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OR D E R S , D E C OR AT I O N S , C A M PA I G N M E D A L S A N D M I L I TA R I A

19 July 2012 • London

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69 Southampton Row © Copyright 2012

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Bloomsbury www.spink.com

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London WC1B 4ET

19 July 2012 • London

STAMPS COINS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS BOOKS WINES

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria


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AUCTION CALENDAR 2012/2013 Group Chairman and CEO Olivier D. Stocker Your Specialists Stamps UK - Tim Hirsch Guy Croton David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Dominic Savastano Tom Smith USA - Chris Anderson George Eveleth Andrew Titley Ed Robinson Rick Penko Europe - Guido Craveri Fernando Martínez China - Anna Lee Johnny Sang Coins UK - Paul Dawson Julie-Morgane Lecoindre Richard Bishop William MacKay Barbara Mears John Pett USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini Normand Pepin China - Mark Li Banknotes, Bonds & Shares UK - Barnaby Faull Mike Veissid Andrew Pattison Tom Badley USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini China - Mark Li Orders, Decorations, Medals & Militaria UK - Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys Books UK - Philip Skingley Alex Smith Autographs USA - Stephen Goldsmith Wines China - Anna Lee Your Europe Team (London - Lugano) Chairman’s Office Dennis Muriu Monica Kruber Directors Tim Hirsch Anthony Spink Auction & Client Management Team Miroslava Adusei-Poku Sandie Maylor Charles Blane Luca Borgo Phillipa Brown Rita Ariete María Martínez Maurizio Schenini Finance Alison Bennet Marco Fiori Mina Bhagat Alison Kinnaird Shyam Padhiar Billy Tumelty IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Attila Gyanyi Liz Cones Curlene Spencer John Winchcombe Bobby McBrierty Tom Robinson Cristina Dugoni Giacomo Canzi Your America Team (New York - Dallas) Chairman Emeritus John Herzog Auction Administration and Marketing & Design Rick Penko Patricia Gardner James McGuire Emily Cowin Clyde Townsend Finance & Administration Sam Qureshi Ingrid Qureshi Ed Robinson Auctioneers Stephen Goldsmith Tracy Shreve Andrew Titley Your Asia Team (Hong Kong - Singapore) Vice Chairman Anna Lee Administration Amy Yung Raymond Tat Gary Tan

Stamps 5 July 11 July 11 July 12/13 July 14 July 18/19 July 25 August 12 September 13 September 23 September Early October 23 October 23 October 24 October 8/9 November 14 November 12 December 12/13 January

The Chartwell Collection - GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs, Stamps and Covers - Part III Rhodesia Double Heads - The Alan Uria Collection Progressive Proofs and Artist’s Essays of Cook Islands, Aitutaki, Penrhyn and Niue The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Chartwell Collection - GB King Edward VIII, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth II Great Britain Stamps Specialised Sale Fine Stamps and Covers of South East Asia The Collector’s Series Sale Victoria Half Lengths - The John Barwis Collection The “Fordwater” Collections of Falkland Islands, Gibraltar and Malta Queensland - The Alan Griffiths Collection The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Chartwell Collection - GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs, Stamps and Covers - Part IV Fine Stamps and Covers of Hong Kong and China

London London London London Hong Kong New York Hong Kong London London Singapore Hong Kong London London London New York London London Hong Kong

Coins 27/28 June 14 July 22/23 August 25 August 26/27 September 13/14 November 4 December 15/16 January

Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals The Collector’s Series Sale

London Hong Kong New York Hong Kong London New York London New York

12025 12032 314 12033 12026 315 12027 316

Banknotes 14 July 22/23 August 25 August 26 September 2 October 2 October 3/4 October 13/14 November 6 December 15/16 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Charity Auction of Bank of England Notes The David Kirch Collection of Bank of England Notes - Part I The David Kirch Collection of English Provincial Banknotes - Part I World Banknotes The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes The Collector’s Series Sale

Hong Kong New York Hong Kong London London London London New York London New York

12032 314 12033 12037 12034 12035 12023 315 12024 316

Medals 19 July 6 September 22 November 25 April 25 July 21 November

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria The Bentley Priory Battle of Britain Trust Appeal Charity Auction Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

London London London London London London

12003 12044 12004 13001 13002 13003

Bonds and Shares 14 July 22/23 August 25 August 13/14 November 28 November 15/16 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World The Collector’s Series Sale

Hong Kong New York Hong Kong New York London New York

12032 314 12033 315 12011 316

Autographs 22/23 August 13/14 November 15/16 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale

New York New York New York

Wines July September November

An Evening of Exceptional Wines An Evening of Exceptional Wines An Evening of Exceptional Wines

Hong Kong Hong Kong Hong Kong

The above sale dates are subject to change

Spink offers the following services Valuations for insurance and probate for individual items or whole collections. Sales on a commission basis either of individual pieces or whole collections.

12015 12038 12040 12016 12032 140 12033 12017 12018 12019 12042 12039 12043 12020 12021

314 315 316


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Orders, Decorations, Campaign medals and militaria Thursday 19 July 2012 at 10.00 a.m. In sending commission bids or making enquiries, this sale should be referred to as GODLEY - 12003

Sale Location: Spink, 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET

Viewing at 69 Southampton Row: Tuesday 17 July 2012 Wednesday 18 July 2012

YOUR SPINK TEAm

10.00 a.m.- 5.00 p.m. 10.00 a.m.- 5.00 p.m.

FOR ThIS SALE

For your questions about the sale lots: mark Quayle +44 (0)20 7563 4064 / mquayle@spink.com

and on Oliver Pepys +44 (0)20 7563 4061 / opepys@spink.com Vat No: GB 791627108 Telephone: 020 7563 4000 Fax: 020 7563 4066

Web Site: For more information about Spink services, forthcoming sales and sales results you can access the Spink web site at www.spink.com

Purchase a catalogue: Please telephone 020 7563 4108 or fax 020 7563 4037 or e-mail catalogues@spink.com for details.

