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Works

Summer 2018

SUNG SU KIM PORTFOLIO In this issue:

Thesis Ensemble AdornĂŠ / CERN, Geneva, Swizerland Residential Loft and Co-living, Detroit

Institution Clague Middle School, Ann Arbor Corner Library, Chicago FAB Robotics / Cast / Waterjet

Mix-use SimpliCity, Chicago

WIP Infinite Possibilities

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Table of Contents T HE SIS

E NS E M B L E A DO R NE // 0 3 - 0 8 I NS T R U C T O R : DE L C A M P O , MAT I A S & M A NNI NG E R , S A NDR A

HOUSING HIGHRISE

G R O W I NG C I R C L E S // 0 9 - 1 4 I NS T R U C T O R : K E L BAU G H , DO U G L A S S

S I MP L I _ C I T Y // 1 5 - 2 0 I NS T R U C T O R : B O G NE R , B O T O ND

INST IT UT IONS_ 01

G R O W I NG C I R C L E S // 2 1 - 2 2 I NS T R U C T O R : M C MO R R O U G H , J O H N

INST IT UT IONS_ 02

C O R NE R F O R E S T // 2 3 - 2 4 I NS T R U C T O R : B L I S S , A NNA M A R I E

FAB_ PANELS

F O L DA B L E // 2 5 I NS T R U C T O R : K E NNE DY, M I C H A E L

FAB_ RO BO T ICS

P O S T P I L L E R // 2 6 I NS T R U C T O R : BR U G MA NN, DU S T I N

WIP

I NF I NI T E P O S S I BI L I T I E S // 2 7 - 2 9 I NDI VI DU A L R E S E A R C H

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T H ESI S E nsemble Ad or né : Finite Boundary and Infinite Patterns MA TIAS DEL CA MPO / S A N D RA M A N N I N G ER Collab or ator s: Yongjo o n K i m & N at han We sse l dyk Cine m a 4D / Maya / Rhi no ce ro s 5 Modern architecture has been looking for an optimal singularity in an attempt to construct a well-tailored object. However, nature is not a “homogeneous soup.” The language of modern architecture has been concealing the complex dynamics of things and ideas in a box of rationality. However, we see architecture as a means of revealing the complexity and the uncertainty of nature by employing patterns of a painterly quality, which allows for infinite possibilities of aesthetics beyond the realm of reason and rationality. Pattern is a medium for understanding a multiplicity of overlaying complex systems and capturing the moments of interaction. The pattern generates a hierarchical framework that allows for the potentiality of new organizational logics. These logics will also be affected by the patterns transitioning between magnitudes of scale from the urban and regional to the architectural detail. This ensemble of logics is the key to creating a framework of this project, which will direct the partto-whole relationship of the design. This thesis explores the “Ensemble” of architecture that clusters different spatial entities of CERN’s new campus within a rigorous and finite organization by allowing the pattern to address the possibility of flexible transitions between different scalar compositions and the potential for future internal and external growth. Under the control of the system, the fundamental elements of a pattern can transform, evolve, and merge together. A variety of formal families composes a more complex group of patterns. A pattern can also transform, overlap, and grow in order to create a field of interactions. The infinite potential of a pattern that grows both inwards and outwards, both two-dimensionally and three-dimensionally, allows for responding to the increasing spatial needs of CERN. The infinity of the pattern continues on the surface of the visitor center by projecting itself on the topological manifolds. The adornment of the ensemble is the interface between the finite and the infinite.

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Research: Formal Families

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Research: Ecology & Patterns


Pattern Projection Axon

Pattern Projection Top Elevation

Visitor Center Iterations

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Arcihitectural Drawings

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Introduction

Interior Perspective

Our proposal explores how the idea of Ensemble can create maximum architectural potentiality by harnessing highly intricate pattern system within the geometric boundary. Understanding CERN's Background CERN’s ambition is not about application of science that responds to a specific problem, but about understanding natural systems at their largest and the smallest scales, and the relationships of everything in between. The ambition is reflected to its future expansion plan with FCC. (approx. circumference 100km) Site The massiveness of the future facilities, including the FCC, requires a solid organizational strategy, which is highly disciplined to meet the scientists’ needs, yet flexible enough to generate infinite spatial potentiality. Adjacency and relationship between the new campus and the existing campus Ensemble “Ensemble” is an idea about how to cluster different entities within a finite organization while allowing the possibility of flexible transition between different scales. The configurations can be morphologically varied and it operates as various spatial uses. To be specific, the rigorous organization of ensemble can create a higher intricacy that allows for a variety of formal typology in respect to its programmatic diversity. Reflecting Pool Perspective

Pattern & Campus

Top Elevation Model

The pattern generates a multiplicity of axis and hierarchy globally and locally as well as connections and adjacencies. The pattern is an organizational strategy, The mechanism and interface between scalar orders of magnitude from the campus within the landscape to the ornamentation of the architecture. The pattern allows the potential of growth internally and externally. The agglomeration of the pattern permits a dynamic multiplicity of potential relationships, instead of static singularity. It is neither the platonic notion of ideal form nor is it formal optimization that responds to a specific contextual problem set. The idea of pattern and ensemble is reflected to the physical planning and programming of the new CERN campus.

