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MARCH–APRIL 2020

Pivotal works of Margaret Atwood, Treemonisha reimagined, a retrospective of Gong Linna’s career, and more 1

P E R FO R M I N G A RT S M AGA Z I N E

INSIDE


o

archaeology · art history · art studio · business · classics · communication · creative writing design · film studies · history · languages · law · literature · mathematics · music · personal development · philosophy · photography · psychology · science · technology · wellness & health

We invite you to join our open learning community. Spring Quarter registration is underway. Most classes begin the week of March 30. Please visit our website to view the entire course catalogue and to enroll.


CONTENTS

Stanford Live Staff & Sponsors

p—5

Welcome

p—6

Upcoming Events

p—8–14

Campus Partners

p—17

Scene & Heard

p—18–19

Behind the Scenes

p—33

Black Women’s Leadership in the Opera: A Century in the Making

Membership

p—34–35

Stanford Live & Bing Concert Hall Donors

p—36–37

Calendar

p—38

By Whitney French

Plan Your Visit

p—39

The female-led creative team behind Volcano Production’s Treemonisha discuss reimagining Scott Joplin’s near-lost opera

p­­—20

Infographic

Infographic

Pivotal Works by Margaret Atwood

Expanding Notions of Traditional and

A tour through some of Atwood’s

Contemporary Music

published works from early in her

A retrospective of singer Gong Linna

career through today

p—28 p—24

Featurette

Featurette

Making Music: An Alternative Model

The Synagogue, the Home, the Stage

An interview with Michael Barenboim on

PBO’s Jews and Music Scholar

the origins and new direction of the West-

Francesco Spagnolo describes the

Eastern Divan Orchestra and its newly

historical context of the upcoming PBO

formed ensemble

Sessions program Jewish Songlines

p—26

p—30 3


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March-April 2020 | Volume 12, No. 4

STAFF

SEASON SPONSOR

Chris Lorway Executive Director Bryan Alderman Assistant Director of Development Karim Baer Associate Director for Campus Engagement and Public Programs Dawn Bercow Development Events Manager

FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

Rory Brown Operations Manager Diana Burnell Assistant Ticket Office Manager Kelsey Carman Marketing Manager Brett Cavanaugh Stage Technician Vanessa Chung Artist Liaison and Executive Assistant

CORPORATE PARTNERS

Robert DeArmond Web Developer Laura Evans Director of Music Programs, Engagement, and Education Ben Frandzel Institutional Gifts and Community Engagement Officer

PAUL HEPPNER President MIKE HATHAWAY Senior Vice President KAJSA PUCKETT Vice President, Sales & Marketing GENAY GENEREUX Accounting & Office Manager

Production SUSAN PETERSON Vice President, Production JENNIFER SUGDEN Assistant Production Manager ANA ALVIRA, STEVIE VAN BRONKHORST Production Artists and Graphic Designers Sales MARILYN KALLINS, TERRI REED San Francisco/Bay Area Account Executives BRIEANNA HANSEN, SHERRI JARVEY, ANN MANNING Seattle Area Account Executives CAROL YIP Sales Coordinator Marketing SHAUN SWICK Brand & Creative Manager CIARA CAYA Marketing Coordinator Encore Media Group 425 North 85th Street • Seattle, WA 98103 800.308.2898 • 206.443.0445 info@encoremediagroup.com encoremediagroup.com Encore Arts Programs and Encore Stages are published monthly by Encore Media Group to serve performing arts events in the San Francisco Bay Area and Greater Seattle Area. All rights reserved. ©2019 Encore Media Group. Reproduction without written permission is prohibited.

Elisa Gomez-Hird HR and Administrative Associate

IN-KIND PARTNERS

Katie Haemmerle Communications Manager Danielle Kisner Stage Technician Maurice Nounou Associate Director of Ticketing and System Operations Nick Oldham Audio Engineer and A/V Manager Egan O’Rourke Production Manager Kimberly Pross Director of Operations and Production

MEDIA PARTNERS

Jeremy Ramsaur Lighting Manager Nicola Rees Director of Development Toni Rivera Operations Coordinator Mike Ryan Director of Operations, Frost Amphitheater Bill Starr House Manager Krystina Tran Director of Marketing, Communications, and Patron Services Michelle Travers Artist Liaison Max Williams Development Programs Manager

Stanford Live’s 2019–20 season is generously supported by Helen and Peter Bing. Underwriting for student ticket discounts for the 2019–20 season is generously provided by the Bullard family. Stanford Live’s 2019–20 season jazz programs are generously supported by the Koret Foundation. The Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund is generously supported by the Hornik family, Victoria and James Maroulis, and the Maurice and Helen Werdegar Fund for Stanford Live.

PHOTO CREDITS On the cover: Margaret Atwood, 1966, photo courtesy of artist; Page 3: Photo 1 courtesy of Volcano Productions, 2 by Jean Malek, 3 courtesy of artist, 4 by Marcus Höhn, 5 courtesy of PBO Sessions; Page 17: Photo 1 by Wesaam Al-Badry, 2 courtesy of Cantor Arts Center, 3 by Farzad Owrang; Page 18–19: Photo 1, 2, 3, 4 & 6 by Allie Foraker, 5 & 8 by Michael Spencer, 7 by Joel Simon; Page 20–23: Photos courtesy of Volcano Productions; Pages 24-25: Photo 1 by Agustina Girardo courtesy of Creative Commons, 2 by George Whiteside; Pages 26-27: Photo 1 by Marcus Höhn, 2 courtesy of artist; Pages 28–29: Photo 1 & 4 courtesy of artist, 2 & 3 courtesy of Creative Commons; Page 30-32: Photos 1 courtesy of PBO Sessions, 2 & 3 courtesy of Creative Commons; Page 33: Photos courtesy of Will Paisley; Pages 34–35: Photo 1 by Joel Simon, 2 by Michael Spencer, 3 by Kate Munsch.

5


WELCOME

“Reality simply consists of different points of view.” Margaret Atwood

In Margaret Atwood’s iconic novel The

In his article The Synagogue, the Home,

Handmaid’s Tale and its recent sequel

the Stage, Francesco Spagnolo traces

The Testaments, Atwood creates a dys-

the influence that Jewish culture and

topian world that many readers (and

space had—and continues to have—

Hulu series fans) view as science fiction.

on popular music from different eras.

Yet there are others who suggest we’re

Finally, Michael Barenboim follows in

slowly inching toward her bleak vision

his father’s footsteps by leading an

of the future.

ensemble that uses music-making as a way to stimulate dialogue between Israelis and Palestinians.

This idea of perspective plays out in a number of articles in this issue of Stanford Live Magazine. In doing

Thank you for spending time with us.

research on a new libretto for Scott

And stay tuned for an exciting an-

Joplin’s Treemonisha (which will have

nouncement in late-April about what we

its world premiere at Stanford Live in

have planned for next season!

April), playwright and librettist LeahSimone Bowen dug into the history of

Chris Lorway

Black Reconstruction and the tension

Executive Director

between the two leaders of that movement, W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington, men who had similar goals but very different approaches to achieving them. This history is once again being examined by a creative team led by women of color.

6


UPCOMING

EVENTS DIS CUS SION

C L AS SICA L

DA NC E

Common in Conversation

Michael Barenboim and West-Eastern Divan Ensemble

Dorrance Dance SOUNDspace

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

T U E S DAY,

MEMORIAL

W E D N E S DAY,

BING

T U E S DAY,

BING

M A RC H 3,

AU D I TO R I U M

M A RC H 4,

C O N C E RT

M A RC H 10,

C O N C E RT

7: 30 P M

7:30 P M

HALL

7:30 P M

HALL

Academy Award, Golden

Michael Barenboim, son of

With SOUNDspace, the troupe

Globe, Emmy, and Grammy

pianist Daniel Barenboim,

from critically acclaimed

winner Common—an

leads the West-Eastern Divan

dance artist Michelle

accomplished artist, actor,

Ensemble. Through music, the

Dorrance will bring 11

and activist—continues to

ensemble combats political

impressive tappers, a pianist,

break down barriers with

divides by bringing together

and a stage full of innovative

a multitude of critically

Arab and Israeli musicians

excitement to Bing Concert

acclaimed, diverse roles.

onto one stage.

Hall.

Listen to Common speak about his deep engagement with social justice and advocacy work related to mass incarceration, mental health, and voting. Joining Common will be Adam Banks, Professor of Education and Faculty Director of the Institute for the Diversity in the Arts.

KEY A M P L I F I C AT I O N AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

8


For the full calendar, visit live.stanford.edu.

