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DEA Grad Lab Design Guidelines DEA 6500 - Problem-seeking through Programming GRADUATE TEAM B Anna Gannett Jenny Kim Manisha Rayaprolu Sukruti Gupta Sung Tsan Yeh

1 Image source: (all images) Cham, Jorge. www.phdcomics.com


Table of contents Existing Space Context Current Space and Usage User Types User Insights - Pros and Cons

3 4 5 6 7

Ancillary Recommendations Organizational Changes Cornell Green Office Certification Program

34 35 36

References

37

Concept Design Guidelines Concept Diagram C9 concept

8 9 10 11

Appendix Appendix A: Interview Summary Appendix B: Focus Group Outcomes Appendix C: Questionnaire Results

38 39 40 41

Recommendations Zoning Prioritization Method for Design Guidelines Zone 1: Study Zone 2: Meeting Zone 3: Support Spaces Overall Guidelines Suggested Layout

13 14 15 16 19 22 26 33

2


Existing Space

3


Context The department of Design and Environmental Analysis is a part of College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. It offers academic programs at both undergraduate and graduate levels that are a unique blend of design strategy, sustainability, and well-being. The graduate programs at DEA encourage interdisciplinary design research. The programs include MA, MS, and PhD degrees that attract both national and international students. There are currently 42 graduate students in the department, from a variety of educational backgrounds including psychology, architecture, environmental science, anthropology, industrial design, neuroscience, etc. The current graduate office of DEA students, commonly known as “Grad Lab,� is situated on the 4th floor of Martha Van Renssalaer Hall (Room No. 4110). The growing student body and diversification of work done in Grad Lab requires reprogramming the space, to remain relevant in changing times. Image source: DEA Official website http://dea.human.cornell.edu/academics

4


Current Space and Usage

24’9”

A C

A

22’2”

D

Empty under-table storage at each study workstation

F

B

Past year’s forgotten projects

D E

Stacks of books piled on top of study desks (desk storage does not have shelving for books)

Eating, relaxing, and group-work

B

Computer and book study Food preparation

Cluttered shelves containing textbooks, cutlery, personal storage, other miscellaneous pieces. Coffee table and fridge are also messy.

Storage Printing and project completion Photographs source: Authors

E Personalization in pinned-up magazine clippings and pieces of artwork (trying to establish territoriality)

5


User Types

THE NATIVE

THE REGULAR VISITOR

THE TOURIST

Comes to Grad Lab more than 5 days a week, over 3 hours a day.

Comes to Grad Lab more than 2-3 days a week, for about 15-30 minutes at a time.

Breezes through Grad Lab every few weeks, rarely spends time.

Grad Lab is the most preferred study spot.

Grad Lab is one of multiple preferred study spots.

Grad Lab is not the preferred study spot.

6


User Insight Pros

Feels like home

Natural lighting

Good Ventilation

Social

Cons

Aged trash Rotten food in fridge

Windows are hard to open/close

Insufficient personal space and storage

Distracting environment

7


Concept

8


Design Guidelines: Informed by Theory, Backed by Research ●

Articulates space through design guidelines that make space (Doorley & Witthoft, 2016) by combining theory and research.

Frameworks

Research that identifies the problems, and proposes solutions based upon research methods of inquiry (Ziesel, 2006).

C-9: A qualitative checklist of achievable parameters that guides and informs our design guidelines, creating a comprehensive framework for quality control.

for

collaboration (Shah & Leeder, 2016) that are incorporated into a new framework, created through research.

9


Concept Diagrams

Collaboration Communication Creativity Cleanliness Capacity Capability

Comfort Convenience Connectivity

Quality Parameters at the social level: Community/Social level variables have an impact on individual level outcomes (Angeles, Guilkey & Mroz, 2005). These 9 quality parameters do not exist in isolation; they affect and inform other related variables.

