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State Aviation Journal Issue #15

March/April 2012

2012 Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium Snapshot: Stephen Summers New Mexico Aviation Director

WAI Conference 2012 Phoenix Hosts 21st International Aviation Symposium

Chambliss Wows Colorado Business Aviation March/April 2012 State Aviation Leaders Journal Page 1


Contents From the Publisher

UNO Aviation Institute Honors Hoot Gibson with Shea Award

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Snapshot: Stephen Summers, New Mexico Aviation Director

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Phoenix Hosts 21st Annual International Aviation Symposium

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Aviation Green™ Alliance Continuing Lindbergh’s Vision

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Women in Aviation International Expressions Visiting the Udvar-Hazy Center

Maria Muia “Aha moments,” with the Former Indiana Director

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FedEx Leadership Institute Leadership and the Generations

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Bring Your Daughter To the Conference Day

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Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium Texas Commercial Airports Association

P-38 Pilot Creates Monumental Sculpture

Kirby Chambliss Wows Colorado Aviation Business Leaders

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Colorado Aviation Business Association Elects Leadership Page 14 Page 2

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Jay B. Lingquist Elected to North Dakota Aviation Hall of Fame

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Symposium Presents Divirse Lineup

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Bill Hamilton Receives Outstanding Service Award

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Airports in Spotlight at Symposium

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North Dakota Warbird Pilots

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March/April 2012


On The Cover

Coming this Summer!

AVED Journal

Photo By: Jay Beckman / Crosswind Images.

Kirby Chambliss puts in full right rudder entering a flat turn at EAA AirVenture 2011 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Jay Beckman is a Chandler, Arizonabased freelance photographer specializing in aviation subjects. Visit www.crosswindimages.com for more of Jay’s work. Publisher/Editor/ Copy Editor Graphic Design/ Layout Design/ Photography/

Advertising Director Contributing Writers

Kim J. Stevens Claire Stern Andrew Stevens Kim Stevens Kim Stevens Shahn Sederberg Kenn Potts Chris Bildilli Andrew Stevens Gary Ness Lara Jackson Andrea Brennan Scott Malta Penny Hamilton Claire Stern

Preview Issue Available Now! at www.avedjournal.com Subscribe Today! Covering aviation education across the nation in the states, federal government, schools, aviation organizations and business. Brought to you by the staff of the State Aviation Journal. March/April 2012

State Aviation Journal

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From the Publisher

Social Media For someone that loves creativity and new and marvelous technology, I sure have stepped slowly into the world of social media. In fact, if not for my son Andrew, my wife Deb and a few savvy friends, I’d still be using a rotary dial phone and licking stamps. I reacted the same way when digital photography came on the scene. At least I’ve recognized the error of my ways and have adapted. You don’t need me to tell you that Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and others have revolutionized the way we communicate, personally and in business. What surprises me the most is how effective a tool they have become for the State Aviation Journal. Our outreach has tripled since I’ve embraced social media. I still don’t know how it works, but have learned to trust that it does. For me its kind of like being a pilot. I’ve never been very good at understanding the inner workings of a Lycoming or Continental but I know if I push this button, tweak this dial, adjust this lever or flip this switch, I continue to hear the smooth purr that gives me confidence that I will get to my destination. Same with social media; I enter this, click that, and true to form, good things continue to happen, the engine of the internet runs smoothly and my message is transported around the globe. The misnomer though is that this makes everything easier. Contraire, contraire! My work load has increased proportionately too! New contacts, new resources, new opportunities. This is a good thing, I just wasn’t prepared for it. I’ve made my share of mistakes as I started this business. I’ve been blessed that I’ve been able to learn from those mistakes and that you, the reader and advertiser, have been incredibly patient with me as I stumble around. I have great plans for the future of this publication and sister publications, the Arizona Aviation Journal and AVED Journal and it doesn’t stop there. The digital world along with social media have allowed me to accomplish much. I just hope that I’m quicker to embrace and do a better job of planning for the next cutting edge breakthrough in technology. Better yet, I think I’ll just turn that part of the business over to my son and let him deal with all of this. I’m going to go play tennis.

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State Aviation Journal

March/April 2012


Subscribe To Weekly Skybrief

Visit StateAviationJournal.com and click on subscribe in the upper right hand corner for a complimentary weekly newsletter!

March/April 2012

State Aviation Journal

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Visiting the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center

Like a Kid in a Candy Store

Expressions

Scott Malta, a contributing writer to SAJ is the current president of SWAAAE and manager at Castle Airport in California.

By Scott Malta I am an aerospace fanatic! I love airplanes and spacecraft. A child of the Apollo Era, I’ve been building and flying model aircraft all my life. I’m a private pilot and have over 2300 hours in Air Force aerial refueling tankers… I really love airplanes. During a recent visit to Washington, D.C., I made my pilgrimage to the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum (NASM) annex at Washington Dulles International Airport. I was in awe, like a kid in a candy store as I surveyed all the eye candy on display there. They have beautifully displayed Continued on page 32.

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Maria Muia

Brings a Unique Blend of Knowledge to Aviation Planning By Kim Stevens For Maria Muia, a former state aviation director for Indiana, life can sometimes be about those “aha moments.” Whether it is hers, a client’s, or a student’s, Muia says it’s the point when the light bulb goes on and suddenly the issue at hand has clarity. “That transition from not understanding to suddenly getting it comes with a unique sense of satisfaction,” said Muia, a Senior Aviation Planner for Woolpert. “For me, this can come from finally figuring out the best way to lay out needed facilities on a space-restricted airport without infringing on any of the protected surfaces, or from determining why aviation activity is going down at an airport when socioeconomic indicators are going up.” It’s a whole different sense of satisfaction when this aha moment happens for someone else and Muia has had a hand in it. Watching a student learn to think critically is immensely rewarding for her. “I enjoy helping a student learn to contest existing boundaries and what they have been taught to be true in text books,” said Muia. “Once a mind learns how to move beyond the boundaries that life has constructed for it, whether they be personal or work related, real change can happen! It’s a great process to expeMuia in California. rience or to watch.” Muia’s experience as a former state aviation director Page 8

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Maria Muia - Sometimes life can be about those “aha moments.”

has helped in her current planning role with Woolpert. “I feel like I’m actually able to see things from two important perspectives now,” said Muia. “The micro, which would be the airport, and the macro, which would be the state.” Really understanding how a project request is going to be reviewed and judged helps Muia to better formulate the correct strategy for documenting the need and justification for it. “I’m also now working on a state aviation system plan and my time in state aviation certainly adds a tremendous amount of insight into that process as well.” Having been on the consultant track for about nine years now, Muia says it’s certainly different from her time at the state. Before, she used to guide and review airport plans, now she develops them. “Mostly my time is spent on airport master plans, environmental assessments and other