C L AS SICA L / DIS CUS SION

C L AS SICA L

FOL K

JA Z Z

PBO Sessions

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra

Dreamers’ Circus

Cécile McLorin Salvant with Darcy James Argue

Jewish Songlines—Performers, Patronage, and Prejudice

Romantic Reflections: Cherubini, Mendelssohn, and Schubert

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

T U E S DAY,

B I N G ST U D I O

W E D N E S DAY,

BING

M A RC H 1 0,

M A RC H 11,

C O N C E RT

8 : 00 P M

7: 30 P M

HALL

WHEN:

VENUE:

T H U R S DAY,

B I N G ST U D I O

Ogresse

M A RC H 12, 7:00 P M & 9:00 P M

Dreamers’ Circus has been a force in the Nordic music

WHEN:

VENUE:

F R I DAY,

BING

M A RC H 13,

C O N C E RT

7:30 P M

HALL

world for a decade now. In its intimate Bing Studio performance, the trio brings its inventive and imaginative

Francesco Spagnolo—

The sensational Vivaldi

Philharmonia Baroque

virtuoso Alana Youssefian joins takes on traditional

Orchestra’s Jews and Music

PBO for a reflective embrace

Scholar—joins forces with

of historically informed

Nicholas McGegan on a

Romanticism, including

journey to the world of Felix

Mendelssohn’s impassioned

Mendelssohn and 19th-

concerto, the overture to

century Germany, a period in

Cherubini’s first Parisian

history rife with sociopolitical

opera, and the expansive

tensions, rich musical

optimism of Schubert’s last

splendor, and religious

completed symphony.

Scandinavian roots.

Renowned jazz vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant’s Ogresse, an original concert concept arranged and conducted by

C OM E DY

Colin Quinn: The Wrong Side of History Comedy at the Bing

conflict. Part of PBO’s Jews

WHEN:

VENUE:

and Music Initiative, this

F R I DAY,

B I N G ST U D I O

riveting program offers

M A RC H 13,

musical reflections paired

7:00 P M &

with dynamic discussion in

9:00 P M

the intimate Bing Studio.

Stand-up comedian Colin Quinn—whose newest oneman show, Red State Blue State, premiered to rave reviews at the Minetta Lane Theatre in New York and was adapted into CNN’s first comedy special in May 2019—will perform a set for the next Comedy at the Bing show. 9

jazz luminary Darcy James Argue, uses Salvant’s eclectic choices, from hip-hop to Cuban to Baroque idioms, coupled with her exquisite vocal gifts for a one-of-akind audience experience. Generously supported by the Koret Jazz Project


UPCOMING

EVENTS JA Z Z / WOR L D

JA Z Z

VO CA L

Sounds of Cuba: Bobi Céspedes

Fly Higher

Choir of St John’s College, Cambridge

Charlie Parker @ 100

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

SAT U R DAY,

B I N G ST U D I O

SAT U R DAY,

BING

W E D N E S DAY,

MEMORIAL

M A RC H 2 1,

M A RC H 28,

C O N C E RT

A P R I L 1,

C H U RC H

7: 0 0 P M &

7:30 P M

HALL

7:30 P M

9: 0 0 P M

Gladys “Bobi” Céspedes has

Acclaimed co–musical

The Choir of St John’s College,

been at the forefront of

directors Rudresh

Cambridge, is one of the

representing and promoting

Mahanthappa (alto

finest collegiate choirs in

Cuban music in the Bay Area

saxophone) and Terri Lyne

the world. For its Memorial

and the United States for over

Carrington (drums) celebrate

Church appearance, the choir

40 years. In her new album,

Charlie Parker’s centennial

will perform its own repertoire

Mujer y cantante, Céspedes

year by showcasing “Bird’s”

that spans over 500 years of

boldly celebrates the strength

uncompromising musical joy,

music and is central to the

acquired through her rich

humor, and beauty as they

Chapel of St John’s College,

familial and cultural legacy.

mine his deep repertoire

Cambridge.

and offer new, modern compositions.

JA Z Z / WOR L D

Music at Stanford and the

Sounds of Cuba: Alfredo Rodríguez and Pedrito Martinez WHEN:

VENUE:

S U N DAY,

B I N G ST U D I O

Generously supported by Stephanie and Fred Harman and the Koret Jazz Project

M A RC H 2 2 , 4: 30 P M & 7: 0 0 P M

In their first duo outing for their album Duologue, Cuban jazz musicians Alfredo Rodríguez and Pedrito Martinez explore a range

KEY

of moods and influences, A M P L I F I C AT I O N AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

Presented in partnership with

from Cuban classics to collaborative original compositions to a number of unexpected favorites. 10

Stanford Office for Religious Life


For the full calendar, visit live.stanford.edu.

VO CA L

Choir of St John’s College, Cambridge WHEN:

VENUE:

T H U R S DAY,

BING

A P R I L 2,

C O N C E RT

7 : 30 P M

HALL

Following its performance in Memorial Church, the Choir of St John’s College will perform a set in Bing Concert Hall. The Stanford Chamber Chorale and members of the Stanford Symphony Orchestra will then join the choir to perform Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem. Presented in partnership with Music at Stanford and the Stanford Office for Religious Life


UPCOMING

EVENTS C ON T E M P OR A RY M USIC

C L AS SICA L

FOL K

Bang on a Can All-Stars

Invoke Multistring Quartet

Songs of Protest: Bruce Cockburn

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

FRIDAY, APRIL 3,

B I N G ST U D I O

S U N DAY,

BING

A P R I L 5,

C O N C E RT

2:30 P M

HALL

7: 0 0 P M

F R I DAY,

BING

A P R I L 10,

C O N C E RT

7:30 P M

HALL

imagining a kind of utopia for

Invoke multi-instrumental

music, and this concert at the

quartet as “not classical,

Bing seeks to demonstrate

but not not classical.” In the

Nano Stern, whom Joan Baez

an open, welcoming, and

group’s performance at the

describes as one of the best

inclusive space for music and

Bing, Invoke will draw from its

Chilean songwriters of his

ideas from a wide variety of

recent album that embraces

generation, returns to Stanford

styles. It features work from

bluegrass, Appalachian fiddle

Live with folk musician Bruce

the organization’s co-founders

music, jazz, and minimalism.

Cockburn. Each will perform a

Julia Wolfe, David Lang, and

solo set of protest songs that

Michael Gordon alongside

capture human experience and

compositions by jazz giant

cultural histories.

Ornette Coleman, young

DIS CUS SION

pioneer Anna Clyne, and Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore.

Margaret Atwood in Conversation

C ON T E M P OR A RY M USIC

WHEN:

VENUE:

SAT U R DAY,

BING

A P R I L 4, 7: 30 P M

C O N C E RT

WHEN:

VENUE:

W E D N E S DAY,

BING

A P R I L 8,

C O N C E RT

7:30 P M

HALL

Acclaimed writer Margaret

HALL

C L AS SICA L

St. Lawrence String Quartet: Good Friday Liturgical Performance Haydn’s Seven Last Words WHEN:

VENUE:

F R I DAY,

MEMORIAL

A P R I L 10,

C H U RC H

5:00 P M

Atwood, whose most recent book, The Testaments, is a

Evoking the last hours of

Superstar Chinese fusion

joint winner of the 2019

Christ’s life, the work’s seven

singer Gong Linna sets new

Booker Prize, will make a visit

individual sections carry

lyrics to centuries-old Chinese

to Bing Concert Hall for a

tempo markings of largo,

melodies backed by the

discussion.

adagio, lento, and grave. In this performance, and as

musicians of Bang on a Can. AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

VENUE:

A radio producer described

With Bang on a Can All-Stars

A M P L I F I C AT I O N

WHEN:

Bang on a Can started by

Gong Linna: Cloud River Mountain

KEY

Featuring Nano Stern

Gong’s husband, German

Presented in partnership with

it was written, Seven Last

composer Robert Zollitsch

the Stanford Storytelling Project

Words will be punctuated

(“Lao Luo”), composes many of

and the Stanford Speakers

with readings from the Good

the brilliantly staged pieces.

Bureau

Friday service.

12


For the full calendar, visit live.stanford.edu.

C ON T E M P OR A RY M USIC

Rebirth of a Nation Paul D. Miller (aka DJ Spooky) featuring Catalyst Quartet WHEN:

VENUE:

W E D N E S DAY,

BING

A P R I L 1 5,

C O N C E RT

7 : 30 P M

HALL

D. W. Griffith’s infamous and controversial 1915 silent film The Birth of a Nation inspired this multimedia piece that shows how exploitation and political corruption still taint the world, but in radically

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different forms. In his Bing performance, DJ Spooky will be joined by the Catalyst Quartet, an ensemble born out of the Sphinx Ensemble in Detroit, which is committed to playing the works of composers of color.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

For the full calendar, visit live.stanford.edu.

FOL K / P OP

C L AS SICA L

T H E AT E R

C L AS SICA L

Oysterhead

Maria Schneider Orchestra

Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha

Sarah Chang with Telegraph String Quartet

Featuring Trey Anastasio, Les Claypool, and Stewart Copeland

Produced by Volcano with Moveable Beast Collective and Co-commissioned by Stanford Live

WHEN:

VENUE:

M O N DAY,

BING

VENUE:

A P R I L 27,

C O N C E RT

T H U R S DAY

PA LO

7:30 P M

HALL

& F R I DAY,

A LTO H I G H

A P R I L 23 &

SCHOOL

24, 7:30 P M

P E R FO R M I N G

SAT U R DAY,

A RT S C E N T E R

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

SAT U R DAY,

F RO ST

SAT U R DAY,

BING

AMPHITHEATER

A P R I L 1 8,

C O N C E RT

WHEN:

HALL

A P R I L 1 8, 6: 30 P M

7: 30 P M

Violinist Sarah Chang joins

After nearly a two-

Known as a breakaway

decade hiatus, supergroup

jazz orchestra leader and

A P R I L 25,

the esteemed Telegraph

Oysterhead is back on tour

composer, Minnesota-born

8 :00 P M

String Quartet—residents

and making a stop at Frost

Maria Schneider and her

S U N DAY,

at the San Francisco

Amphitheater. The band

18-member orchestra perform

A P R I L 26,

Conservatory of Music—

features Phish guitarist Trey

worldwide, tackling lush and

2:30 P M

to perform Vivaldi’s Four

Anastasio, drummer Stewart

complex works that bring new

Seasons and Astor

Copeland of the Police, and

energy to the jazz orchestra

Piazzolla’s Four Seasons of

Primus bassist Les Claypool

landscape.