John hayward +44 (0)20 7563 4049 / jhayward@spink.com For your bids: miroslava Adusei-Poku +44 (0)20 7563 4020 Fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4037 auctionteam@spink.com For your internet bidding: Attila Gyanyi +44 (0)20 7563 4090 / agyanyi@spink.com For your payment: Shyam Padhiar +44 (0)20 7563 4023 / spadhiar@spink.com For your VAT enquiries: John Winchcombe +44 (0)20 7563 4101 / jwinchcombe@spink.com

Use this QR code to visit our online catalogue and leave proxy bids on Spink Live. You can download the QR Code Reader for iPhone, Blackberry and Android from App Store on your smartphone

Spink is pleased to continue to offer Spink Live, the internet bidding service which has revolutionized the way in which our clients bid at auction. If you have not already had the opportunity to try this state-of-the-art bidding tool feel free to contact us today for personal assistance in getting started. We are very proud of how the programme has developed over the years and are looking forward to a record breaking year in 2012. For more information contact Berdia Qamarauli today Tel: +44 (0)20 7563 4089 Email: bqamarauli@spink.com

Our Environmental Commitment: Paper from Sustainable Forests and Non Hazardous Ink For centuries Spink and its employees have been preserving and curating collectable items. We now wish to play a modest role in preserving our planet, as well as the heritage of collectables, so future generations may enjoy both. We insist that our printers source all paper used in the production of Spink catalogues from FSC registered suppliers (for further information on the FSC standard please visit fsc.org) and use inks containing non hazardous ingredients. Spink recycle all ecological material used on our premises and we would encourage you to recycle your catalogue once you have finished with it. Front Cover Illustration: Lot 5

Back Cover Illustration: Lot 2 Captain A.F.G. Kilby urging his men on at the Battle of Loos, 25th September 1915, taken from Deeds that Thrill the Empire


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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Order of Sale Thursday 19 July 2012 Groups and Pairs with Orders and Decorations for Gallantry or Distinguished Service ........................................................

1 - 22

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23 - 28

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29 - 44

Campaign Groups and Pairs

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45 - 100

medals to the Ferrior Family

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101 - 102

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103 - 319

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320 - 324

medals to the hamilton, Cox and Clibborn Families British Orders and Single Awards

Single Campaign medals miscellaneous

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325 - 404

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405 - 409

Foreign Orders, Decorations and medals miniature Awards

Coronation, Jubilee, Long Service and Efficiency Decorations and medals ............................................................................................ 410 - 431

We regret to announce the death on the 9th May of Edward Charles Joslin, L.V.O. (1924-2012). Edward joined Spink in 1946 following Wartime service in the Royal Navy, and was Head of the Medal Department from 1953-86. During his time at Spink he was instrumental in producing the first ‘Standard Catalogue’ of British Medals, as well as overseeing the first Spink Medal Auction in December 1983.

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July 19, 01 - London

THURSDAY 19 JULY 2012 Commencing at 10.00 a.m. All Sales are subject to the Conditions of Business printed at the back of this catalogue Estimates The estimated selling price of each lot is printed below the lot description and does not include the Buyer’s Premium. Bidders should bear in mind that estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and are not definitive. They are subject to revision.

GROUPS AND PAIRS WITH ORDERS AND DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY OR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

1 1 The Superb Great War V.C. Group of Six to Private S.F. Godley, Royal Fusiliers, For the Defence of the Nimy Bridge at Mons, 23rd April 1914, When, Although Severely Wounded by Shrapnel and With a Bullet Lodged in his Skull, He Took Over a Machine-Gun From His Mortally Wounded Commanding Officer and Continued to Hold his Position, Single Handed For Two Hours Against a Sustained Heavy German Assault, The First Infantry Attack of the Great War, When The Order Came To Withdraw He Maintained A Covering Fire Until All The Battalion Was Evacuated; Overtaken by the Enemy He Was Taken Prisoner of War. Private Godley and His Commanding Officer Lieutenant Dease Were Both Awarded The Victoria Cross- The First V.C.s of the Great War a) Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar engraved ‘Private S.F. Godley, 4th. Battn. Royal Fusiliers.’, reverse of Cross engraved ‘23. Aug. 1914.’ b) 1914 Star, with Bar (13814 Pte. S. Godley. 4/R. Fus.) c) British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves (L-13814 Pte. S.F. Godley. R.Fus.) d) Coronation 1937 e) Coronation 1953, campaign medals polished, otherwise nearly very fine, the Cross better, housed in a Spink, London, leather case, the lid embossed ‘S.F. Godley. V.C.’ (6) £140,000-180,000 V.C. London Gazette 25.11.1914 13814 Private Sidney Frank Godley, 4th Battalion The Royal Fusiliers, City of London Regiment ‘For coolness and gallantry in fighting his machine gun under a hot fire for two hours after he had been wounded at mons on 23rd August.’ The original Recommendation, by Lieutenant F.W.A. Steele, Royal Fusiliers, states: ‘In the defence of a railway bridge near Nimy, 23rd August 1914, Private Godley of ‘B’ Company showed particular heroism in his management of the machine guns. his Commanding Officer having been severely wounded and each machine gunner in turn shot, Private Godley was called to the firing line on the bridge and under heavy fire he had to remove three dead bodies and proceed to an advanced machine gun position under a sustained enemy fire. he carried on defending the position for two hours after he had received a severe head wound.’

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria Battalion, Royal Fusiliers were positioned at this critical point and were responsible for the embankment and the two bridges. The rail bridge was additionally defended by two machine-guns under the command of Lieutenant m.J. Dease, Royal Fusiliers. Railway sleepers were set up to act as emplacements for the gunners.