March/April 2012


planning projects, but I am also working on an Airport Cooperative Research Program project,” said Muia. While most of her work is in Indiana, she has crossed the boarder a number of times and enjoys gaining new perspectives from those experiences. Although she values her state aviation experience, Muia hasn’t maintained contact with her fellow state aviation directors or the National Association of State Aviation Officials. (NASAO) “It was a long time ago when I was in NASAO,” said Muia. “I was one of the only women in the group.” Muia acknowledged it wasn’t the easiest fit at times, but said there were a handful of really great guys who took her under their wing and made her feel like part of the group. “Even though I don’t see those guys now, I will always remember them with great fondness.” Meeting and working with people in aviation is a great motivator for Muia who says she consistently meets the most interesting and truly enjoyable people in this field. “Aviation has a really great fan base: they are loyal, they love the game and they have great stories that they love to share,” said Muia. “So many times when I meet someone new, at some point in the conversation, we always realize we have some connection.” Muia refers to Kevin Bacon’s six degrees of separation where Bacon can be linked to any other actor through an average of six actors. “In the airport world, I think it is more like two or three degrees of separation. I just met a guy whose wife knew the gal that was my first hire at INDOT some 20 years ago!” And once you find that connection, according to Muia, it’s like you are old friends and have this whole new thing to talk about. “It’s really fun.” Growing up, her greatest aviation influence was her family. “I really had no choice in the matter,” said Muia. “My pop bought a 1956 straight tailed Cessna 172 and taught my brothers and I to fly on a grass strip between two cornfields.” She was 15 when she first started taking flying lessons, and according to Muia, only did it to impress her friends. “To be perfectly honest with you, people thought it was cool so I kept doing it.” Eventually, she earned her private pilot certificate and instrument rating, but had no desire to follow in her father’s footsteps into the airlines.

Muia with her Goddauther Samantha, and golden-doodle Baxter. The photo was taken last year at Tukerman Ravine in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Another family influence was her brother Frank, who was two years older and attended Indiana State University. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do and he told me about this degree in aviation administration that I could get, so off to Terre Haute I went to become a Sycamore.” Muia said her brother Frank really had an important and enduring impact on her, whether he intended to or not. In his life, he guided her career choice and profession; and in his death, he has guided her values. “Losing him made me see life differently, and while I miss him dearly, his early departure gave me a perspective I probably never would have had otherwise,” said Muia. “Next to my mother, he did, and still does, influence me the most.” During Muia’s twenty plus years of experience she has accomplished many things including a Ph.D. in Management and over a thousand hours in the air. But there are still things she has yet to check-off. “I’d really like to complete an environmental assessment with a “purpose

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Muia Continued from previous page.

and need statement” that the FAA didn’t edit! “But seriously,” said Muia, “I want to go on a road trip to Maine with my mom. That’s where she grew up. I’m talking a real road trip in a van with the dog and no GPS,” said Muia. “Where you map it out by hand on the Rand McNally and you stop at every interesting place along the way and take pictures that you later can’t remember why you took.” In graduate school, the chair of Muia’s dissertation committee said, “Maria, life is short, but it’s wide. Fill it up.” “You know how you have warning signs on your rearview mirror,” reflected Muia. “Well, we should have them on our calendars that say ‘Warning! Dates are closer than they appear.’ My professor was right, fill it up now because life is too short to fill up later.” Woolpert planner, Maria Muia.

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Texas Commercial Airports Form Association to Create Better Lobbying Effort By Kent Penney The commercial passenger service airports in Texas announced the establishment of a new organization, the Texas Commercial Airports Association (TCAA). Discussions about having an association began this past summer as airports witnessed little progress in a Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization which at that time was on its 21st short term extension over four years. Issues like the FAA reauthorization were items the airports felt they would fare better working as a group to influence representatives from Texas, rather than as individuals. A similar association was created with the California Airports Council (CAC) in 2007. Julian Potter, an individual involved in the establishment of CAC, and currently with San Francisco International Airport, was asked to speak to an initial group of interested airports in July 2011. She outlined the structure and accomplishments of the CAC to date. The CAC was instrumental in dealing with state issues such as rental car fees as well as presenting the airports perspective on national issues such as the Passenger Bill of Rights. Julian stated, “the CAC has become a single point of contact for state officials on any issues which might affect commercial airports.” The TCAA plans to have a similar impact on airport issues in Texas. “By coming together as an organization, the passenger airports in Texas can speak through one clear, strong voice,” said Mario Diaz, Director of the Houston Airports System and TCAA Chairman. “Collectively, we believe we have greater influence than any one of our airports can have individually.” There are 27 commercial airports in Texas serving 135 million passengers annually. These include the large hubs of Dallas/Fort Worth International and George Bush Intercontinental in Houston, as well as other commercial airports throughout Texas such as Abilene, Amarillo, Col-

lege Station, Killeen, McAllen, Tyler and Waco. ‘Commercial Airport’ is the term used by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to distinguish airports with scheduled airline passenger service from other airports referred to as ‘General Aviation’ by the FAA. Commercial airports are the most visible element of aviation to the general public and commercial aviation is an area in which legislators often work with from a public policy standpoint. “Commercial airports drive growth and job creation in diverse segments of our state, national and international economies,” said David Cain, Executive Director of TCAA and a former state senator. “Now with the creation of TCAA, Texas commercial airports will be able to leverage their resources to maximize that growth.” The members of TCAA see a multitude of avenues that the organization can work in. The group will start with a website (www.texas-airports.com) to keep members connected with issues. A trip to Washington D.C. is also planned to provide the state’s congressional delegation a general introduction to TCAA. The organization also plans to establish several subcommittees/task groups to aid David Cain in tackling the variety of issues that commercial airports face such as security, safety and infrastructure funding. There are other areas besides legislation that the group plans to work in. Two key examples are expanding international destinations from major hubs at DFW and Bush Intercontinental. These international connections depend upon feed from all the airports in the region and their cu-

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Continued from previous page.

mulative passengers. There are businesses located across the state that can benefit from international destinations and through the TCAA the airports expect to work together collectively to meet these needs. The second example is the handling of irregular operations like weather. In the event certain airports are experiencing weather, there are often diversions. With the airports coordinating together they can plan ahead and provide the support those diverted passengers require as they are delayed until they reach their final destinations. As noted before, the commercial airports are the most visible to the general public, but the airport community

clearly recognizes that there are uses of aviation beyond just scheduled airline passengers. This area commonly known as General Aviation is not forgotten by TCAA. Another association, the Texas Airports Council (TAC), will continue with a primary focus Mario Diaz on general aviation airports in Texas. There are 265 general aviation airports in the state and the TAC will hold an ex-officio seat on the TCAA board as a means of coordinating efforts that are of mutual interest to commercial and general aviation airports.