Social Level

Creativity

Individual Level

Cleanliness Capacity

Quality Parameters at the individual level: In Grad Lab, graduate students operate within varying contexts and zones. These modes of operation are achieved by the following individual-level parameters, that also influence the way the social-level parameters function.

Individual Level

Capability Comfort Convenience

Grad Lab

Connectivity Communication Social Level Collaboration 10


C9 Concept: Quality Parameters (Social) COLLABORATION: In Grad Lab, collaboration is defined as an activity or outcome that happens when a group of graduate students work together jointly on a common goal or shared project.

COMMUNICATION: The process of exchange of information between individuals, that helps to facilitate, and is facilitated by, the physical and social environment of Grad Lab.

Modes of Collaboration/Communication Image source: http://blog.socialcast.com/e2sday-better-together-tuckmans-stages-of-grou p-development/

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C9 Concept: Quality Parameters (Individual)

CREATIVITY The abstract quality of being creative; of facilitating and enabling a student’s thought processes to be original, imaginative and inspired. CLEANLINESS This is both the abstract state of being clean, as well as the habit (individual) of maintaining this state. CAPACITY The potential to accomplish a physical, mental or creative task - through refining the conditions under which a student is able to receive and retain information, perform and withstand tasks. CAPABILITY The sum total of both ability and capacity in a student; it is a characteristic that is both functional and constructive, allowing a student to rise to their fullest potential. COMFORT A qualitative state of physical and mental well-being that is achieved when environmental conditions facilitate this state. CONVENIENCE Ease of access to and accommodation of services, facilities and needs. CONNECTIVITY To establish links between services, facilities and needs that a student requires.

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Recommendations

13


Zoning Loud Zone

Grad Lab can have the following major zones: 1. Study - Individual study tables where students can use their personal laptops, or common desktop computers with single or dual screens.

Acoustic Separation

Support Spaces

2. Meeting - Tables where a group of students could sit together to eat, work on a project, or have conversations.

Meeting

Study

3. Support spaces - Services or equipment that would be for common use, ex. pantry and related things, common electronic equipment, storage.

Circulation

Quiet zone

4. Circulation - There should be clear, obstruction-free space between all the zones for ease of access and rearrangement of furniture.

Entry

Physical Connection 14


Prioritization Method for Design Guidelines Highest priority items that are to be implemented first, and are critical for the project’s success.

M

Must

S

Should

Items that are important, but don’t need immediate attention.

C

Could

If the budget allows, then these items might be implemented to further improve the project.

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Zone 1: Study Organizing the space according to potentially the most significant function Grad Lab support.

Potential issues of noise and lack of space will be mitigated by organizational changes and zoning.

This specific guideline addresses issues identified by users of distraction.

Image source: www.cryomats.org

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Study M

1.

2.

3.

Provide a variety of study settings for a variety of work styles and postures. a. Limit the provision of single screen monitors, and increase the provision of dual screen monitors to allow students to process more information in the same time (Chang, Hsu & Yu, 2011). b. Provide a certain number of standing desks/standing-facilitating equipment to allow for healthier task performance (Finch, Tomiyama & Ward, 2017). Use functional accessories (Finch, Tomiyama & Ward, 2017) to segregate the study zone from other zones of use. These functional accessories can be screens and partitions that help to visually and acoustically separate the study zone Provide each desk with functional task lighting to increase visual comfort (De Korte et al.,

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

2015)

S

1.

Provide counter-height tables and stools for for laptop-only work (O’Shea, Grimley & Live,

Convenience

2013)

Connectivity

C

1.

Provide all desks with standing facility, so that healthier task performance is maximized (Finch, Tomiyama & Ward, 2017)

Communication Collaboration

17


Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability Counter Table Heights

Comfort

Image source: https://www.hayneedle.com/bar-stool-buying-guide.cfm

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Collaboration Counter Table Distances

Standing Desk Posture

Image source: https://www.hayneedle.com/bar-stool-buying-guide.cfm

Image source: https://www.hayneedle.com/bar-stool-buying-guide.cfm

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Zone 2: Meeting Creates a more organized space for collaboration that fulfills multiple needs

Any potential issues with cleanliness and space shortage would be dealt with through organizational changes and additional storage

These guidelines address issues identified by users of having a lack of social space that can be academic or informal

Image source: https://www.behance.net/yamakunz

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Meeting: Social M

1. 2. 3.