Buenos Aires at the Bing. Stanford Live hosts the

and brings an eclectic mix of alt-funk fusion. This performance is co-

Generously supported by the

world premiere of this

Co-presented with Chamber

Wollenberg Foundation and the

groundbreaking opera from

Music San Francisco

Koret Jazz Project

visionary composer Scott

presented by Stanford Live

Joplin. Treemonisha is reborn

and Goldenvoice. Tickets are

for the 21st century with

sold through AXS, so Stanford

a new libretto by Leah-

Live ticketing policies will

Simone Bowen and musical

not apply. Learn more at

arrangement starring

frostamphitheater.com.

renowned soprano Neema Bickersteth that reimagine the timeless story of female leadership and community. This performance is cocommissioned by Stanford Live with support from a Hewlett Foundation 50 Arts Commission, the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund, and Washington Performing Arts. See full credits at live.stanford.edu. 14


Stanford pediatricians, now in your neighborhood at Peninsula Pediatric Medical Group genpeds.stanfordchildrens.org


CAMPUS Paper Chase: Ten Years of Collecting

galleries, the Cantor is enacting a new

past of American ceramics and ideas for

Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at

vision to act as a gathering place for

the future of the art form. Kathy Butterly,

the Cantor

diverse ideas and to present art in more

Kahlil Robert Irving, Simone Leigh, and

Apr 3–Aug 3, 2020

contemporary ways. It now hopes that

Brie Ruais are pushing the boundaries of

Cantor Arts Center

vision will extend beyond its front steps

their medium and exploring questions of

through the museum’s recently acquired

value, identity, materiality, and the body.

sculpture OY/YO by artist Deborah Kass,

While distinctly different, they share a

now on view.

reverence for ceramics and its rich, and

Experience over 100 acquisitions to the Cantor’s collection that investigate issues of identity, social justice, and humanity’s changing relationship with nature. OY/YO Sculpture by Deborah Kass Ongoing Cantor Arts Center This major acquisition announces Cantor’s new direction. Across its

Wesaam Al-Badry (United States, b. Iraq,

sometimes complicated, history. Together, Formed and Fired: Contemporary

they provide extraordinary insights into

American Ceramics

the medium’s expressive qualities and

Mar 13–Sep 28, 2020

capacity for individual expression.

Anderson Collection This exhibition presents the work of four groundbreaking contemporary artists whose practices provide insight into the

OY/YO is now on display at the Cantor.

Simone Leigh (United States, b.

1984), Hermes #V, 2018, archival pigment

1967), Stretch Series #1, 2019, glazed

print. Gift of Pamela and David Hornik,

stoneware, 25 x 13 x 13 inches (63.5 x 33

2019

x 33 cm) (Inv# SLH 19.096). Photography: Farzad Owrang. Courtesy of Luhring Augustine, New York, and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles

PARTNERS 17


SCENE &

HEARD

1

2

3

4

5

18


6

1 — K RO N O S Q UA RT E T

6 — SELMA

Clarence Jones, Martin Luther

The Memorial Auditorium

King Jr.’s speechwriter and

showing of the 2014 Oscar-

Stanford Scholar in Residence,

winning film Selma included

took the stage following the

a score from a live orchestra

Kronos Quartet’s performance

conducted by Sarah Hicks.

of the song “Peace Be Till.”

The full orchestra included jazz pianist Jason Moran and

2 — M A N UA L C I N E M A

guitarist Marvin Sewell.

The multimedia theater work

7

No Blue Memories—The Life

7 — L AU R I E A N D E R S O N

of Gwendolyn Brooks from

In addition to her

Manual Cinema involved a

performance at the Bing,

cast of puppeteers, actors,

musician and artist Laurie

musicians, and over 600

Anderson’s return visit to

puppets and cutouts.

Stanford Live included a discussion with contemporary

3 — JA S O N DA N I E L E Y

artist Jim Campbell at the

In a sold-out performance,

Anderson Collection.

Broadway star Jason Danieley shared songs and stories

8 — N F M W RO C Ł AW

honoring his late wife Marin

PHILHARMONIC

Mazzie.

Giancarlo Guerrero conducted the NFM Wrocław

4 — S T. L AW R E N C E

Philharmonic with violinist

S T R I N G Q UA RT E T

Bomsori Kim in its first U.S.

Stanford’s acclaimed St.

tour since 2012.

Lawrence String Quartet started the year with a special program by Beethoven and Adams. 5 ­— JASON MORAN AND THE HARLEM HELLFIGHTERS

8

Jazz pianist Jason Moran’s first performance this season honored the life and music legacy of jazz composer James Reese Europe.

19


M A I N F E AT U R E

Canadian soprano Neema Bickersteth plays the role of Treemonisha. Photo by John Lauener

Black Women’s Leadership in the Opera: A Century in the Making By Whitney French Reimagining Scott Joplin’s 1911 opera

As playwright and librettist Leah-

women artists. This international team,

Treemonisha is a massive undertaking.

Simone Bowen explains, “This man

commissioned by critically acclaimed

The brilliant “King of Ragtime”

wrote an opera with a central female

Canadian theater company Volcano,

composer spent his entire life savings

figure. What’s that about? That’s so

gathers artists from across North

publishing his groundbreaking

innovative right there. It was the women

America to pay homage to Joplin.

masterpiece and never lived to

in his life that really shaped him.”

see it reach the stage. This April,

The titular character and protagonist

audiences will witness a rendering

And indeed, it’s Black women who

Treemonisha is a leader in her

of Treemonisha—perhaps the only

continue to shape his work over a

community. As per the original

surviving opera written about life

century later—the majority of the

rendition—Joplin’s cast was all African

postslavery by a black person who

creative team is made up of Black

American—the present-day production

lived it—like no other.

mirrors that same vision. 20


“It made sense to look for people who were Treemonisha in their own world,” says Neema Bickersteth, lead soprano and creative producer. “Through [Treemonisha’s] curiosity and her openness…I feel a similarity in myself to be curious about projects that I am in and all the projects that [have] led me to Treemonisha.” For Bowen, collaboration was critical to the reworking of the piece. “I worked very closely with Deanna Downes…an amazing academic and dramaturge. She knows a lot about Reconstruction in African American history. She was really my everything.” Through extensive research, revisioning, and returning to Joplin’s repertoire, Bowen began the journey to build a narrative to modernize the original. She methodically centers Treemonisha in character and in voice, whereas Joplin’s version presented male voices singing about her. “There has been pushback from people. ‘Why would you dare touch Joplin?’ But the interesting thing is that artists like Shakespeare…live on because [they have been] adapted and remixed and rewritten,” Bowen says. “Why doesn’t

Stanford Live is presenting the world premiere of Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha from April 23–26. Photo courtesy of Volcano Productions

Joplin deserve that kind of reverence?” Director Weyni Mengesha and talented co-arrangers Jessie Montgomery and Jannina Norpoth seized the opportunity to remount Treemonisha. They were eager to recover this nearlost piece of music from the Black cannon. Scott Joplin,

“As I began working on the story, I

known for

leaned on Weyni, and…one thing that

his ragtime

doesn’t get talked a lot about is the

compositions,

trauma that everyone [experienced],”

never saw his

Bowen says. “We talk a lot about

opera fully staged.

intergenerational trauma now, but [for]

Photo courtesy of

the people in the piece, slavery had

Volcano Productions

just been abolished for twenty years.” 21


A N EW

HOME FOR MUS I C

Ute and William K. Bowes Jr. Center for Performing Arts

Across the street from the War Memorial Opera House and Davies Symphony Hall

• SFCM Student and Community Housing • Conservatory Teaching and Learning Centers • Unique and Welcoming Performance Spaces

Join the San Francisco Conservatory of Music’s expansion to 200 Van Ness Avenue in fall 2020. To make a gift or schedule a site tour, contact us at 415-503-6282 or bowes@sfcm.edu.

sfcm.edu/bowes


As a means of exploring the myriad

Presented by Stanford Live, Scott

ways that African Americans coped

Joplin’s Treemonisha makes its world

during Reconstruction, the musical

premiere April 23–26, 2020, at the

team experimented with both

Palo Alto High School Performing Arts

European classical sounds and African

Center. Produced by Volcano theater

musicality and rhythms. The two

with Moveable Beast collective and

communities within the opera—the

co-commissioned by Stanford Live,

farming community and the maroon

Treemonisha promises to be the first

society of fugitive slaves—come

of its kind, one that opens a door

together and so do their musical

to a continued tradition of great

expressions.