Colorado World War II P-38 Pilot Creates Monumental Sculpture By Penny Rafferty Hamilton Lifelong artist, Fredric Arnold, at age 90, is passionate about a monumental bronze sculpture called Lest We Forget which he is dedicating to the WWII comrades of his original P-38 42-J group of 14 fighter pilots, who flew in North Africa with him. “At my age, I don’t even buy green bananas. Therefore, I am looking for help to get this important project done as soon as possible,” Arnold quipped. “We promised each other that the last one to survive would find a way to pay homage to the others. Well, today, I am the last guy standing. I am determined to fulfill my commitment to honor their memory,” he said at the recent Colorado Aviation Business Association (CABA) annual meeting which featured Arnold and his wife, Natalie, at an informational booth. In addition to being a decorated WWII P-38 combat fighter pilot with 50 combat missions in the North African theater, Arnold test flew America’s first jet, wrote and illustrated the official flight manuals for the P-38, P-47, P-51 and P-80. He is also the author of the best selling Page 12

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book, Doorknob Five Two, which puts the reader in the P-38 combat cockpit. As the creator and sculptor of Lest We Forget, Arnold faithfully depicts 12 life-sized fighter pilots in bronze during a mission briefing. The ‘spirits’ of aviators already lost in action are created in white, looking over the shoulders of those combat pilots at the briefing. The full-sized sculpture will measure 22 feet wide by 20 feet deep. Visitors could sit on the bench among the pilots while hearing an audio reenactment of an actual WWII aviation mission briefing. Although Fredic Arnold is a healthy and energetic visionary artist today, his project needs support now. The complete story with photographs and descriptions of a table-top version of Lest We Forget and other ways to help are at www.LestWeForgetSculpture.com.

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Red Bull Aerobatic pilot, Kirby Chambliss, is intense and focused when performing. (Courtesy Photo) Inset - Red Bull Mini-Cooper Team greeted Colorado Aviation Business Association (CABA) members and guests with free cans of Red Bull at Rocky Mountain Metro Airport-BJC recently. (Photo Penny Rafferty Hamilton)

Chambliss Wows Colorado Aviation Business Leaders By Penny Rafferty Hamilton Wunderkind Kirby Chambliss, five-time U.S. National Aerobatic Champion and two-time Red Bull Air Race World Champ, wowed the enthusiastic crowd of aviation leaders at the recent Colorado Aviation Business Association (CABA) annual meeting held at Rocky Mountain Metro Airport-BJC in Broomfield. Opening his program with a video of “death-defying” aerobatic flying which had the crowd gasping, Chambliss then shared his story and love of aviation with the packed room of eager aviation enthusiasts. “I always knew aviation was in my heart because at age two I was focused on toy airplanes. Zooming and swooping them through the imaginary sky. “At age 13, I helped my father build an airplane. Later, I became a ‘line boy’ at the airport and then worked in baggage service to have money to build hours to fly. But age 21, I was a corporate pilot in a Cessna Citation,” Kirby said. Chambliss became the youngest commercial airline pilot at age 24. By the time he made captain at age 28, he was already looking at commercial flying as a “day job” to pay

for his passion of aerobatic flying. Asked by an audience member if he has had any close calls, Kirby smiled, looked at his pilot watch and joked, “do you have several hours?” He went on to say, “You live and you learn, or you die and you don’t. I train constantly. There is no substitute for practice.” According to teamchambliss.com, Kirby is intense when he climbs into the cockpit of his beloved Zivko Edge 540. He is aggressive and has learned to go all out to win. Chambliss loathes second place, regarding it as “first loser.” He also feels the need to share the important message that aviation is also a business tool and not just an “extreme sport.” He flew his Piper Meridian to the Colorado event from his Arizona ranch and training base. He pointed to it out of the window from the meeting room on the tarmac in the fading daylight. He encouraged pilots in the audience and corporate leaders to incorporate “upset training” and even an aerobatic course into proficiency training. “I flew in 27 events last year to promote the sport of extreme aviation as part of Red Bull’s Team. Flying is a passion and a career which should be encouraged,” concluded Kirby Chambliss.

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Colorado Aviation Business Association Elects Leadership By Penny Rafferty Hamilton Colorado Aviation Business Association (CABA) is focused on its mission to promote aviation and related business throughout Colorado. The awesome power of any business group is to work in partnership to foster a healthy business environment and reach out to the public about the importance of aviation activities in Colorado. CABA members elected their all-volunteer Board at their wellThe CABA Aviation Saves Event held at Centennial Airport in June 2011 offered an array of informationattended March 2012 annual meet- al booths to the aviation community. Learn more about 2012 events planned at www.mycaba.org (Photo ing held at Rocky Mountain Metro Penny Rafferty Hamilton) Airport-BJC. Brittany Davies will serve as Board Chair. programs include an NBAA tax seminar is scheduled for As a Colorado home-grown aviation professional and May 4. Keep up with all the CABA news and events at graduate of Metropolitan State College with a degree in www.mycaba.org aviation technology, she is eager to continue the important annual Aviation Saves Event to be held at Centennial Airport-APA later this year. CABA will again work with the Governor’s office on a proclamation and other important educational efforts highlighting aviation business contributions to the general public. “We want to continue the partnerships CABA successfully developed in the past with organizations such as the Wings over the Rockies, college aviation organizations, Boy Scouts and the VFW,” shared Davies. “We want to offer our members forums and educational programs. We are very eager to see a group such as the Colorado General Aviation Alliance begin to form which will bring state aviation organizations and other industry groups together.” Together with other CABA leaders, Craig Fitzsimmons, Malachi O’Neill, Brian Moss, Kenneth Kline, Iver Retrum, Gene Langfeldt and Chris Swathwood, corporate aviation throughout the state is represented. Upcoming Page 14

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Ray Bennett of Hawker Beechcraft Corp., left, with Robert “Hoot” Gibson.

UNO Aviation Institute

Gibson took this photograph of Bruce McCandless II during the first untethered spacewalk.

Hoot Gibson Presented with William F. Shea Award by Jim Brazda (Midlands Business Journal) Robert “Hoot” Gibson has flown them all — from F-4 Phantoms and F-14 Tomcats in the Navy to NASA space shuttles and airline jetliners. He’s accumulated more than 14,000 hours of flight time in more than 130 types of aircraft. He is an icon in the world of aviation, said William “Bill” Shea, founding director of the University of Ne-

Ronnie Mitchell, director of the Nebraska Department of Aeronautics, left, chats with Kevin Nichols of ConAgra.

braska at Omaha Aviation Institute (UNO). “In my book, he’s one of the top living legends in aviation in the world,” Shea said. The UNO Aviation Institute awarded Gibson the William F. Shea Award for his contributions to aviation. The ceremony was held April 3 at the Strategic Air and Space Museum during the 2012 Charles Durham Distinguished Guest Lecture, which Gibson delivered. Continued on next page.

Becky Lutte, UNO Aviation Institute faculty member, and Bill Shea.

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Hoot Gibson Continued from previous page.