Multifunctional spaces that can facilitate social gathering and eating Comfortable sofa (seating) Table that can be matched with sofa to facilitate comfortable eating (proper height) (All above derived from focus group)

S

1.

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Add any artworks or display that can give inspiration to students. Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Collaboration Artwork

Social meeting space

Image source: thingsiliketoday.com

Image source: retaildesignblog.net

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Meeting: Academic M

1. 2.

Workstations for 4-6 people for collaborative work Movable whiteboard and markers (All above derived from focus group)

S

1. 2.

Provide separate space for group meeting so that the individual work is not disrupted (derived from the questionnaire) Tackable surface for pin-up discussion or presentation

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

C

1.

Projector with movable screen Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Collaboration Collaborative Work Areas Image source:/sce.parsons.edu, pinterest.com

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Zone 3: Support Spaces These spaces will complement the academic activities occurring in Grad Lab, making them more feasible.

Potential issues with maintenance will be mitigated through organizational changes.

The redesign of support spaces will support the academic functions of the space, and make more efficient use of precious space

Image source: https://www.officepantry.co.uk/case-study-fully-managed-office-kitchen-service/

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Storage: Communal M

1.

Use of vertical space for increasing bookshelf storage capacity Creativity

S C

1. 1.

Use of bookshelves to provide privacy between individual study areas (derived from focus group)

Cleanliness

Indexed guide to provide organizational structure of literature resources available to all students (derived from observation)

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Bookshelves as partitions Image source: pinterest.com

Collaboration Bookshelves as partitions and vertical space usage Image source: Authors

23


Storage: Personal M

S

1.

2.

Provide 40 personal lockers: a. Placement in the hallway outside of the grad lab to maximize use of available space (derived from interview with Nancy Wells) b. Interior shelving to provide back to front storage flexibility Coat hooks for outerwear

1. 2.

Keypad entry to allow for student turnover Shelving will allow area for wet winter shoes and boots

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Collaboration Lockers with keypad entry Image source: Authors

Coat rack and boot shelf example Image source: pinterest.com

24


Pantry M

1.

Posted rules for use of fridge space, such as labeling with name and date (derived from focus group)

2. 3.

Standard appliances provided: microwave, fridge, kettle, coffee maker Provide designated communal non-perishable food storage space

Creativity

Cleanliness

S

C

1. 2. 3.

Install sink within room for preparation, cleaning, and drinking water (from focus group) Provide clear preparation area for handling food Install paper towel dispenser for maintaining cleanliness (derived from focus group)

1.

Provide a water filtration system with boiling (for tea, instant coffee, ramen) and cold water tap options (derived from focus group)

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Collaboration Faucet Image source:edgarswater.co.uk

Organized Pantry Image source: Authors

25


Overall Guidelines These guidelines apply to Grad Lab as a whole, helping to connect or separate the various zones.

Through transition stages, redefining the spaces could be an issue for existing users, but this will be mitigated through education and over time.

The following guidelines are important for bringing together all of the pieces of Grad Lab into a cohesive unit with its own identity.

Image source: pinterest.com

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Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment M

1. 2. 3.

Printing station upgradation and separate computer (Appendix - Survey questionnaire) Remove existing under-table storage or repurpose them for better usage Layout of Grad Lab should be changed to a more flexible space that intuitively implies co-working/hotelling studio-style space (as opposed to the current layout, which promotes designated desk and territorialization).

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity Repurposed Under-table Drawers Image source: huntsoffice.co.uk

Printing station Image source: news.uga.edu

Coffee table

Intuitive co-working space

Image source: pinterest.com

Image source: creativeboom.com

Communication Collaboration

27


Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment S

1. 2. 3.