Private S.F. Godley m.I.D. London Gazette 19.10.1914 No. 13814 Private S. Godley, 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. 13814 Private Sidney Frank Godley, V.C., was born in East Grinstead, Sussex, on the 14th August 1889, the son of Frank Godley, a local plumber, and the nephew of George Godley, a metropolitan Police Officer involved in the 1888 hunt for Jack the Ripper. his mother died when he was six, and he moved to live with an uncle and aunt in Willesden, North London. his father re-married in 1899 and soon after Godley and his brother moved back to live with his father and step-mother in Bromley, Kent, where he attended the Sidcup National School. he left school at fourteen and worked at an ironmonger’s shop in Kilburn, before enlisting in the Royal Fusiliers on the 13th December 1909. he was a noted sportsman in the Battalion, being a keen footballer, cricketer, and cross-country runner. Outbreak of War Following the outbreak of War in August 1914, Godley’s Battalion, the 4th Royal Fusiliers, was one of the first to embark for the Western Front; arriving on the Continent on the 13th August, as part of the 9th Brigade, 3rd Division, II Corps, they advanced to the town of mons, just over the Belgian border, reaching the outskirts of the town on the 22nd August. That morning a patrol from the 4th Dragoon Guards had encountered a German picquet on the road leading to mons and, firing upon it, had driven it off- the first shot of the War fired by the British on the Continent. Further reconnaissances carried out that day by British Cavalry units established the fact that the German forces in great numbers were present in the immediate vicinity, and the entire British Expeditionary Force was ordered to advance forward to take up a position on the banks of the monsCondé Canal. Following a trying march over cobbled roads, Godley’s Battalion reached the canal on the afternoon of the 22nd. As would become all too soon apparent, the canal formed a far from ideal defensive line. A broad belt of woodland extended along the whole length of the north of the canal, thus capable of screening the approach of the enemy to within a mile of the British line. Furthermore, as the canal approached mons it formed a wide loop passing through the suburb of Nimy, thus making a salient, which was equally ill-adapted to a prolonged and serious defence. Two bridges crossed the canal at Nimy, a road bridge and a rail bridge; if the Germans were able to capture these bridges then the British Expeditionary Force would be surrounded and would have to evacuate their entire forward line. ‘B’ and ‘C’ Companies, 4th

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Battle of Mons At first light on the morning of Sunday 23rd August the gun teams were hard at work improving the defensive positions on the bridge. The weather was fine, Church bells were ringing, and all around them the inhabitants of the villages near the canal were heading for divine worship. Two children approached Private Godley as he worked on the defences: ‘a little boy and girl came up on the bridge, and brought me some rolls and coffee. I was thoroughly enjoying the rolls and coffee, and talking to the children the best I could, when the Germans started shelling us. So I said to this little boy and girl “You’d better sling your hooks now, otherwise you may get hurt.” Well, they packed their basket and left.’ (Recipient’s account taken from VCs of the First World War 191 refers). The bombardment increased as the morning advanced, and at 09:00 hours the Germans began their attack in earnest, as four battalions were suddenly flung at the head of the Nimy bridge- the first infantry attack of the Great War. As the enemy advanced in close column their front sections collapsed under the deadly and accurate fire from the two British machine guns, and they fell back in haste to the woods. Renewing their attack in greater numbers half an hour later they managed to establish a foot-hold on the railway bridge, from where they were able to maintain an accurate and deadly fire on the British line. Lieutenant Dease was hit in the neck, but insisted in maintaining a returning fire. manning one of the guns himself, he was exposed to murderous rifle, machine gun, and artillery fire, and kept calling for gunners to take the place of men who were dead or wounded in the fighting. All this time Private Godley had been working on the bridge, and, although wounded from shrapnel in his back and a bullet which had lodged in his skull, had continued to help provide ammunition. Finally, Lieutenant Dease fell- hit for a fifth time, his body lay slumped over the railway tracks. Seeing this, and despite his wounds, Godley immediately took over the gun from him and, despite having to remove three dead bodies to get into position, maintained a returning fire. At 14:00 hours, with casualties mounting, and all the men of the two gun crews either killed or wounded, orders came for the Battalion to withdraw, under the command of Lieutenant F.W.A. Steele. They had to move from their dangerous position across 250 yards of exposed open ground which was being swept by shrapnel and machine gun fire. Godley alone remained at his gun and continued to hold the bridge singlehandedly, maintaining a covering fire until all the Battalion had been successfully evacuated with minimal additional casualties. Eventually, after running out of ammunition, his final act was to destroy the gun and to throw the pieces into the canal. he had inflicted tremendous damage on the German infantry and saved his Battalion from destruction.

Victoria Cross (reverse)


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Private S.F Godley working the machine-gun in Defence of the Bridge at mons, 23rd August 1914, taken from Deeds that Thrill the Empire. Prisoner of War Crawling off the bridge, Godley was soon overtaken by the advancing enemy and was taken Prisoner of War, being sent first to Berlin for surgery and skin grafts; bullets were removed from his skull and back, and his back alone needed 150 stitches. When he was fit enough he was transferred to a Prisoner of War camp at Doberitz, where he was informed on his arrival by the senior German officer in charge of the prison that he had been awarded the Victoria Cross; Godley’s V.C., along with that awarded to Lieutenant Dease, for ‘both displaying the most conspicuous gallantry in working the gun after they had been wounded’ (Battalion War Diary refers) were the first V.C.s awarded for the Great War. he remained a Prisoner of War for the next four years: ‘Private S.F. Godley, who won the V.C. but is now a prisoner of war in Germany, had the “honour” of being invited to dine with German officers on Christmas Day because they understand the V.C. in England was equal to the Iron Cross in Germany. The V.C. is the greatest honour a British soldier can acquire, and to speak of the two as equal in merit is a disgraceful insult to our V.C. heroes.’ (East Grinstead Observer, 26.2.1916 refers), but was able to escape in 1918 when the camp guards deserted their posts during the revolution in Berlin, and returned to England via Denmark. Whilst in Denmark he sent a postcard home to his family telling them that he was being repatriated. This arrived on the day he arrived home. however the first member of his family to meet him was his sister, who knew nothing of the arrival of the postcard, and bumped into him while out shopping. (Article in the Kentish Mercury, 20.12.1918 refers). he was presented with his Victoria Cross by h.m. King George V at Buckingham Palace on the 15th February 1919; he was later given a civic reception in Lewisham and presented by the mayor of Lewisham with 50 Guineas and a copy of the Lewisham Roll of honour. ‘Old Bill’ After the War Godley was discharged from the Army and in 1919 married miss helen Norman at St. mark’s Church, harlesden; the service being conducted by the Rev. Edward mellish, V.C. Between the Wars he worked as the caretaker at Cranbrook School, Bethnal Green, as well as being a regular volunteer at the Regimental museum at the Tower of London and working very hard on behalf of Service charities, in particular the ‘Old Contemptible’s’ Association.

