works in practice. Each week student-selected current event papers will be required for classroom discussion. Each year’s fall campaigns and elections will be monitored closely and speakers from government will be brought in to address the class from time to time. Developing a working knowledge of all sides of hot-button issues will be encouraged – as will participation in the democratic process. Requirement may be met through College American Government.

Curriculum: Teacher-generated curriculum

College American Government (SBU POL 1113, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher.

Required, 11th/12th Grades, Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

Origin, organization and policy of United States government at the national, state and local levels. Encourages citizen participation and leadership in democratic processes beginning at the community level. Fulfills the Missouri statutory requirement. Requirement may be met through American Government.

Curriculum: Cengage, American Government, Essentials Edition: Institutions and Policies AP Edition, 16th Ed

Founding Brothers, the Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J Ellis

Supplemental material

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Strategies: American Government

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 Credit, additional fees may apply

This unique program was designed for students to learn the concepts covered in basic government courses. An ability-appropriate reading level; discussion-based lecture; and up-to-date visuals make Government accessible to all students. Topics to be covered in the course include types of government, the history of the U.S. government, political parties, The House of Representatives and the Senate, the President, and Vice President, the cabinet, independent government agencies, the federal court system, The Supreme Court, and much, much more.

Curriculum: PCI Government

Economics

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course is designed to help students understand economic concepts necessary for their participation in the global socioeconomic and capitalist systems as wage earners, business owners, producers, and investors. Basic economic concepts like supply and demand, competition, growth, and stability are emphasized. Topics include the government’s role in the economy, the sharing of economic risks, and the effect of inflation and monetary policies on national and international economics.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Economics

Strategies: Economics

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 Credit, additional fees may apply

This unique program was designed for students to learn the concepts covered in basic economics courses. An ability-appropriate reading level; sophisticated page layout; and up-to-date visuals make Economics accessible to all students. Topics to be covered in the course include: What is Economics, How Markets Work, Businesses and Labor, Economic Performance, Government and the Economy, The Global Economy and How Economics Affects You.

Curriculum: PCI Economics

College Geography (SBU GEO 1103, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

Students will discover the beautiful, unique blue planet that God gave Mankind dominion over. The zones and features of the physical Earth will be taught in harmony with how human history and culture have been influenced by topography and climate. Planetary and continental extremes will be studied in depth. There will be internet assignments related to the United States Geological Survey as well as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Curriculum: Wiley, Geography: Realms, Regions and Concepts, 16th Edition

College American History (SBU HISTORY 2213, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher For sophomores to be considered for the class, they must have a high school cumulative percentage of 95% or higher Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

This course covers the period of American history from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War. Two historical research papers will be required. One paper will be related to colonial settlement while the other will be based on slavery and the antebellum south. Students will participate in genealogy research and archiving. Upon successful completion of this class, students will earn three fully transferable college credits through SBU.

Curriculum: Mary Rowlandson, The Captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson; Frederick Douglas, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass; McGraw Hill, The Unfinished Nation, Volume 1; Teacher-generated PowerPoint presentations

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College American History 1877-Present (SBU HISTORY 2223, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher For sophomores to be considered for the class, they must have cumulative high school cumulative percentage of 95% or higher Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

This course covers the period of American history from Reconstruction through the end of the Cold War. One historical research paper will be required. Upon successful completion of this class, students will earn three fully transferable college credits through SBU.

Curriculum: Raymond A Mohland, Roger Biles, The Making of Urban America McGraw-Hill, The Unfinished Nation New York, Warriors Don’t Cry

Teacher-generated PowerPoint presentations

College Western Civilization to 1600 (SBU HIS 1113, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher Elective, 11th/12th Grade, 1st Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

This course provides a survey of Western Civilization from the Paleolithic period through the Middle Ages.

Curriculum: The Making of the West, Peoples and Cultures, fifth edition, Hunt, et al

College Western Civilization since 1600 (SBU HIS 1123, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher Elective, 11th/12th Grade, 2nd Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits Examines the history of world civilization from the Renaissance to the present day.

Curriculum: The Making of the West, Peoples and Cultures, fifth edition, Hunt, et al.

College General Psychology (MBU, PSY 133, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher Elective, 11th/12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 high school credit, 3 college credits

Provides a basic and general knowledge of the theoretical, scientific, and conceptual foundations of psychology, including biological, cognitive, emotional, developmental, cultural and social aspects. Includes key concepts and principles, methods for collecting and evaluating evidence, and application of psychological knowledge.

Curriculum: Houghton Mifflin, Social Studies: Psychology (2018)

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Technology Applications

Required, 9-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

*Internet safety module is required of all SCA students. See advisor for details.

Technology Applications will produce students who are capable of being ethical digital citizens, morally responsible, competent, and creative users of technology and Cloud computing. This class reviews and builds on the foundation of Digital Citizenship and covers the use of SCA technology; Internet safety (i.e. cyber bullying, information security, responsible use of social media, etc ); Google Apps for Education; keyboarding skills; intermediate (and some advanced) Microsoft Office 2010 skills; and an introduction to Application Development Multiple individual and collaborative projects will be used for assessment Requirement may be met through SCA Junior High Digital Citizenship Curriculum: TestOut

Marketing and Social Media

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Business Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This class is for students with excellent computing skills who have completed SCA’s Introduction to Business course. This course helps students understand marketing by learning the method through which businesses analyze, plan, and implement products to develop and maintain valuable exchanges with target buyers. Students will learn the basic elements of social media marketing and how it applies to the current trends. Curriculum: Teacher developed materials

BUSINESS

Introduction to Business

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This course will strengthen student awareness of the American economic system and business operation. Topics covered include the global economic environment, corporate structures, management strategy, impacting government interaction, marketing, information processing, and labor relations. Students will develop an awareness of business and career opportunities.

Curriculum: Pearson, Business Essentials; Online: Google Apps for Education, other online learning tools

Personal Finance

Required, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

Students will increase their knowledge and understanding of personal finance concepts through a fast paced video driven curriculum produced by Dave Ramsey and his organization The class will focus on the student’s money management skills to enable them to function as a responsible consumer, family member, citizen, and participant in the business world. Topics include financial institutions, budgeting, saving, investing, debt management, career readiness, insurance and much more.

Curriculum: Lampo Group, Foundations in Personal Finance

Economics

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 Credit

This course is designed to help students understand economic concepts necessary for their participation in the global socioeconomic and capitalist systems as business leaders, producers, wage earners, investors, and citizens. Basic concepts like decision making, modeling, indicators, economic systems, and the government’s role in the economy are emphasized. Specific topics covered include cost/benefit analysis, supply and demand, levels of competition, economic indicators, command vs. market systems, and monetary policy.

Curriculum: BJU Press, Economics

BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY
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Strategies: Economics

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 Credit, additional fees may apply This unique program was designed for students to learn the concepts covered in basic economics courses. An ability-appropriate reading level; sophisticated page layout; and up-to-date visuals make Economics accessible to all students. Topics to be covered in the course include: What is Economics, How Markets Work, Businesses and Labor, Economic Performance, Government and the Economy, The Global Economy and How Economics Affects You.

Curriculum: PCI Economics

Career Internship

Elective, 12th Grade, Full Year career internship. Minimum of 4.5 onsite hours each week or 72 each semester. Number of hours determines credit. Must be enrolled in Career Internship during 7th and 8th periods for admission into the program.

External Internship Opportunities: This practical, on–the-job career shadow is provided by students’ participation in organizations which connect to students’ long-term career or ministry goals. Students will be placed at organizations that further develop the competencies needed to succeed in a professional work environment. Students will report to an off-campus organization 3 days per week and will receive in class instruction 2 days per week. Grades will be based on in-class projects and on-site performance evaluations completed by site supervisors. Past internships have included a law firm, surgical center, elementary and secondary education, special needs education, sports medicine, photography, fire department, engineering, sheet metal work, and much more. Any student idea for an internship will be considered.

Admission into the internship program is reserved for students with outstanding character. Consideration toward student attendance, discipline, academic effort, and dependability will be given prior to acceptance into the course. Some students may be admitted on a probationary status for the second semester only. No student will be allowed to intern at a family business or with a parent due to a conflict of interest.

Curriculum: Toy Box Leadership by Hunter & Waddell

Internship

Elective, 11th/12th Grade, Semester, 0.5

In preparation to succeed in a competitive global economy, SCA supports practical on-the-job learning. Finishing their sophomore and/or junior years, students may elect to perform an internship. Internships may not be paid, must be approved through administration, and are subject to the availability of an assigned supervising member. Internships must be for the purposes of career exploration.

The internship supervisor will meet with the student's teacher for development of objectives to be met over the time of the student's service. They will also perform on-site visits that are both announced and unannounced. Students are required to document hours and activities. Student direct reports must be outside of a familial relationship. Internships will be added to the transcript as .5 credits with documentation of every 60 hours. No grades will be assigned. Students may earn a maximum of 1 full credit.

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Entrepreneurship

Prerequisite: Intro to Business Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This course will strengthen students’ awareness of small business management and entrepreneurial concepts. Topics covered include sole proprietorship, marketing strategy, customer service, planning business processes, and managing finances for business. Students will create a business plan for a potential future business throughout the semester, which they will formally present to successful community entrepreneurs in a business “pitch” at the end of the semester.

Curriculum: Cengage learning eBook: Entrepreneurship-Ideas in Action 6e, Cynthia L Greene

Textbook excerpts: Pearson Custom Edition for JCCC - Introduction to Entrepreneurship Online: Google Apps for Education, Tinkercad.com, Wix.com and other online learning tools Microsoft Office 2010.

Accounting I

Prerequisite: Introduction to Business or Personal Finance, Understanding of Excel Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 Credit

This course is designed to build a basic understanding of manual and automated accounting principles, concepts, and procedures. Activities include using the accounting equation, completing the accounting cycle, entering transactions to journals, posting to ledgers, preparing end-of-period statements and reports, managing payroll systems, completing banking activities, calculating taxes, and performing other related tasks.

Curriculum: Cengage Learning, Mindtap

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VISUALARTS

Drawing

Elective, 9th -12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course is designed for all beginning drawing students. If you can write your name, you can learn to draw what you see. Students learn how to visually measure objects, how to enlarge images using a grid system, and other techniques to improve drawing skills. Subject matter is from life. Drawing exercises focus on contour lines; positive and negative space; visual measurement and proportion; value, form and contrast; and illusion of depth and space. Students complete major drawings including a self-portrait, still life, and landscape. Various media are used including graphite, charcoal, colored pencil, content crayon, oil, pastel, watercolor pencils and ink.

Curriculum: Barnes & Noble Books, How to Paint & Draw

Videos: Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, Learn to See, Learn to Draw

Design Elements

Elective, 9th -12th Grade, 1st semester, 0.5 credit

Students learn and apply the elements of design and experiment with them through imagination and creative application of a variety of two and three dimensional art media. Students also gain understanding of commercial career applications.

Curriculum: Davis Publications, The Visual Experience, Teacher's Edition

Design Principles

Elective, 9th -12th Grade, 2nd semester, 0.5 credit

Students learn and apply the principles of design and experiment with them through imagination and creative application of a variety of two and three dimensional art media. Students also gain understanding of commercial career applications.

Curriculum: Davis Publications, The Visual Experience, Teacher's Edition

Painting

Elective, 9th -12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course is designed to encourage painting competency in both watercolors and acrylics. The majority of class time is spent on studio work, experimenting and discovering the possibilities of these mediums. Outline includes properties of color, hue, value, intensity, and color theory. Students will explore art historical periods with studio work relating to these studies and painting in a variety of media. Course outline includes overview and exploration from realistic painting, Baroque, Regionalism, Fauvism, Impressionism, Post Impressionism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Hard Edge Painting, and Pop Art. Self-evaluation, art criticism, and art history are explored. Research includes investigating historical periods in art and the artists who created them.

Curriculum: Crystal Productions, Acrylic Painting

Pottery

Elective, 9th -12th Grade, 1st semester, 0.5 credit

Emphasis is on three-dimensional design. Students learn the fundamentals of clay construction through hand-building (coil, slab, and pinch), as well as an introduction to the pottery wheel.