Pattern & Campus The superimposition of pattern on the site acts as a formal basis of the recursive process for the building form. The pattern ties the building and the surrounding context together. Based on the base pattern overlaid on the site, multiple massing iterations have been produced.

Pattern & Campus The pattern not only acts as a form-generator, but also acts as an interface of conversion between 2D pattern and 3D materiality. It is projected to the building mass and dictate te material division and scaling architectural details.

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H O USI N G

Site

Jeffers on Lo fts / Ten Ho u ses

EAST LAFAYETTE

ST.

DOUGLASS K EL B A U G H Collabor ator s: Juan Re st re p o & El l i o t Ev ans Revit / Rhinoc e ro s 5 Jefferson Lofts

EAST FORT ST.

The Jefferson Lofts is a project striving to explore the concept of lofted spaces by attempting to create a large variety of unit types to accommodate people of different income rates. The building creates a total of nine different unit types. As a code workaround typical of the Pinkzones in Lean Urbanism, the building incorporates double height units and corridors every other floor to achieve a 7-story building with fire-proof construction only on the ground floor. Though various studies the building includes a total of 39 units ranging from typical lofts to three bedroom apartments where some include balcony spaces and three different communal areas that are distributed throughout the building. Some of these amenity spaces include a community gym, workspace and a rooftop space for the residents to enjoy the views of downtown Detroit and the surrounding area. The construction type inspired the materiality of the wood facade and screening element, where the the construction type begins manifesting itself onto the facade.

BEAUFAIT ST.

JEFFERSON CT.

MELDRUM ST.

SHEILA’S WAY

Ten Houses The Ten Houses project explores the future of housing in Detroit as more millennials and young professionals begin to move back into the city. Though this exploration, the concept of shared housing was explored by creating a series of ten townhouses with a range of five to six different rentable bedrooms. The idea is the cost of the townhouses would be split between young professionals with the overall goal of promoting co-living and cross collaboration between the well-educated youth seeking increased opportunities in a newly rejuvenated Detroit. The townhouses include two terrace/balcony spaces as well as large communal kitchens and lounge spaces.

EAST JEFFERSON

AVE.

JEFFERSON LOFTS TEN HOUSES

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Ten Houses Rendering

Lessons Learned Throughout the development of this project, we gained much insight on the specific restrictions that are generated by the building construction code. Due to this, the project quickly became an exploration of ways we could expand upon the code through a focus on bringing variation of unit types to a one plus three skip corridor configuration. With this intention, we sought to look for methods in which we could address affordability and diversity within our buildings by providing a critique of the current mezzanine code. In doing so, we calculated the lofted spaces by the entire floor plan below as opposed to the direct space it opens up to. This analysis ultimately enabled us to create varying unit types by redistributing the square footage throughout the floor. As a result of this critique, we successfully were able to create a total of nine different unit types which included range of simple lofts up to three bedroom apartments. This eventually resulted in a design scheme that maximized the usage of square footage, provided diversity in the community, and offered a variety of unit type options for a rapidly changing demographic. As Detroit continues to develop, more types of individuals and families will be moving back to the city, with this in mind, our project explores and provides options for all different types of people to live and learn from each other in a development that seeks to grow and adapt to the rapidly changing demographics of one of the largest cities in The United States.