he also regularly dressed up as ‘Old Bill’, the character created by the artist Bruce Bairnsfather that symbolised the typical ‘British Tommy’ during the First World War. Tradition has it that the Bairnsfather based the character on Godley; in any event Godley did bear a striking resemblance to the character and used it to good effect: ‘he had the walrus style moustache, wore his hat at a rakish angle and sported a pipe; on occasions he would wear a helmet with the design of a Union Jack covering it.’ (VCs of the First World War 191 refers). On occasions he took part in the Armistice Service at the Cenotaph in London, and in 1939, nearly 25 years after the Battle of mons, Godley, together with a party of fifty men from the Royal Fusiliers, attended the opening of a new railway bridge at Nimy. During the ceremony a plaque commemorating the heroism of Lieutenant Dease and Private Godley was unveiled, which reads ‘To the glorious memory of the officers, N.C.O.s and men of the 4th Bn Royal Fusiliers who held this sector of the British front in defence of the town of mons August 23rd 1914. This memorial marks the machine Gun Position where the first V.C.s awarded during the War 19141918 were gained by Lt. m.J. Dease V.C. and Pte. S.F. Godley V.C.’ Following the ceremony the mayor of mons gave a reception at the hotel de Ville; one of the fellow guests was the little boy who had fed Godley with rolls and coffee on the morning of the battle. In 1956 Godley took part in the celebrations to mark the Centenary of the institution of the Victoria Cross, the highlight of which was the parade at hyde Park when, exactly 99 years to the day since Queen Victoria had decorated the first 62 V.C. recipient’s whilst seated on her horse ‘Sunset’, 297 living V.C. recipients paraded in front of h.m. The Queen. A regular attender of Old Comrades’ reunions all his life, Private Godley died in hospital in Epping, Essex, on the 29th June 1957, and was buried with full military honours in Loughton Cemetery. Officiating at his funeral was his fellow V.C., the Rev. Edward mellish, who had married him 36 years earlier. A Civic ‘Blue Plaque’ marks the house where he last lived. In 1976 a new housing estate in Bexley, close to where he went to school, was built and named the Godley V.C. housing Estate; and in 1992 a new housing block in Bethnal Green, close to where he lived, was named Sidney Godley V.C. house in his honour.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 2 The Outstanding Great War Posthumous 1915 ‘Loos’ V.C., 1914 ‘Ypres’ M.C. Group of Five to Captain A.F.G. Kilby, 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, For Sustained Gallantry, Cold Courage, and Leadership in the Early Stages of His Battalion’s Operations, And For Most Conspicuous Bravery on the First Day of the Battle of Loos, 25.9.1915, When He Volunteered With His Company to Attack an Enemy Strong-Point in the La Bassée Canal Area. Wounded at the Outset, He Charged Along the Narrow Tow-Path at the Head of His Men, Urging Them On and On Right Up to the Enemy Wire Where, Having Been Hit And With His Foot Blown Off, He Was Last Seen Encouraging His Men Forwards. Commended By The Germans, They Buried Him Where He Fell and Inscribed A Simple Wooden Cross Beside The Tow-Path Outside Their Redoubt: ‘The Kilby Family May Think Of Their Son With Pride, As We Remember Him With Respect.’ a) Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar engraved ‘Capt. A.F.G. Kilby, Late 2nd. Bn. S. Staffords. Regt.’, reverse of Cross engraved ‘25. Sep. 1915.’ b) military Cross, G.V.R., reverse privately engraved in serif capitals ‘Capt. A.F.G. Kilby. South Staffordshire Regt. Novr. 3rd. 1914, may 10th. 1915. Ypres.’ c) 1914 Star, with Bar (Capt: A.F.G. Kilby. S. Staff: R.) d) British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. A.F.G. Kilby.), minor edge bruise to BWM, generally nearly extremely fine, all housed in a glazed display frame, with the recipient’s Great War Bronze memorial Plaque (Arthur Forbes Gordon Kilby), this housed in fitted leather box, with Buckingham Palace enclosure (6) £140,000-180,000 V.C. London Gazette 30.3.1916 Captain Arthur Forbes Gordon Kilby, late 2nd Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment ‘For most conspicuous bravery. Captain Kilby was specially selected, at his own request, and on account of the gallantry which he had previously displayed on many occasions, to attack with his company a strong enemy redoubt. The company charged along the narrow tow-path, headed by Captain Kilby, who, though wounded at the outset, continued to lead his men right up to the enemy wire under a devastating machine-gun fire and a shower of bombs. here he was shot down, but, although his foot had been blown off, he continued to cheer on his men and to use a rifle. Captain Kilby has been missing since the date of the performance of this great act of valour, and his death has now to be presumed.’ m.C. London Gazette 18.2.1915 Captain A. F. G. Kilby, The South Staffordshire Regiment ‘For services rendered in connection with Operations in the Field.’ m.I.D. London Gazette 17.2.1915 Kilby, Captain A.F.G., 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment ‘For gallant and distinguished service in the field.’ Captain Arthur Forbes Gordon Kilby, V.C., M.C., was born at East hayes, Cheltenham, on the 3rd February 1885, the son of James Kilby, formerly of the Bengal Police and Customs Department, and was educated at Winchester College and the Royal military Academy, Sandhurst. he was Commissioned a Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, South

