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Portfolio Sukruti Gupta a selection of works in architecture, design, and environmental sustainability


M.S. (Sustainable Design Studies) 2018, Cornell University Major: Design and Environmental Analysis Minor: City and Regional Planning B. Arch. 2016, School of Planning and Architecture, Bhopal LEED Green Associate email: sukruti.gupta@gmail.com, sg2247@cornell.edu phone: +1-607-280-0643 address: 100 Newkirk Street, Apt. 5A, Jersey City NJ - 07306


CONTENTS 1. The Blue Box 2. Graindrop

architectural programming of a study-work space

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urban resilience against climate change, biomimicry global design challenge 2017

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3. Cornell Abroad

workplace strategy and office redesign

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4. Project E-Bazaar

conceptual design strategy, china

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5. Water-conscious Mixed Use Building 6. Research and Teaching

undergraduate thesis

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research, graduate thesis, and teaching

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email: sukruti.gupta@gmail.com, sg2247@cornell.edu phone: +1-607-280-0643 address: 100 Newkirk Street, Apt. 5A, Jersey City NJ - 07306


architectural programming of a study-work space

THE BLUE BOX An architectural program and design brief was developed for the mezzanine space at Mann Library, Cornell University. ‘The Blue Box’ is the new identity given to the underutilized space, re-imagined as a small-group work and study space for graduate students. Research, in the form of interviews with the client and students, and extended observations, informed the design recommendations. A detailed space program was proposed to achieve eight design goals. Furniture specifications and performance requirements were stated to inform the design. A prioritization method was developed as part of scenario planning. The programming document concluded with a suggested layout and budget. (Full report available here.)

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DESIGN BRIEF The mezzanine space of Mann Library is currently underutilized, and its few users report dissatisfaction. The program for redesign of the space is aimed to assign a new, desirable identity to the space.

STRATEGIC PROBLEM-SOLVING The identity of the Mezzanine will be redefined as the Blue Box. It will be a graduate-student only collaborative space. Immediate changes can occur at a minimal cost through rebranding and rearranging furniture. More permanent changes with new furniture and technology will involve a more significant financial investment.

Location of Mann Library on Cornell University Campus

Location of Mezzanine space within Mann Library

Details of the Mezzanine space


RESEARCH PROCESS Pros

Original Use:

Space feels large and open More natural light than graduate study space Better ventilation Segregated space makes students feel exclusive

Current Use:

Cons Specific kinds of distracting noises Wayfinding is difficult Intended use is unclear (confusion regarding quiet/loud space, graduate-only space)

Client Interview

Literature

Review

Student Interview

Problems Identified

The Blue Box Graduate-only collaborative space

Observation

Case Study


PROGRAMMATIC REQUIREMENTS Problems Identified • Opportunities for intervention

Lack of defined function

• Defined, unique and innovative functions

Difficult to find the space

• Branding, signage, and wayfinding

?

Inaccessible upper mezzanine

• Ensure universal accessibility

Dissatisfaction due to noise intrusion

• Propose alternate compatible space use


PROPOSED REBRANDING A place to practice presentations

STUDY

BRAINSTORM

mobility of spatial arrangements

PRESENT

INFORMAL

A place to study in small groups

TETHERED / FIXED

type of interaction - behavior

A place for creativity, ideation and collaboration

MOBILE / FLEXIBLE

FORMAL


STRATEGIC DESIGN Defining design goals through detailed performance requirements

1

BRANDING

To create a unique identity:

• Possible color schemes • Unity - From 6 Principles of Design

5

BRAINSTORM

Dedicated dynamic space:

• Flexible furniture configurations • Toolboxes that can facilitate creativity

2

ACCESS

Accessible to all graduate students: • “Graduate Students Only” • Accessible approach to mezzanine

6

PRESENT

Facilitate presentation rehearsals: • Requirements for presentation area • Dimmable lights


3

AMBIENCE

Calm, comfortable, and soothing ambience: • Combined illuminance • Thermal Comfort Range

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TECHNOLOGY

Current and future technological needs: • Connect, Display, Adapt • EPEAT certification