Ten Houses Plans / Detail Section

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Jefferons Lofts Rendering

Unit Typology

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Details


Jefferson Loft: Unit Perspective

Jefferson Loft: Wall Section Detail

Facade

ROOF OVER BALCONY **(EXTERIOR)** REFLECTIVE ROOF COATING EPDM ROOF MEMBRANE (ADH.) 3/4” OSB DECKING 3/4” PLYWOOD CEILING **(INSIDE)**

TOP OF ROOF 76’-0” ROOF 73' - 0"

ROOF OVER CONDITIONED SPACE **(EXTERIOR)** REFLECTIVE ROOF COATING EPDM ROOF MEMBRANE (ADHEARED) 3/4” OSB DECKING 12” BATT INSUL. 3/4” PLYWOOD CEILING **(INSIDE)**

One of our primary goals throughout the design relates to the construction JEFFERSON LOFTS type manifesting itself onto the Elliot Evans, Juan Restrepo, Sung Su Kim facade in regards to its material Kelbaugh characteristics. The project also takes on multipul sustainable aspects that Wall Section begin to shape the facade dynamically through the integrated movable louver Wall Section Design Narrative: system located on the South and West One of our primary goals throughout the design relatesfacades. to the construction type manifesting itself onto the facade in regards to its material characteristics. Level 3 33' - 0"

Level 4 52' - 0"

ROOF 73' - 0"

MEZ 4 62’-0” MEZ 4 62' - 0"

2X8 HEADER COLLUMN (BEYOND)

EXTERIOR WALL **(INTERIOR)** 5/8” GYPSUM BOARD INT. FINISH VAPOR BARRIER 2 x 6 STUD WALL WITH H.D. BATT INSUL. 3/4” PLYWOOD SHEATHING 1” POLYISOCYANURATE (FOIL-FACED) BREATHABLE WEATHER BARRIER 1/2” AIR SPACE 3/4” CEDER GROOVED PANELING **(EXTERIOR)**

Level 4 52' - 0"

MOVABLE LOUVER SYSTEM (WOOD)

MEZ 3 43’-0” MEZ 3 43' - 0"

42” RAILING + TRACK FOR LOUVER SYSTEM

LVL. 3 33’-0” Level 3 33' - 0"

MEZ 2 24’-0” MEZ 2 24' - 0"

LVL. 2 14’-0”

1ST FL. EXTERIOR WALL **(INSIDE)** 12” CMU BLOCK VAPOR RETARDER 2” RIDGID INSULATION MOISTURE BARRIER 1/2” AIR SPACE PREFAB CONCRETE PANEL **(EXTERIOR)**

Level 2 14' - 0"

LVL. 1 0’-0”

TYP. FLOOR LAYERS **(TOP)** 3/4” PLYWOOD FLOORING GREEN GLUE 1/2” PLYWOOD SERENA MAT UNDERLAY (FOR NOISE C.) UNDERLAY ADHESIVE 3/4” OSB SUBFLOOR 11 5/8” TJI JOIST 16” O.C. 1/2” PLYWOOD CEILING

1ST FL. FLOOR LAYERS **(TOP)** 4” CONCRETE SLAB VAPOR RETARDER 2“ RIGID INSULATION MOISTURE BARRIER 2” SAND 4” GRAVEL GROUND BELOW

MEZ 2 24' - 0"

1’-6” MIN. FOOTING

Level 1 0' - 0"

WALL SECTION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Level 4 52' - 0"

MEZ 3 Level 1 43' - 0" 0' - 0"

FOOTING -4’-0” PARTIAL SOUTH ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Through three primary facade conditions we are also able to hint at the program hidden behind the facade. First, the more public areas, such as the storefronts on the ground floor as well as the common spaces on each floor are parimarally faced with glazing, window wall / curtain wall systems. In contrast the residentail This particular wall section focuses on the lofted unit r iav asecondary t e s p ascreening c e s , awall r ecreated d o mbyi- n a t e d b y which p has vertical wood louvers and movable sliding + folding wood pallet. a majority of the louver a system. One major elementAt we explored that is conveyed within the section are the opperable double high, lofted spaces the wood windows within the window wall for natural ventilation and tofcapitalise on the stack affect. Another aspect acade manifests itself through which is still under inspection is the beam that connects the mez. floor to the vertical mullions. This is past the vertical louvers which extend not only to help hold the floor up but it also acts as a brace against the wind since itthe is a double height Then for balcony toloadform railing. space. the 2 story, more affordable units the use of grouved wood paneling is used. ThroughMEZ three primary facade conditions we are also 4 62' - 0" able to hint at the program hidden behind the facade. First, the more public areas, such as the storefronts on the ground floor as well as the common spaces on each floor are parimarally faced with glazing, window wall / curtain wall systems. In contrast the residentail private spaces, are dominated by a wood pallet. At a majority of the double high, lofted spaces the wood facade manifests itself through vertical louvers which Level 2 14' - 0" extend past the balcony to form the railing. Then for the 2 story, Level 3 more affordable units the use of grouved 33' - 0" wood paneling is used.