Black opera.

“There is something really special

Many on the creative team are

about…envisioning how someone like

hoping for a resurgence of and

Joplin worked in this active fusion,”

newfound reverence for Joplin’s

says Montgomery. “I think that for a

work.

Black opera, it is really important and special to celebrate all of the different

“So many people don’t even

traditions that have come out of Black

know that Treemonisha exists as

theater and Black music.”

an opera,” Montgomery states. “[My hope is] that they would be

The entire creative team gained

inspired by Treemonisha. This idea of

a deeper understanding of Joplin,

self-realization, self-actualization,

particularly his personal life, through

and courage keeps us inspired and

the making of Treemonisha. “He had

lifted. I feel passionately that this story

a very difficult life,” Montgomery

can capture those common human

reveals, “but his music is energy. It was

aspirations.”

Montgomery, Weyni Mengesha, and Ross Manson take a look at the original printed score for Treemonisha, hand delivered to the Library of Congress by Scott Joplin in

designed to bring joy.”

1911. Photo courtesy of Volcano

The irony of ragtime and the realities

Whitney French is a storyteller and a

of Joplin’s hardship aren’t lost on the

multidisciplinary artist. She is the editor

arranger. Dualities—ones that do not

of Black Writers Matter (2019), a

center on whiteness—are a constant

critically acclaimed anthology published

theme throughout Treemonisha.

by the University of Regina Press. Currently she lives in Toronto, Canada,

“I am a classically singer trained in a

where she works as an acquisitions editor

classical condition,” Bickersteth adds,

for Dundurn Press.

“and I am a Black person. I often think about the conversation between these sides of myself. I feel that Joplin was having this conversation with himself [also].”

Creative team Jessie

Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha Thu, Apr 23 & Fri, Apr 24

For Bowen, it is the specific details of

7:30 PM

Joplin’s life that inform her process. “I

Sat, Apr 25

have a very intimate relationship with

8:00 PM

a dead man,” she laughs. “He’s just so

Sun, Apr 26

fascinating to me. Yes, it’s an adapted

2:30 PM

work that we’ve tried to modernize

Palo Alto High School Performing

for a new audience, but Joplin is the

Arts Center

backbone of the piece.” 23

Productions


Pivotal Works by Margaret Atwood “Make Margaret Atwood fiction again” read protesters’ signs at the Women’s Marches that followed Donald Trump’s inauguration in 2017. While this slogan was specifically inspired by Atwood’s most famous novel The Handmaid’s Tale, much of the author’s prolific oeuvre—which includes novels, poetry, short stories, children’s books, comics, and essays—has been heralded for its eerily accurate descriptions and predictions of social realities, from misogyny to class warfare. Politics “enters a writer’s work,” Atwood said in 1981, “not because the writer is or is not consciously political, but because a writer is an observer, a witness, and such observations are the air he breathes.” On April 8, Margaret Atwood will take the stage in a special discussion event presented by Stanford Live, the Stanford Storytelling Project, and the Stanford Speakers Bureau. In preparation, take a tour through several of Atwood’s major achievements.

The Journals of Susanna Moodie

Survival

The Handmaid’s Tale

The Blind Assassin

1970

1972

1985

2000

Atwood first came to promi-

Survival put Atwood on the

The novel that made Atwood

Atwood’s first Booker Prize–

nence as a poet in the 1960s.

map as a cultural critic and put

a household name imagines

winning novel earned praise

Her sixth verse collection,

Canadian writing on the map

an authoritarian America

for its innovative combi-

The Journals of Susanna

as a literary tradition inde-

whose ruling class weaponizes

nations of genres. Assassin

Moodie, reimagines the diaries

pendent from those of other

religion to brutally control

deftly blends Gothic tropes

of an English settler who

Anglophone nations. Atwood

women. It’s a dystopia in

with historical fiction,

immigrated to Quebec in

argues that the central theme

which each new generation

detective plots with sci-fi

the 1830s.

of her homeland’s poetry and

of readers has found chilling

story lines, faux newspaper

Journals tackles a perennial

prose is that of survival: the

resonances—from a 1980s

clippings with a novel within

North American theme:

struggle to persevere, whether

audience living in fear of

a novel. As Atwood expert

humans’ struggle to connect

in the face of a hostile natural

the spread of totalitarianism

Sherrill Grace points out,

with the natural world. Ini-

landscape or in the face of

(Atwood wrote the book

such mixtures of the fictional

tially appalled by the stark

political, linguistic, and cultural

while living in Cold War Berlin)

and the factual have become

Canadian wilderness, Moodie

erasure by England and the

to the women who have

a major literary trend in the

eventually achieves a pro-

United States.

donned scarlet handmaid’s

years since, with authors such

found kinship with the land,

robes at reproductive rights

as Elena Ferrante and Rachel

and encourages her modern

protests around the world

Cusk writing in the same vein.

reader to strive for the same.

in recent years.

24


The MaddAddam novels

The Heart Goes Last

The Testaments

2003, 2009, 2013

2015

2019

The speculative fiction trilogy

Demonstrating Atwood’s

This long-awaited sequel to

made up of Oryx and Crake,

abiding commitment to exper-

The Handmaid’s Tale, which

The Year of the Flood, and

imenting with literary form, The

won Atwood her second

MaddAddam displays Atwood’s

Heart Goes Last was originally

Booker Prize, takes place 15

deep interest in the sciences.

released as a four-part Web

years after the original. Inter-

Published during the decade in

serial. The near-future satire

linking the testimonies of three

which climate change became

centers on an impoverished

women living in a still-theocratic

a staple of public discourse,

couple who sign up for

Gilead, Testaments develops

Atwood’s tale of a worldwide

Consilience, a sinister “social

themes to which Atwood has

apocalypse brought about

experiment” wherein they can

returned throughout her career

by man-made epidemics and

live for free in a cheery suburb

as an author and activist: wit-

environmental collapse struck

for half the year—and in a

ness, complicity, and literature’s

many as all too plausible. The

prison for the other half. The

role in both. The writer is both

series asks readers to consider

protagonists’ terrifying discov-

“the one to whom personal

the potentially horrific out-

eries about Consilience offer a

experience happens,” Atwood

comes of corporate control of

biting critique of present-day

has said, “and the one who

the sciences—and how humans

conformity, capitalist greed,

makes experience personal

might rebuild after catastrophe.

and the prison system.

for others.”

25

Margaret Atwood in Conversation Wed, Apr 8 7:30 PM Bing Concert Hall


F E AT U R E T T E

Violinist Michael Barenboim is the founder of the West-Eastern Divan Ensemble. Photo by Marcus Höhn

Making Music: An Alternative Model By Thomas May

To mark the West-Eastern Divan

that envisioned new hopes for global

Orchestra’s 20th-anniversary season,

harmony and for the central place

violinist Michael Barenboim is touring

of art in furthering cross-cultural

the United States with the newly formed

understanding.

West-Eastern Divan Ensemble, a chamber group of string players who will bring the

How dramatically things have

organization’s cross-cultural vision to

changed in the mere two decades

Stanford in March.

since the Divan’s founding. Amid increases in the political and social

In 1999, while many were preoccupied

tensions that were among the

with the elusive Y2K bug, the

original catalysts for this project, the

conductor and pianist Daniel

reality of climate change looms as

Barenboim and the literary scholar

an ever-more-ominous backdrop—

Edward Said co-founded the West-

developments that only underscore

The Divan Ensemble will perform

Eastern Divan Orchestra as an

the urgency of finding ways to

Jawb, a new piece commissioned

alternative model for trying to come

transcend barriers of hostility and to

just for the ensemble by the

to terms with the Israeli-Palestinian

celebrate our shared humanity.

young, much sought-after French

conflict. The Divan blossomed from

composer Benjamin Attahir. Photo

a millennial outlook—an outlook

courtesy of CAMI Music 26


“The Divan blossomed from a millennial outlook— an outlook that envisioned new hopes for global harmony and for the central place of art in furthering cross-cultural understanding.” “The members of the Divan get a

And what are those ideals? They first

“[The academy is] more than a music

chance to see the human element

took shape in conversations between

conservatory,” explains Barenboim.

when they meet and talk and perform

Daniel Barenboim and Said, who is also

“The same ideas about cultural

with people who in their normal

remembered as a prominent figure in

dialogue that are at the basis of the

environment would be considered

the field of colonial studies. (Said died

Divan guide the music instruction as

enemies,” says Michael Barenboim,

in 2003.) Together, and drawing on

well as the other classes here, whether

Daniel’s son and violinist and director

their respective Israeli and Palestinian

in philosophy, history, or literature.”

of the organization’s latest project, the

backgrounds, Daniel Barenboim and

West-Eastern Divan Ensemble. “Outside

Said established an orchestra whose

For the Divan Ensemble, Barenboim

rehearsals, people talk, discuss, and

identity defied the hostile boundaries

has brought together orchestra players

discover things. Everyone changes in

scarring the Middle East. The members

with backgrounds from Lebanon,

different ways, but being part of the

are Palestinians and Israelis, along with

Palestine, Israel, Egypt, and Jordan.