4

STUDY

Spaces for small groups : • Workstation group size • Rationale for desk size

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LONGEVITY

Relevant for at least 10 years:

• Levels of Cornell Green Office Certification Program • Product life-span


ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAMMING AND BUDGET: Space use “Present” Sq. Ft. No. of people

Ambient Environment

140 Per station

2-5

Number of stations

1

Total

2-5

Lighting

~300 lux, adjustable

Sound

50-80 dB

Temperature

70-75 °F 1 no. electronic screen

Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment

Total Remodelling Budget

4 nos. chairs for audience 1 no. acoustic barrier

Finishes

Present

1 nos. high chair for presenter 1 no. mini sound system

Interior Features

Proximity

1 no. movable podium

Chairs - cool color pallette Desk and podium surface - warm color palette

Hardware

Power outlets and charging points

Enclosures

Partial enclosure to contain light and sound

Primary

Study

Secondary

Entry

Item Table Chairs Presenter Chair Podium Electronic Screen Acoustic separation Sound system

Number 1 4 1 1 1 3 1

Total cost $1,751.00 $2,508.00 $811.00 $670.00 $2,568.00 $5,841.00 $700.00 $56,188.00


LAYOUT AND DETAILS

Existing Layout

Proposed Layout

3-D View of Proposed Layout

Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment


urban resilience against climate change, biomimicry global design challenge 2017

GRAINDROP Designed as a biophilia-oriented solution to urban climate change resilience, Graindrop is a strategic systems solution that incorporates strategies of food recycling, water management, and inter-species cooperation. The biomimicrybased system of interconnected bioswales draws inspiration from the benthic food cycle. The design was awarded Honorable Mention; it was placed among Top 8 student entries in Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2017. (Full competition entry available here.)

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THE BIOMIMICRY DESIGN PROCESS 1. DEFINE

Identification of a question: Here, the impact of climate change on water availability and food production


2. BIOLOGIZE

3. DISCOVER

Design Question: How might we help farmers achieve food stability? Functions: stabilize food amounts

Context: Farm, farmers,

and quality, help farmers in planting

unpredictable foods’ amounts and quality due to climate change

Benthic communities in and on the bottom of the ocean floor.

Biologized Questions: How does nature … • •

Provide food for species? Keep the food cycle stable?

Finding solutions in nature for the identified question: Here, the stability of food cycle

Seasonal Variation

Transfer of nutrients

Diversity in organisms

Phytoplanktons and other organisms in sunlit regions

Vertical water columns

Deposit and Filter Feeders

Ideation of a systems design inspired from nature to solve for the identified question: Here, the systemic recycling of nutrients among oceanic species


4. ABSTRACT

5. EMULATE

Translation of solution found in nature to the design thinking process: Here, the nutrient cycle is deeply analyzed and its design parallels are developed

Adaptation and replication: Here, the food cycle and water cycle in the built environment are re-designed using biomimicry principles to achieve urban resilience to climate change


THE DESIGN SOLUTION: “GRAINDROP� How Graindrop works:

1

Graindrop gets its inputs from organic food waste, rainwater, and greywater

2

Waste and water are upcycled into fresh food through urban agriculture in swales. Swales conserve water and nutrients within a closed loop, as observed in benthic communities

3

The network of swales is maintained by the community, giving them quality open spaces for recreation and restoring natural habitat


SALIENT FEATURES OF GRAINDROP Stakeholder involvement:

Graindrop is powered by an app that measures, regulates and rewards contribution to this system of bioswales

Regenerative and Resilient:


6. EVALUATE

Benthic Communities

Graindrop

Closed loop Self-sustaining Reuses Waste Conserves resources Diverse actor organisms Rewards cooperation

Reviewing design against nature for relevant characeteristics: Here, Graindrop meets and exceeds expectations


workplace strategy and office redesign

CORNELL ABROAD A workplace strategy was developed for Cornell Abroad, the responsible body for international education programs at Cornell University. Its renovated office was expected to support the diverse functions and needs, accommodate future growth, and project an exciting, welcoming, and professional image. Fragmented nature of the office space (3 disconnected rooms on 2 floors) was the biggest design challenge. Interviews, observations, space use data, and workflow patterns were analyzed to inform the design. The proposal was chosen as the preferred solution by the client, out of 4 presented solutions. (Full report available here.)