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Sculpture

Elective,9th -12th Grade, 2nd semester, 0.5 credit

Students learn and explore different types of sculpture (freestanding, relief, and mobile) and create using a variety of methods (modeling, carving, assemblage) utilizing an assortment of different media.

Digital Photography

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This is a basic course in photography designed to offer experiences with digital devices and cameras. Various camera settings will be learned to offer greater creative and technical control. This course builds the foundation for visual literacy regarding both form and content of photographic images. The elements and principles of design as they relate to photographic composition are emphasized. Students learn framing within the viewfinder and explore various compositional principles. Students also learn to examine images critically through weekly critiques of their own and classmates photographs. . Digital processing techniques are also introduced using Adobe Photoshop.

Curriculum: Teacher-Generated Materials

Media Production

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Digital Citizenship or Technology Applications Personal iPhone for filming and collaboration purposes.

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, .5 credit

Students will develop their storyboarding, filming, editing, and screenwriting skills through practical learning and the creation of several short film projects, both as individuals and as members of a group. Students will explore the many different elements of the film industry, creating many different types of short films present in today’s traditional and digital media industry.

Curriculum: Teacher developed materials.

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Acting and Improv

Elective, 9th -12th grades, 1st Semester, .5 credit

New to the scene and seasoned actors will develop their acting skills in improvisation, acting techniques, and activities that build confidence in class and performance. All assignments are designed to build on prior skills, and take the actor/speaker/comic to a whole new level. Special units are designed with student interest-based topics. Those interested in theatre education and professional performance opportunities will be building their auditioning repertoire and acting experiences portfolio.

Curriculum: Improvisation through Theatre Sports, by L.Belt, R. Stockey, The Complete Book of Speech Communication for students of speech and theatre, by Carol Marrs, Amazing Story Generator, Big Book of Audition Monologues, Monologues for Adults, by Mike Kimmel, 101 Drama Games and Activities by David Farmer, Theatre Machine Trilogy, Spirit Productions by Karen Baker

Acting Workshop

Elective, 9th-12th grades, 2nd Semester, .5 credit

Refine skills in acting, improvisation, character development, artistic appreciation, and awareness of career possibilities that can expand to business, project development, and communications. Students will learn comedy techniques, and the Hero’s Journey, as well as critical evaluation of objectionable themes in literature. The Princess Bride film is examined for biblical parallels through christianfantasy.com. Dramatic Ministry outreach themes are explored.

Curriculum: Basic Drama Projects, Teaching Improv, the Essential Handbook by Mel Paradis, Objectionable Elements, The Biblical Approach, BJU Press, The Writer’s Journey, by Christopher Vogler, Theatre Machine Trilogy, various scripts, and a variety of teacher-generated materials

Advanced Acting and Storytelling

Elective, 9th-12th grades, 2nd semester, .5 credit, offered annually, dependent upon student enrollment Published scripts, fractured fairy tales, reader’s theatre, original adaptations, Shakespeare, spoofs, finding biblical themes, parallels, and more, are all potential areas to explore in this energetic class. Performance opportunities may extend to elementary classrooms and One Acts/Showcase night in May.

Curriculum: Acting Like A Pro by Mary McTigue, Do’s and Don'ts of Drama by Jean Lee Latham, The Scenebook of Values and Virtues, by Patrick Rainville Dorn, The Big Book of Audition Monologues, Monologues for Adults, by Mike Kimmel, The Theatre Audition Book and The Theatre Audition Book 2, 57 Original Auditions for Actors by Eddie Lawrence, Mastering Monologues and Acting Sides by Janet Wilcox, Theatre Machine Trilogy, Spirit Productions by Karen Baker, and a variety of teacher-generated materials

Theater Production

Elective, 10th – 12th Grade, Semester, .5 credit, offered annually, dependent upon student enrollment As a team, develop the High School Spring plays, assist the Jr. High play, in all major areas of production. Cast, direct, stage manage, design, and promote student written and professional scripts for One Acts night, possibly even featuring your own script in a world premiere. Some will participate in Cappies and International Thespian Society hosting and officer duties. Students will be expected to support drama productions through both in-class activities and pre-show development for a minimum of four hours after school during show week.

Curriculum: Basic Drama Projects,Tips, Ideas for Directors by Jon Jory, Spirit Productions by Karen Baker, various scripts, and a variety of teacher-generated materials

THEATREARTS
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Theatre Repertory

9th-12th grades, Year Long, 1 credit, offered annually, dependent upon student enrollment Creativity reigns! Give your artistic expressions direct experience as you develop and perform a full-length play in February (or May), and experience any and all of your areas of interest and expertise at the end of the year One-Acts. Explore playwriting, or elements of film production, or stagecraft. Go on field trips to locally produced professional productions. Some fees will apply for ticket, food, and travel costs. Students will be expected to support drama productions through both in-class activities and pre-show development for a minimum of four hours after school during show week.

Curriculum: Basic Drama Projects, Play Director’s Survival Kit, theatre classroom library including Stage Lighting Step by Step, Stage Costume, Step by Step, Instant Period Costumes, Costuming Made Easy, Scenic Art for the Theatre, Self-Supporting Scenery, Stage Make-up, Stage Make-up for Stage and Screen, Theatre Machine Trilogy, Spirit Productions by Karen Baker, various scripts, and a variety of teacher-generated materials

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Allegro Strings

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply. Allegro Strings meets daily as an academic class, and players are expected to have a minimum of one year of experience on their instruments through either private lessons or Allegro JR. Students in Allegro Strings will learn the essentials of ensemble playing, as well as improve their technique and skills, both inside the classroom and through home practice. There will be opportunities for multiple school-wide performances, field trips, participation in the Worlds of Fun Festival of Music, and mentoring fellow string students. High school Allegro String members are eligible to participate in MSHSAA contests for solos and ensembles. All Allegro Strings may compete as a large group. High school students may also letter and are eligible to audition for All District and All State Orchestra. Students will be assessed through playing tests, written tests and quizzes, class participation, and performance attendance. Students who continue with their string instrument study will have an entire world open for them (including college scholarships) upon graduation from this program.

Curriculum: Smart Music

Symphonic Band

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply. Symphonic Band meets daily as an academic class. Students in Symphonic Band are eligible to participate in MSHSAA contests for solo/ensemble and as a large group and full orchestra. Students also have the opportunity to letter. Symphonic Band students are eligible to audition for All District and All State Band and Orchestra. Students will be assessed through playing tests, written tests and quizzes, class participation, and performance attendance. There will be opportunities for multiple school-wide performances, field trips, participation in the Worlds of Fun Festival of Music, and mentoring younger band students.

Curriculum: Band Tune Book of the Salvation Army , Smart Music

High

School Choir

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply

This course provides students the opportunities to develop their musical potential and understanding through singing in a choral ensemble. Course study includes production of beautiful tone, aesthetic awareness, the ability to read music with increasing fluency, and the building of technical skills, team spirit, and responsible rehearsal habits. Students will also be encouraged to heighten listening skills and increase their ability to analyze and evaluate music and music performances. Attention will also be given to relating music experiences to the time and culture of the pieces they study, as well as to contemporary society. Sight singing techniques are practiced on a daily basis. Phonetics of various languages and a variety of musical styles are presented.

As authentic performance is a necessary part of choir, there are some required evening/weekend events. Students must coordinate published school dates with their calendars to avoid grade deduction. The following events will be required:

● Grandparents’ Day

● Fall, Christmas, spring, and other concerts

● MSHSAA large group music festival (Optional opportunities to be involved in MSHSAA solos or small ensembles Conference choir or MCDA District/State Choir will be available to selected students )

Curriculum: Variety of instructor-selected resources used for theory, history, and listening; Choral literature is chosen by the instructor each year for performance; Patti Dewitt Co, The Singing Musician; Music Literacy for Singers

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Concert Chorale

Prerequisite: HS Choir or satisfactory performance on entrance audition

Elective, 10th -12th Grade, Full year, 1 credit Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply

This course is an advanced mixed choral ensemble for dedicated and serious musicians Auditions are held in the spring of the previous school year Course study includes the production of beautiful tone, aesthetic awareness, the ability to read music with fluency, the polishing of performance skills, team spirit, and responsible rehearsal habits Students will hone listening skills and their ability to analyze and critique music and music performances. Attention will be given to relating music experiences to the time and culture of the pieces studied as well as to contemporary society. Expectations include a sincere desire to improve musical understanding and techniques.

As authentic performance is a necessary part of choir, there are some required evening/weekend events. Students must coordinate published school dates with their calendars to avoid grade deduction. The following events will be required:

● Grandparents’ Day

● Fall, Christmas, spring, and other concerts

● MSHSAA large group music festival (Optional opportunities to be involved in MSHSAA solos or small ensembles. Conference choir or MCDA District/State Choir will be available to selected students.)

Curriculum: Variety of instructor-selected resources used for theory, history, and listening Choral literature is chosen by the instructor each year for performance

Junior/Senior Ensemble

Prerequisite: Approval or satisfactory performances on entrance audition. Must also be enrolled in Concert Chorale. Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Full year by audition/invitation only-class size limited, 1 credit Concert apparel required; additional fees may apply This class is for the highly motivated and talented choral musician This performance-based course provides students the opportunity to perform in public venues and competitions Students will have the opportunity to enhance the choral ensemble skills currently being developed in High School Choir or Concert Chorale, with an emphasis on a higher level of individual vocal development. Students will perform as soloists and in small ensembles, in addition to the large ensemble. Only the most advanced choral music is performed. Required performances include (but are not limited to) at least four evening concerts per year, Grandparents’ Day, Christmas caroling, the MSHSAA Music Festival, MSHSAA Solo/Ensemble Festival, Conference Choir, opportunities for worship and church performances and various community events. (Students are encouraged to try out for the MCDA District/State Choirs.)

Curriculum: Variety of instructor-selected resources used for theory, history, and listening Choral literature is chosen by the instructor each year for performance

College Music Appreciation (MBU, MUHL 153, Dual Credit Class)

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 High School Credit, 3 College Credits. Introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the basic elements, genres, and style periods of Western music Classical and popular styles will be presented Two live concert experiences are required Curriculum:Cengage VitalSource Music

College Fundamentals of Music (MBU, MUTH 103, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: None

Elective, 11th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 High School Credit, 3 College Credits. This course will include study of the notation of melody, rhythm, and basic harmony. Includes scales, intervals, triads, and harmonization of simple melodies. For non-music majors and those preparing for MUTH 113.

Curriculum:TBD

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Introductory Worship I

Prerequisite: Approval or satisfactory performances on entrance audition

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

The purpose of Introductory Worship I is to enable students to have a personal response to the revelation of Christ and model a lifestyle of character that flows out of an intimate relationship with the Father. Students will be expected to begin gleaning a deep knowledge of Scriptural passages concerning worship and, subsequently, break down personal barriers of tradition in order to fully worship in spirit and in truth. Students will learn to build music sets, which are intentional and may be theme-based. They will analyze lyrics through a biblical worldview and work within a team to carry the message of worship to the community through their individual talents.

Students taking Worship I for fine arts credit must demonstrate musicality through public performance of worship with the instrument of their choice (this may include vocal performance). Students will learn to build music sets, which are intentional and may be theme-based. This course may be repeated as elective credit only.

Curriculum: ESV Bible Scripture

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Intermediate Worship II

Prerequisites: Introductory Worship I

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

The purpose of Worship II is to enable students to continue deepening their personal relationship with Christ in order to promote personal service to the body of Christ. Deep knowledge of Scriptural passages concerning worship will be increased through study of Scriptural commentary and writings of current and past worship leaders. Students will learn to build music sets, which are intentional and theme-based. They will write an analysis of readings and chosen music lyrics, synthesizing information they have gleaned from their studies. Greater service through community outreach and willingness to demonstrate leadership skills within a team through both speech and actions will be expected as students become true servant leaders. May be used to fulfill Bible III credit.

Students taking Worship II for fine arts credit will be expected to perform with the worship team and will demonstrate knowledge of transposing music and creating a worship team with balanced vocals and instrumentation. Mastery of a single instrument should be accomplished and a comfort level for performance with a secondary instrument will be expected. Fine arts students in Worship II will also be expected to compose/arrange a worship song. Students taking Worship II for Practical Arts credit will be part of the worship team technical crew. Responsibilities will emphasize areas of student personal interest, but demand cross training on sound systems, and media presentation. This course may be repeated for elective credit only.