After college, Gibson enlisted in the U.S. Navy, where he flew combat missions in southeast Asia. During that time he made more than 300 carrier landings and graduated from the Navy’s Fighter Weapon School, better known as Top Gun. In 1978 he was selected as a NASA astronaut in the first space shuttle program. Over the next 18 years he flew five space flights, accumulating 36 Robert Gibson, at right, meets Cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov in space after first docking with days in space. space station MIR. Getting to orbital speed (17,500 mph) in just 500 seconds is, “really an exciting ride,” Gibson Shea said. said. The social and economic impact of aviation is poised to During his first mission the crew conducted the world’s grow as markets in the Pacific Rim and South America first untethered spacewalk. As the pilot, he didn’t have expand, he said. much to do during the spacewalk, so he grabbed his “It’s an incredible time to be in aviation because we are camera and began snapping some of NASA’s most iconic going to see an incredible transformation of the industry,” photos. Shea said. He also piloted the first space shuttle docking with the The above article was reprinted with permission from the MIR Space Station. The process had him lining up two Midlands Business Journal, Omaha, Nebraska. 4-foot, circular doors, which were both moving at 17,500 mph. “They said I could be sloppy,” Gibson said. “I just had to line it up within two inches. And no pressure, but there will be five million people watching you.” After a successful dock, Gibson was photographed shaking hands with a Russian cosmonaut. “The president announced that this handshake ended the cold war,” Gibson said. “So now you know who ended the cold war.” Since retiring from NASA, Gibson flew with Southwest Airlines and as an air race pilot in the Reno National Championship Air Races. The aviation institute has come a long way in 23 years, said founding director Bill Shea. Graduates are making a global impact in positions around the country, he said. “With new developments in aviation and the new satellite avionics control system, we’re going to have an even Scott Vlasek, interim director of the UNO Aviation Institute. greater need for more graduates of the aviation program,” Page 16

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New Mexico

Snapshot

Education Important for New Aviation Director By Kim Stevens

mers. “We just hired an Education and Safety AdminWith only five months in the position, Stephen Summers, istrator and his mission will be to initiate programs and presentations in the school system in an effort to spark a life-long native of New Mexico, is still in the learning interest in aviation career fields.” curve. But with his past experiSummers first became interested ence in the aviation and airport in aviation as a child. “I can still industry, he hasn’t missed a beat remember the first time I saw a Bellas he embraces his current role 47 fly over when I was around six or as Aviation Division Director for seven years old and that ended up as the New Mexico Department of a driving force within me to pursue Transportation. “With my past a career in aviation.” It took him experience you deal with the surawhile to get there but he has always prises as they occur,” said Sumbelieved that if you want something mers. “Instead of one airport, bad enough and are willing to work I’m looking at all of them across hard and stay focused you can get it the state.” accomplished. “Luckily I was given Born in Santa Fe, Summers the opportunity from an overall great grew up in Taos and Las Vegas, pilot that allowed me to pursue my NM. He graduated from New dream.” Mexico Highlands University Prior to becoming a state aviation with a BA in accounting/busidirector, Summers has had some ness administration. Summers Stephen Summers. exposure to the National Association has worked in aviation, accountof State Aviation Officials (NASAO). ing and municipal government in “I was able to volunteer to help in the NASAO tent at New Mexico for a combined time of over 30 years. Most recently, Summers served for over 17 years as Director of Oshkosh for a number of years and had the pleasure of meeting a number of state directors and of course Henry Clovis Municipal Airport, where he secured $19 million O[grodzinski]. NASAO is an invaluable resource and in grants for airport improvement projects and services. Summers sees his current position as a great opportunity Henry’s leadership is second to none.” Summers served as president of the New Mexico Airport to promote aviation statewide in a number of different Managers’ Association for two terms and served on the facets. “New Mexico is a vast state with a diversity of needs and challenges from both the physical flying side to Board numerous years. He was named Airport Manager of the Year in 2007. In that same year Clovis Municipal the aspect of funding the needed infrastructure improveAirport was named FAA Airport of the Year. Summers ments.” According to Summers the number one goal is is a member of the New Mexico Municipal League, the to maximize the funding sources for capital improvement American Association of Airport Executives and AOPA projects. Another goal is the re-introduction of an educa(Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association). Licenses intion program. “I find it alarming the lack of new student clude commercial helicopter and private fixed wing. pilots and interest in other areas of aviation,” said SumMarch/April 2012

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Airline industry panel, from left, Scott McCartney, moderator, Wall Street Journal, Nicholas Calio, President & CEO, Airlines for America, Captain Lee Moak, President, Air Line Pilots Association, Bradford Rich, President, SkyWest, Inc., and Will Ris, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs for AMR Corp. & American Airlines.

Phoenix Hosts 21st Annual International Aviation Symposium By Kim Stevens Billed as the most exclusive gathering in the industry, the city of Phoenix and Sky Harbor International Airport hosted the 21st Annual International Aviation Symposium at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix, Arizona. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton was on hand to welcome attendees from around the globe to Phoenix. Over 120 pre-registered for the three-day event to hear or participate in sessions ranging from airline and airport strategy to airline loyalty programs and ancillary revenue. “This event is very important to our Phoenix mayor and city council as it showcases our city as the home of Phoenix Sky Harbor, one of the busiest airports in the United Sates,” said Danny Murphy, Phoenix Aviation Director. “They come to Phoenix to discuss Captain Lee Moak, ALPA, left and the most pressing is- Krishna (Kris) Urs, U.S. Dept. of State. sues of the aviation industry, and we’re proud to have that happen right here.” Randy Babbitt, former FAA Administrator was on hand to deliver the keynote luncheon address during day Page 18

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two and joked that the audience was getting “Babbitt Unplugged.” The former FAA head was given a standing ovation after his talk which was, in his own words, unrestrained from the typical political strings you might expect from a federal agency head. However, Babbitt didn’t stray too far in his talk which briefly touched on NextGen, airports, system infrastructure, equipage and funding. Babbitt acknowledged passage of the new FAA four-year authorization bill but did say that he may be the only administrator whose term saw nothing but continuing resolutions. The symposium agenda also included sessions on airline customers, airline finance and network issues, open skies, cross-border combinations and mergers. An executive panel made up of Doug Parker, Chairman and CEO of US Airways Group, Willie Walsh, CEO of International Airlines Group, Dave Cush, President and CEO with Virgin America and Ben Baldanza, President and CEO of Spirit Airlines, wrapped up the symposium with a discussion on the topic of progress and challenges in the airline industry. The global aviation market is fiercely competitive, and according to Mayor Stanton, Sky Harbor is one of the most competitive airports in the nation when it comes to costs and services. Deborah Ostreicher, Deputy Aviation Director said the Phoenix International Aviation Symposium gives them the opportunity to meet with many airlines from around the country and around the world in Phoenix. “By being here, they see all that we have to offer as a premier airport.”

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Will Ris, AMR Corp. and American Airlines, left and Randy Babbitt, former FAA Administrator.

Deborah Ostreicher, Deputy Aviation Director, Sky Harbor, left and Thelma Munoz, Marketing with Aeromexico.

Jim Barry, Passur Aerospace and Catherine Mayer, VP of SITA, Inc.

James Kineen, US Airways, left and Jay Shabat, Publisher, Airline Weekly.

Nicolas Rhoads, Aeromexico, left and Andrew Watterson, Hawaiian Airlines.