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CLIENT REQUIREMENTS

The creation of a cohesive space for Cornell Abroad that supports the diverse functions and needs of staff, students and visitors and accommodates future growth while projecting an image that is exciting, welcoming, and professional.

OBSERVATIONS:


CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

ADJACENCY DIAGRAM Suite 300

Room 282 Outreach Coordinator

Education Abroad Coordinators

Travel Safety Coordinator

Visiting Students Program Coordinator

Director Associate Director

Finance Manager

Accounts Coordinator Data Steward

The adjacency diagram is based on work type and communication. Work areas in Cornell Abroad are divided into three categories: Administration Area (blue bubbles), Flexible Office Area (green bubbles), and Advising Area (yellow bubbles). The adjacency lines, bolded and dotted, both represent primary (inperson meetings) and secondary (via phone or email) communication respectively.


SUITE 300: OPTION 1

The wide and articulate circulation path also gives a more welcoming and “easy come, easy go” atmosphere.

Easy flow:

SUITE 300: OPTION 2

Cosmopolitan: The open plan with

areas encourage visitors to sit aroun about Cornell Abroad.


h wide lounge-seating nd and find out more

ROOM 282: OPTION 1 Due to the separation from the 3rd floor, this area will provide modern amenities and innovative room configurations for the staff.

Just what we need:

ROOM 282: OPTION 2 Here, we bring the staff physically together in a way that encourages collaboration and spontaneous interaction.

Out of the box:


conceptual design strategy for corporate workplace, research, and amenities, china

PROJECT E-BAZAAR Project E-Bazaar is a futuristic workplace strategy for Zhejiang Overseas High Level Talents Innovation Park (ZOTP) in Hangzhou, China. Aimed at attraction and retention of talent, reducing urban-rural divide and facilitating digital markets, this proposal has Chinese e-commerce industry at its heart. The business needs of various stakeholders in e-commerce industry were analyzed and translated into spatial needs to inform the design. Project E-Bazaar provides integrated services for incubation, and facilities for remote connections. The conceptual design draws inspiration from West Lake, and transforms the current workplace model while promoting ideals of equity, environmental stewardship, and sustainability. (Full report available here.)

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FORWARD-LOOKING WORKPLACE STRATEGY FOR A TECHNOLOGY PARK What can we do to address social equity in the future, through a workplace strategy?

Developing country

How do people communicate with each other while working remotely?

Evolving work pattern

Social infrastructure

How do we translate these abstract ideas of social equity and remote working into design and strategy?

Attributes of companies currently located in ZOTP Technology Park 26% - Companies at ZOTP with > 50 employees

Small businesses 11%

<10

Big businesses

7%

>100

19%

50-100 63%

10-50

Start-ups

Remote businesses

NGOs and Collectives

74% - Companies at ZOTP with < 50 employees In China and internationally, trends in company size show an increasing number of small companies, with remotely working employees.


LOCATION- AND INFRASTRUCTURE-BASED NETWORKING Service Users

Service Providers

Small businesses Big businesses

NGOs and Collectives Start-ups

Extending the idea of workplace strategy beyond rentable workspaces, the design proposes opportunities to share knowledge and infrastructure between diverse businesses.

Remote businesses

THE BIG IDEA: Design spaces as interconnected and integrated platforms to support diverse businesses. Small and remote businesses receive knowledge and infrastructure. Big businesses, aided by NGOs and collectives, fulfil CSR obligations at minimal logistic cost.