Curriculum: ESV Bible Scripture Multitracks.com Subscription

Beginning Strings

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 High

School credit

It is an introduction to string instruments. Students will choose a string instrument and learn it in a group setting. Daily practice at home is expected in order to improve skills. After one semester, the student may be ready to join Allegro Strings.

Curriculum: Learn to Play a Stringed Instrument, Books 1-3 (Matesky and Womack), Alfred Music; Smart Music

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WORLD LANGUAGES

Spanish I

Elective, 9th – 12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of Spanish and develops their abilities to communicate through writing, reading, listening, and speaking. Students will learn to greet and introduce others and talk about their classes, family, daily routine, food, clothes, and pastimes. Learning fundamental grammar topics and conjugation of present and preterite verb tenses will enable students to formulate sentences and dialogue. Cultural activities and discussions will accompany language lesions, acquainting students with topics such as food, holidays, and customs. Classes will discuss God’s heart for the world and how to show His love in how we interact with people of other nations and cultures.

Curriculum: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, ¡Exprésate! 1

Spanish II

Prerequisite: Spanish I or test out option (Students who have completed 7th and 8th grade Spanish, or those who are heritage speakers, may petition to take a comprehensive exam over Spanish I If successful, they may enroll in Spanish II No credit for Spanish I will be given for this option.)

Elective, 9th – 12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Through thematic units, students in Spanish II will expand their skills in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural awareness. Students will develop a functional command of words and phrases that deal with immediate needs and common everyday situations or while traveling in limited situations. Students will demonstrate comprehension of simple questions and statements about family, residence self, weather, time and interests. The content expansion includes the use of familiar words and phrases applicable with normal commands, frequent instructions, and courtesy interchanges. Students will be able to recognize and properly use present and past tense grammar structures. These skills will also be applied to continued Bible studies that expand upon previous learning.

Curriculum: Vista: Descubre 2

College Spanish I (SBU SPA 1114, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Spanish II and a cumulative high cumulative percentage of 80%or higher or pass the entrance exam.

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, .5 high school credit, 2 college credits

In Spanish III, students continue to develop their proficiency in speaking, listening, writing and reading by interacting with other speakers of Spanish. Pronunciation, grammar, reading of simple prose, aural-oral practice. This class may be taken for dual credit.

Curriculum: McGraw-Hill Tu Mundo 2nd edition and Easy Spanish Reader

College Spanish II (SBU SPA 1124, Dual Credit Class)

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, .5 high school credit, 2 college credits

A Continuation of SPA 1114. Prerequisite: SPA 1114.

Curriculum: McGraw-Hill Tu Mundo 2nd edition and Easy Spanish Reader

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College Inter Spanish I (SBU SPA 2213, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: Spanish III (SBU SPAN 110/SPAN 120) and a cumulative high school cumulative percentage of 80% or higher Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, .5 high school credit, 3 college credits

For Spanish IV, students cover grammar review, simple composition and conversation, and the reading of short narratives. Topics go well beyond basic needs and include: personal and family affairs, current events, school, work, etc. Students can comprehend descriptions and narration referring to past, present or future events. They can comprehend dialogue about special fields of interest and narratives of a nontechnical or specialized nature. There is an increased comprehension of in-depth material about special interest topics used in class, including Spanish literature and the Bible. Grammar control includes all but the infrequently used and the most complex forms and word order problems. Students work toward building a larger reading, speaking and listening vocabulary through the use of materials, representative of the Hispanic culture. This course may be taken for dual credit.

Curriculum: McGraw-Hill, Tu Mundo 2nd edition and Easy Spanish Reader

College Inter Spanish II (SPA 2223, Dual Credit Class)

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, .5 high school credit, 3 college credits

Continuation of SPA 2213 with emphasis on reading.

Curriculum: McGraw-Hill, El Cuento Hispanico, Other materials and short films

Mandarin Chinese I

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Chinese I is an introductory course in the fundamentals of Chinese. The course is designed to teach cumulative grammar concepts, deepened by studies in Chinese culture, literature, and the Bible. It provides a foundation for those interested in continuing a study of Chinese.

Curriculum: Joint Publishing, Chinese Made Easy, Level 1

Mandarin Chinese II

Prerequisite: Chinese I

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Chinese II is designed to introduce students to the more complex structures of Chinese. The language instruction is more rigorous. This class is meant to equip students for further language study and for low-level mastery of the language (the student should be able to present ideas and respond to native speakers). The course uses children's literature (in translation) and short stories in Chinese. The class conducts Bible studies using a Chinese translation on a weekly basis.

Curriculum: Joint Publishing, Chinese Made Easy, Level 2

Better Chinese, Discovering Chinese, Volume 2

Mandarin Chinese III

PrerequIsite: Chinese II

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Chinese III is a gifted class for students to master the Hanyu Pinyin and to improve their Chinese skills with listening, speaking, reading and writing. The students will achieve more advanced topics: Food and health, social events, media and technology, holidays and celebrations, weather and environment, travel and world famous cities. The students are required to read “Back to Jerusalem” and to introduce the church history in China.

Curriculum: Joint Publishing, Chinese Made Easy, Level 3

Better Chinese, Discovering Chinese, Volume 3

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French I

9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

French I is an active class that gives the beginning student the vocabulary necessary to communicate on a basic level with French speakers on a variety of familiar subjects such as school, home activities, etc. The student will learn how to formulate sentences and dialogues through listening, speaking, reading and writing. French translations of familiar Bible verses will be incorporated throughout the course. Cultural activities will accompany language lessons to acquaint students with food, artistic expression, and diversity of the francophone world.

Curriculum: EMC; Vista: Chemins 1

French II/College French I (SLU FREN 1010, Communicating in French I, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: French I or test out option (Students who have completed 8th grade French, or those who are heritage speakers, may petition to take a comprehensive exam over French I. If successful, they may enroll in French II.) Also, a cumulative high school percentage of 80% or higher.

9th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 3 college credits

Through thematic units students will continue their communication skills through reading and writing, speaking and listening. Students will develop a functional command of words and phrases that deal with immediate needs and common everyday situations or while traveling in limited situations. Students will communicate in the present and past tenses about celebrations, traveling, their homes, food, and their daily activities. Francophone countries around the world will continue to be emphasized with a Biblical worldview. Students who choose to earn dual credit will create and present a Francophone country in the target language as well as write a research paper in English about that country

Curriculum: Vista, Chemins 2

French III/College French II (SLU FREN 1020, Communicating in French II, Dual Credit Class)

Prerequisite: FREN II and a cumulative high cumulative percentage of 80%or higher Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 high school credit, 3 college credits

Continuation of FREN 1010. Expansion of oral and written communication skills in areas of immediate needs, personal interests and daily life. Grammatical concepts include the imperfect and future tenses. Curriculum: EMC, Vista: Perspectives

Seal of Biliteracy information (see

Appendix p. 69-74)

The Seal of Biliteracy promotes active participation in a global society and economy by incentivizing, recognizing and celebrating the acquisition of biliteracy skills and sociocultural awareness.

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Extended Campus PE

Elective, Semester or Full Year at Bodies, Health & Fitness, 0.5 or 1 credit

SCA partners with a personal trainer to provide one-to-one fitness education that is personalized for each student. Sessions may be scheduled during or outside of school hours for an additional fee. See your advisor for details. Additional fees will apply. Programs are held at Bodies Health and Fitness.

Introduction to Weight Training

Elective, 9th - 12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit, Gender

Specific Classes

This course will provide an introduction to weight training with an emphasis on student participation. The student will be presented with the proper technique for a variety of weight training movements with an emphasis on learning proper movement rather than strength development. Grades will be determined through participation, written tests, and the completion of a workout journal/notebook. Curriculum: RACK Performance Software

Advanced Weight Training

Prerequisite: Beginning weight training

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit, Co-Ed Classes

This course has three main objectives: development of an understanding of weight training physiology, development of the skills necessary to maximize performance of strength training techniques, and to continue progress toward an individual’s strength and fitness goals. Students will learn to design and implement their own individual workout plan and track their progress by maintaining a workout journal or tracker. Grades will be determined through participation in class, written tests, and completion of the workout journal or tracker. This class may be repeated for further credit.

Fitness For Life

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit, Co-Ed Classes

Fit for life is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills that are essential for creating a healthy lifestyle. In this class, students will participate in various low-impact resistance exercises designed to tone, stretch, strengthen, and sculpt muscles to improve body composition and fitness. Areas may include but are not limited to fitness testing, goal setting, circuit training, weight training, walking, aerobics, jogging, interval training, stretching, various low-impact competitions, nutrition analysis and planning, and current event research. This class may be repeated for further credit.

Team Sports

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit, Gender Specific Classes

This course will include a variety of team sport activities that may include team sports such as football, softball, soccer, and basketball. Instruction is aimed at developing fitness and traditional and non-traditional team sports games. Injury prevention and sport-related careers will also be included in the instruction. Students will also examine coaching and team strategies, and officiating mechanics for each sport. Students will participate in a variety of sports and games, teach classmates rules and skills, and have the opportunity to officiate various sports and games.

Curriculum: PE Equipment such as footballs, basketballs, soccer balls etc.

PHYSICALEDUCATION
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Net Sports and Lifetime Activities

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit, Gender Specific Classes

Students will participate in a variety of lifetime activities which may include tennis, volleyball, badminton, softball, frisbee, golf, pickleball, bowling, table tennis, recreational and outdoor recreational activities. Students will also learn about the health benefits gained from participating in these activities. Regular class activities include participating in lifetime activities and taking written assessments over the rules and terminology related to them.

PRACTICALELECTIVES

ACT Prep

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester, 0.5 credit

This course is designed to provide students with both instruction and practice in the five major categories that appear on the ACT: English, Math, Science, Reading, and Writing (Optional). Students will learn test-taking strategies specific to the ACT. They will also spend substantial class time in supervised practice (individually and in teams) in the areas of English, Math, Science, and Reading, as well as limited time preparing for the Optional Writing component of the ACT.

Curriculum: Princeton Review ACT Prep, 2020: 6 Practice Tests +Content Review + Strategies (College Test Preparation)

Upgrade to current year each new school year

Yearbook

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Full Year, 1 credit

Prerequisite: Admission into the course is reserved for students with a high level of dependability

Enrollment: 15 students maximum

This is a production-based course that requires a high level of responsibility and commitment as we create the SCA yearbook in a Christ honoring and accurate way. Because the staff is solely responsible for the content, design, and layout of the yearbook, students who choose to participate in this course must ensure that it runs efficiently and effectively. The yearbook staff must be cooperative, punctual, professional, creative and productive. Students will be expected to maintain good attendance and display strong academic performance. Students will apply for various staff positions which will require them to be responsible for conducting interviews, composing captions, designing and editing all elements of text, graphic art, and digital photography layouts. Students will learn the basics of the Adobe InDesign and Bridge software program as they work together to complete the secondary yearbook along with organizing and distributing at the end of the year. This course requires students to be available outside of regular class hours to attend sporting and fine arts events and other student activities in order to photograph at least one event per month.

Curriculum: InDesign Training Videos from Lynda.com and Teacher-Generated Materials

Life Prep

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester or Full Year, 0.5 or 1 credit

Grades given will be Pass/Fail and will not impact your cumulative percentage.

SCA’s mission is to enable students to meet their God-given potential. In supporting this goal, Life Prep class has been created to honor the uniqueness of each student. Time may be spent to facilitate music lessons, study for classes, obtain tutoring, or take advantage of ministry opportunities. Students are encouraged to bring their ideas for Life Prep time to their Life Prep instructor. Should students choose to use life prep hour to complete an accredited course from a different educational institution, credit will be issued for that course rather than a life prep credit. Only .5 credit may be issued for a single period semester

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Life Prep Plus

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester or Full Year, 0.5 or 1 credit

Additional fee may apply

Grades given will be Pass/Fail and will not impact your cumulative percentage. SCA’s mission is to enable students to meet their God-given potential. In supporting this goal, Life Prep Plus class has been created to honor the uniqueness of each student. Time may be spent to facilitate music lessons, study for classes, obtain tutoring, or take advantage of ministry opportunities. Students are encouraged to bring their ideas for Life Prep Plus time to their Life Prep instructor. Students will meet weekly with the teacher to look at grades, upcoming assignments, and to discuss strategies to improve academic skills. This is a small group setting. Fees may apply.