Divan Orchestra has changed everyone

musicians from other Arab countries,

“I wanted to highlight the core of the

who joins it.”

Iran, Turkey, and Spain.

Divan, which originated with a focus on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict,”

To mark this 20th-anniversary season

The Divan Orchestra officially launched

he says. Four of the musicians are

of the Divan Orchestra—in which he

on August 16, 1999, with a concert in

currently students or former students

himself has played since 2000, when

the symbolically chosen city of Weimar,

of the academy, where Barenboim also

he was only 14—Michael Barenboim

Germany. That year, Weimar had been

teaches.

founded the Divan Ensemble “to offer

named a European Capital of Culture,

the public an opportunity to see the

and it is also closely associated with

The Divan Ensemble doesn’t pretend

members of the orchestra in a more

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who

to offer easy answers, Barenboim says.

intimate environment.”

had spent one of his most flourishing

“We don’t have a political message.

creative periods there. Daniel

We are musicians first of all. The only

The ensemble consists of eight string

Barenboim and Said took the name of

thing we offer is an alternative model

players from the Divan Orchestra.

their project from West-Eastern Divan,

of thinking that is not based on the

In February and March of 2020,

a collection of Goethe’s poetry—with

conflict patterns we see in the news

Barenboim will lead the group on

contributions from his lover Marianne

all the time. The basis is a dialogue

its inaugural tour, which starts its

von Willemer—published in 1819.

of understanding—involving and

14-concert journey in Chicago.

“Divan” refers to an anthology, and the

accepting the narrative of the other.”

The final stops of the tour take the

underlying theme of this one is a lyrical

musicians to California, with a program

dialogue between East and West.

Thomas May is a freelance writer, critic, educator, and translator whose work

of chamber music classics as well as a brand-new commission at Stanford’s

The Divan Orchestra initially had

has been published internationally.

Bing Concert Hall on Wednesday,

headquarters in Seville, Spain, but has

He contributes to the programs of

March 4.

since made its home at the Barenboim-

the Lucerne Festival as well as to the New

Said Academy in the heart of Berlin.

York Times and Musical America.

Barenboim notes that another

Along with supporting the orchestra,

motivation for founding the Divan

the academy offers bachelor’s degrees

Ensemble is “to represent the ideals

and artist diplomas in music. In recent

Michael Barenboim and West-

of the whole Divan project to a wider

years, some of the academy students

Eastern Divan Ensemble

audience.” The greater flexibility

have gone on to join the Divan

Wed, Mar 4

inherent in the ensemble allows the

Orchestra.

7:30 PM

musicians to play in places where the

Bing Concert Hall

orchestra cannot travel as feasibly. 27


Expanding Notions of Traditional and Contemporary Music A Retrospective of Singer Gong Linna By Kyle Reed ‘20

This spring, Bing Concert Hall welcomes a unique collaboration between superstar Chinese fusion singer Gong Linna and the American ensemble Bang on a Can All-Stars. Learn about Gong Linna’s music career and her quick rise to stardom in China.

Tradition Meets Modernity

Overnight Sensation Her breakout moment occurred in 2010,

Partners in Love and Work

Gong Linna masterfully blends centuries-old

when her televised performance of “Tan

She is married to German composer

Chinese musical traditions with new lyrics

Te” at the Beijing New Year concert went

Robert Zollitsch. Zollitsch, also known

and incredible vocals. Her performances

viral, gaining billions of views. The entirely

as Lao Luo, is an expert in various forms

build off the past but don’t aim to re-create

new interpretation of Chinese folk music

of traditional Asian music and composes

it, instead offering a unique, modern, and

presented in the song left audiences

music for Gong Linna, including her

sometimes controversial work.

shocked.

breakout song “Tan Te” as well as the album Cloud River Mountain, which they composed together. 28


A Young Prodigy

Sound Over Sense

Gong Linna was born in 1975 in Guiyang,

Her most famous song “Tan Te” has no

Guizhou. At the age of five, she first

real words. Instead, her voice imitates the

performed onstage and at 16 attended

voices of Chinese opera and the sounds

the Chinese Conservatory of Music.

of traditional Chinese instruments.

She knew she wanted to be a professional singer since her early childhood.

New Collaborations

The Big Idea

Gong Linna presents Cloud River Mountain

Gong Linna and Zollitsch envision

with the Bang on a Can All-Stars, a

a new musical genre that they term

six-member, genre-defying ensemble. The show combines Chinese and Western “sound worlds,” including folk, pop, and

“Chinese new art music.” Their music is an expression of this idea, which aims to incorporate Chinese traditions with

contemporary music, to tell an ancient

contemporary influences to produce an

story by the famous poet Qu Yuan.

exceptional new sound.

Gong Linna: Cloud River Mountain With Bang on a Can All-Stars Sat, Apr 4 7:30 PM Bing Concert Hall Bang on a Can All-Stars A Musical Utopia Fri, Apr 3 7:00 PM Bing Studio

29


F E AT U R E T T E

The Synagogue, the Home, the Stage By Francesco Spagnolo

PBO Sessions’ Jewish Songlines helps

exchange. For many centuries,

Europe until the 19th century.

to trace a network of musical ideas

Jews and non-Jews have been

Compared with their state in

and places. In modern times, we can

meeting inside synagogues, and

previous periods, the welfare of the

see a continuing musical dialogue

synagogue sounds have often

Jewish community improved with

linking the synagogue, the Jewish

reflected the musical cultures of

the establishment of Italian ghettos

home, and the concert stage. This

their surroundings. This is best seen

in the 16th century. Ghettos, and

dialogue was long in the making, and

in the Jewish ghettos of the Italian

the synagogues inside them, quickly

it continues to this day.

Renaissance, beginning with the

became veritable vitrines in which

Ghetto of Venice, which, established

Jews could be observed and Jewish

The synagogue—often perceived

in 1516, came to define both the

culture (most notably its venerable

as a private space solely devoted

term “ghetto” and its connotations

liturgy) experienced by non-Jewish

to Jewish worship—has always

as well as the conditions of urban

visitors. The attraction was to the

been a porous space of cultural

inclusion of Jewish minorities across

perceived antiquity of Jewish rituals,

30


“The synagogue—often perceived as a private space solely devoted to Jewish worship—has always been a porous space of cultural exchange. ”

1

their exotic allure, and the constant,

create the new sound), performers,

transcultural musical encounters

cacophonous, and ever-changing

and audiences. First tested in smaller

first pioneered in the synagogue

music-making that took place in

Italian Jewish centers in the 16th

had also found new life in the

their midst.

century, these musical performances

homes of the nascent emancipated

became popular between the 17th

Jewish bourgeoisie residing in

On the basis of this interest,

and especially 18th centuries in

Europe’s capitals. Crossing into the

Jewish communal leaders became

Venice, Ferrara, Siena, and Casale

liminal space between Judaism and

invested in creating new liturgical

Monferrato, as well as outside Italy,

Christianity, religious and secular

performances that, by building on

most notably within the walls of the

music, the home and the stage,

the intersection of Biblical antiquity

Spanish-Portuguese synagogue of

musicians like Giacobbe Cervetto,

and the new wave of Kabbalah-

Amsterdam (completed in 1675). The

Felix Mendelssohn, Ignaz Moscheles,

inspired culture, presented Jews

English annotations in the original

Isaac Nathan, and Joseph Joachim

and non-Jews alike with music

libretto of a Hebrew oratorio based

brought virtuosity, composition, and

that interwove Hebrew texts

on the biblical story of Esther seem

intercultural dialogue to the center of

and European aesthetics. These

to suggest that by the end of the

the public’s interest in Berlin, London,

productions often involved Jewish

18th century, the format had also

and Paris, first in private concerts

and Christian composers (the latter

reached the United Kingdom.

and only later on the concert

hired by Jewish communities to

By then, the production of

stage. The powerful combination of

31


F E AT U R E T T E

(perceived) Biblical musical materials and live stage presence was a key factor in the growing interest in musical compositions inspired by Jewish themes that characterized the evolution of Jewish musical culture in the 19th century. Lord Byron’s Hebrew Melodies, which were first commissioned and set to music by Nathan around 1815, were translated into German in 1920, and later into Hebrew with the title Zemirot Yisrael (J. L. Gordon, 1884), and eventually into Yiddish (1926). They inspired a host of musical settings, including works by Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (1830s), Felix Mendelssohn (Sun of the Sleepless, 1834), Robert Schumann (Drei Gesänge, 1849, publ. 1851), Joseph Joachim (Hebräische Melodien, 1854–1855), Modest Mussorgsky (Tsar Saul, 1863), and others.