C

1. 2.

Furniture should be ergonomic with optimal tabletop size. Small desk size is generally sufficient (3’x2’) for individual work. Provide opportunities for personalization and display of work. Upholstery should be easy-to-clean and comfortable.

Creativity

Reduce the number of single screen monitors Change aesthetics/colour theme to create a more bright, cheerful, invigorating atmosphere.

Capacity

Cleanliness

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Pinboards

Communication

Image source: regencydisplays.com

Collaboration

28


Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Recommended

Existing Dual-screen desktops

4

Dual-screen desktops

2

Single-screen desktops

2

Single-screen desktops

2

Work tables 4’ long x 2'6" wide

4

Work tables (multiple sized for group work)

3

Work tables 4’ long x 2' wide

11

Under-table Storage Drawers

8

Green Humanscale chairs

15

Black chair

1

Core chair

2

Waste Bins

3

Small Refrigerator

Work tables 3’ long x 2' wide (for individual work) Under-table Storage Drawers Ergonomic Chairs

12 8 24

Uniform and well-marked Waste Bins

3

Small Refrigerator

1

1

Microwave oven

1

Microwave Oven

1

Pantry storage shelves

1

Small Table

1

Sink and faucet arrangement

1

Shelves 1' wide

7’ x 4 = 28' running

Bookshelves as partitions (1’ wide)

56’’ running

Printing Station

1

Stationery Storage Cabinet

1

Sofa

1

1

Whiteboard + Tackable surfaces

4

Whiteboard + Tackable surface

1

Common Pinboard 5’ wide x 7’ long

1

Small pinboard

1

Coat and boot storage

1

Coat rack

1

Personal Lockers

Printer

1

Storage Cabinet

1

Sofa

1

Coffee Table

40

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Ambient Environment: Ventilation 1. 2. S

3. 4.

Temperature control should be located in the room (derived from focus group) The weight of windows should not exceed 11lbs for ease of opening and closing (derived from observation) The grid of windows should be 40 - 60 inches for users to easily be able to open and close (derived from observation) The horizontal distance between window and user should not exceed 10 inches (derived from observation)

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Collaboration Temperature Control

Window system

Image source: store.google.com

Image source: window-openers.com

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Ambient Environment: Lighting M

1. 2. 3.

Adopt natural light as much as possible (Sleegers et al, 2013) Install blinds that allow for control of light levels (derived from focus group) Artificial light in the space should create brightness of 500 lux/m2 at any time. (NOAO, 2015)

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity

Communication Window blinds

Optimal Lighting Level

Image source: blindstogo.com

Image source: bcwh.com

Collaboration

31


Ambient Environment: Noise M

1. 2.

The exchange of noise should be minimized between different zones Items, such as keyboards and chairs, should make minimal noise in the individual study area (derived from focus group)

Creativity

Cleanliness

Capacity

Capability

Comfort

Convenience

Connectivity Acoustic Space Dividers

Acoustic barriers

Silent keyboard

Image source: urban-office.com

Image source: maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Discs-Noise-Barrier-Glass

Image source: cdn.trendhunterstatic.com

Communication Collaboration

32


Suggested layout Eating, relaxing, and group-work Computer and book study Food preparation Storage Printing and project completion

33


Ancillary Recommendations

34


Organizational Changes WASTE MANAGEMENT To deal with odours from trash that accumulates quickly, a daily trash disposal system may have to be considered, and grad lab users may have to be more proactive in managing the waste generated in Grad Lab. QUIET STUDY RESERVE As per the space usage questionnaire results, a minimum of one office could be opened to masters students who need quiet study time, on a reserve system basis.