New this year, program information was available to attendees through a mobile-friendly Sympo- Peter Walsh, MTE Business Head for Oliver sium website. Wyman.

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WAI

FedEx Leadership Institute

Leadership and the Generations: Knowing How to Connect By Kent Penney “It is all about knowing how to connect, because you can connect with everyone” stated Jimmy Daniel, co presenter from the FedEx Leadership Institute. We operate in workplaces with four generations and the ‘Leadership and the Generations’ session provided the framework for attendees to understand these generations. Just like different children raised in the same home behave differently, these generations exhibit even greater differences in their expectations, motivations, attitudes and behaviors. Jimmy Daniel and James Sneed, both with the FedEx Leadership Institute, provided practical insight to the 23rd Annual Women in Aviation International Conference attendees in Dallas, TX. Daniels led by saying, “I understand the attention to detail and the technical expertise that goes into being a pilot but when we talk leadership we have to shift gears and understand leadership is an art and most leadership will take place in gray areas.” “One of the models for FedEx is servant leadership,” said Sneed. The presentation was based on this leadership mind set. Sneed and Daniel outlined the different perspectives and interest among these four generations. The first of these generations, the Traditionalists/Veterans who were born between 1922 and 1945 are ones who have functioned with the motto of ‘work hard then play.’ They are loyal, like tradition, expect respect and honor, and seek to leave a legacy. The second of these generations are the Baby Boomers born between 1946 and 1964 and distinguished themselves from the Traditionalist by asking ‘why’ and like to be involved in decision making. The baby boomers enjoy teamwork, seeing progress and like a little feedback but not too much. Page 20

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The third of these generations are known as Gen X and were born between 1965 and 1982. Gen X operates with a motto of ‘life first, work second’ and seek a work/life balance. They will often change jobs to gain promotion and like to have room to challenge the status quo. The most recent of these generations are known as Mil-

Driving Values of Each Generation

Traditionalist: Respect and Sacrifice Baby Boomers: Status and Workaholic Generation X: Self Branding and Flexibility Generation Y: Collaboration/Innovation lennials/Gen Y and were born between 1983 and 1999. The millennials take Gen X one step further and see work as a part of lifestyle. They have empathy, value community and knowledge and enjoy the opportunity to use technology. Daniel reminded attendees that, “It makes a great workplace when people are not all like you.” “There are benefits to understanding the generations,” outlined Sneed, “which include more effective communication, increased recruitment, better employee retention and a deep level of trust among employees across generations.” Just when you think you know it all though, realize that the latest generation known as Gen 9/11 is on their way and will be entering the workforce over the next 10 years. Their expectations, motivations, attitudes and behaviors are again likely to be different than the previous four generations.

March/April 2012


WAI

New for this year’s conference was an outreach to girls called “Bring Your Daughter to the Conference Day.”

‘Bring Your Daughter to the Conference Day’

Local Girl Scouts Add to Conference Success By Kent Penney The Women in Aviation International Conference 2012 included a ‘Bring your Daughter to the Conference Day.’ There were 160 girls who participated ranging in age from 10 to 17, many of whom did not have parents with an aviation background. A large outreach was completed thanks to the area Girl Scouts. The girls attending took part in hands-on activities in the morning led by a variety of volunteers. The one-on-one activities delivered valuable exposure to aviation while also showing practical application of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) educaAWAM (Association for Women tion. There were five activin Aviation Maintenance) demonstrated the role of safety wiring. ity stations which could be used in a classroom or at an airport open house. The stations included: build an airport, aeronautical charts, safety wiring/bracelets, flight

simulator and air traffic control simulator. James Brough, FAA Aviation Education National Program Manager, helped to coordinate the event. “The activities they participated in were the tip of the iceberg of what teachers or airports can use in their own local event,” said Brough. The NASA Smart Skies program was used to introduce the girls to air traffic control. The simulation had them work two commercial aircraft to Modesto, California in the allotted time, keeping a three mile separation. The girls were able to adjust the route and the speed of the aircraft. “What we are really teaching is pre-algebraic abstract thought,” said Brough. The program is free with workbooks and answer keys and is aligned with all state standards. An app is called ‘Sector 33’ which is an actual sector from Oakland Air Traffic Control Center. The app will run the smart skies on an IPad or android platform. For more information you can visit www.smartskies.nasa. gov. Following lunch, the girls took to the exhibit hall floor on an active scavenger hunt. AWAM hid twenty different parts with exhibitors and the girls needed to find ten of them. The unique thing was the exhibitors with the parts were with companies that employed aviation maintenance

March/April 2012

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WAI

Daughter Continued from previous page.

technicians. This included not just maintenance shops but also airlines and corporate flight departments. The girls were also interviewing women employed in aviation, which included military aviators, airline pilots, mechanics, airport managers, helicopter pilots, and corporate pilots. They quizzed these aviation professionals about where they worked, what they liked about their job, their typical duties, what is the average salary and how they use math, science and technology in their work.

Girls built their own airports, learning the features of an airport as well as engineering, dimensions, ratios and even airport lighting and signage. Based on this activity the girls are able to understand more as they look out the porthole window the next time they travel on a plane.

Women in Aviation conference attendees helped teach girls map skills by using aeronautical charts. The girls also learned how to determine longitude and latitude. They learned to look at the DFW Metroplex from an aviation perspective, seeing things that they had never been aware of before that are right around them.

Girls were able to fly using Microsoft Flight Simulator with an aircraft yoke and throttle. The activity was structured to give them valuable experience rather than just playing around. While on Flight Simulator they followed the lesson for landing and learned with the aid of volunteers to adjust their aircraft accordingly to bring it in safely. This provided the girls an exposure to physics learning about how to adjust pitch and power for landing.

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Kent Penney and his daughter Brianna covered Women in Aviation Internation for the State Aviation Journal in Dallas, TX last month. Brianna took all of the photos.

March/April 2012


Aviation Green Alliance

Continuing Lindberghs’ Vision to Balance Tech and Nature By Lara Jackson Over the past decade, the aviation industry and those industries and companies closely associated with aviation have started to realize the impact their actions have on the environment. As stated on the Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh Foundation’s Web site (www. lindberghfoundation.org), “…aviation continues to make inestimable contributions to the quality of all life. Nonetheless, aviation – its industry, corporate operators and individuals alike – is coming under intense governmental and media scrutiny.” Founded in 1977 in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s transatlantic flight, the Lindbergh Foundation was established by those instrumental in the advancement of aviation including General James H. Doolittle, Astronaut Neil Armstrong and longtime close friend of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, James D. Newton. The intent of the Foundation is to “…honor the Lindbergh’s pioneering contributions in aviation, exploration, conservation, sciences and the humanities…The Foundation seeks to support present and future generations in working toward such a balance, that we may ‘discern nature’s essential wisdom and combine it with our scientific knowledge’ [Charles A. Lindbergh] and ‘balance power over life with reverence for life’ [Anne Morrow Lindbergh].”

ing additional work in the discovery and the incubation of new technologies that address aviation’s environmental issues. • Recognizing member successes in addressing aviation’s environmental concerns. • Developing best practices for achieving measurable aviation-related conservation and sustainability initiatives. • Fostering educational efforts related to the progress of the industry’s successes in addressing aviation’s environmental footprint. “We (the Lindbergh Foundation) are still in the stages of building a membership, which we represent to a group of stakeholders with a broad interest in aviation,” explains Continued on next page.