2

The progressive transfer of the performative context of these musical encounters out of the synagogue culminated in the

3

1—Francesco

representation of biblical stories

Spagnolo explores

on the international opera stage, in

the world of

works such as Gioachino Rossini’s

Mendelsoohn

Mosè in Egitto (Naples, Italy, 1818),

and 19th-century

Fromental Halévy’s La Juive

Germany through

(Paris, 1835), and Giuseppe Verdi’s

music and

Nabucodonosor (aka, Nabucco, Milan,

discussion in the

1842). Next would come Broadway

PBO Sessions

and Hollywood.

program Jewish Songlines. Francesco Spagnolo is Philharmonia 2—The Scola

Baroque Orchestra’s Jews and Music

Levantina

Scholar.

synagogue was built in Venice, Italy, between 1538 and 1561. 3—This painting

PBO Sessions Jewish Songlines—Performers,

portrays composer

Patronage, Prejudice

Ignaz Moscheles

Tue, Mar 10

in 1860.

8:00 PM Bing Studio 32


BEHIND

Indigenizing the Curation Process

cultural sensitivity rather than extraction

By Will Paisley ’20, Stanford Live Curatorial Fellow

when engaging indigenous artistry.

Yá’át’ééh. I belong to the Dine’ (Navajo)

The American performance industry is

and Amskapi Piikani (Blackfeet) nations

not inherently inclusive and respectful of

and am Two-Spirit. After serving as

diverse artistry, as it rests on a legacy of

co-president of the Stanford American

Euro-American colonial supremacy. By

Indian Organization my junior year, I was

indigenizing performance spaces and

introduced to Stanford Live director Chris

promoting dialogue with indigenous

Lorway to assist in the curatorial process

partners, I’m helping Stanford Live create

as part of Stanford Live’s 2020–21 season

equitable and culturally respectful practices.

centered around themes of reconciliation and forgiveness.

I hope the Stanford community enjoys the performances from indigenous identities

My work at Stanford has always been

curated for 2020–21 and recognizes the

grounded in my indigenous identity and

intentionality and opportunities for learning

community. Stanford Live has made

in each. As someone who holds my Native

concerted efforts to indigenize the curation

identity first and foremost, it’s my pleasure

process and develop new modalities for

to be involved in the curatorial process

engaging with indigenous artists. I’m

to present artists who uphold indigenous

proud to work in a space that honors

values to promote our resilience and

my identities and proactively promotes

survivance.

SCENES

THE

Stanford Live Curatorial Fellow Will

The Stanford American Indian

Paisley, a senior double majoring in

Paisley was the student speaker at

Organization hosts the Stanford

sociology and Native American studies,

Stanford’s 2019 Opening Convocation

Powwow each May.

surveys the scene in La Serena, Chile. He studied in Chile in 2017 as part of his

Ceremony in September 2019.

Spanish minor.

33


MEMBERSHIP

The San Francisco Symphony performed at Frost Amphitheater in July 2019. Photo by Joel Simon

Inside Stanford Live Membership Everything we do at Stanford Live is

conversation. And they underwrite

One of our members’ favorite benefits is

made possible by the generosity of our

our K–12 student matinees, teacher

presale ticket access to all Stanford Live

members. Because ticket sales account

workshops, and artists-in-schools

venues, including Frost Amphitheater,

for less than half of what it takes to

programs that increase access to arts

starting at the Supporter ($250+) level.

present our programs, memberships

education for students in Silicon Valley.

With our 2020–21 season announcement

are vital to supporting our work, from

on April 22, 2020, we will reveal many

commissioning innovative premieres to

There are many ways to give, from

exciting programs and our members will

bringing the world’s most acclaimed

the Patron level, starting with a $100

have the earliest access to tickets to

performing artists to the Stanford

gift, to our Bing memberships, at

experience the extraordinary artists and

campus.

$7,500 and above. We say thank you

compelling themes of the coming season.

to our members in many ways, from Our members’ donations also make

complimentary ticket exchanges to

it possible to host dozens of free

For more information about Stanford Live

member receptions and opportunities to

engagement events we present every

memberships and other giving opportunities,

meet with guest artists.

visit live.stanford.edu/support.

year that bring audiences closer to artists and inspire a community 34


Engagement with the Community Member support makes it possible for Stanford Live to offer unique music-making opportunities to our community. Our workshop on November 9, 2019, with the King’s Singers brought together six high school, university, and youth and adult community choruses for a joyful day of learning and collective singing. On February 29, 2020, the Bing Studio sizzled with an Afro-Cuban jazz jam session for community musicians that was led by Grammynominated Jane Bunnett and Maqueque and was open to all. In November, the King’s Singers led workshops on Stanford’s campus for local high school, university, and community choral groups. Photo by Michael Spencer

Bing Fling One of the most special nights of the

concierge ticket service, reserved

year for Stanford Live is Bing Fling, our

parking, and access to our donor lounge

annual dinner and performance to thank

at Frost Amphitheater events.

our Bing members for their support. For this year’s edition on April 25, 2020,

For more information about Bing

we’ll celebrate with a performance of

memberships, contact Bryan Alderman

our world-premiere commission of Scott

at bryan.alderman@stanford.edu or

Joplin’s Treemonisha. Bing Fling tickets

650.498.9365.

are just one of Bing members’ benefits, which also include premium seating,

The 2019 Bing Fling celebrated Frost Amphitheater performances throughout the decades. Photo by Kate

35

Munsch


Stanford Live Members Stanford Live thanks the following members for their support: BING CIRCLE ($25,000+) Anonymous (2) Jeanne & Larry Aufmuth Helen & Peter Bing The Bullard Family Roberta & Steven Denning Ann & John Doerr Jill & Norm Fogelsong Mary & Clinton Gilliland Marcia & John Goldman Drs. Lynn Gretkowski & Mary Jacobson Leonard Gumport & Wendy Munger Cynthia Fry Gunn & John A. Gunn Stephanie & Fred Harman Rick Holmstrom & Kate Ridgway The Hornik Family Leslie & George Hume Fong Liu Victoria & James Maroulis Deedee McMurtry Barbara Oshman Mindy & Jesse Rogers Marian & Abraham Sofaer Trine Sorensen & Michael Jacobson Bonnie & Marty Tenenbaum Maurice & Helen Werdegar David Wollenberg Priscilla & Ward Woods

BING DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE ($15,000–$24,999) Shawn & Brook Byers Joyce Chung & Rene Lacerte Jill Freidenrich Lynn & Jim Gibbons Morton Grosser Catherine & Franklin Johnson Joan F. Lane Leatrice Lee Debra & Mark Leslie Carrick & Andrew McLaughlin Linda & Tony Meier Nancy & Lawrence Mohr David Morandi William Reller Condoleezza Rice Susan & David Young

BING ARTIST’S CIRCLE ($7,500–$14,999) Anonymous (5) Fred Alvarez & Beth McLellan Alvarez Felicity Barringer & Philip Taubman Alison & Joe Barta Iris & Paul Brest Janice Brody & Bruce Rule Eva & Chris Canellos Regina & Gerhard Casper Diane & Stephen Ciesinski Julia & James Davidson Margaret Dorfman Susan Ford Dorsey & Michael Dorsey William Draper III Barbara Edwards Mary & William Fitch Maggie & Fred Grauer Ann M. Griffiths Eleanor & Bruce Heister Anne & Jack Holloway Larry Horton & George Wilson Elizabeth & Zachary Hulsey Mary Ittelson Lucie Jay Lisa & Marc Jones Sallie De Golia-Jorgenson & John Jorgenson Betty & Bob Joss Roberta & Charles Katz Lisa Keamy & Lloyd Minor Kathy & John Kissick Iris & Hal Korol Caroline Labe Ingrid Lai & William Shu Carolyn & William Langelier Bren & Lawrence Leisure Cynthia & Richard Livermore Rick & Amy Magnuson Michael & Jane Marmor/The Marmor Foundation Cathy McMurtry Tashia & John Morgridge

Dean Morton Susan & Bill Oberndorf John O’Farrell & Gloria Principe Lynn & Susan Orr Anthony Paduano & Ruth Porat Donna & Channing Robertson Amanda & Michael Ross Barbara & Greg Rosston Mark & Theresa Rowland Tom Sadler & Eila Skinner Meryl & Rob Selig The Honorable & Mrs. George P. Shultz Barbara & Arnold Silverman Dr. Harise Stein & Mr. Peter Staple Madeline & Isaac Stein Tracy Storer & Marcia Kimes Andrea & Lubert Stryer Lena & Ken Tailo Carol & Doug Tanner Lorna & Mark Vander Ploeg Karin & Paul Wick

Amy Ladd & Doug Fitzgerald Albe & Ray Larsen Ayleen & Emory Lee Y. K. Lee Fred Levin & Nancy Livingston Marcia C. Linn Kristen & Felix Lo Edward Lohmann Sandra & Joseph Martignetti Jr. Dick R. Miller & James M. Stutts Dr. Martha J. Morrell & Dr. Jaime G. Tenedorio Celia Oakley & Craig Barratt Og & Ogina Daniel & Ginger Oros Carmela & Eli Pasternak Edward & Nadine Pflueger Kitty & Lee Price Tony, Myrla & Sarah Putulin Shirley & Bob Raymer Kathy & Gary Reback Rossannah Reeves Sara Eisner Richter & Michael Richter Diane & Joe Rolfe Amy Rosenberg & John Slafsky Debbie & Stuart Rosenberg Ali Rosenthal & Kat Carroll Nancy & Norman Rossen Diana & Philip Russell Scott D. Sagan & Sujitpan Lamsam Lela & Gerry Sarnat Doris Sayon Elizabeth & Mark Schar Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation Ted & Linda Schlein Robyn & Mark Setzen Katie and Dhiren Shah Lee Ann & Martin Shell Elizabeth & Russell Siegelman Charles Sieloff Nerija Sinkeviciute-Titus & Jason Titus John Stern & Susan Anderes Barbara & Charles Stevens Kathryn Stivers Eleanor Sue & Wendy Mines Jeff & Linda Suto Michelle Swenson & Stan Drobac Onnolee & Orlin Trapp Mary & John Wachtel Karen & Rand White Mansie & Gary Williams Dr. Carlene Wong & Dr. Philip Lee Elizabeth F. Wright Eva Xu & Roy Wang Sharon & Robert Yoerg