GRAD LAB EXTENSION As space constraint has been identified as an issue in the questionnaire, we would like to propose that the concept of Grad Lab be extended to other pockets of space in MVR, by designing and branding such spaces so that they welcome graduate students. GREEN OFFICE CERTIFICATION FOR GRAD LAB We had achieved a Level 1 certification, as per Cornell University’s sustainable office guidelines. We propose that organizational changes be made such that Grad Lab achieves the highest level of certification: Level 4

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Cornell Green Office Certification Program Grad Lab had been awarded a Level 1 certification (now expired). To do more, we have to achieve more in the following categories: -Community Engagement Engage not only Grad Lab users to be more proactive in achieving the certification requirements, but also the community in general. -Energy (Use windows wisely, change computer settings to save energy, shut down computers when not in use, turn off lights, UNPLUG electronics for nights, weekends and holidays) -Green Events (BYO Bowl/cup/plate/utensils to events, compose the event, use water/juice pitchers, green the food) -Recycling (Recycle plastic bags, crisp bags, batteries/CDs in special locations around campus) -Transportation (Use the bus, zimride, purchase carbon offsets) -Waste (Reduce printing, print double-sided as a default, reuse paper for notes, use post consumer recycled paper, provide mugs, cutlery and soap to reduce disposable items that are thrown away)

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References Angeles, G., Guilkey, D. K., & Mroz, T. A. (2005). The impact of community-level variables on individual-level outcomes: Theoretical results and applications. Sociological Methods & Research, 34(1), 76-121. doi:10.1177/0049124104273069 Chang, T., Hsu, J., & Yu, P. (2011). A comparison of single- and dual-screen environment in programming language: Cognitive loads and learning effects. Educational Technology and Society, 14(2), 188-200. De Korte, E. M., Spiekman, M., Hoes-van Oeffelen, L., van der Zande, B., Vissenberg, G., Huiskes, G., & Kuijt-Evers, L. F. M. (2015). Personal environmental control: Effects of pre-set conditions for heating and lighting on personal settings, task performance and comfort experience. Building and Environment, 86, 166-176. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2015.01.002 Doorley, S., & Witthoft, S. (2011). Make space: How to set the stage for creative collaboration (1. Aufl.;1; ed.). Hoboken: Wiley. Finch, L., Tomiyama, A., & Ward, A. (2017). Taking a stand: The effects of standing desks on task performance and engagement. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(8), 939. doi:10.3390/ijerph14080939. National Optical Astronomy Observatory. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.noao.edu/education/QLTkit/ACTIVITY_Documents/Safety/ LightLevels_outdoor+indoor.pdf. O'Shea, L., Grimley, C., & Love, M. (2013). Interior design reference and specification book : Everything interior designers need to know every day. Osceola: Rockport Publishers. Shah, C., & Leeder, C. (2016). Exploring collaborative work among graduate students through the C5 model of collaboration: A diary study. Journal of Information Science, 42(5), 609-629. doi:10.1177/0165551515603322 Sleegers, P., Moolenaar, N., Galetzka, M., Pruyn, A., Sarroukh, B., & Van der Zande, B. (2013). Lighting affects students’ concentration positively: Zeisel, J. (2006). Inquiry by design: environment/behavior/neuroscience in architecture, interiors, landscape, and planning. (Rev. ed.). New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

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Appendix

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Appendix A: Interviews Summary We interviewed Prof. Nancy Wells, Director of Graduate Studies, DEA and Prof. Mardelle Shepley, Chair, DEA. They both are of the opinion that Grad lab and PhD offices are spaces to help people progress. Grad lab promotes academic learning and interaction between Masters and PhD students. It can be regarded as a home base for all graduate students. They were open to us proposing any redesign proposal, including organizational changes. However, there is no exact timetable and budget on grad lab renovation. The fourth floor of MVR was recently renovated, and the furniture is fairly new. On the other hand, DEA is considering expanding its size on graduate school. If DEA wants to enroll more students, redesigning the space becomes necessary.