Aviation Green Alliance The Aviation Green™ Alliance was formed by the Lindbergh Foundation in February 2011 “for members to share strategies, progress and ideas related to aviation’s environmental issues.” Key elements to the Alliance include: • Providing the most current and important aviationenvironmental news and information. • Funding research and development grants, encouragMarch/April 2012

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Green

Continued from previous page.

David Treinis, vice chairman at the Lindbergh Foundation. “The Aviation Green™ Alliance was founded so we could focus more on the efforts made in ‘green’ aviation. At first, we’re concentrating on building a representative group of stakeholders.” One of the pioneers in green aviation, FedEx, joined the the Aviation Green™ Alliance as a founding member. FedEx was presented the Lindbergh FoundaDavid Treinis, Vice Chairman, Lindbergh Foundation tion’s Corporate Award for Balance in 2010. and made operational improvements which the corporaAccording to FedEx Vice President, Environmental tion calls its “Reduce, Replace and Revolutionize” proAffairs and Sustainability Mitch Jackson, “When the gram, which basically means utilizing the right vehicle for Lindbergh Foundation awarded FedEx with the Corporate the correct application. Award for Balance, I wrote an article that quoted Charles The program states: Lindberg because it was appropriate for what the Founda- • Utilize routing efficiencies in order to reduce the numtion was focusing upon with their award: ‘Our ideals, laws ber of vehicles needed. and customs should be based on the proposition that each • See to downsize vehicles that travel more miles in orgeneration, in turn, becomes the custodian rather than the der to maximize fuel economy and reduce greenhouse absolute owner of our resources and each generation has gas emissions. the obligation to pass this inheritance on to the future.’ I • Seek fuel efficient and environmentally beneficial said at the time that we were honored, that was an undertechnologies, such as hybrid electric and electric vestatement. And that feeling remains. It was also one of the hicles, in order to maximize efficiencies – particularly reasons we decided to join the Lindbergh Foundation’s in heavily urbanized ares. Aviation Green™ Alliance as a founding member.” Jackson further explains the positive impact of these FedEx is an excellent example of the mission of the programs, “By the end of the fiscal year of 2011, aircraft the Aviation Green™ Alliance. According to Jackson, carbon dioxide declined by more than 13.5% compared “In 2008, FedEx became the first company in the U.S. to 2005 levels on an emissions/available-ton-mile basis. transportation industry to set a global aviation reduction And, FedEx has improved total fleet miles per gallon carbon dioxide goal, along with a commercial vehicle fuel within the US by more than 16% since 2005.” efficiency goal. This was important, as they are the two FedEx’s environmental policy has been in place since the biggest sources of emissions.” late 1990s and has resulted in plenty of firsts including: In order to reach these goals, FedEx has replaced aircraft First U.S. transportation logistics company to set a global Page 24

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March/April 2012


aviation reduction carbon dioxide goal; first transportation logistics company to push for commercial vehicle economy/greenhouse gas legislation and regulation; and first transportation logistics company to set a commercial vehicle fuel efficiency goal. Upon the announcement of FedEx’s membership with the Aviation Green™ Alliance, Jackson stated in a February 2012 press release, “FedEx strives to be an environmental leader in the transportation industry. … FedEx is excited to be a part of the Aviation Mitch Jackson Green™ Alliance and support the development of more innovation that will guide environmental stewardship in the industry.”

Sikorsky, Ballistic Recovery Systems, Join Aviation Green™ Alliance The Lindbergh Foundation announced that Sikorsky Innovations has become the first rotorcraft company to join the

Aviation Green™ Alliance as a Founding Member. Also joining the Alliance is Ballistic Recovery Systems, a designer, manufacturer and seller of exceptionally reliable, innovative and high quality safety and aerospace products. Sikorsky Innovations is Sikorsky Aircraft’s technology development organization, charged with tackling the toughest problems in vertical flight. Lindbergh Foundation Chairman and CEO Larry Williams said they were thrilled to have Sikorsky Innovations join their elite group of Aviation Green™ Alliance Founding Members. He feels that both Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh would be enormously proud to have such a presti-

Moving Forward

gious organization supporting this vital Foundation program.

In addition to building its membership, the Foundation’s David Treinis explained the Alliance is currently soliciting grant requests which “focus on the Lindbergh’s vision of balance between the advance of technology and preservation of the nature/human environment.” Grant categories include: agriculture, aviation/aerospace, conservation of animal resources education/intercultural communication, waste minimization and management. Additionally, forums will be held next year so attendees and Aviation Green™ Alliance members can exchange innovations and ideas concerning green aviation. Also, the Alliance is currently planning an international symposium for 2013. Even though it is still in the building stages, the Aviation Green™ Alliance plans to further the Lindbergh Foundation’s concern and balance of technology and the environment by furthering research and education of both areas.

dustry (including manufacturing, corporate operators and

Williams explained that in recent years, the aviation inindividuals) has come under intense pressure to address aviation emissions, noise, efficiency and other environmental concerns. To address these issues, the Lindbergh Foundation launched the Aviation Green™ Alliance to support and encourage those who are committed to proactively addressing aviation and environmental challenges.

March/April 2012

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UMAS

North Dakota

Lindquist Inducted into Aviation Hall of Fame By Penny Rafferty Hamilton Aviation leader, Jay B. Lindquist, was inducted into the North Dakota Aviation Hall of Fame at a gala awards banquet in Bismarck during the Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium held in early March. His first airplane ride at age 15 started his love affair with aviation. Even during studies at Dickinson State University, Lindquist returned to his hometown of Hettinger on weekends to share the joy of flight by instructing in his Cessna 150. In 1968, he founded Air Dakota Flite, an FBO and aerial spray company which operated up to 25 aircraft in Hettinger, Dickinson and Bismarck. This first-of-a-kind business in Adams County, served North Dakota farmers for more than 50 years with many of his family members joining the effort. Over the years, Lindquist performed weather modifications flights, flight instruction and served the region with critical air taxi and air ambulance services to rural communities. He was the Hettinger Community Airport Manager for 40 years and for five years was also Dickinson Airport Manager. As a volunteer, he donated time and expertise as a board member of the North Dakota Agricultural Association, North Dakota Aviation Association, North Dakota Aviation Council and Adams County Airport Authority. He was appointed by the Governor to the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission in 1993 on which he continues to serve. In 2010, Lindquist earned the FAA’s Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award for achieving 50 years of safe flight operations. He has given free airplane rides to Hettinger first graders for more than 35 years, now flying the children of children he introduced to the joy of flight over the years. In addition to contributions to aviation, criterion for induction into the Hall of Fame also includes significant contribution to the local community or the state of North Dakota. Lindquist was on the Board of Directors for HetPage 26

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Jay B. Lindquist and his wife of 42 years, Carol, enjoy his important Aviation Hall of Fame induction at the Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium Awards Banquet. (Courtesy photo Amy Taborsky)

tinger West River State Bank and also West River Health Services. He is an active member of the Chamber of Commerce, Civil Air Patrol, Hettinger Eagles and Dickinson Elks. He is a trustee of his church. His wife of 42 years, Carol, jokes, “He has never worked a day in his life!” A plaque describing some of the accomplishments of Jay B. Lindquist will soon be displayed in the North Dakota Aviation Hall of Fame, along with 35 previous inductees, at the Bismarck airport terminal.