SUSTAINER ($2,500–$7,499) Keith Amidon & Rani Menon Jonathan, Frances & Alison Axelrad Celeste & Wendell Birkhofer Joan & Tom Brown James Canales & James McCann William Coggshall & Janet Littlefield Diane Elder & Bruce Noble Sissy & Theodore Geballe The Stephen & Margaret Gill Family Foundation Greg Goodman & Susan Schnitzer Judy & Jerrol Harris Charlotte & Larry Langdon Joan Mansour Betsy & Matt Matteson Judy M. Mohr & Keith W. Reeves Betsy Morgenthaler Paula & Bill Powar Deborah & Michael Shepherd Srinija Srinivasan Kenneth Weinberg Dr. Irving Weissman & Ann TsukamotoWeissman

PARTNER ($1,000–$2,499) Anonymous (9) Marian & Jim Adams Margaret Anderson Patrick Barnes & Kathy Keller Lisa Barrett Deborah & Jonathan Berek Karen S. Bergman Matthew Bien & Grace Lee Carolyn & Gary Bjorklund Lissy & Byron Bland Tab Bowers & Michie Kasahara Linda & Steve Boxer Terri Bullock Thomas Byrnes Tasha Castañeda Rowland Cheng & Shelli Ching Donald Cheu Jamie & Linda Clever Holly & Andrew Cohen Joanne & Michael Condie Jack & Angela Connelly Bill & Bridget Coughran Ann & David Crockett Bruce Daniel Debra Demartini Tom Dienstbier & Joyce Firstenberger Patricia Engasser & Mark Reisman Sally & Craig Falkenhagen Stanley Falkow & Lucy Tompkins Margaret Ann & Don Fidler Rona Foster & Ken Powell Betsy & David Fryberger A. A. Furukawa Daniel Garber & Catharine Fergus Garber Jane & Bruce Gee Mike & Myra Gerson Gilfix Eric Giovanola Susan Goodhue Matthew Goodman Ed Haertel & Drew Oman Eric Hanushek & Margaret Raymond Paul Harrison & Irene Lin Tine & Joerg Heilig Anne & William Hershey Caroline Hicks Leslie Hsu & Richard Lenon Rex & Dede Jamison Pamela S. Karlan Randall Keith & Karen Hohner Carla Murray Kenworthy Ed & Kay Kinney The Klements

ADVOCATE ($500–$999) Anonymous (15) Lois & Edward Anderson Richard & Delores Anderson Marie & Douglas Barry Richard A. Baumgartner & Elizabeth M. Salzer Charlotte & David Biegelsen Richard Bland & Marlene Rabinovitch Barbara Blatner-Fikes & Richard Fikes Norm Blears Jeanie & Carl Blom Vera Blume Bonnie & William Blythe Patty Boone & Dave Pfefer Caroline Bowker & Charles Bliss Prudence Breitrose Laura Breyfogle & David Warner George Brown Drs. Julie Buckley & Eric Fung Thomas Bush & Grace Sanchez Enrique & Monica Caballero The Cha Family Gregory Chan Chanin & Dotson Family Gloria & Michael Chiang Jane Chung, MD Ann Hammond Clark Chris & Gina Clarke Kalyani Comal & Arun Ramakrishnan Jonah & Jesse Cool Suzanne & Bruce Crocker Melanie & Peter Cross Richard De Luce Michael Dickey Paul & Rosleyn Dumesnil Ellen & Tom Ehrlich Eleanor Eisner Maria & George Erdi James Feit Jeffrey Fenton Joan & Allan Fisch Shelley Fisher Fishkin Sarah & Stan Freedman Carol C. & Joel P. Friedman Markus Fromherz & Heike Schmitz Karen & Edward Gilhuly

36

Charles Goldenberg & Pamela Polos Sara & Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert Margaret & Ben Gong Mike & Loren Gordon Jonathan & Natsuko Greenberg Ester Gubbrud & Charles Ross The Harrick Family Fran & Steve Harris Robin Hatfield Linc & Robin Holland Serena Hu & John Lenox Chris Iannuccilli & Michele Schiele Karen Imatani David Israel Sally & Rob Jackson Melinda & Jim Johnson Leigh & Roy Johnson Lil & Todd Johnson William Keats & Deborah Barney Carol Kersten & Markus Aschwanden Mary Lou Kilcline Michael & Wendy Kirst Renate Klipstas Christina Kong Linda & Fredric Kraemer Mr. Joseph & Dr. Caroline Krauskopf Kerry & Maureen Kravitz Gary & Yuko Kushner Edward & Miriam Landesman Kurt F. Lang & Dr. Janna Smith Lang Cathy & Stephen Lazarus Cynthia & Bob Leathers Joan & Philip Leighton Sanford Lewis Jose Teodoro Limcaoco Laurel & Joe Lipsick Dr. Leon Lipson & Susan Berman Drs. John & Penny Loeb Rachel & Zohar Lotan Liqun Luo Vera Luth Ruth Lycette Susan Lydick Alisa & Neil MacAvoy Kathy Mach & David Scherer Charlene & Dick Maltzman Christopher & Jane Manning Marylin McCarthy Christina & Bill McClure Dr. C. Kwang Sung & Meghan McGeary Millbrey McLaughlin & Larry Klein Penny & Jim Meier Elyce Melmon Linda Membreno Evelyn Miller Andres J. Montoya Arabella & George Napier Katherine Nelson Fred & Kirstin Nichols Christine & Ronald Orlowski Shari & Donald Ornstein Sandra & Scott Pearson Nancy & Stephen Player Barbara & Warren Poole The Randall Family Anna Ranieri & Stephen Boyd Richard & Karen S. Recht Ann Rossi Elise & Jay Rossiter Nicole & Amir Dan Rubin Lisa Rutherford David Sacarelos & Yvette Lanza Carla Scheifly Paula & George Schlesinger Celestine & Scott Schnugg The Schwabacher Family Kent & Tracey Seymour Judith & William Shilstone Judy & Lee Shulman Diane & Branimir Sikic Hannah & Richard Slocum Matthew Sommer Karen & Frank Sortino Saroja Srinivasan Trisha Suppes Jorge & Molly Tapias Rosi & Michael Taymor Rachel Thomas Katherine Tsai Penelope & Robert Waites Patti & Ed White Melanie & Ron Wilensky John & Jane Williams Polly Wong & Wai Fan Yau Mitchell & Kristen Yawitz

SUPPORTER ($250–$499) Anonymous (27) Mark & Stephanie Agnew Matthew & Marcia Allen Eugene An


Dana & Juliana Andersen Daniel Appelman & Deborah Soglin Linda Ara Adrian Arima & Monica Yeung Arima Dan & Leslie Armistead Anne & Robert Baldwin Simon Bare Brigid Barton & Orrin Robinson Grace Baysinger Betsy & George Bechtel Amy Beim Marilyn Belluomini Rachel Bensen Pamela Bernstein Yuet Berry Justin Birnbaum Ruth Brill Beverly Brockway Bill Brownell Cliff & Ronit Bryant Bernard Burke Frances Burr Karen & Ben Cain Michael A. Calabrese Peter & Jane Carpenter Mike Cassidy Cecily Chang Dr. James Chang & Dr. Harriet Roeder Alexander Chapman Beth Charlesworth Gautam Chaudhary Marianne Chen Ada Cheung Nona Chiariello & Chris Field Robert & Susan Christiansen Albert & Betty Cohen Susie Cohen & Barry Weingast Bud & Roxanne Coleman Moby Coquillard & Judy Heller Iva Correia Alana Corso Elaine Costello & Bud Dougherty George Crow Alan Crystal James Cunningham Anthony Custodio & Meredith Ackley William Damon & Anne Colby Tim & Patricia Daniels Anne O. Dauer Ingrid Deiwiks Howard Demroff Stephanie Dolin Virginia & Gregory Donaldson Debra Doucette Janet Driscoll Katharine & William Duhamel Alison Elliott & Steve Blank Renee Euchner Charles Evans & Luis Stevens-Evans Patricia & Fred Evans Laura & Mihail Fechete Nancy & Tom Fiene Kristen E. Finch Renee Fitzsimons Barry Fleisher Leigh Flesher & Mark Bailey Shelley Floyd & Albert Loshajian Reg & Cynthia Ford Gregory Franklin Leah & Lawrence Friedman Adam Frymoyer Tim Gallaher Sarah & Patrick Gibbs Bernd & Sabine Girod Carl & Elizabeth Gish Matt Glickman & Susie Hwang Molly Barnes Goodman & Randolph Goodman Tatiana Granoff & Robert Olson Harry & Diane Greenberg Walter Greenleaf Renee & Mark Greenstein Marla Griesedieck Linda & John Griffin Waldo Griffin Andrew Gutow & Madeleine Blaurock Insook Han Ginger Harmon Courtney Harrison Ann & Barry Haskell Howard & Nancy Hassen Yael Hasson Jeffrey & Caron Heimbuck R. Carl Hertel Lance Hill The Hittle Family Ron Ho & Christina Lai Susan Holmes William Hurlbut Keith Jantzen Dave Jefferson Arthur Johnson Jane & Bill Johnson Zeev Kaliblotzky