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Required for 9th - 12th Grade International Students, Full Year, 1 credit

Within the EAP classroom, each student will be individually assessed so that progress may be tracked in grammar, vocabulary, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will also be given instruction in preparation for standardized language testing and MLA essay formatting. The teacher will incorporate lecture, technology, and individual tutoring as needed to help ensure the academic success of each student in core college-prep classes. Time will be taken to facilitate cultural adaptation and to explore opportunities for students to share their culture within SCA’s environment.

Curriculum: Longman, Writing Academic English, Level 4; Longman, Introduction to Academic Writing, Level 3; Barron’s, TOEFL iBT, 13th Edition; Grammar and Beyond Level 3 and 4

Language Cadet Teacher

Prerequisite: Must have at least a B in English I and approval of an EAP teacher.

Elective, 10th-12th Grade, Semester or Full Year, 0.5 credit or 1 credit

This class is for students who desire to aid the teacher in instructing students in language acquisition using their first language. The objective of the language cadet teacher course is to assist the classroom language teacher, provide authentic language as a native speaker, and offer cultural insight and exploration. Language cadet teacher responsibilities include: preparing educational materials and supplies, providing instruction to the class in selected subject areas under the supervision of the classroom teacher, providing individual instruction to students, and other duties as assigned by the teacher

Student Aide

Prerequisite: Administrative approval required Students must fill out an application Applications may be picked up in the college and career advisor’s office

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Semester or Full Year, 0.5 or 1 credit

Students have the opportunity to work in a variety of settings as an aide. They will be asked to help with an array of tasks under the supervision of SCA faculty or staff. Aide positions are available in the following areas: elementary or secondary classrooms, the elementary library, school offices, and maintenance.

Grades given will be Pass/Fail and will not impact GPA Must pass to receive credit Students should pick an alternate elective class in the event they are not chosen as a Student Aide.

Special Topics

Elective, 11th/12th Grade, Semester or Full Year, 0.5 or 1 credit

With administrative approval, students may choose to do more in-depth study on a course elective. The objectives to be learned for the special topics course will be established by the course instructor in conjunction with the student. These objectives will be approved by administration and documented within the student’s file. Examples of course electives for special topics include but are not limited to painting, worship, etc.

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Discovery Program

Prerequisite: Administration of Individualized cognitive and academic standardized tests, Woodcock-Johnson III – Tests of Achievement, Bender Gestalt, and miscellaneous informal tests (separate fees assessed for testing)

Elective, 9th-12th Grade, Full Year

The student enrolled in the Discovery Program (a research-based model put forth by the National Institute of Learning Development or NILD) meets one-on-one with a certified educational therapist, for a total of 180 minutes each week. Each session is specifically targeted to remediate perceptual weaknesses in the visual, auditory, and/or cognitive processing domains. Enrollment in the Discovery Educational Therapy Program is recommended only after a student has been thoroughly evaluated via a battery of psycho-educational, standardized, and informal tests, in which a pattern of perceptual deficits is revealed. There is required work outside of the therapy session four days each week. The goal of the Discovery Program is for each student to become an independent learner, who no longer requires accommodations or modifications in order to function in an academic setting. Every Discovery student is re-evaluated annually to determine if reenrollment is recommended for the upcoming school year. Typically, students remain in the program 3-5 years. There is an additional fee required for the Discovery Program.

Textbook: Interactive Educational Systems, Inc , The Blue Book Method NILD Support Manipulatives

Summit Technology Academy & Missouri Innovation Campus

Prerequisite: See Qualifications

11th/12th Grade, Full Year, 1 Credit per/semester

STA’s partnership with SCA enables students to attend the STA campus from 7:55-10:00 a.m. It should be noted that STA follows the R-7 school district calendar, and it is important that students follow those dates. This may mean, as it does with other partnering districts, that our students at STA will not experience full days off during certain vacation times as SCA does not follow the Lee’s Summit District school calendar. STA will modify the course ending dates to match seniors’ schools’ ending dates.

Qualifications:

For entrance into the basic STA programs, students must:

1. Enroll in their local public school district. SCA will help facilitate. (Kansas

2. Students do not need to enroll in their local school district).

3. Go to: https://sta.lsr7.org/

a. Fill out the application

b. Cumulative Percentage of 75%

c. Attendance average of 90%

d Had a minimum of 80% in Algebra I

e English testing on grade level

f For Software development: Keyboarding at 30 wpm

g Some programs require either current enrollment or having had one or more of the following: physics; pre-calculus; Anatomy, chemistry, and biology

h Write two essays from prompts

i Why are you interested in enrolling into this program

j Describe what you know about careers related to this program and how it

4. [SIC] might help you reach your educational and career goals

5. Have two letters of recommendation from teachers

6. Other prerequisites from Project-Lead-the-Way Schools are required, but our students would be exempted from those prerequisites.

7. In addition to the above MIC candidates must have:

a. An 80% Cumulative Percentage

b. ACT scores of 18 in English; 19 in Reading, and 20-22 in math (depending on program)

c. Have an average 95% attendance rate.

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Requirements for part time students desiring to participate in MSHSAA activities

1. Attendance: Part-time students must be currently enrolled in and regularly attending courses totaling 3.5 units of credit or courses that are 80% of maximum allowable credits that may be earned. (At SCA, students should be enrolled in a minimum of 2 traditional, seated courses out of the SCA 8-period day).

2. Prior Semester Requirements for High School: When a student who has not had any connection to SCA initially applies (whether they are coming in full-time, or part-time, or Traditional or Nontraditional), two different areas must be reviewed and confirmed before the student is able to represent SCA in MSHSAA competitions.

A. First, academic credit for the prior full semester has to be confirmed and accepted. For this to happen, a student must have earned a minimum of 3.5 credits or have earned credit in 80% of the maximum allowable classes in which a student can be enrolled in the semester, whichever is greater.

B. Second, all previously taken courses must be added to the SCA transcript. To be added courses must meet criterion of SCA courses (i.e., be from an accredited body and/or taught by certified personnel, meet hours p/Carnegie measure, be listed in SCA Course Description Guide in Appendix B, or be approved by the administrative based on previous listed criterion).

3. Part-time students must provide SCA with verification of all courses completed. (Documentation should include tracked hours from an accredited program OR a virtual transcript.)

4. For high school students, In addition to following MSHSAA academic semester requirements, SCA students must also meet monthly grade check requirements. Grades should reflect no F's OR no more than one D in all courses in order to participate in MSHSAA competitions.

5. At the end of each semester, the school advisor will confirm students are continuing in eligible courses for the next semester and will also confirm all previous semester courses were passed. These courses will then be added to the transcript.

*For high school students, a $35.00 transcripting fee will apply p/year. This fee will be charged upon enrollment and is nonrefundable.

6. SCA will provide a transcript that includes all SCA and transferred approved courses. Courses transferred into SCA will be placed in parenthesis on the transcript.

7. For high school students, upon initial enrollment, part-time students are considered to be transfer students. The athletic office will file a Transfer Eligibility Form in order to confirm eligibility through MSHSAA. Students must maintain their non-traditional student status in subsequent semesters or will be required to refile a Transfer Eligibility Form for MSHSAA to again confirm their eligibility. For example, if a student wants to run cross country in the fall, but he/she doesn’t wish to continue enrollment at SCA for the spring, the student would be a transfer student again if he/she re-enters the agreement next fall.

8. Part-time students may attend lunch and/or one life prep (study hall) course, if desired courses are not immediately consecutive in the school schedule.

9. Part-time students are welcome to attend SCA chapels and all other school activities.

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Appendices

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Appendix A

Seal of Biliteracy

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SUMMIT CHRISTIANACADEMY

Missouri Seal of BiliteracyApplication

The Missouri Seal of Biliteracy promotes active participation in a global society and economy by incentivizing, recognizing and celebrating the acquisition of biliteracy skills and sociocultural awareness. SCA is dedicated to providing an education that prepares students for life and service in a global society. These skills include the ability to communicate with individuals, clients, colleagues and associates who speak a language other than English, as well as understand the sociocultural intricacies that can further enhance the relationship. The Missouri Seal of Biliteracy is awarded to students who have attained proficiency in English and at least one other language before high school graduation.

Any SCA student who is studying a world language is a potential candidate for the Seal. Native English speaking students may acquire the second language through world language classrooms, community-based programs, at home or other experience. English Language Learners (ELLs) are also eligible to apply and demonstrate their proficiency through the mentioned requirements. If you wish to pursue the seal and accompanying graduation honors, submit this form to your world language teacher. The world language teacher should provide a copy to the International Program Director for processing.

I wish to pursue the Missouri Seal of Biliteracy. Name Email: Grade Language(s) to be Tested Language classes taken in High School
Reading score: Please attach official document. 68
ACT
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LOG FOR SOCIOCULTURALCOMPONENT OF SEALOF BILITERACY This log serves as a place to record all activities and obtain signatures of the overseeing adult(s). Requirements: Students must acquire a total of 15 points in any combination of the options below. Points may be acquired over a two-year period.
I. Attach a written, researched 3 page paper on the cultural topic(s) shown below.Your paragraph may be written in English. 1 Topic 1: Music 1 Topic 2: Art 1 Topic 3: Poetry 1 Topic 4: Current Event 1 Topic 5: Literature 2 Topic 6: Compare and Contrast yourAmerican systems of Health, Government, Civil Liberties, Economics with a country where your language is spoken 3 II. Cultural Presentation - attach presentation. Provide date, time, and contact information for the adult supervising the presentation. III. Develop relationships with native speakers 4 Opportunity 1: Be an SCABuddy 4 Opportunity 2: Be an SCAHost family 4 Opportunity 3: Demonstrate Leadership in NEXUS 4 Opportunity 4: Participate with International/Refugee discipleship through local church 4 IV. Service Project with native speakers - attach 1- page written reflection on your experience and supervising adult’s signature V Visit-Attend a local event where a country that speaks your language is highlighted.Attach a 1-page reflection. 4 Visit 1: Alocal Church Service 4 Visit 2:ALocal Festival or Event 4 Visit 3:AMuseum Exhibit 5 VI. Translation - attach translated piece and supervising adult’s signature 6 VII Out of Country Trip - attach written 1,000 word reflection on experience along with 3-5 photos. Supervising adult’s signature 70
Points possible Activity Option Descriptions

LOG FOR SOCIOCULTURALCOMPONENT OF SEALOF BILITERACY

This document is designed to provide a place to track all points related to your sociocultural component for the Seal of Biliteracy. All documents must be filled out entirely before submission. All signees must be verifiable and provide contact information for verification.

Students: Briefly describe the activity/activities you plan to accomplish (include what you will be doing, where it will be performed, who you will be working with, when this will be completed, and total number of points seeking.)

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LOG FOR SOCIOCULTURALCOMPONENT OF SEALOF BILITERACY Date/ Location Activity Adult’s Name & Phone Number Position/ Title Signature Points Seeking 72

Appendix B

Pre-Approved Homeschool Courses for High School Students

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PRE-APPROVED HOMESCHOOLCOURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOLSTUDENTS

To participate in any MSHSAA competition, all part-time students must pass a total of 7 courses each semester, earning a total of 7 high school credits (.5 for each semester). These courses will be placed on an SCA transcript once approved by administration. Part-time students may participate in high school graduation if they have earned a total of eight SCA credits, including a Bible course, as long as all other graduation requirements have been met. For a list of these graduation requirements, please see page 7 in this Course Description Catalog

Pre-Approved Courses Include:

I. Courses taken from the following entities with accompanying grade report: Abeka Academy BJU Press MOVIP & MOCAP (Missouri Course Access and Virtual School Program) North Star Academy Sevenstar University of Missouri Online

II. Courses taken from Home with a parent-generated grade report: Courses created and taught by a teacher certified within the subject area.