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Appendix B: Focus Group Outcomes Primary Activities? Reading, printing, storage (binders, books, popcorn, lunch, backpacks), homework, assignments, computer work, kettle, socializing, eating, sleeping Why here? Guaranteed space to work, large monitors (better efficiency to multitask), talk with others in similar classes about problems, productive environment (everyone else working), daylight and open space (“better than my office�), sense of ownership Negatives? Leftover traces from prior years, lack of storage, cannot control temperature, no access to outside, lighting on desks, small size, dirty tabletops, dirty cups/food left, musty smell Typical use?

Duration: 10 minutes, 1 hour, or 3-4 hours Frequency: 3-4 times per week, or daily

Ideas? More storage, assigned cleaning responsibility, water source (cleaning dishes and filling water bottles) Dream big? New modular furniture, presentation screen (collaborative schoolwork or social movies), automatic windows, basketball hoop, foozball or ping-pong tables, healthy snacks, access to PhD offices for interviews

40


Appendix C: Questionnaire results Q1

-

What

type

of

Q2 - Which year are you in, of your PhD program? grad student are you?

1

Ist year

33.33%

2

1

PhD student

25.00%

6

2

2nd year

50.00%

3

2

Masters student

75.00%

18

3

3rd year

16.67%

1

4

4th year

0.00%

0

Total

100%

24 5

5th year

0.00%

0

6

6+ year

0.00%

0

Total

100%

6

41


Questionnaire results Q3

-

Are

you

satisfied

1

Very satisfied

0.00%

0

2

Satisfied

33.33%

2

3

Neutral

16.67%

1

4

Dissatisfied

33.33%

2

5

Very dissatisfied

16.67%

1

Total

100%

6

with

Q4 - Do you prefer using grad lab or your PhD office your current to PhD office space?in? space work

1

Grad Lab

16.67%

1

2

My office space

33.33%

2

3

Neither

50.00%

3

4

Both

0.00%

0

Total

100%

6

42


Questionnaire results Q5 - If you wish to provide a reason for your preference, please do so:

Q6 - How willing would you be to loan out your office space to masters students who wish to borrow it sometimes?

If you wish to provide a reason for your preference, please do so:

grad lab is too small. I prefer it over my office

Quiet atmosphere and personal storage

My office is too small, too crowded for two people. Grad lab is a social place, not really for serious working or reading. 1

Very willing

50.00%

3

2

Willing

0.00%

0

3

Neutral

16.67%

1

4

Unwilling

0.00%

0

5

Very unwilling

33.33%

2

Total

100%

6

43


Questionnaire results Q8 - Do you have any comments to make on the feasibility of such a reserve system, for your office space?

Q1- - What year of your Masters program are you in?

I mean it's kind of ridiculous that this is a question. DEA just needs more space in general. It would be a lot easier if they took one office and just had that as a first come first serve for masters students to use.

Sometimes I could help some of Master's students when they need quite spaces for job interviews. However I mostly work in my office from early morning till late evening except few hours of taking classes or eating outside. Just to be honest, I'm not sure whether I can find time to regularly loan my desk to others.

Although I'm very willing to loan out my office space, my office is so small, which is only capacious enough for one person, which is why I'm usually not in there. Actually, graduate lab is probably more comfortable for working than my little office... Sometimes I store my stuff in my phd office so it might be difficult to loan the space to a masters student to use. I would have to clear out my things from the space which might be a hassle.

1

Ist year

44.44%

8

2

2nd year

50.00%

9

3

3rd year

5.56%

1

Total

100%

18

44


Questionnaire results Q2-

-

What

is

your

opinion

1

Definitely Approve

22.22%

4

2

Approve

16.67%

3

3

Neutral

50.00%

9

4

Disapprove

11.11%

2

5

Definitely Disapprove

0.00%

0

Total

100%

18

on

Q3- - What type of study space do you prefer? PhD students using grad lab?

1

Individual, designated study spaces

33.33%

6

2

Shared, unassigned study spaces

16.67%

3

3

Both

50.00%

9

Total

100%

18

45


Questionnaire results Qa - How important do you think the following functions/services are for you, in grad lab?