March/April 2012


UMAS

Aviation Symposium Presents Diverse Line-up By Penny Rafferty Hamilton

Birgir (Biggi) Haraldsson, Director of Aviation of Northland Community & Technical College, shared information on the educational programs available at the Thief River Falls, MN, Aviation Campus. Aviation maintenance technology and unmanned aircraft systems including Associate in Applied Science Aviation Technology or Diploma programs are offered. Details at www.northlandaerospace.com (Photo Penny Rafferty Hamilton)

The North Dakota Aviation Council (NDAC) Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium (UMAS) recently held in Bismarck was one of the most successful in recent years. Even the weather was perfect for attendees to participate in a large offering of educational and aviation business management programs on varied topics as, paperless cockpit comparison of Garmin-IPad-Solid FX, airport lease requirements, aviation insurance, and airspace and UAV integration and many others. NDAC was founded in 1983 by six aviation organizations interested in promoting aviation and serving a “unified voice” in presenting their concerns before government officials and the general public. Described as the “Aviation Umbrella of Strength,” today the member organizations are now eight: Airport Association of North

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UMAS

Bill Hamilton Receives Outstanding Service Award

Maynard and Karen Herting, Jr. provided expert information on UAV technology from their Unmanned Application Institute (UAI), International booth at UMAS. The purpose of the Grand Forks UAI is to advance the UAS industry in North Dakota and in the region. Maynard is the Executive Director. Complete information is available at www.uaiinternational.com. (Photo Penny Rafferty Hamilton)

Symposium Continued form previous page. Dakota (AAND), North Dakota Agricultural Aviation Association (NDAAA), North Dakota Association of Aviation Museums (NDAAM), North Dakota Business Aviation Association (NDBAA), North Dakota Experimental Aircraft Association (NDEAA), North Dakota Flying Farmers (NDFF), North Dakota Pilots Association (NDPA), and North Dakota Professional Aviation Mechanics Association (NDPAMA). The annual event provides a forum for the exchange of information, ideas and experiences among pilots, mechanics, airport managers, FBOs, educators, aviation museums and non-profit aerospace leaders. Concurrent and plenary educational sessions, exhibit hall and industry luncheons and informal mixers as well as an “Awards and Hall of Fame Banquet” are packed into the three day conference. The next UMAS is already scheduled for March 3-5, 2013 at the Ramada Plaza Suites in Fargo. To be kept informed on that program, simply visit www.ndac.aero and click on the link for 2013 UMAS information and eventually on-line registration.

Robert Miller, left, Chairman of the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission, presents the first-ever Outstanding Service Award to Bill Hamilton in recognition of Bill’s 25 years of dedicated service to the General Aviation community of North Dakota. (Courtesy photo: Amy Taborsky)

“When the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission learned that AOPA’s Regional Representative Program was to be changed,” said North Dakota Aeronautics Commission member Dr. Kim Kenville, “we commissioners voted unanimously to recognize Bill Hamilton’s years of outstanding service to general aviation across North Dakota.” That decision resulted in the Commission’s first-ever Outstanding Service Award, according to Larry Taborsky, Aeronautics Director. Representing the full commission of Maurice Cook, Kim Kenville, Jay B. Kim Kenville Lindquist, and Cindy SchreiberBeck, Chairman Robert Miller presented this important recognition to Bill Hamilton at a well-attended plenary session on March 5, 2012 at the Upper Midwest Aviation Continued on next page.

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March/April 2012


UMAS delivered to the large UMAS crowd by Lt. Governor Drew Wrigley. The text reads: “Whereas, aviation plays an increasing role as an economic catalyst in North Dakota, creating 16,000 jobs and contributing $1.6 billion annually to the state’s economy; and Whereas, North Dakota’s aviation industry plays an important role in the state’s economic The staff and community supporters of Barnes County Municipal Airport at Valley development efforts, creating opportunities for City proudly display their “2011 General Aviation Airport of the Year Award” presented by the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission at the recent UMAS. Photo communities, businesses and citizens with 3,300 Penny Rafferty Hamilton. active pilots and 2,100 registered aircraft; and Whereas, airlines operating from North Dakota Governor Proclaims Aviation Week flew 1.7 million passengers on 74 daily flights in 2011; and Whereas, aviation impacts many sectors of our economy and state; last year, air travel tourism contributed $200 million to the state’s economy; 126 aerial applicators with By Penny Rafferty Hamilton 252 agricultural planes sprayed more than 4.9 million acres of crops; next day packages were delivered as a Governor Jack Dalrymple declared North Dakota Aviaresult of air delivery service, and emergency ambulance tion Week to coincide with the Upper Midwest Aviation

Airports in Spotlight at Aviation Symposium Symposium (UMAS). The good news was personally

Continued on next page.

Hamilton Continued from previous page.

Symposium (UMAS) in Bismarck. As Chairman Miller handed Bill the engraved plaque, Hamilton said, “I cannot accept this award for myself. I must also accept for my wife, Penny, who has been with me every step of the way during the almost 25 years of AOPA service to the highly-organized general aviation community of North Dakota. “Actually, this award brings us full circle because my first assignment from AOPA was to attend the Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium (UMAS) here in Bismarck. We have attended UMAS almost every year, whether held in Bismarck, Fargo, Grand Forks or Minot. One year, Penny was the banquet speaker. Another year, we won the

famous, legislative chili cook-off. “When we saw the North Dakota Aviation Council’s outstanding model of how to organize to support general aviation, we became like Johnny Appleseed, trying to plant the ‘North Dakota seed’ in other states in AOPA’s Central Region to grow their own versions of the North Dakota Aviation Council (NDAC) and also to produce an annual aviation symposium such as your highly successful UMAS. “We experienced various degrees of success in seven other states and all of those successes are a tribute to the high standard set by the NDAC, the UMAS, your Commission, the two great directors you have had and that of your devoted staff. I cannot thank you enough for this award and it is one we shall treasure always,” Hamilton concluded.