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Appendix C Forms

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Summit ChristianAcademy

CourseApprovalForm(i.e.,off-campusoronline)

Thefollowingstudentisplanningtotakeacourseorcoursesfromanotherinstitutioninordertofulfill graduationrequirementsatSummitChristianAcademy.Pleaseseethecoursedescriptionguide(pg5) forfurtherdetails.

Student’sName:____________________________________

CourseName Institution SCARequirement

Thestudentandparent/guardianunderstandthatproofofcoursecompletion.Apassinggrademustbe submittedtotheschoolofficefromtheinstitutionprovidingthecourseinordertoreceivecredit. Submissionshouldbedoneimmediatelyafterthecompletionofthecourseinordertoupdateschool transcriptshereatSCA.

Thesignaturesbelowshowthatthestudent,theparentorguardian,andtheschoolagreetotheabove satisfyinggraduationrequirementsatSCA.

StudentSignature:____________________________________

ParentSignature:_____________________________________
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Principal/CounselorSignature:___________________________
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Appendix D

Philosophies

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The goal of the SCABible department is to teach the Bible as a tool for the student’s relationship and service to God. The Bible is the written revelation from God to humankind and is the original, infallible, inerrant source from which we learn of the salvation offered by grace, through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. In the Scriptures, we encounter the central Truth of Jesus’life, sacrificial death on the cross, and resurrection in power from the dead. SCA incorporates Bible classes as the Scriptures are God’s intended source for teaching, rebuking, correcting, and training in righteousness (I Tim.3:16-17). We see Scripture as God’s revelation and the key to personal relationship with Him. Christians must read and understand Scripture in order to understand the personal sacrifice required of all believers to serve the body of Christ, (the Church) of which Christ is the head (Eph 1:23, Rom. 12:1-2, I Pet. 2:9). To fulfill God’s command that we are to love Him with all of our heart, soul and mind (Matt. 22:37), it is our desire to teach dedication in critically studying God’s Word, that Christians may grow in their relationship with the Creator, Redeemer, and Savior (Col 3:23, I Pet. 3:15).

God’s Revelation and the Need for Relationship

It is also the aim of the SCABible department to lead in forming an apologetic for the Christian faith. The Bible is clear that God reveals Himself to all people through Creation, though it is not a revelation leading to salvation (Rom. 1:18-23). Therefore, it is the Christian’s responsibility to identify and proclaim those aspects of God found in creation, revealed only by the Holy Spirit (Acts 14:8-18, 17:22-34, I Co. 2:6). Every discipline finds its source in God by way of His creation, so all subjects teach the truth of God (Col. 1:15-20, I Pet. 3:15).As we look to the humble example set by Christ as the Word of God. Though Christians stand in a special place understanding the truth of this world and God, it is not the place of the Christian

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to judge or ridicule (John 5:19, Phil 2:5-8). Though the Christian may be prepared with God’s truth, the presentation of that truth should illustrate the love and sacrifices God has made (John 3:16).

Regarding Translations of the Bible

The Bible is an ancient book written in three different languages: Hebrew, Greek, and small portions ofAramaic (Daniel). SCAacknowledges the canon as the sixty-six books: Genesis through Revelation. While the school supports no particular English translation, we encourage a more literal translation for classroom use. Popular examples of such translations would be: English Standard Version, New International Version, NewAmerican Standard Bible, and the King James Version.

Regarding Curriculum Content to Encourage World Impact

As Christians relate the gospel to our generation, we may not forget that James 3:17 warns that “the wisdom from above first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial and sincere.” Christians should be careful not to be “taken captive by philosophies” of our current generation; however, understanding modern ideologies may lend Christians a great opportunity to grow in the understanding of God and in the ability to witness to our generation (Col. 2:8). Christians must be patient to understand others if we wish to testify of grace in Christ. Because we believe in the absolute moral truth of Scripture, as well as the mandate to reach our world, we understand the necessity of Christians being able to define and engage philosophies and cultures different from our own.

Regarding Unity within our School Body

Should debate concerning church doctrine ensue within a classroom as we are engaging our culture and the Word, students are encouraged at all age levels to bring questions to parents and pastors. In regards to class discussion, teachers will moderate

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differently depending upon the age level of students. At the early elementary levels, no debate or vigorous discussion will ensue. As students begin developing more ability to think abstractly, teachers will allow moderated discussion and direct students to the Word to begin critically thinking out their personal faith. At the highest grade levels, vigorous conversation may occur as students wrestle with their theology in an attempt to strengthen their faith as they prepare to enter college and the world. Always, the Word of God will be the platform for discussion.

Conclusion

It is our desire that the Bible education received through SCAwill provide a deep understanding of God’s Word and equip students to demonstrate personal application of that Word, enabling a life lived as a disciple for Christ.

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The mission of the Business and Technology Department is to provide offerings that meet student needs, interests, abilities, and aspirations. The department will enhance a student’s ability to respond to actual or anticipated opportunities for employment, advanced education, and practical life application in the 21st Century. These students will also study business and technology through both a Christian and secular lens to promote awareness of the need for careful evaluation of practice. Romans 12:2 states: “And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is good, and acceptable, and perfect will of God.” This department will prepare students to transform the world around them by renewing their minds and trusting God, so that we may glorify Him through our careers and lifestyles.

Students in the SCA Business and Technology Department are guided in many ways as they develop the skills necessary to be informed consumers, citizens, employees, and business leaders. Divergent thinking is encouraged in the Business and Technology Department at SCA. Within the department, students will frequently customize their experiences by selecting projects based on personal and career interests. Student learners, working independently or in teams, will use a wide range of technology to solve unstructured problems. Several opportunities support the students’ desire for independence and creativity. Additionally, students will participate in group projects designed to foster the extremely valuable skill of team collaboration.

Some general goals for graduates of the Business and Technology Department at Summit Christian Academy include:

● Possessing a thorough understanding of the biblical view of prosperity, wealth, and private property

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● Grasping the importance of being “a light unto the world” and the immense opportunity to witness for Christ as Christian business leaders in the global marketplace.

● Functioning as economically literate citizens through the development of personal consumer economic skills, knowledge of social and government responsibility, and an understanding of business operation.

● Demonstrating interpersonal, teamwork, and leadership skills necessary to function in multicultural business settings.

● Selecting and applying emergent technology tools as they relate to personal and business decision making.

● Managing data from all of the functional areas of business needed to make wise management decisions.

● Communicating effectively as writers, listeners, and speakers in social and business settings.

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“Let the redeemed of the Lord tell their story,” Psalm 107:2

The goal of the SCAtheatre department is to inspire students to achieve their God-given potential in performance and technical theatre through the observation of and performance in excellent productions, as well as the opportunity to take elective courses at the secondary level. By participating in drama and secondary theatre at SCA, students develop professionalism, responsibility, creativity and humility.

At the elementary level, students will have the opportunity to view a minimum of three plays: 1st, 2nd, and 5th grades all have yearly performance attendance. Other plays may be attended, depending on local offerings. Teachers discuss performances to begin enabling students to evaluate from a biblical worldview. Students begin dramatic performance at the first grade, and yearly opportunities occur as informal class activities tie to curriculum. Performance in elementary dramatic experiences culminates at 5th grade when students participate in a thirty minute musical.

SCAsecondary theatre classes and productions aim to develop the following biblical qualities in our theatre students: joyful, loving, faithful, driven, teachable, trustworthy, patient, compassionate, humble, and forgiving. Students who participate in theatre cultivate communication and leadership skills as they prepare to enter a world where they will both lead and follow by example – onstage, backstage, and beyond.

Theatre productions at SCAserve many purposes—to educate, inspire, equip, challenge, entertain, warn, and empower. God uses stories in his Word for these same purposes. He reveals Himself and His Truth through parable, narrative, and poetry.The Bible

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tells stories of redemption and brokenness featuring people who followed God and people who opposed God. We learn from both types of stories and both types of people. Therefore, theatre experiences at SCAreveal truth, deal with real-life issues and conflicts, and demonstrate the consequences of sin. Productions feature honest representations of the struggle between good and evil, not only through the conflicts between characters, but also through the internal turmoil within characters. Because some realistic struggles are not appropriate for all ages to explore, extracurricular productions appeal to a variety of audiences; some plays appeal to young audiences, while others appeal to older audiences. SCAinforms our families of the play content so they are aware of the intended audience for all theatre productions.

Though many theatre activities are performed for an audience, the primary goal of SCA theatre is to equip and inspire the students who choose to participate. To accomplish this, our plays, musicals, and in-class scenes contain a variety of exciting and demanding roles that challenge students’ability to create believable, life-like characters. Because SCArecognizes the value of classic literature, students have the opportunity to perform scenes and plays that have literary and historic significance. The works of famous authors, critically acclaimed plays, and excellent new works are also represented. Vulgarity, blatant sin, and immoral lifestyles are not glorified. Christian and secular sources can be vessels of God’sTruth; therefore material by both Christian and non-Christian playwrights and musical composers is selected.

SCAtheatre gives students unique opportunities to use the gifts that God has given them both onstage and backstage. Each year the theatre department performs two major productions (one large cast and one small cast) with a major musical every other year Students may enroll in various theatre classes to take advantage of additional performance opportunities.Young playwrights and directors have the chance to hone their skills throughout their secondary career, while students who enjoy theatre review writing may join our Cappies

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critics team. Improvisational acting skills may be further developed by joining our Improv Team, and students may also participate in forensics, which offers theatrical events. Participation in these activities leads many students to induction in our school’s troupe of the International Thespian Society, through which students connect with other schools and compete for theatre scholarships.

Students who participate in theatre at SCAbuild a base of theatrical experience that prepares them to enter a university-level theater program either as a major/minor or as an extracurricular activity.They also acquire the knowledge and experience to contribute to theatre within their future communities beyond college. Students gain an understanding of theatre history by examining the cultures surrounding various playwrights and plays and by evaluating the worldview expressed within selected works.Acting students build skills in the areas of voice production, movement, characterization, and script analysis. Students with an interest in behind-the-scenes work learn about technical responsibilities such as costumes, set building, lighting. In the SCAtheatre department, the possibilities for students to develop their God-given potential are vast, and personalized classes and projects are the norm rather than the exception.

The SCATheatre department also provides hands-on leadership training for advanced students as they lead within their area of expertise, either as actors or crew leaders. In this way, participation in theatre at SCAis an introduction to the management of both people and projects. As they take a scene, play or musical from auditions to curtain call, our students are learning responsibility, professionalism, creativity, and humility. When these students go forth into their universities and communities, we hope that their theatre training has equipped them to lead others and to see how God is at work in the arts around them.

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Summit ChristianAcademy’s health instruction is designed to enable our students’ increased growth in “wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man” (Luke 2:52). As such, curriculum scope and sequence has been created to promote the whole person. In addition, ideas of social responsibility and ethical behavior will be explored.

Curriculum Content

The biblical foundation of health will enable students to acknowledge that they are “fearfully and wonderfully made,” (Psalm 139:14) and that they have the responsibility to maintain their health as a testament to the glory of God. This emphasis on spiritual and physical health further promotes SCA’s social goal of good health habits as well as its goal of imparting a respect for the sanctity of life. Emotional and social health will be explored with topics of ways to evidence respect for God, one another, authority, and country

Social Responsibility and Ethical Behaviors

The safety of self and others will also be taught in addition to first aid at the secondary level so students can help others when emergencies arise. At the elementary level focus will be on personal health and nutrition topics. At the secondary level, social topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and gender identity will be debated to ensure students have the tools to develop a biblical worldview. When discussing sexual morality before marriage, an abstinence-only stance will be taken by all instructors. This unit will afford opportunity, especially at the secondary level, for students to explore their biblical worldview and the importance of its impact on the changing society around them.

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Teaching Methodologies

Secondary health discussions will include the use of the school health clerk when that person is a registered nurse in order to facilitate the best information possible for students.The clear personal value of the knowledge provided yields the intrinsic motivation necessary to obviate the need for grades at the secondary level. Formative assessment is done, however, through active class discussion and evidence of changes within the affective domain as well as within demonstrated behaviors. At the elementary level, health grades taken will be minimal, and those taken will be incorporated into the science grade. Whenever possible, science models will be used to facilitate understanding of the human body and its functions.