Patricia Chambers Kalish Bob Kanefsky Pearl Karrer Melanie & Perry Karsen Stina & Herant Katchadourian Ron Katz & Libby Roth Jeffrey & Marcia Keimer Shirley Kelley Maureen Kelly Lynn & Richard Kelson Tahsin N. Khan Stephanie Kimbro Kenton & Keiko King Ralph King & Leslie Chin James Kitch Dan Klotz Cynthia Krieger & Stuart Friedman Leslie Kriese The Kirincich Family Norman & Nina Kulgein Ralph & Rose Lachman Lila LaHood Cathy & Dick Lampman Ed Landels & Martha McDaniel Jacob Langsner Donna Lera Laurie Leventhal-Belfer & Howard Belfer Lee Levitt Raymond & Kathleen Levitt Living Trust Reuben Levy Hongquan Li Susan Li Yanbin Li Sandra Lillie Randall & Lori Livingston Sarah Longstreth & Tom Culbertson Hal & Carol Louchheim Ellen & James Lussier Adrian & Margot Maarleveld Marion & Erick Mack Helen & David MacKenzie Fred Malouf Grainger Marburg & Katie Woodworth Carol Matre & Richard Swanson Leslie Mayerson Laure & Sam Mazzara James McElwee Nancy & Patrick McGaraghan Maura McGinnity & Erik Rausch Hillary McKinney Leslie McNeil Wallace Mersereau John Micek Alan F. Miller Monica Moore & Deborah Burgstrum Rudolf Moos Coralie & Gerhard Mueller Kathleen Murren Kevin & Brenda Narcomey Susan Nash The Neumann Family Joan Norton Richard & Susan Olshen Erik & Jill Olson Dick & Sandi Pantages Kartikey Patel Gary & Sandy Peltz Ann Perry Caroline Petersen Helen Pickering Klaus & Ellen Porzig Bert & Anne Raphael James Reilly Martin Reinfried Laurie Reynolds Angela Riccelli Barry & Janet Robbins Annette & William Ross Ruth Rothman Joel & Rachel Samoff Denise Savoie & Darrell Duffie Mary Schlosser Kevin Scott Joy & Richard Scott Grady Seale Michael Sego Carla Shatz Winnie & Gil Siegel Ashka Simpson Mindy Spar Helen & David Spiegel Kathy Stark & Christopher Aoki Elliot & Karen Stein Raymond & Apryl Stern Sandra & James Stoecker Rebecca & Ben Stolpa Jenny Stone Jay Jackman & Myra Strober Yannie Tan Nicholas Telischak Lothar & Ilse de Temple Harold & Jan Thomas Chris & Carol Thomsen

Mary Toman Elizabeth Trueman & Raymond Perrault Anne Tuttle Jeanine Valadez & Reynette Au Victoria Valenzuela The Vargas Family Teri & Mark Vershel Madeleine & Anders Viden Lisa Voge-Levin Roger & Wendy Von Oech Rita & Newton Wachhorst Lora Wadsworth Joan & Roger Warnke Hans & Frauke Weiler Joseph & Erika Wells The Wendling Family Dr. & Mrs. R. Jay Whaley Jeri & Kevin Wheaton Ann & Matt White Anne Wilbur Justina Williams Paul Williams & Helge Ternsten Catherine Wilson & Steven Callander Jennifer & Phil Winters Mike Wright Warren Wu Marilyn & Irvin Yalom Mariko Yoshihara Yang & Phillip Yang Nicholas Yu Selma Zinker Yao Zou

2019–20 Advisory Council

PERFORMANCE SPONSORS

Bing Concert Hall Donors

Helen & Peter Bing Mary & Clinton Gilliland Marcia & John Goldman Stephanie & Fred Harman Leslie & George Hume Trine Sorensen & Michael Jacobson Bonnie & Marty Tenenbaum The Wollenberg Foundation

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS $100,000+ The Koret Foundation Stanford Medicine The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation $10,000–$49,999 Anonymous California Arts Council Capital Group Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation National Endowment for the Arts Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Funds Wells Fargo $1,000–$9,999 Aaron Copland Fund for Music The Amphion Foundation, Inc. New Music USA Western States Arts Federation Contributions listed are from current Stanford Live members who made gifts through 1/15/20. For corrections, or to make a contribution, please contact us at 650.725.8782 or supportstanfordlive@stanford.edu. To learn more about giving to Stanford Live, visit live.stanford.edu/give.

37

The purpose of the Stanford Live Advisory Council is to support the mission of Stanford Live and to provide advice on the strategic direction of the organization. Fred Harman, Chair Jeanne Aufmuth Peter Bing Rick Holmstrom David Hornik George H. Hume Leslie P. Hume Lisa Jones Cathy McMurtry Roger McNamee Linda Meier Trine Sorensen Srinija Srinivasan Doug Tanner Jorge Tapias David Wollenberg

Ex officio: Maude Brezinski Stephen Sano Anne Shulock

BUILDING DONORS Peter and Helen Bing Cynthia Fry Gunn and John A. Gunn The John Arrillaga Family Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Roberta and Steve Denning Elizabeth and Bruce Dunlevie Jill and John § Freidenrich Frances and Theodore Geballe Andrea and John Hennessy Leslie and George Hume Susan and Craig McCaw Deedee and Burton § McMurtry Linda and Tony Meier Wendy Munger and Leonard Gumport Jennifer Jong Sandling and M. James Sandling Regina and John Scully Madeline and Isaac Stein Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang

BING EXPERIENCE FUND DONORS With appreciation for the following donors, who provide major support for programming and musical instruments for Bing Concert Hall. Anonymous Apogee Enterprises, Inc. The Adolph Baller Performance Fund for Bing Concert Hall Friends of Music at Stanford Fred and Stephanie Harman Fong Liu Elayne and Thomas Techentin, in memory of Beatrice Griffin Bonnie and Marty Tenenbaum The Fay S. and Ada S. Tom Family Turner Corporation The Frank Wells Family Maurice and Helen Werdegar


Coming Up This Spring Thu

M AY

Fri & Sat MAY 1 & 2

Malpaso Dance Company

Thu

MAY 7

MAY 28

Rob Kapilow’s

From Ragtime to

What Makes It Great?

Harlem Stride

John Adams’ Shaker Loops

Featuring Aaron Diehl

Sat

Fri

MAY 9

MAY 29

Powwow Concert

Black Cowboys: An Evening with Dom Flemons

Wed MAY 13

New Century Chamber

Malpaso Dance

Orchestra with Daniel Hope Music of Spheres

Sun

CALENDAR

MAY 3

Lang Lang Don Flemons

Sun MAY 31

Necati Çelik with Denise Gill

Daniel Hope

Thu, Fri & Sat

Lang Lang

JUNE

MAY 14–16

Is This a Room: Reality Winner

Wed

Verbatim Transcription

MAY 6

Tina Satter/Half Straddle

Van-Anh Vo and the V’AV Ensemble

Fri JUN 5

Comedy at the Bing: The New Negroes Sat JUN 6

An Evening of Flamenco Music with Grisha Goryachev

Is This a Room Van-Anh Vo

and Serouj Kradjian

Sun

Sun

MAY 17

Wed

JUN 7

Sundays with the

MAY 6

Cantabile Youth Singers

St. Lawrence with

Rob Kapilow’s

Gilles Vonsattel, piano

What Makes It Great? Music of Cole Porter

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365 Lasuen Street, Second Floor

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38

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Plan Your Visit The Interlude Café in Bing Concert

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Hall’s lobby serves guests before

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with five business days’ notice given

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can be reserved for you.

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Performance Venue Information Parking for Bing Concert Hall and Frost Amphitheater can be found in

UN

the Galvez Lot and on Lasuen Street,

ARB

Museum Way, Roth Way, and the Oval.

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visit.stanford.edu/plan/parking.

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For comprehensive campus parking

Frost Amphitheater

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website: live.stanford.edu.

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Directions

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and on Lasuen Street.

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Drive, on Roth Way, on Museum Way,

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Cantor Arts Center

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found along the Oval at the end of Palm

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Parking for Memorial Church can be

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Public Parking

--- Walking Path F

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Parking is FREE on the Stanford campus in metered and lettered parking zones on weekdays

Alumni Café, Arrillaga

after 4:00 pm and on weekends at all times.

Alumni Center

Disabled parking, loading, and service-vehicle restrictions are enforced at all times.

39


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