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Captain A.F.G. Kilby

Staffordshire Regiment, 16.8.1905; and was promoted Lieutenant, 31.10.1907; and Captain, at the relatively early age of 25, 1.4.1910. Initially posted as a subaltern with his Battalion to Strensall, he used to make regular visits to York minster, trips which started a lifelong interest in architecture and led him to declare York as one of the most beautiful of English Cathedrals. Also a keen student of foreign languages, he was fluent in both German and hungarian- the only Officer in the Army to be fluent in the latter at the start of the Great War. Prior to the outbreak of the Great War he was in Spain studying Spanish and, as an officially accepted candidate, preparing himself for the Staff College entrance examination. Outbreak of War In December 1910 Kilby had transferred to the 2nd Battalion, which had then just returned from South Africa. Following the outbreak of War in August 1914, the 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment was one of the first to embark for the Western Front, arriving on the Continent on the 13th August, as part of the 6th Brigade, 2nd Division,


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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria Military Cross Ten days later, on the 12th November, there was severe fighting around the position held by 6th Brigade. At about 6:30am, in the pale light of the early morning, the enemy made a surprise attack on the French 17th and 18th Divisions, on the British left, and forced them back approximately 600 yards beyond the Broodseinde road. This exposed the extreme left of the British line, where the 2nd South Staffordshires were the flank battalion, and the Germans penetrated behind the British line. The situation was critical, with no reserves to call upon, but fortunately the enemy advanced was soon checked, largely due to the defence of the South Staffordshires, who extended their line and fell slightly back to re-connect with the French 18th Division. For his gallantry and leadership in closing the gap, Kilby was awarded the military Cross, and was also subsequently mentioned in Field marshal Sir John French’s Despatch of the 14th January 1915: ‘The gap that was caused by the retirement of the French formed a gap between the trenches held by the South Staffordshire Regiment and the new line taken up by the French. The gap was filled by a portion of the South Staffords, and this exposed line was held by a portion of the Regiment all day. This manoeuvre was supervised by Captains A.F.G. Kilby and S.G. Johnson, both of the South Staffords. Both these officers were wounded on this occasion.’ (Extract from a Report by major-General C.C. munro, Commanding 2nd Division, refers).

Captain A.F.G. Kilby I Corps. he first saw action at maroilles on the 25th August; the following day as his brigade was ordered to withdraw he was sent to the rear-guard to supervise their retreat, where he was subjected to the concentrated fire of the German Artillery. Knocked flat down with concussion caused by the high explosives, he was separated from his unit and left to wander alone for hours without food and water, before collapsing again. Taken back to base he spent nearly a month in hospital, before re-joining his battalion on the 24th September, when it was fighting in the Battle of the Aisne. In order to make up for missing the previous month’s action, including the Battle of the marne, he volunteered to go out on several solitary sniping expeditions, on two occasions penetrating into the German lines and bringing back valuable information. Battle of Ypres Kilby’s Battalion moved north to the Ypres sector in October, and on the 2nd November, when north-west of Becelaere, he led a counter-attack which earned him fulsome praise from his Commanding Officer: ‘The British line being reported to be broken, Captain Kilby was sent with his Company to the point of danger. Although this report proved to be premature, the troops to the right of Kilby’s new position did subsequently fall back from their trenches, which the Germans thereupon occupied. Kilby at once took action as effective as it was gallant, executing “a brilliant counterattack, in which, by rapid fire, he bluffed the enemy, whose force was several times the strength of his own, and turned them out of the re-occupied trenches and a wood which they had just taken.” This action gained immediate recognition, the following message being passed down the lines to him: “Bravo, Kilby! Your colonel is proud of you and your Company. hearty congratulations on good work.”’ (extract from The V.C. and D.S.O., Vol. 1 refers).

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Wounded in the right arm and lung by a rifle bullet, Kilby returned to England, but although he never fully recovered the strength of his right hand he re-joined his Battalion in may 1915, and in August was recommended for the Distinguished Service Order. The original recommendation stated: ‘For consistent good work, making some very useful reconnaissances, imbuing all ranks with keenness by his example. On the night of the 5th to 6th September he went out along the canal tow-path under cover of darkness, accompanied by Lieutenant Thompson, 1st King’s, and closely reconnoitred the German position on the embankment redoubt and brought back most useful information. The reconnaissance was a very dangerous one, as the canal bank is a hot-bed of snipers, and it required the greatest skill and courage to get right up to the German position as Captain Kilby did. This is only one specific instance. This officer constantly made night reconnaissances of this nature.’ however, Kilby never did receive the D.S.O.; owing to the statutes in force, both then and now, the D.S.O. cannot be awarded posthumously, and as the recommendation made its way up through the various tiers of the honours committee, events were to tragically overtake it. Battle of Loos On the opening day of the Battle of Loos, 25.9.1915, after four days of Artillery bombardment, the 2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment was in the front line at Cuinchy, immediately south of the La Bassée Canal. At 5:35am, 15 minutes before the gas discharge was due to begin, the Officer in charge of the gas on the 6th Brigade front considered the wind so unfavourable that he declined to turn on the gas cylinders and reported the situation to the 2nd Division headquarters. A reply came through that the gas attack must be carried out regardless. At 6:00am the cylinders were opened, but on the front of the South Staffordshires the gas-cloud was so dense that, despite wearing smoke-helmets, all the companies were affected, a large number of men being violently sick and 130 of them being unable to take any further part in the day’s operations. The South Staffordshire attack began at 6:30am- ‘A’ and ‘B’ Companies crossed No man’s Land, but on reaching the first German wire entanglement found it unbroken and were subsequently greatly held up by fierce machine-gun and rifle fire. On the left, ‘C’ Company, under Captain Kilby, went forward along the narrow tow-path along the canal- despite most of the men being badly gassed, and under intense