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The goal of the PS-6th grade library program at Summit ChristianAcademy is to work with the faculty and administration to encourage and enable students and staff to be effective users of information and ideas that develop intellectual spiritual, personal, and social growth for service to the Lord. The educational goals are threefold: to enlighten students of their Christian responsibility in information management, to foster students’independent learning, and to broaden students’information literacy

Akey function of the library program at Summit ChristianAcademy is to provide students with the ability to accurately evaluate and use information and literature in a democratic society based on a biblical worldview. Scripture teaches that we must be selective in what is read (Ecc 12:12) and that “our minds must be constantly filled with that which is pure and wholesome.” (Phil 4:8) 1 Because writing is a powerful tool which easily influences thought, students’participating in library skills will exercise their biblical worldview through the selection and appropriate promulgation of new found knowledge. Group discussion and activities will provide ample opportunity for students to sharpen their ability to use and evaluate information within the context of a Christian worldview

With this philosophy and mission in mind, as we increase the selection of items for elementary and secondary students, we purposefully seek materials (books, internet sources, periodicals) with varying points of view in order that students will be exposed to and able to defend the Christian worldview as well as develop the ability to discern the accuracy of information from a biblical perspective. It is our desire that students be exposed to and able to digest different viewpoints within a safe environment so that they can learn to compare them

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against the plumb line of the Bible. This will help in assessing whether something is based on truth and allow them to defend their position.

In addition to improved use and selection of resources, students will also become more independent learners, developing confidence in their active pursuit of knowledge related to both personal interests and the interests of others. “Man’s writings reflect his inner thoughts and desires; therefore, we study literature to understand people.”2 Students will learn to appreciate literature and other creative expressions of information, as they strive for excellence in the seeking of information and its transfer to relevant venues. The students of SCAwill find no information source too daunting for the purposes of personal knowledge or public dissemination.

Participation in library skills will enable students to find the best resources for their needs. Students will be able to access information efficiently and effectively, demonstrating an ability to glean knowledge from any appropriate media. They will receive instruction in the use of reference materials, literature, Internet, and other written information found in a variety of libraries.

Students participating in the library skills program of Summit ChristianAcademy will become confident in evaluating the written word through the lens of their biblical worldview

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The goal of the SCA math department is to teach mathematical truths as demonstrated in the orderliness and exactness of God. This goal is accomplished through the facilitation of two objectives: 1) to enable students to appreciate the works of God in His creation and His attributes, and 2) to enable students to apply the understanding of mathematical concepts to other areas of life using their God-given creativity. The goal of the SCAmath department is to teach the discovered mathematical truths, which are entirely dependent upon the God of the Bible, Who created all things and holds all things together - including math - as indicated in Colossians 1:16-17, “For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities - all things were created through him and for him.And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together”This goal is accomplished through the facilitation of two objectives: 1) by enabling students to appreciate the works of God in His creation and His attributes of orderliness and creativity and order, and 2) enabling students to apply critical thinking developed through mathematical comprehension

The mathematics courses of Summit ChristianAcademy will reveal the character of God and His creation. With intentional application of mathematics to the working world in which students live, they will come to appreciate the works of God and better assume the responsibility of stewardship as commanded in Genesis 1:8 The orderly and creative attributes of God may be gleaned through the study of mathematics as teachers demonstrate the consistency and exactness of the covenant-keeping God, Who established and set all laws in motion and Who upholds them to this day In Jeremiah 33:25-26a, “This is what the Lord says: ‘If I have not made my covenant with day and night and established the laws of heaven and earth, then I will reject the descendants of Jacob and David my servant and will not choose one of his sons to rule over the descendants ofAbraham, Isaac and Jacob.’’Studying mathematics from a biblical worldview is an invitation to student mathematicians to

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know more about their Creator, Who works in patterns and is always faithful in sustaining the order of the universe.

Math develops critical thinking skills through abstract thought which leads to higher levels of discernment throughout all subjects and in life. From the earliest levels, students will be tasked with grasping the logical order of math through activities such as showing full work, calculating by hand, and using manipulatives as concrete representation of numbers As students begin taking higher level courses, they will understand how abstract truths in any subject can be assigned mathematical concepts such as geometric proofs, exponential functions, and statistical correlations to demonstrate the logic ofTruth. Ultimately, graduates will grasp that math can be an act of worship as students seek Truth with the realization that both logic and philosophy are mathematical. As such, SCAwill demand a mastery of basic math facts. Regarding Calculator Use

Critical to the mathematical success of students at SCAis the complete mastery of math facts

Beginning in the third grade, students will experience exit exams concerning addition, subtraction, and multiplication through the 12s, and division Emphasis will be placed on showing work Calculator use is introduced at the junior high level in limited units. Students will be taught calculator use in upper courses and input formulas for theACT prepared to use technology. Students will be required to show their work throughout their math coursework.

Regarding Number of High School Courses

Students will be encouraged to maintain presence in a math course all years of high school in order to continue development of the left-brain and executive function

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The goal of the SCAmusic department is equipping students to experience music at an intellectual, personal, and spiritual level. This goal is accomplished through fostering musical skills and concepts, as well as an interest in music that will lead to a lifetime of enjoyment and appreciation which focuses on the privilege of using music to glorify and worship God.

Music K-6

Elementary general music classes are often the final musical training some students will ever receive. The skills and attitudes acquired during this time must be sufficient to encourage active participation or appreciation that will last a lifetime. SCAelementary music will, therefore, have a general music curriculum as its primary focus in order to foster intellectual understanding of music. In addition, there will also be some opportunity for performance given every other year with the off year providing exposure to a professional group within the music arts.

Elementary will also provide an opportunity for exposure to instrumentation. The Orff Model of sing, say, move, play will be used and taught by trained staff. Students will have the ability to begin instrumentation as young as kindergarten through Orff instruments. Fourth grade will allow recorder use, and students may then choose to participate in either the band or strings program, each of which provides performance opportunities.

Music 7-12

At the secondary level, music is defined as a co-curricular subject. Secondary music courses are elective for students and will build upon the intellectual foundations that have been established, offering students the opportunity to further develop both their knowledge and

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God-given musical interests and talents.Attention will be paid to sight reading, posture, and musical composition. Students in secondary level courses will be expected to practice.

Many students are gifted musically and in order to afford them the opportunity to reach their “God-given potential,” SCAoffers higher-level instrumental programs in both strings, band, and vocal performance groups. These groups serve as a training ground for college-bound or aspiring professional musicians. Opportunity to compete and travel will be provided and supported through curriculum.

In addition, a dual credit course offering is provided to further hone musical skills for those needing a future fine art course and are non-music majors.

Choice of Music

For students to experience music at an intellectual level, skills and concepts will be acquired through various methodologies and curricular resources including, but not limited to, composing, performance, and exposure to music from many cultures. Sacred as well as secular materials will be used to achieve these skills as both Christian and secular sources can be vessels of God’sTruth. Both venues can promote musical excellence. Musical selections are based on the quality and content of the music rather than the composer. Vulgarity, blatant sin and immoral lifestyles will not be glorified. Phil. 4:8 exhorts us, “Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy, think about such things.” The music department will uphold this Scripture in its examination and performance of all music.

In light of God’s Word, a personal connection with music can be achieved through exposure to various musical styles and cultures, performance opportunities as well as classroom and field trip experiences. Realizing that not every student will have a musical career or even be a performing musician, our responsibility is to give ample opportunities to

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discover an appreciation, respect and/or interest in music and enable students to accurately evaluate it against standards of excellence.

The Power of Music in Worship

Using Scripture, both classroom discussions and opportunities to worship in all music courses, students will come to realize that music is a gift from God and is to be used for His glory. Music is a powerful means of praise and worship and can draw a person into a closer relationship with God through the Holy Spirit. The use of musical worship teams facilitated through high school courses helps further facilitate this purpose of music at SCA. Psalm 92:1 States, “It is good to praise the Lord and make music to your name, O Most High.” Psalm 95:2 encourages us “Let us come before Him with thanksgiving and extol Him with music and song.” Through the Christian training given within the music department, students will be better able to worship their Creator Conclusion

Regardless of a student’s musical gifts, all students at SCAwill be pointed toward their “God-given potential” in music.The goal of the SCAmusic department is equipping students to experience music at an intellectual, personal, and spiritual level. This goal is accomplished through fostering musical skills and concepts, as well as an interest in music that will lead to a lifetime of enjoyment and appreciation which focuses on the privilege of using music to glorify and worship God.

Music K-6

Elementary general music classes are often the final musical training some students will ever receive. The skills and attitudes acquired during this time must be sufficient to encourage active participation or appreciation that will last a lifetime. SCAelementary music will, therefore, have a general music curriculum as its primary focus in order to foster intellectual

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understanding of music. In addition, there will also be some opportunity for performance given every other year with the off year providing exposure to a professional group within the music arts.

Elementary will also provide an opportunity for exposure to instrumentation. The Orff Model of sing, say, move, play will be used and taught by trained staff. Students will have the ability to begin instrumentation as young as kindergarten through Orff instruments. Fourth grade will allow recorder use, and students may then choose to participate in either the band or strings program, each of which provides performance opportunities.

Music 7-12

At the secondary level, music is defined as a co-curricular subject. Secondary music courses are elective for students and will build upon the intellectual foundations that have been established, offering students the opportunity to further develop both their knowledge and God-given musical interests and talents.Attention will be paid to sight reading, posture, and musical composition. Students in secondary level courses will be expected to practice. Many students are gifted musically and in order to afford them the opportunity to reach their “God-given potential,” SCAoffers higher-level instrumental programs in both strings, band, and vocal performance groups. These groups serve as a training ground for college-bound or aspiring professional musicians. Opportunity to compete and travel with talents will be provided and supported through curriculum.

In addition, a dual credit course offering is provided to further hone musical skills for those needing a future fine art course or those planning to further their musical talents at the collegiate level.

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Choice of Music

For students to experience music at an intellectual level, skills and concepts will be acquired through various methodologies and curricular resources including, but not limited to, composing, performance, and exposure to music from many cultures. Sacred as well as secular materials will be used to achieve these skills as both Christian and secular sources can be vessels of God’sTruth. Both venues can promote musical excellence. Musical selections are based on the quality and content of the music rather than the composer. Vulgarity, blatant sin and immoral lifestyles will not be glorified. Phil. 4:8 exhorts us, “Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy, think about such things.” The music department will uphold this Scripture in its examination and performance of all music.

In light of God’s Word, a personal connection with music can be achieved through exposure to various musical styles and cultures, performance opportunities as well as classroom and field trip experiences. Realizing that not every student will have a musical career or even be a performing musician, our responsibility is to give ample opportunities to discover an appreciation, respect and/or interest in music and enable students to accurately evaluate it against standards of excellence.

The Power of Music in Worship

Using Scripture, both classroom discussions and opportunities to worship in all music courses, students will come to realize that music is a gift from God and is to be used for His glory. Music is a powerful means of praise and worship and can draw a person into a closer relationship with God through the Holy Spirit. The use of musical worship teams facilitated through high school courses helps further facilitate this purpose of music at SCA. Psalm 92:1 States, “It is good to praise the Lord and make music to your name, O Most High.” Psalm 95:2

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encourages us “Let us come before Him with thanksgiving and extol Him with music and song.” Through the Christian training given within the music department, students will be better able to worship their Creator.

Conclusion

Regardless of a student’s musical gifts, all students at SCAwill be pointed toward their “God-given potential” in music.

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Penmanship at Summit ChristianAcademy is taught to ensure the legible communication of ideas. Repeatedly, the Lord gives the command to write something down so that it may be read and not forgotten. For example, Isaiah 3:8 states, “Now go, write it before them in a table and note it in a book, that it may be for the time to come forever and ever.” Legible writing is key to ensure clarity of communication. SCArecognizes that writing ensures the accurate transmission of ideas and is an important foundational skill to reading, writing, and testing.