Qb - Please tell us what you think of the following ambient/environmental conditions in grad lab:

Scale: 1 = Low 3 = Ideal 5 = High

46


Questionnaire results Qc - Approximately how many hours do you think you spend in Grad Lab per week?

1

0-10

78.26%

18

2

10-20

8.70%

2

3

20-30

8.70%

2

4

30-40

4.35%

1

5

40-50

0.00%

0

6

50+

0.00%

0

Total

100%

23

Qd

-

How

often

are

you

in

grad

1

More than once a day

21.74%

5

2

About once a day

26.09%

6

3

A few times a week

47.83%

11

4

About once a week

0.00%

0

5

Less than once a week

4.35%

1

Total

100%

23

lab?

47


Questionnaire results Qe

-

Would

1

you

Yes - like a great deal

like

30.43%

to

be

Qf - How comfortable is the desk seating in grad lab for to personalize grad lab? you?able

1

Extremely comfortable

21.74%

5

2

Somewhat comfortable

43.48%

10

3

Neither comfortable nor uncomfortable

17.39%

4

4

Somewhat uncomfortable

17.39%

4

5

Extremely uncomfortable

0.00%

0

Total

100%

23

7

2

Yes- like somewhat

34.78%

8

3

Neutral

26.09%

6

4

No - dislike somewhat

8.70%

2

5

No - dislike a great deal

0.00%

0

Total

100%

23

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Questionnaire results Qg - What improvements would you like to see in the redesign of grad lab? Deal with odours, with storage and with untidiness.

More accommodations for PhD students who would like the opportunity to collaborate or facilitate a sense of belongingness with the rest of the program. Comfortable rest area

Better hairs clusters of workstations/desks for specific purposes instead of rows of uniform desks

a bigger space. more ergonomic seating. nooks and crannys or partitions where one can find a bit of privacy.

assigned workspaces

I would like to see designated seatings.

I really don't like to stay in the PHD student office. It's like you're living in somebody's a storage room. I prefer hoteling office or in some way that you can schedule a room for a long period of time.

More computers

MORE SPACE is the number one thing. A more comfortable area for relaxation/eating/conversation, and break out rooms for group work that doesnt disrupt individual work.

Space better utilized, more accessible outlets by all seats, more personalization options for all, places to share during group talk (i.e. white boards), option for visual privacy (I.e. dividers) Tidier

Flexible partitions, bigger monitors, less clutter

More storage

The walls are cluttered with a lot of brochures and papers, so maybe organize them more Have an imaginary boundary between individual study spaces and socialization spaces

Better configuration of furniture More and better work computers. Add some partitions.

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Questionnaire results Qh - Please list the top 3 functions that you use grad lab for. 1. Homework 2. Conversations 3. Eat/Drink

Printing Group work Spending time between classes

Storage of small items, lunch, individual work on dual screen monitors

Printing Storage Chatting

printing reading conversation

I use it for different functions now that I have been constrained to my office - these days, I use it only for printing.

communicate with peers, social, print

Individual quiet study Storage Interaction

Group meeting, individual work-time, nap

Eating printing talking

Collaboration, completing assignments, spending time with peers Printing Killing time Group discussion

Printing / chat / relax Private work Relaxation Conversation

Printing, meeting up with people

Printing Discussing with classmates

Print, be around classmates, microwave individual work, group work, brief conversations Printing Individual study Leaving my boots on the couch (storage), until I need to change Printing, meeting with peers, socializing

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Questionnaire results Qi - If you can think of one word to describe the culture of grad lab now, what word would you choose?

Communal

stuffy

tepid

Vibrant and friendly but sometimes too noisy and crowded.

ambiguous/chaotic no culture

Awkward

Uncomfortable

Variable! untidy undefined gradlab Social Diverse Community Social Exclusive Cozy

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Questionnaire results Qj - What kind of storage would you like to use in grad lab? Individual storage, desk storage for books, more shelves for coffee mugs, boxes, etc. More umbrella, coat and boot racks Safer storage (for relatively valuable things)

i don't really store things in the grad lab.