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Victoria Cross (reverse) enemy fire from both sides of the canal, the Company surged onwards, gallantly led by their Captain. Kilby was hit in the hand at the outset, but still went on, and urging his men on reached the German wire. Exposed to a shower of stick grenades thrown at them from the enemy redoubt, Kilby’s foot was blown off, but despite the pain he continued to urge his men on fire on the enemy with his rifle. It was the last anyone saw of him. Despite repeated attempts the Company was unable to breach the German positions, and at 8:00am orders were given to withdraw. Only 20 men from the Company succeeded in making it back to the British trenches; the Battalion as a whole suffered 11 Officers and 280 men killed or wounded. In a letter written after the failed attack to Captain Kilby’s father, Colonel moss, the Battalion’s Commanding Officer, wrote: ‘The Regiment had to attack the very strongest section of the German line. We started under very unfavourable conditions, as everyone was suffering badly from gas before we charged. Your son led his company against the embankment redoubt with the most magnificent gallantry. he was wounded at the very start, but still insisted in on cheering his men right up to the German wire, which our guns had been unable to destroy. he was again wounded, but still continued to cheer on his men. This is the last we know of him.’ (extract from The V.C. and D.S.O., Vol. 1 refers). After nightfall volunteers from the Company were called for to go and search for the wounded and missing, including their gallant Captain- out of a total of 47 fit men no fewer than 40 volunteered for the task, but under an intermittent enemy fire no trace of Captain Kilby’s body was found. Victoria Cross For his gallantry at Loos, Kilby was recommended for a posthumous Victoria Cross by Brigadier Daly, 6th Brigade. Daly also wrote to Kilby’s parents: ‘he had such a sound military instinct, serene courage, and unbounded confidence.

It was a great hope that the search parties would find him. No men could have done more; they all loved him, and they all risked their lives in the search... In all the losses of friends one has, there has hardly been a day since the 25th September that your son has not been in my thoughts. Amongst the many gallant officers in this brigade he always stood out... Before the big fight your son’s company was often in that part of the trenches just opposite the railway embankment immediately south of La Bassée Canal. he asked me himself if ever there was a serious attack to let him attack at that point. It was a very tough nut, but he was convinced it could be done. he knew the ground well, and had all his plans cut and dried. I used to go up there with him and examine the German position and talk it all out. If anyone could have done it your son was the man. When the orders came for the big attack I made him promise me that he would not go over until at least half the company had gone; it was so essential to have his brain and judgment to direct the men and not get knocked out at once. On the actual day, as you know, things went wrong with the gas, and my own idea is that your son realized that it was going to be a failure, and went in front to lead what he considered was a forlorn hope, for he was leading the men when last seen.’ (ibid). Captain Kilby’s body was recovered by the Germans where he fell, and buried by the side of the tow-path outside their redoubt, the simple wooden cross inscribed ‘The Kilby family may think of their son with pride, as we remember him with respect.’ he was subsequently re-buried in the Arras Road Cemetery at Rodincourt, and a memorial tablet was erected to his memory in York minster, the cathedral he had admired so much as a young subaltern. his Victoria Cross, so gallantly earned, was presented to his father by King George V in a private ceremony in the ballroom of Buckingham Palace on the 11th July 1916.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 3 The G.C.M.G., G.B.E., ‘Boer War’ D.S.O. Group of Seven to Lieutenant-Colonel The Lord Islington, Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, Aide-de-Camp to Lord Methuen; Later Governor and Commander-in-Chief of New Zealand a) The most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George, Knight Grand Cross (G.C.m.G.) set of Insignia, sash Badge, 99mm including crown suspension x 72mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to St. George’s horse on reverse central medallion; Star, 84mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, red enamel damage to one arm of cross on Star, with evening dress section of sash riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue b) The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, military Division, Knight Grand Cross (G.B.E.) set of Insignia, sash Badge, 94mm including crown suspension x 71mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 104mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with full and evening dress section of sash ribands, in Garrard, London, case of issue c) Distinguished Service Order, V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar d) The most Venerable Order of St. John, Knight of Justice set of Insignia, neck Badge, 53mm, gold and enamel, with lion and unicorn embellishments in angles of cross; Star, 60mm, gold and enamel, with lion and unicorn embellishments in angles, suspension ring damaged on Badge, with neck riband, in case of issue e) Queen’s South Africa medal, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Lt. & Qr. mr. Sir J.D. Poynder. 1/Impl. Yeo.) f) Coronation 1911 g) Jubilee 1935, generally good very fine or better, mounted Court style as worn, together with the recipient’s two Boer War related miniature awards, and two Order of St. John silver and enamel miniature awards, the latter on a Lady’s bow riband, attributed to Lady Islington (10) £5,500-6,500 G.C.m.G. London Gazette 10.6.1913 The Right honourable Lord Islington, P.C., K.C.m.G., D.S.O. K.C.m.G. London Gazette 2.1.1911 The Right honourable Lord Islington, D.S.O., Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of New Zealand. G.B.E. London Gazette 3.7.1926 The Right honourable John Poynder, Baron Islington, G.C.m.G., D..S.O., Retiring Chairman of the National Savings Committee. D.S.O. London Gazette 27.9.1901 Lieutenant Sir John Poynder Dickson-Poynder, Bart., 1st Battalion, The Imperial Yeomanry ‘In recognition of his services during the operations in South Africa.’ Order of St. John, Knight of Justice London Gazette 9.6.1911 his Excellency the Lord Islington of Islington, K.C.m.G., D.S.O. Lieutenant-Colonel The Right Honourable John Poynder, 1st Baron Islington, G.C.M.G., G.B.E., D.S.O., was born John Poynder Dickson, at Ryde on the Isle of Wight in October 1866, the son of Rear-Admiral J.B. Dickson, C.B., who was the 6th son of Rear-Admiral of the Red Sir Archibald Dickson, Bt. he was educated at harrow and Christ Church, Oxford; despite being the son of the sixth son he succeeded to the Baronetcy on his uncle’s death in 1884, and subsequently assumed by Royal License in January 1888 the additional surname of Poynder on succeeding to his maternal uncle’s estates. he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry in January 1890; later that year he was appointed high Sherriff of Wiltshire, and was elected member of Parliament for the Chippenham Division of the County in 1892, initially sitting as a Conservative. In September 1896 he married miss Anne Beauclerk Dundas, a grand-daughter of Lord Napier of magdala. Promoted Lieutenant in may 1895, and Captain in December 1898, he served with the 1st Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry with the rank of Lieutenant in South Africa from 17.2.1900 as aide-de-camp to Lord methuen. Appointed Quartermaster, Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, 10.3.1900, he was mentioned in Lord Roberts’ Despatch, 4.9.1901 (London Gazette 10.9.1901), and awarded the D.S.O. he was also promoted major, 31.5.1902, and later Lieutenant-Colonel, 31.3.1908, in the Territorial Force. having crossed the floor of the house of Commons over the issue of tariff reform in 1905 (the same issue which caused Winston Churchill to cross the floor), he relinquished his Parliamentary seat five years later on being raised to the peerage as Baron Islington, 27.4.1910, in advance of his appointment as Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of New Zealand, 4.5.1910. Whilst in New Zealand he served as honorary Colonel of the 9th (Wellington East Coast) mounted Rifles; in appreciation of his service as Governor he was appointed a Knight Commander of the most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George and appointed a member of his majesty’s most honourable Privy Council, before resigned his Governorship, 9.12.1912, in order to become chairman of the Royal Commission on Public Services in India, for which work he was advanced to a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St. michael and St. George. After the Commission reported, Lord Islington served as Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, 1914-15, and UnderSecretary of State for India, 1915-19. he also chaired the Imperial Institute, and was in charge of the National Savings Committee from 1920-26, being appointed a Knight Grand Cross of the most Excellent Order of the British Empire on his retirement. Lord Islington died at home in London, heirless, 6.12.1936. Anne Beauclerk, Lady Islington, née Dundas, a grand-daughter of Lord Napier of magdala, married Sir John Dickson-Poynder, September 1896, and was appointed a Lady of Grace of the Order of St. John in 1924 (London Gazette 4.3.1924). Note: From 1912 until 1926 the Star and Badge of Knights of Justice were in gold, and both were embellished with lions and unicorns in the angles of the cross. In 1926 the Star was increased in size, and the embellishments were removed; Knights of Justice already in possession of pre-1926 insignia were permitted to continue to wear the embellished insignia.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