The content of the penmanship curriculum varies by grade. In kindergarten and first grade, students are taught manuscript letters, which must be replicated legibly. SCAdoes not incorporate D’Nealian writing due to texts using block manuscript letters. Beginning in second grade, cursive handwriting is taught. It is reviewed daily in third grade, with students having the option to use either manuscript or print during the first quarter Finally, in the second quarter of third grade, cursive is all that is used by both teachers and students. This penmanship expectation is maintained through the sixth grade, with the culminating project being a research paper hand written for extra credit. Handwriting is assessed from kindergarten through third grades using a grading scale of Outstanding, Satisfactory, Needs Improvement, and Unsatisfactory

There is no formal handwriting instruction or assessment in grades four through twelve. However, a standard of legibility is mandated. Intervention will be required at any point if a student’s handwriting is illegible.

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The purpose of the SCAPhysical Education program is to develop growth as described in Luke 2:52: “And Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and men.” Our goal is for students twofold. First, we desire students to experience growth spiritually, physically, socially, and mentally through PE activities; and secondly, students prioritize healthy lifestyles throughout their lives.

The primary purpose is to assist the learner in developing: (1) total fitness and a lasting desire to pursue a life-long healthy lifestyle, (2) movement abilities ranging from functional life skills to those needed for successful participation in physical activities of their choice; (3) an appreciation and knowledge of the creation of the body, (4) a responsible, personal, and social behavior in physical activity settings with an understanding and respect for differences among others, (5) an understanding that physical activity provides opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction.

Because physical education is primarily a participation class, attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to be properly prepared and dressed for class. Special attention is given to fitness monitoring and enabling students to use their own fitness as motivation for improvement. It is our goal to help inspire them to obtain their God-given potential in the area of their physical fitness and enjoyment during participation in activities and sports.

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In I Chronicles 16:9, Scripture charges the believer to, “Sing unto Him, sing psalms unto Him, talk ye of all his wondrous works.” The ability to create, analyze, and appreciate poetry enables the believer to better praise his Creator. In addition, as the art of poetry is a reflection of culture, Christians must be able to accurately analyze and create poetry in order to evaluate a poet or a people from a biblical worldview. Further, the writing of personal poetry allows nurturing of potential God-given potential in the arts. As such, Summit Christian Academy believes that all students should be exposed to methodical poetry instruction which includes poetic analysis, memorization, and creation.

Poetry Analysis

Poetry instruction will include a wide range of poetry and artists. As the stylistic features of poetry provide its artistic merit, teaching will include study of poetry’s forms, patterns and use of figurative language. A wide variety of classical poets and their works will be taught in order to provide students with a broad range of knowledge. A graduate of SCA will be comfortable analyzing and evaluating both the form and content of any given poem using appropriate terminology and a biblical worldview.

Poetry Memorization

Memorization of poetry will increase students’ overall ability to memorize. Oral and written exams will stress different aspects of the literary form, while allowing students to forever hold man’s best language in their minds. Oral quizzing will provide an opportunity to gain confidence in public speaking, a necessary skill in enabling our Christian mandate to be witnesses.

Poetry Creation

Creation of poetry encourages critical thinking by forcing students to be purposeful in word choices. Their own writing will provide better understanding of the gift of the poet and will teach more

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personal life application. Finally, through the opportunities provided to write poetry about their relationship with Christ, students will fulfill the mandate in I Chronicles 16:9.

Summit Christian Academy values poetry as an art form and as a true component of Scripture. Its in-depth instruction will enable students to feel adequate in their knowledge of this subject area.

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The importance of literature is constituted in the belief that God privileges the spoken and written word, as evidenced by the prominence of both in the Old Testament and the New Testament. Jesus Himself is described as the Word of God (Logos) in John 1:1 (In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God), and God’s Word is one of the few things that abides forever. According to Haycock in Encyclopedia of Bible Truths, “Man’s writings reflect his inner thoughts and desires; therefore, we study literature to understand people” (ref. Prov. 16:23; Prov. 18:4; Matt. 12:34-37; Matt. 15:18-20).

Additionally, the ability to interact with others in society and serve as a witness to various communities and populations is enhanced by engagement with diverse genres of literature, reflecting both cultural and historical phenomena. Certain literature genres enable the student to gain entrance into specialized communities; enhanced understanding and reading comprehension are essential to success in higher education. With these truths in mind, the scope and sequence of instructional methodologies at SCA provides opportunity to develop important literature skills through teaching reading, reading comprehension, literary analysis, and exploration of literature choices.

Teaching Reading

SCA stresses the need for systematic, explicit reading instruction which incorporates pre-reading activities, decoding, and fluency emphasis. Reading instruction at Summit Christian Academy begins with pre-reading activities such as letter recognition and phonemic awareness of sounds. Initially, there is thorough instruction on phonics charts and rules. Phonics instruction continues through the second grade. Additionally, at the kindergarten and first grade levels, whole language concepts are introduced and assessed. Fluency is formally assessed from kindergarten through second grades. It continues to be formatively assessed through twelfth grade.

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Reading Comprehension and Literary Analysis

SCA curriculum will enable the student to appreciate and understand literary genres and devices, construction, criticism, the cultural background of works of literature. To accomplish these goals, students will examine the principle components of a short story and a novel including: plot, theme, setting, character, point of view, etc. At the elementary level, teaching methodologies emphasize small group instruction, student-created visual tools, and oral presentations. At the secondary level, students will examine works of literature through the writing of essays and reading responses, which incorporate analysis, synthesis, compare/contrast, classification, cause and effect, definition, profiles, and reviews. These literary writing tasks are supported by the developed skills of summarization, synthesis, analysis, classification, evaluation, interviewing techniques, and other supportive critical thinking skills. Assessment of literature will be developed around performance and authentic standards to assess student understanding and higher critical thinking skills.

Literature Choices

The desire of SCA is that students be equipped to enter into the cultural and academic conversation in order to excel in whatever area of life into which they are called, and to biblically express the truth of God within every jurisdiction of life and academics. In the tradition of Moses, Daniel, and Paul, our students will be equipped through literature to converse in the language of diverse cultures and evaluate literature from a biblical perspective (ref. Acts 7:22; Daniel 1:4, 17; Acts 17:28). Therefore, purposeful exposure to texts with diverse worldviews, secular themes, and questionable language will occur in the process of enabling students to evaluate and discuss literature from a biblical perspective. Additionally, through exposure to classical, contemporary, and multi-cultural works, students will be challenged to improve their comprehension and reading level so that graduates will read and analyze on the collegiate level.

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Conclusion

Through engagement with literature, the development of critical thinking skills and the enhanced understanding of culture enable the student to fully participate in the cultural and academic communities.

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The singular goal of the SCAscience department is to instill a love for the subject area within all of our students while equipping them to discover God’s work, revealing that “The heavens declare his righteousness, and all the people see his glory” Psalm 97:6. This goal is accomplished through the facilitation of three objectives: (1) to equip students to deepen their relationship with their Creator through understanding His creation, (2) to equip students to think scientifically and express their own ideas through analysis of gathered information, and (3) to fully equip students to successfully enter a science field if they so choose.

Creation

Graduates of SCAwill understand their origin and be able to demonstrate that science provides evidence for the Creator Accepting God’s mandate for man to master the created world, our curriculum is designed to explore all aspects of that creation. Though today’s society tries to use science to challenge the existence of our Lord, SCAgraduates will be confident in defending and purporting their position of faith. At the high school level, this exploration will include sensitive issues such as bio-ethics, human reproduction, and theories such as evolution and the definition of life. During these sensitive topics, teachers will promote Scriptural teaching on honoring life and maintaining purity They will exercise discretion in choosing age-appropriate objectives and methodologies in order to promote focus and discussion.

Human Reproduction

During the anatomy of reproduction unit, classrooms may be divided by gender An abstinence-only model, which emphasizes reproduction in light of marriage, will be used. The purpose for discussing these issues is to further enlighten and at no time should provoke

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disunity within our body. Therefore, though elementary students may encounter instruction on those topics should they arise, they will not be matters for debate due to maturity level.

Research and Presentation of Findings

Lessons in God’s creation will be taught in a manner, which emphasizes the scientific method of inquiry demonstrated through students’original work and its presentation. Each science unit will begin with the text and teacher instruction of planned objectives. Then lessons should branch into various methodologies of information gathering, documentation, and public presentation. Methodologies include but are not limited to hands-on activities, individual research, transferring data into visual representation and qualitative information (i.e. Graphs, charts, etc.), written work, in-class debate, and word processing applications and data spreadsheets. Special focus will be given to incorporating mathematical formulas and statistics as validation for scientific research.

Teachers will frequently provide opportunities for public expression of scientific conclusions through activities such as science fairs and in-class presentations. Participation in these activities will cause students to be confident in their ability to think scientifically and express those thoughts in a manner which inspires themselves and others.

Career Exposure

The curriculum at SCAwill capitalize on students’developed love of science by introducing a wide variety of careers in the science field. Beginning at the sixth grade, students will be apprised of the wide opportunity for careers in the science field. Middle school career explanations will focus on life science in seventh grade and earth science in eighth grade. High school students will be given the opportunity to explore a variety of individual choices.

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No matter their individual calling or career, the science curriculum at Summit Christian Academy will facilitate students meeting their God-given potential.

Conclusion
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The goal of the SCASocial Sciences Department is to teach history as God’s plan and purpose for all generations as well as for each individual's life. Our Biblical worldview begins with the Genesis account of Creation and is summarized in Isaiah 46:9-11 which states, Remember the former things, those of long ago; I am God, and there is no other; I am God, and there is none like me. I make known the end from the beginning, from ancient times, what is still to come. I say: My purpose will stand and I will do all that I please…What I have said, that will I bring about; what I have planned, that will I do”

The history curriculum will include state, national, and world history. The ability to critically examine evidence in the areas of geography, government, citizenship, current events, psychology, and economics will be developed. through a variety of elective course offerings.

Students will be able to appreciate, analyze and understand themselves and other people groups around the world through the lens of Scripture so that they can effectively evangelize a world-wide mission field.

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The importance of spelling and vocabulary is constituted in the belief that God privileges the spoken and written word, as evidenced by the prominence of both in the Old Testament and the New Testament. Jesus Himself is described as the Word of God (Logos) in John 1:1 (In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God), and God’s word is one of the few things that abides forever. The effect of language upon life, as described in James 3:6 suggests that the course of one’s life may be determined in one’s speech, which is reinforced by Ephesians 4:20 which states, “Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear” Thus, words/language structures reality. The ability to accurately use words both in terms of spelling and meaning (vocabulary) is important for believers/students to understand God’s written and preached word. Additionally, the ability to interact with others in society and serve as a witness to various communities and populations is enhanced with accurate spelling and an expansive appropriately used vocabulary. Certain vocabularies enable the student to gain entrance into specialized communities and enhanced vocabulary and reading comprehension is essential to success in higher education. With these truths in mind, the scope and sequence of instructional methodologies at SCA provides opportunity to develop important spelling and vocabulary skills.

Spelling Instruction

In kindergarten through second grades, spelling instruction is informed by balanced brain-based research of teaching methods which include oral review, observing words in sentences, and other activities such as manipulating letters.

Spelling activities strongly encourage partnering with parents. In grades three through ten, word lists are tied to spelling rules and or specific prefixes, suffixes or roots. In some grades, words are

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gleaned from cross-curricular subject matter; and word lists are generated from frequently misspelled word lists. In grades three through ten, teaching methodologies echo earlier techniques with less oral repetition as the child gets older. Finally, in grades eleven and twelve, differentiated spelling instruction is developed through individual assessment of student work.

Vocabulary Instruction

Kindergarten through second grade vocabulary development begins with a word of the week. Grades three through six use words pulled from authentic texts, chosen to enrich the student’s speaking and writing vocabulary. The goal is to move beyond memorization to comprehension. Activities that are based on brain research include symbols used with words and frequent repetition. Students are asked to create meaning-rich sentences, which include vocabulary words. The words chosen are primarily associated with verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Peer tutoring is an instructional strategy that is also used.

Secondary vocabulary instruction incorporates words chosen from curriculum-provided lists taught via workbooks. Eleventh and twelfth grade differentiated instruction occurs through teacher evaluation of student writing and encouragement to use writing resources (i.e. thesaurus). Peer tutoring for vocabulary in the twelfth grade is based on the choice of English elective.