METAL FRAME FOR LOUVER SYSTEM (BEYOND)

TYP. BALCONY **(TOP)** DUCKBOARD FLOATING DECK SYSTEM DRANAGE/WEATHER MEMBRANE SLOPED BLOCKING FOR DRANAGE 3/4”OSB SUBFLOOR 2X8 JOISTS 1/2” PLYWOOD CEILING

MEZ 2 24' - 0"

The project MEZ 3 also takes on multipul sustainable aspects 43' - 0" that begin to shape the facade dynamically through the integrated movable louver system located on the South and West facades.

LVL. 4 52’-0”

PARTIAL SOUTH ELEVATION SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

DETAILED WALL SECTION SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

Level 2 14' - 0"

KEY ELEVATION NOT TO SCALE

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Jefferson Loft Interior Rendering

Model Picture 1, 2, and 3

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Jefferson Loft Roof Garden

Model Picture 4, 5, and 6

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HIG H RI S E Si m p l i_City BOT OND BOGNER Co lla borator s: Mar yr ose Zb e zi nski & Ro ngb o H u R ev i t / Sketc hUp Development at Wolf Point in Chicago integrates four different programs into one building and creates a vertical city. The design was based on Kevin Lynch's five urban elements: Path, Edge, Node, District, and Landmark. These ideas were incorporated into different spaces within the building layout. Other important consideration included viewpoints for the various programs to celebrate the Chicago River Front. The building is consist of 72 floors above ground and three underground floors. The Frame created between two "Legs" allowed the users to experience the sublime from the scale. The office and the residential tower have a slightly smaller footprint compared to the hotel tower to allow more space from the Northeast side of the site. Including the first four floors on the ground and six floors of the "bar" includes the amenity programs to support and sustain the environment within the structure. The West side of the site contains the sunken plaza to attract pedestrians and drivers from the nearby river bridges. Space along the river includes a wooden pathway and various verdant green spaces to revitalize the riverfront.

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Chicago River Rendering + Model Perspective was set to celeberate the Simpi-city with a Wolfpoint Chicago.

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Five Elements Application Reincarnating the city within a highrise is ideal approach for such a project since the site was located in the core of the city. The site's location demands such landmark that can promote the downtown area. In order to bring the city-within-a-city concept to the design, we have adapted the Kevin Lynch's 5 Elements of the "City". - Paths: routes along which people move throughout the city; - Rdges: boundaries and breaks in continuity; - Districts: areas characterized by common characteristics; - Nodes: strategic focus points for orientation like squares and junctions; and - Landmarks: external points of orientation, usually a easily identifyable physical object in the urban landscape.

Formation Diagram

Bottom Right: Skyline Ratio River-side skyline ratio whether the highrise becomes the landmark of the city or not. Wolfpoint is the core of the downtown Chicago; it demands something that is eye-catching.

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Five Elements Diagram


Sections

Bar Amenity

Podium Amenity

This part of amenity, consists of six floors, is solely for the users of the tower. This part of the tower will serve the function of fulfilling the needs of the guests from the hotel, office users, and also the residents. Spaces will be divided into three sections as it is followed by the project programs. Hotel amenity will be located right on top of he West Hotel tower, which is programed to have a restaurant, bars, convention halls, fitness, spa and swimming pool. Lower East section of the tower serves as the office tower. Therefore, the first three levels located on the East side will serve as amenity for the office users. The residential tower is located on top East section of the tower, so we programmed out top three floors of amenity to serve the residents.

Public amenity is for the people who are not the “user� of this spaces. This category of people should have an easier access to the amenities such as restaurant and shops. At the most bottom of the tower, the podium makes the visitors simply enter through center then disperse to the wherever the point of interest of the person is. Also simply by having public amenity, podium, on the bottom of the tower, on street level, there is a clear separation between public user and private users (office, hotel, and residents). Only by having lobbies totally secured from the other spaces around the podium, no worries for public people to enter these areas.

The Bar

Podium

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Structural Diagram

Central Plaza

Hotel & Office

Residence

The Center of the tower Is the heart of the tower. This frames the downtown Chicago with the famous worldly known landmark Willis-Tower. The opening will create the whole new perspective of the Chicago and the visitors from all around the world will experience something unique that will only be established by this landmark “Simpli-City.�

Hotel and office spaces are located in the bottom half of the structure. Both programs require some interlink to the public spaces from private spaces for users to use public amenities.

Residential units are located on the top of the tower to isolate from the public circulation. The bottom half of the tower are programmed to be a hotel and office. In this case, hotel and office populations have easier access to the public amenities.