Places for textbooks/materials that aren’t occupied by unused materials partition shelf

personal lockers - spacious fridge I don't leave things in the grad lab, so I cannot answer this question.

Personal but not necessarily lockable storage

Storage that is not open, that is, you should not be able to see what is stored inside until you open it

Large, personal for backpacks, clothing, fridge space

None

I think that there needs to be a better method of storing our items, preferably that allows each of us to have our own "unit" or area to store books or personal items in rather than having to share.

storage for books and coats; safe for valuables.

I don't need any, as I have sufficient space in my office.

a NOT top-loaded container of some sort, a container that can be closed

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Questionnaire results Qk - How frequently do you use the table and chairs in front of the elevator near grad lab?

1

More than once a day

9.52%

2

2

About once a day

0.00%

0

3

A few times a week

9.52%

2

4

About once a week

28.57%

6

5

Less than once a week

52.38%

11

Total

100%

21

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Questionnaire results Ql - What amenities/facilities would you like to see added to spaces outside grad lab, that you use as an extension of grad lab? (For example: Lockers as part of corridors, etc)

Lockers sound good. Printing kiosk and a printer, if possible.

Places for grad students to do group work without interrupting others in grad lab (i.e. small group work space)

Lockers, plants. lockers as part of corridors sound good. Lockers Eating and casual conversation space lockers in the corridor - furniture for small group interaction

Lockers is good! News paper. A good sitting and relaxing area to stay and talk. some posters. Breakout rooms for group work

Various seating/study space

Student art-work An easily identifiable group collaboration space, with whiteboard/ TV lockers would be awesome!, a working sink (to wash hands, dishes, containers, etc), a working water dispenser (the current one is degrading rapidly to unusable - sideways trickle), individual/privacy work pods (like the phone-booths they have in many coworking spaces), more coat racks, more standing desks (a cafe style bar surface along the wall would be good) Couch

Lockers would be good!

Lockers as part of the corridor could solve the above mentioned storage problem

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Questionnaire results Qm - Do you have any additional comments to make? reducing the footprint of each workstation (the desks are too big for laptop users + revolving chairs have a large footprint) The cellular offices on the 4th floor are boring and I think it's a waste of space. If you ask me do you think whether a ph.d. student needs a personal office, I would say yes (only if the office is close to their advisor's office, as it will increase informal communications.) Otherwise, the office like now is only for storage, seldom people use that. A study place more open and flexible will be more attractive for me.

There should be social events held in grad lab that can help create a dept culture of grad students. right now the grad lab oscillates between extremes - it's either dead quiet and no one can say a word without being disruptive, or it's extremely loud and it's just a bunch of people socializing, you can't store your things there without people digging into it, seeing your things, or having them crushed at the bottom of a top-loading blue bin. There's no place to take a phone call that's not disruptive (the hallway is loud and noise carries so easily all throughout), There are few options to stand and work, even though that is a primary finding from our ergonomics department. The few standing desk apparatus we had have been turned into personal bookshelves. The personalization of desks also ranges from one extreme to another - there is a creeping personalization of one computer that grows every couple weeks. The temperature is extremes - either someone has all windows wide open and it's freezing, or it's quite hot. There is no task-lighting near the desktop computers and it's very harsh on the eyes when working until late at night.

Grad lab swings between silent and LOUD with little in between

No

The PhD offices are important for several reasons. Most PhD students are TAs and need to hold office hours outside of grad lab. PhD students are also here for 4+ years, so having a static, personalized space for individual work is very useful. With the current space constraints, however, I feel very restricted from using grad lab when I want a more collaborative work environment. This is definitely a disadvantage and makes me feel feel excluded from the social aspects of DEA grad life.

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