Conclusion

Students graduating from SCA will have the vocabulary and spelling skills to communicate effectively and clearly to both the secular and Christian world.

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“ whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required ” Luke 12:48

This student environment of arduous study is for those students who demonstrate academic giftedness. Giftedness is defined as those children who demonstrate significant development of mental capacity and learning potential. This capacity is determined by an acceptable professional evaluation to the extent that continued educational growth and stimulation could best be served by an environment beyond typical grade-level curriculum. The task is to identify these students and to provide educational opportunities that will challenge and develop their abilities. This identification typically happens via educational testing.

Because we believe every student is “gifted,” we have actively worked to avoid using that terminology. Rather, our program is called Stewards. To those who participate, it is hoped that this title endows this scriptural truth: they must be good stewards of the intellectual talent which is a gift from the Lord, and consequently, be sober-minded in knowing “… For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required.” Luke 12:48

The Stewards teacher will use discussion, technology, field trips and guest speakers to inspire students to engage in deep research on topics not related to topics of classroom curriculum. Students will engage in hands-on projects and opportunities for presentation of their work. The teacher will also engage in brief lessons on social behavior from time to time, since some stewards students may experience social difficulties in the classroom.

Stewards is considered part of the resource services at SCA; and as such, students will each have a ClassroomAdjustment Privilege (CAP) plan. This plan will partner with the classroom teacher to ensure the student is not penalized with additional homework as a result

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of being in Stewards. it will also partner the Stewards teacher and classroom teacher to individualize classroom experience to ensure Stewards students are meeting their God-given potential.

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Summit Christian Academy recognizes that God has created man in His image (Genesis 1:26-27). God has also given man the desire and ability to create. We are each uniquely created by God with a specific plan and purpose (2 Timothy 1:9). We each develop unique ways to express or communicate an individual interpretation of the world around us. Summit Christian Academy recognizes that God created us with the ability to express ourselves creatively and artistically. God has surrounded us with the beauty and variety of His creation (Psalms 19:1, Psalms 8:3-5) and calls us to be affected on a personal, spiritual, emotional and even physical level by visual stimuli.

The process of observing God’s creation (Job 37:14) and using the gift of creativity that is given by God are means by which we are able to connect with the Lord on a deeper level. Through these observations and explorations, we witness that there is intentional order and purpose to God’s design (Isaiah 45:1-); and we can see, appreciate, and emulate these characteristics in our visual design choices. Our culture is increasingly visually based by way of media, advertising and functional design. The art department of Summit Christian Academy desires appropriate preparation of our students; teaching proper ways of understanding, discerning, and using creativity and visual media in ways that bring glory to God (Philippians 4:8).

Visual art also promotes an understanding of human nature across cultures and time, fosters many forms of communication, and allows for perception/aesthetic awareness and creativity. The study of visual arts and God’s creation encourages students to discern art concepts that exalt/glorify God.

The visual arts also can be used to enhance learning in all areas of the curriculum. While biblically integrated, the visual art program is structured based on components or principles of art content and appreciation that allow students to heighten their problem solving and critical thinking skills across the curriculum. The four components or content areas of the visual arts are:

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1. AESTHETICS – “What is art?” Understand that one purpose of art is to create beauty. Appreciate each work as a unique, individual creation. Observe, listen, and discuss art and perceptions. Understand or dissect artistic choices and how they relate to and enhance life. Encourage taking risks and thinking with a new, artistic vision.

2. ART CRITICISM – “How visual art is organized/what to look for.” Involves a close, viewer interaction with images resulting in aesthetic experience. Involves organized discussion about art, whether regarding artists from many cultures and time periods, or discussion regarding own art. Four-step art criticism process as follows:

a. DESCRIBE - Objectively, what is seen: title, artist, when/where created, media, subject matter, visual elements of art and design (line, shape, form, value, color, space, texture).

b. ANALYZE - Objectively, how it is organized: principles of design (emphasis, unity, contrast, balance, rhythm, movement, pattern).

c. INTERPRET - Subjectively, what it is saying. Use imagination to interpret, based on clues from prior steps, the potential meaning or purpose of an artwork or what it expresses about human experience.

d. EVALUATE - (Use higher level thinking skills)-Subjectively, consider craftsmanship, design quality, expression, personal response, originality and comparison to other artworks to determine whether or not it is a successful artwork or whether or not it has aesthetic value. Integrate a Christian perspective based on recognition of God as supreme artist/creator. Analyze communication of beauty/holiness/truth/God’s character Discern communicated message within the basis of God’s word and God’s standard of excellence. Determine integration of scripture or scriptural principles with integrity

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3. ART HISTORY - Learning about art by understanding people in relation to times and cultures in which particular artworks were created, including beliefs, values, customs, social habits, economic conditions, etc. Understand how beliefs are or are not consistent with Christianity. Art history selections that are taught are based on the quality and content of the visual art more so than the artist. Worldly, sinful lifestyles will not be exalted, but rather, artworks will be evaluated through a biblical, scriptural lens as mentioned above.

4.

- Communicate ideas visually through creative use of materials and production processes (collage, drawing, fibers, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, 3D forms, technology) utilizing elements and principles of design. Use artistic expression to communicate God’s glory and bless others with the God-given gift of creativity.

ART PRODUCTION AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Conclusion Through the visual arts, students will be able to express their life experiences via a variety of media and methods, as well as learn various techniques to visually express and communicate their ideas and emotions. Students will learn to look for deeper meanings and learn to appreciate aesthetics of God’s creation and, subsequently, visual art. Through the visual arts, students make decisions, develop discipline, promote originality, problem solve and experience new ways of thinking and seeing, allowing for the development of personal purpose, character refinement, confidence/motivation, and a deeper understanding of and relationship with God, our creator

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The importance of writing/grammar is constituted in the belief that God privileges the spoken and written word, as evidenced by the composition of the Old Testament and the New Testament, God’s revelation of Himself to humankind. Jesus Himself is described as the Word of God (Logos) in John 1:1 (In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God), and God’s Word is one of the few things that abides forever. According to Haycock in Encyclopedia of Bible Truths, “Man’s writings reflect his inner thoughts and desires . . .” (ref. Prov. 16:23; Prov. 18:4; Matt. 12:34-37; Matt. 15:18-20). The purpose of writing is to enhance thinking skills, increase articulation and personal voice, develop research and documentation skills, and effectively communicate ideas. Additionally, the ability to interact with others in society and communicate the Gospel to various communities and populations is enhanced by effective writing skills, which take into consideration audience awareness, rhetoric/purpose, specialized terminology, tone /style, and proper grammatical constructs. Writing enables people to communicate generationally and establishes the chain of knowledge that is necessary for civilization and the Gospel to progress (Matt. 28:19-20). With these truths in mind, the scope and sequence of instructional methodologies at SCA provides opportunity to develop important writing and grammatical skills.

At the elementary level there is a heavy emphasis on grammar via textbook practice. Experiences in creative writing, journaling, and expository writing are also provided at every grade level. Writing is taught as a separate subject at the second grade level and through Writing Safari in grades 4-6. Writing Safari both partners with teachers to support writing assigned in core subject areas and provides opportunities for student creative writing. Students have the opportunity to take their work through the writing process, from prewriting to publishing. Special focus in elementary is on

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expository, narrative, creative, and persuasive writing. Students of all grade levels engage in poetry.

Through writing safari, students also have the opportunity to present their work to an authentic audience comprised of faculty, their peers, and parents.

At the secondary level (Grades 7-11), students will examine works of literature, essays, and other cultural artifacts through the writing of essays and reading responses which incorporate analysis, synthesis, compare/contrast, classification, cause and effect, definition, profiles, and reviews. These literary writing tasks are supported by the developed skills of summarization, synthesis, analysis, classification, evaluation, interviewing techniques, and other supportive critical thinking skills. All core subject areas are required to implement writing that has a significant percentage assigned to it. In Senior English, it is the highest category, and in the college class, it is 60% of the grade.

Student Writing Content

The desire of SCA is that students be equipped to write in various contexts in order to enter into the cultural and academic conversation to excel in whatever area of life into which they are called. The purpose is for the student to biblically express the truth of God within every jurisdiction of life and academics. In the tradition of Moses, Daniel, and Paul, our students will be equipped through literature to converse in the language of diverse cultures and evaluate literature from a biblical perspective (ref Acts 7:22; Daniel 1:4, 17; Acts 17:28). As students become more mature, careful and purposeful exposure to various audience writing contexts reflecting diverse worldviews, secular themes, and questionable language will sometimes occur in the process of enabling students to evaluate and write about literature and cultural issues from a biblical perspective. Should questionable language and themes or troublesome self-disclosure appear in student writing consultation with appropriate school officials and parents may result.

Writers’ Corner

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Good writing demands vulnerability and a willingness to engage in the revision. Revision includes the other processes and issues associated with writing. As such, Summit Christian Academy has created the Writers’ Corner. Students are supported in assignments through the Writers’ Corner, which services students in grades 7-12 through peer tutoring. Writing fellows are chosen from students in grades 10-12 and are trained to support their peers in effective communication. The Writers’ Corner is open before and after school, as well as during all life prep periods.

Conclusion

Writing enhances the development of critical thinking skills, articulation, and the ability to enter into extended conversation with various audiences in society. The ability to persuade effectively and negotiate various writing conventions prepares the student academically and vocationally for life’s challenges and equips him or her in the communication of the Gospel.

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The World Language Department at Summit ChristianAcademy strives to promote I Chronicles 16:24 which states, “Declare His glory among the nations, His marvelous deeds among all peoples.” This verse reminds us that our mission is to all people of all nations. It is in our heart, in obedience to this Scripture, to continue increasing the availability of a variety of languages to our students. Our vision at Summit ChristianAcademy is to equip students to communicate the love of Jesus Christ with people of other cultures and languages.

World LanguageAcquisition

In alignment with state and national standards, we will address the three modes of communication: 1) interpretive, which includes reading and listening, 2) interpersonal, using another language to communicate with others, and 3) performance, which encompasses written and spoken production. At the elementary level, the greatest emphasis is in the area of conversation. Avariety of teaching methods, including songs, games and drama, are used to introduce students to Spanish vocabulary As students progress to upper elementary and middle school grades, the performance mode is expanded to include reading, writing, and an increased development of listening comprehension.

At the high school level, students engage in all modes of communication. Instruction involves an active class that gives the beginning student the vocabulary necessary to communicate on a basic level with target language speakers on a variety of familiar subjects such as school, home, activities, etc. The student will learn how to formulate sentences and dialogues through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Cultural activities will accompany language lessons to acquaint students with food, artistic expression, and diversity of the target culture(s).

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CulturalAppreciation

I Corinthians 14:9-11 states, “You must speak words that people understand. If you don’t, no one will know what you are saying. You will just be speaking into the air. 10 It is true that there are all kinds of languages in the world.And they all have meaning. 11 But if I don’t understand what someone is saying, I am a stranger to that person.And that person is a stranger to me.” Students will learn to communicate better when they have an understanding of the practices and perspectives of the cultures studied. We strive to equip students to function in an appropriate manner when interacting with people from other cultures.

Connections Through World Language studies, students will reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines. Studying another language will improve their understanding of English grammar and improve writing skills in both languages. Knowledge of geography and history will be expanded through study of the places the target language is spoken. Connections to math and science are explored as the students learn of the contributions of people from the target culture and through practical experience using the metric system and figuring exchange rates. Appreciation of the arts of the target culture can be applied to many other cultures and can enhance the quality of life for students regardless of their chosen career path.

Christian Outreach

The World Language Department seeks to encourage and equip students in fulfilling the great commission as stated in Matthew 28:19-20, “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” This goal is achieved by interweaving Scripture, biblical concepts and vocabulary into the daily instruction in the language classroom, aligning with their studies

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in the SCABible curriculum. Students will progressively increase exposure to familiar verses, learning to read and recognize them, and in advanced levels memorizing key passages.

Conclusion

The World Language Department of SCAhas designed a curriculum that will build a strong educational foundation for World Language acquisition, promote an appreciation of world cultures, and empower students to fulfill their God-given potential as disciples of Jesus Christ in this world. We endeavor to offer students a high quality language program that will prepare them for their post-secondary education and careers.

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