4

4 A Fine ‘Maharajpoor’ C.B. Group of Three to General C. Hamilton, Indian Army, Who Commanded the 2nd Regiment Bengal Native Infantry With Distinction Throughout the Gwalior Campaign of 1843-44, and During The Sutlej Campaign of 1845-46 a) The most honourable Order of the Bath, military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) breast Badge, gold (hallmarks for London 1843) and enamel, wide suspension type, with swivel ring, maker’s initials ‘WN’ on suspension loop, and its integral gold riband buckle b) maharajpoor Star 1843 (Lieutenant Colonel C. hamilton, C.B. of the 2nd Regt of Native Infantry, Grenadiers), with original brass hook suspension, detachable silver suspension for wearing purposes, and silver top-riband bar c) Sutlej 1845-46, for moodkee, one clasp, Ferozeshuhur (Lieut. Col. C: hamilton C:B: 2nd Regt N:I: Grenrs.), with silver top-riband bar, nearly extremely fine (3) £4,500-5,000 C.B. London Gazette 2.5.1844 Lieutenant-Colonel Charles hamilton, Bengal Infantry General Charles Hamilton, C.B., commissioned Ensign, Indian Army, 1818; Captain 1826; advanced Lieutenant-Colonel, 1843, and commanded the 2nd Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry, Grenadiers, throughout the the Gwalior campaign, 1843-44, during which his regiment distinguished themselves at the battle of maharajpoor, 29.12.1843, where they captured two Regimental Standards in the attack on Chonda (C.B.; mentioned in General Sir hugh Gough’s Despatch, headquarters, Camp, before Gwalior, 4.1.1844); served throughout the Sutlej campaign, 1845-46, and was present at moodkee and Ferozeshuhur; also served with the expedition to Kote Kangara, march 1846; Colonel 1853; major-General 1854; advanced General 1872.

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5

5 The Outstanding Second War D.S.O., 1944 ‘North-West Europe’ D.F.C., 1942 ‘Defence of Malta’ D.F.M. and ‘Immediate’ North Africa Bar Group of Eight to Beaufighter and Mosquito Navigator, Flight Lieutenant, Later Wing Commander, D.A. Oxby, Royal Air Force, The Highest Scoring Night Fighter Navigator of the Second World War, Who In Just Over Three Years of Operational Flying Produced 36 Visual Contacts on Enemy Aircraft, Which Resulted in 26 Interceptions; Of These Combats, 22 Enemy Aircraft Were Destroyed, Two Were Probably Destroyed, And Three More Were Damaged a) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., silver-gilt and enamel, minor white enamel damage, reverse of suspension bar dated ‘1945’, with integral top riband bar b) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., reverse dated ‘1944’ c) Distinguished Flying medal, G.VI.R., with Second Award Bar, reverse dated ‘1943’ (1254447. F/Sgt. D.A. Oxby R.A.F.) d) 1939-1945 Star e) Atlantic Star f) Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar g) War medal h) malta George Cross Fiftieth Anniversary medal, generally very fine or better, first seven mounted as originally worn, with the following related items and documents: - Wing Commander’s Cap, by Gieves Ltd, and Tunic, the latter with Navigator’s Brevet and ribands; riband bar - Small presentation silvered base metal Pelican, on wooden plinth, with metal plaque engraved ‘D.A.O. 1960-62’ - Presentation Salver, silver-plate, by Garrard & Co. Ltd, engraved ‘Wing Commander Douglas A. Oxby, Ottawa, 9 July 1962-20 August 1965’, with additionally engraved signatures - Two Observer and Air Gunner Flying Log Books (8.6.1941-28.1.1945 and 1.2.1945-11.5.1960) - Commission appointing Douglas Alfred Oxby, D.S.O., D.F.C., D.F.m. as Flying Officer, R.A.F., with effect from 1.9.1945, dated 1.4.1947, this glazed and framed - Bestowal Document for the Distinguished Service Order, dated 16.3.1945, this glazed and framed - Pocket Services Diary for 1942, entries recording recipient’s service in malta - R.A.F. Service Records - Recipient’s unpublished memoir Nightfighter Navigator, typed and bound, with part proof copies and correspondence relating to the content; also a CD copy - a large number of photographic images (3 framed and glazed), prints and newspaper cuttings relating to recipient’s service - Framed Cartoon depicting Oxby on a flying dog kennel in the guise of Snoopy - Copies of The Telegraph and The Times, carrying his Obituary, dated 27.4.2009 and 1.5.2009 respectively - a Copy of Night Fighter, C.F. Rawnsley and Robert Wright; together with other ephemera (lot) £50,000-60,000 Page 1