March/April 2012

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UMAS

Airports Continued from previous page.

flights were deployed throughout the state. Now, therefore, as Governor of the State of North Dakota, I do hereby proclaim March 4-10, 2012, AVIATION WEEK in the state of North Dakota.” North Dakota Airports were a central focus of the UMAS because scattered throughout the exhibit hall and conference rooms were easels of photographs of various airport landmarks and aerials of the “to-be-identified airports” as part of a contest. Kyle Wanner, North Dakota Aeronautics Commission Aviation Planner said, “We designed the ‘Name That Airport’ contest to promote discussion and communication among the participants.” Each registration packet contained a “test your knowledge/name the airport” contest sheet. Eight easels scattered throughout the conference were on display. For successfully identifying all the airports, aviator Jamie Bryn of Dazey won the $75 first prize. Earning $50 for second place was James Dwello of St. Hilaire, Minnesota. Ron Lundquist from Kindred took third place and $25. North Dakota has interesting airports. According to AOPA Pilot, February 2011 edition, International Peace Garden Airport in Dunseith has a border running through it. S28 is managed by the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission. Located exactly on the United States-Canada border with half in Canada and the other half in the U.S. American pilots usually park on the U.S. side and the Canadians land in North Dakota but taxi over to Canada. Not surprisingly the hamburger stand is on the U.S. side. Pilot Deon Vilhauer knows something about airport hamburgers. He was recognized at UMAS for visiting 88 of North Dakota’s 89 public-use airports as part of the tourism Passport-Create a Flying Legacy in North Dakota Program which encourages aviators to visit airports and earn stamps by visiting a particular amenity on the airport Page 30

State Aviation Journal

or in the community. For example, a pilot who flies in to Rolla-06D can visit the Rolla Municipal Golf Club. Turtle Lake-91N the passport stamp, is available at the terminal. Aviation passport stamps can later be redeemed for prizes including a polo shirt, flight bag and leather flying jacket. Fly into Barnes County Municipal Airport-6D8 in Valley City and you can view the recent 2011 General Aviation Airport of the Year Award for excellence in safety, airport improvements and community service. Larry Taborsky of the North Dakota Larry Taborsky Aeronautics Commission and Tim Thorsen, President of the Airport Association of North Dakota, presented this prestigious award at UMAS to Dennis Helland, Steve Nielson, Tim Logan and Lori Jury, who accepted on behalf of the Airport Authority and community. Representing his community, Dickinson Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport Manager Matt Remynse, accepted the 2011 Commercial Airport of the Year award. DIK provides important aviation services for western North Dakota, eastern Montana and northwest South Dakota, daily departures connect to worldwide locations.

March/April 2012


UMAS

According to Warren Pietsch, what began with Bismarck’s Dr. Henry Reichert’s P-51 Dakota Kid, grew into the journey of a lifetime with the partnership of the Dakota Territory Air Museum and the Texas Flying Legends Museum. B-25 Betty’s Dream, the P-40 Aleutian Tiger (above) and the Whistling Death FG-1D (top) enroute to Caribbean waters. (Courtesy Photo Texas Flying Legends Museum)

Warbird Pilots Share Adventure with Attendees By Penny Rafferty Hamilton North Dakota Warbird Pilots, Warren Pietsch, Tim McPherson and Casey Odegaard opened the Upper Midwest Aviation Symposium (UMAS) banquet program with a breath taking in-cockpit clip of exciting flying from their Texas Flying Legends Museum DVD Bucket Airshow St. Barths. The precision and exciting flying was performed flawlessly at the March 25 - 27, 2011 Caribbean resort which marked the 25th anniversary of the Bucket Regatta Yacht Race. The packed ballroom of aviation enthusiasts was ready for “the rest of the story.” Pietsch, McPherson and Odegaard explained the months of preparation required to put together a team of outstanding pilots to fly and maintain historic planes from World War II flying from the Dakota Territory Air Museum in Minot, in partnership with the Texas Flying Legends Museum at Ellington Field-EFC in Houston to the West Indies. Pietsch said, “Each plane had the same pilot the whole time so that any nuances of that plane would be under-

stood and in harmony with that pilot’s skills.” Pietsch is a born flyer. He soloed on his 16th birthday. In 1980, in his restored T-Craft, he joined his father and brother in performing air shows across the United States and Canada. He is an honorary Canadian Snowbird and the recipient of the Bill Barber Showmanship Award at Oshkosh. He also made time for a 20-year airline career flying Lockheed 1011, B-727s and 737s worldwide. He continues to operate the 60-year old aircraft restoration and repair service started by his father, Al, which is now called Minot Aero Center. McPherson, another experienced North Dakota restorer and pilot shared insider stories of the adventure. McPherson started Tall Towers Aviation near Page in 1980. Over 18 years he rebuilt a P-51 Mustang and finally finished in 2006. With over 21,000 hours of flight time and an A/P mechanic with an I/A authorization, McPherson provided insight into the challenges of long distance flight over water and into small airfields with few services. Television

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The space shuttle Enterprise has now been replaced by Discovery.

Udvar-Hazy Continued from page 6.

the Boeing – 80, the prototype for the Boeing 707 and KC-135 tankers I flew on, the B-29 Enola Gay, WWII German aircraft I’ve always been fascinated with – the Dornier 335 Arrow, Arado 234 Blitz jet-powered bomber, and ME-163 Komet rocket-powered fighter, to name but a

Warbirds Continued from previous page.

hero “MacGyver” would have been proud of the “Mr. Fixit” solutions McPherson and others improvised to keep the show in the air. Another team member has lots of time in the air. Casey Odegaard began flying P-51D Mustangs at age 21. Now only 27 years old, he has logged nearly 2,000 hours in everything from Aeronca Champs to Douglas DC-3. In addition to joining the Warbird Adventure team, he is working on a Goodyear F2G Super Corsair. When he is not flying to the West Indies he lives in Kindred. Other crew were Doug Rozendaal from Iowa. Hank Page 32

State Aviation Journal

few! By the time this article and photos are printed, they will have swapped the space shuttle Enterprise (which has been on display there) with the recently retired, space veteran Discovery. I was also particularly amazed to see the original, yet lovingly restored Langley Aerodrome on display. In a word, this museum is AWESOME! Continued on next page.

Reichert, Bob Odegaard and Chris Griffith. “Five of the six flight crew members were from North Dakota. North Dakota is full of aviation talent,” explained Pietsch. “We are proud of our pilots and mechanics and the partnership of the Dakota Territory Air Museum and the Texas Flying Museum. “The challenges involved in planning and flying this trip, along with the chance to work with such outstanding people, provided an opportunity of a lifetime. Being over a large expanse of ocean looking out of a P-40 at three other historic WWII aircraft, each being expertly flown by a close friend is a memory I will always cherish.” Enjoy the flight and stories at www.flyingfreedom.us and www. dakotaterritoryairmuseum.com.

March/April 2012


Udvar-Hazy Continued from previous page.

If you are going to be in D.C. and you like (or as in my case) love aviation do yourself a favor and visit the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum downtown and the Hazy Center on the back side of the Dulles Airport. For more information visit: http://www.nasm. si.edu/udvarhazy/.

Photos by Scott Malta

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March/April 2012 Magazine