Podium Perspectives

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Unit Typology

Unit Details

Central Plaza Rendering

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I N S TI T U T I O N S _ 01 G row ing Ci r cles JOHN MCMORR O U G H Re vit / Ske tc hUp

In-Formate De-Formate Re-Formate

The In Formation / De-Formation / Re: Formation studio uses a researchbased approach that works from the premise that buildings and institutions come into existence as parallel developments, and, if one is to work with the ambition of “liberating” institutions, one must first study and understand the institution’s existent operations as a necessary pre-condition for any su bs e q u e nt pr opos i t i on. As i m pl i e d by t h e studio n ame, the approach is threefold. The first aspect, “Information,” focuses on the gathering, filtration, and synthesis of programmatic data into configurations that address the needs (both overt and implicit) of the institution’s various constituencies. “Deformation” works to marshal the extrinsic forces that operate on buildings (zoning and infrastructural constraints) into productive design criteria. Finally “Reformation,” entails a close reading of the institution’s typological history, and identifies potentials within the institutional lineage for new and surprising (i.e. “liberating”) configurations. The final result of the studio is a building, both in its geometric description (drawings, models) but also in l og i c a l a r g u m e nt s for i t s e xi s t e nc e ( di a g r a ms an d n arratives).

Pedagogical Argument Include the technology into the pedagogy of the middle school for the expansion of the education further.

It’s too hard...

?

I can help you!

!

Program Identifying Research

Plan Social Argument This school can provide education to the public, and facilities can be used as a conference, learning and social gathering spaces.

Axonometric Drawing

Urban Argument Adjustment between the original and new grid lines will emphasize the uniqueness of the structure.

Typological Argument Two circles create the two central areas where these two spaces become entertainment + gathering spaces.

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Exterior Perspective

Interior Perspective

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I N S TI T U T I O N S _ 02 Corner_Fo r est A NNA MA RIE BLI SS Revit / Rhinoc e ro s 5 / S ke t chU p The library should function as a space for education, socialization, and communication. However, these are the very basic factors of the character of the library. Chicago is the city where not so much of the sporadic greeneries are celebrated. The design emerged from the reminiscing the forest and shadows of the trees. The idea was to challenge a new idea of the integration of both urban and architectural design should be and find new opportunities within the design decisions. The intention was to create a very modern and chic version of the forest through the facade, while the programs inside create the valley like condition where the users travel through the crevasse like atrium space to access to the programs.

Interior Perspective 1 & 2

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Site Vicinity Diagram


Axon Explosion

Exterior Perspective

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FA B_ P AN E L S F old a ble Panels DU STI N BRU GM AN N Collabor ator : Ha n G ao , Jake G o nde k, & Chri st i na K i m Rhinoc e r os 5 Material: Foam Used Machines: KUKA Robotic Arm & Wire Cutter There are two cut patterns that were processed together. This allowed us for a combination of a fluting and a triangular morphing. Dyfing gravity aesthetics were created from the triangular cuts, however the center of the gravity were calculated to be located at the secure points.

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FA B_PA NE LS F o l dab l e P an e l s M I CH A E L KE N N E D Y C o l l a b o r a t o r : H a n Ga o , Al e c i a H l e b e c h u k Rhinoceros 5 Material: Metal Sheet Used Machines: Water-Jet The panel was designed to be fold-and-insert. This method allows for mass production of the paneling, and it's aesthetic can be applied where unique designed elements is needed to provide accent to the environment.

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Scene 1: The Whale

Scene 2: The Light Stand

WIP I nfinite Possibilities : Vo l.1, Scene 1 - 5 INDIVIDUA L RE S EA RCH Maya / Cine m a 4 D / Re v i t After the graduation, for the first five days, I took one more step further into a search for architectural possibilities within the programs that were used in animation / visual effects software. Various programs used for these different design media such as Cinema 4D and Maya, which allowed me to easily visualize the collection of the design in different scales, from the scale of furniture to mega-structure. The method of generating a formal series was different from the usual modeling and designing process. It allowed creating a unique set of palettes, not only from the general scope of space as architecture has been but through the different scales and time. Animated forms allowed the rigid bodies to adapt more of fluid flows between the variations of the volume created throughout the animated frames. The models were chosen in a highly selective process, each animated models generated about a hundred plus types of the models to compare the fusion of the variants given with the forms. The agglomeration and blend between the models not only provided the possibilities within the models throughout the frames, but the possibilities of the adaptation of the other design tools that are unrestricted to architecture toolsets.

Scene 3: The Sphere

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Scene 4: The Midrise


Scene 5: The Megastructure

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SUNG SU KIM SUMMER 2018  

WORKS

SUNG SU KIM SUMMER 2018  

WORKS

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