TRANSLATION OF BUSINESS NEEDS TO SPATIAL NEEDS: Ensuring future affordability of space Business Needs Expansion opportunities Consultation with experts Attracting investors Developing collaborative relationships Meeting with service providers Learning market trends and new technology Recruitment Assessment of competitors Acquisition or getting acquired CSR and Engagement

Spatial Needs Physical Workspace Display and Exhibition Meeting spaces Hospitality Warehouses Short-term rentals Long-term lease Access to facilities


INTEGRATED PLATFORMS

W PLATFORM

C PLATFORM

Work & NetWork KnoWledge

Cognitive Thinking & Collaborative Learning

Knowledge and Skills as a Shared Resource

Learning and Facilitating Cognitive Processes

Auxiliary supporting spaces such as commercial (cafes & restaurants) services (storage, pantries, facilities).

Auxiliary supporting spaces such as transitional (lobbies, outflow spaces (washrooms, storage).

Workshops (Maker Spaces) & Studios (Virtual Studios, Traditional Studios)

E PLATFORM

Amphitheatres, Auditoriums and Lecture Halls

Exhibition Experience

Display and Showcasing as a ValueAdded Resource

E

E

Exhibition and Experience Spaces

Auxiliary supporting spaces such as commercial (restaurants, retail) & service (washrooms, storage).

W

W

H

C

S

C

E

S W

H

Conceptual Site Plans


s) & service

Hospitality & Accommodation

H PLATFORM

Creating an Environment for Remote Businesses to Come, Stay, Learn and (Net)Work. Mixed-use approach towards hospitality and accommodation

Auxiliary supporting spaces such as reception spaces, experience spaces, & services

S PLATFORM

Storage Warehouses Services – Parking, HVAC, Admin & Management

Supporting Services and Storage as a ‘Common’ Resource Provision of Storage Warehouses and Services

Auxiliary supporting spaces such as circulation and transportation, workspace.


Architectural features


Cultural and natural elements in design


SECTIONS: Programmed Spaces

E: Experience and Exhibition

C: Thinking and Collaborative Learning

W: Workspaces

PASSIVE CLIMATE CONTROL


TRIPLE-BOTTOM LINE

Social

• Promotes social equity through a small-to-large business model. • Expresses culture through organisational framework and architectural design. • Alleviates urban migration by enabling remote working. • Provides access to quality infrastructure for small enterprises.

Economic

• Putting Profits Back Into The Cycle As Per CSR. • Generates posibility of increased revenue gains. • One-stop solution for all business requirements. • Redistributes revenue from urban areas to remote locations.

Environmental

• Local is resilient. • Biophilic and human scale-based development. • Water is the main communication channel for information, goods and people.


undergraduate architecture thesis

WATER-CONSCIOUS MIXED USE BUILDING Designed for bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thesis project, this mixed-use project has a total builtup area of 24,200 m2, and consists of retail, office, and residential floors. The project site is located on the watershed of a large urban lake, and the building was designed as a low-impact, water-efficient building. Through a number of strategies, 48% water savings were projected in comparison to a conventional building. The design process included conducting case studies, developing designs, construction and presentation drawings, and research-based water use calculations. (Details available here.)

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CONTEXT

A polluted urban lake

Hussain Sagar lake was built as an irrigation tank in 1562-75 A.D., joining the twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad, providing water and historical aesthetic beauty to them. The economic incentive to encroach upon a polluted waterbody is high in this dense and overpopulated downtown area.

Water crisis in the city

Hyderabad faces increasingly worse water shortage with each passing year due to rising temperature, heat waves, drought, and exhausting water supply. The drop in groundwater level has worsened as a result of increased runoff and reduced infiltration caused by construction and urban sprawl.


Health of a lake is dependent on the treatment of each land parcel in its watershed

To achieve absolute water efficiency, a complex, integrated approach is required. A systematic, integrated approach would be one that links all water-related activities to one another; it would explore connections between water supply, rainwater, stormwater and wastewater. Along with water security, water-sensitive design supports green landscapes that significantly enhance ambiance, help to cool urban environments, and improve the health of waterbodies while providing opportunities for community engagement and recreation.


WATER-CONSCIOUS DESIGN DECISIONS

Landscaping: • use of native plant species • vegetation and waterbodies to enhance micro-climate • minimizing hardscapes • raingardens along site perimeter

Orientation and Wayfinding: • waterbodies at key circulation locations • private, shared, and/or public access to lakeviews • community engagement with water

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Massing options were evaluated on their performance on zoning bylaws, building orientation (with respect to sun path and dominant wind direction), structural grid for different building uses, passive climatecontrol affordability, and aesthetics.


Passive Cooling: • climate-sensitive design and building materials • openings for cross-breeze and stack ventilation • shading and evaporative cooling

VISUALIZATIONS

Rainwater Harvesting: • rooftop rainwater collection • systems for storage, filteration and reuse of rainwater • managing stormwater runoff


Retail Floor Plan showing Atrium

Office Floor Plan

Residential Floor Plan

Mixed-Use: Sound Building Decision Mixed-use development integrates commercial and residential uses to support quality urban design. The natural surveillance of people coming and going at different hours (office, retail, housing) maximizes utility and provides security. The location of the project boasted stores, offices, residences, public services, and recreation spaces within walking distance, making mixed-use development a sound programming decision.


Front Elevation Residential

Services Offices

Retail

Side Elevation Residential

Services Offices

Retail


LOOPED WATER RECYCLING SYSTEMS

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF WATER CONSUMPTION BEFORE AND AFTER* WATER-SAVING MEASURES Water consumption by use volume of water used (lpcd)

100

Reduced freshwater consumption

52%

Before measures After measures

80

LESS

60

overall building-level

40

48%

20

LESS

0

l

tia

en

id res

c

ial

erc

m om

AC HV

g

pin

sca

d lan

per capita consumtion * compared to conventional buildings


Making invisible water visible through design: Concept image of atrium


social science/environmental research and studio teaching assistantships

RESEARCH AND TEACHING Rigorous research is an important component of strategic and evidencebased design. At Cornell University, I was part of numerous research studies that contributed either to design guidelines, or furthered the understanding of how people interact with their environments. These research projects included conference papers, pre-design research, term-papers, and the M.S. thesis project. I was also awarded Teaching Assistantship for two studio courses: Visual Design and Literacy (Fall 2017), which is an introduction to design freshman studio; and Design Immersion[s] (Summer 2018), which is a basic design course for high school seniors.

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DESIGN RESEARCH

LITERATURE REVIEWS AND CASE STUDIES

Skilled at gathering relevant information from existing literature. Compiled literature reviews on various topics in sustainable design, human-environment relation, and social sciences. Conducted and analyzed case studies to distill key features.

2017

FOCUS GROUPS AND INTERVIEWS

SURVEY OBSERV

Expertise in conducting and moderating focus group discussions and structured interviews for design research, inlcuding compilation of key takeaways after sessions and providing summaries.

Urban Migration as a Water Issue - Case Studies from India: Presented as EDRAShorts at international 48th Annual Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) Conference and published in proceedings.

2016

Developed surve and observation to reliable measures. Experience wit multiple surveys i and collection data, including of all collected da subsequent analys

Practical Research in S International India-U.S. c Utah. Funded by and pres


YS AND VATIONS

ey questionnaires ools using valid and

th administering in lab and on site, of observational final compilation ata to be used for ses.

DATA ANALYSIS

Quantitative statistical analysis using linear regression, multiple regression, and general linear models. Proficient in working with spreadsheets and software like Minitab and SPSS. Qualitative data analysis using Atlasti software.

Support of Sustainable Urbanization: collaboration project with University of sented to the U.S. Consulate, Hyderabad.

2014

WRITING AND PRESENTATIONS

Experienced in writing papers, structured essays, detailed reports, and research abstracts for academic purposes. Developed and delievered presentations with graphic visual content for conferences, competitions, and client communications. Composed blog posts and book reviews for a citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sustainability collective.

Spaces To Grow In - A Comparative Study of Two Orphanages: Won second prize (3500 USD), Berkeley Prize Essay Competition 2014, endorsed by Department of Architecture, University of California, Berkeley.


M.S. THESIS PERCEPTIONS OF INDIAN CONSUMERS TOWARDS PHARMACEUTICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

The increase in access to and use of medication worldwide has led to ubiquitous, and persistence presence of pharmaceuticals in the natural environment. Major risks from environmental contamination due to drugs include death of organisms, habitat loss, mutation, and rise of antigen-resistant microbes. India has suffered enormous regional ecological damage from pharmaceutical contamination. Green chemistry approaches and environmentally-friendly pharmaceuticals exist, but they currently do not enjoy popular support from the pharmaceutical industry or the consumers.

RESEARCH DESIGN: NON-EXPERIMENTAL SURVEY Independent Variables Environmental Concern Self-Estimated Knowledge

Demographic Variables

Dependent Variable

Age Gender Education Level

Consumer Intention

Risk Perception

PARTICIPANT DEMOGRAPHICS (N = 141) 62% 47%

57%

53%

41%

38%

Male

Female

Young

Old

Low Education

High Education

SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE


MAIN EFFECTS

STATISTICAL ANALYSES: GENERAL LINEAR MODEL Table 5 Associations from General Linear Model analysis of each independent variable with dependent variable, consumer intention R2 (adj.) df β SE β P F Model 1. Environmental 63.79% 1 0.81 0.05 238.81 0.000** Concern – Consumer Intention Model 2. Self-estimated 14.51% 1 0.38 0.08 0.000** 23.92 Knowledge – Consumer Intention Model 3. Risk Perception 47.00% 1 0.96 0.09 120.71 0.000** – Consumer Intention Note. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.001

Table 6

INTERACTIONS (MODERATORS)

General Linear Model analyses to test for interaction independent variables and consumer intention Models R2 R2 (adj.) df Model 1 67.14% 66.39% Environmental Concern 1 Education Level 1 Environmental 1 Concern*Education Level

effects on associations between the β

SE β

0.73 1.08 -0.16

0.06 0.33 0.06

F

p

169.80 0.000** 10.66 0.001* 8.66 0.004*

Model 2 No significant interactions were found Model 3 51.84% 50.75% Risk Perception 1 0.77 0.10 Education Level 1 1.20 0.37 Risk 1 -0.30 0.10 Perception*Education Level Note. Education level encoded as -1 (low education), +1 (high education) *p < 0.05, **p < 0.001

By conducting a public survey in Indore, India, this research attempted to understand whether consumers would support environmentally-friendly pharmaceuticals. Statistical analyses indicate that environmental concern, self-estimated knowledge, and risk perception are each positively correlated with consumer intention. Results show that most people demonstrate environmentally-friendly consumer intention, and environmental concern has been found to be its strongest indicator of consumer intention.

58.41 10.65 8.54

0.000** 0.001* 0.004*

KEY CONTRIBUTIONS 1. Relationship between environmental concern and pro-environmental behavior, attitudes, or behavior intention

2. Associations between environmental knowledge and behavior or behavior intention

3. Risk perception studies

4. Relationship between behavior intention and the actual behavior


AURA: Final Exhibition of Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Work

Prototypes Luminaire

Packaging


COURSE SUMMARY: DESIGN IMMERSION[S] In the three-week studio session, students learnt how designers think, solve problems, and improve our world. The course enabled a better understanding of design principles and their application to definitive fields in a way to creatively solve problems. The process involved conceptualization of an abstract value of the student’s identity, and developing a luminaire to express that value. Further, they developed a logo, branding, and packaging for their luminaire. All the luminaires were collectively exhibted at the end of the session. Earth Art

Contributions: • created and edited course syllabus and structure • presented opening lecture “Design Inspiration from Nature: Andy Goldsworthy” • conducted small-group crit sessions • managed logistics of each session, including grading and updating online platform

Restricted abilities to understand universal design

Egg Drop Challenge

Crit session

Design Disciplines Introduced:

Skills Developed:

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

graphic design universal design product design interior design architecture appreciation exhibit design

Guest lecture and tour

rapid prototyping 3-d modeling sketching and visual representation design conceptualization universal design principles sustainability concepts


sg2247@cornell.edu | sukruti.gupta@gmail.com | +1-607-280-0643

Portfolio  

a selection of works in architecture, design, and environmental sustainability

Portfolio  

a selection of works in architecture, design, and environmental sustainability

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