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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria D.S.O. London Gazette 16.3.1945 Flight Lieutenant Douglas Alfred Oxby, D.F.C., D.F.m. (138413), R.A.F.V.R., 219 Sqn. The Recommendation, dated 6.2.1945, states: ‘Since his last award F/Lt. Oxby has been responsible for the interception of four enemy aircraft at night resulting in the destruction of all four. On the night of 26th December, 1944, he carried out an interception on a slow flying enemy aircraft, refusing to be put off by accurate and intense flak near Liege. On the night of the 1st February, 1945, he intercepted an enemy night fighter near munchen Gladbach (on a freelance contact) approaching head on and below under the most difficult conditions of Radar jamming.’ Remarks of Squadron Commander: ‘F/Lt. Oxby has proved himself a N/R of exceptional ability, and has been responsible for the interception of twenty-eight enemy aircraft at night, of which twentyone have been destroyed, two probably destroyed, and two damaged. These success have been due to his courage, outstanding devotion to duty, and persistent hard work to improve his A.I. operating. he has completed a large number of operational flying hours at night many of which have been over enemy territory and in bad weather. he has operated from malta, at the height of its ordeal, from N. Africa and Sicily; from ‘D’ Day over the Normandy Beachhead, the Dutch, Belgian and German Battle Areas. he has been of the greatest assistance to his Squadron in passing on his own knowledge and exceptional experience to others who have profited greatly by it.’ D.F.C. London Gazette 15.12.1944 Flying Officer Douglas Alfred Oxby, D.F.m. (138413), R.A.F.V.R., 219 Sqn. The Recommendation, dated 27.10.1944, states: ‘This Officer has been responsible for the interception of more than 21 enemy aircraft at night, resulting in the destruction of 17, the probable destruction of two, and the damaging of two more. Since receiving his last award, he has been responsible for the destruction of 4 enemy aircraft, including 3 in one night, and since then has flown 270 hours on operations. At all times he has shown himself a keen and efficient Navigator Radio, and his successes have been largely due to the effort that he has put into the working out of his problems.’ D.F.m. London Gazette 4.12.1942 1254447 Flight Sergeant Douglas Alfred Oxby, 89 Sqn. The Recommendation, dated 4.11.1942, states: ‘This N.C.O. has given his pilot invaluable guidance at night enabling him to shoot down 7 enemy aircraft confirmed and one probable; all but one whilst operating from malta where he arrived on 23rd June, 1942. On the night of 14th/15th October, 1942, he carried out a successful interception at 22,000 feet without using oxygen in order that his pilot could obtain benefit of the little that was left. he has taken part in 5 intruder patrols over Sicilian aerodromes and several convoy patrols. Sergeant Oxby is a Radio Observer of exceptional ability and determination. his high degree of technical ability has on two occasions enabled him to repair his apparatus after an hour’s work whilst airborne, as a result of which two enemy bombers were destroyed.’ D.F.m. Second Award Bar London Gazette 16.2.1943 1254447 Flight Sergeant Douglas Alfred Oxby, 89 Sqn. The Recommendation, dated 4.2.1943, states: ‘This N.C.O. has displayed exceptional keenness and devotion to duty over a long period of time. By his skill and courage, he has been responsible for the interception at night of 21 enemy aircraft of which his pilot destroyed 13.’ Also Recommended for the United States of America Silver Star: ‘Flight Lieutenant Douglas Alfred Oxby, D.S.O., D.F.C., D.F.m. (138413), 219 Sqn. (Navigator) This officer has shown high courage and devotion to duty in air operations. he has destroyed at least 22 enemy aircraft. By his own successes and experience, Flight Lieutenant Oxby has contributed much to the successes of the whole squadron.’ Wing Commander Douglas Alfred Oxby, D.S.O., D.F.C., D.F.M. (1920-2010), born Cardiff; educated at Canton high School before going to the Technical College; prior to enlistment was employed as a Barrister’s Clerk; completed forms for entry in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, march 1940, and upon carrying out his medical Oxby was informed that he was unfit for flying duties

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Wing Commander D.A. Oxby

due to being long-sighted; as a consequence he was recommended for training as ground crew; reported for enlistment and attestation, R.A.F. Uxbridge, 25.6.1940; and posted for training as AC2, Radio Operator (Ground), the following month; training including at Bridnorth and Yatebury; he also underwent training on the A.I. (Ground) Course, and, ‘having completed the radar course successfully and qualified as a Radio Observer (Ground), my first posting was a coastal station ‘somewhere in Wales’ where I spent three tedious months using early radar to monitor U-boat activity in the Irish Sea. Instead of the intense activity and excitement I had been expecting, there was a fruitless monotony. I was contributing nothing to the War effort, and I was bored stupid. Two contacts were observed in those three months - for about thirty seconds before they each disappeared under the waves again... By now, my low boredom threshold forced me to defy mother’s orders for the first time [never volunteer for anything]. So, when the opportunity presented itself, I volunteered for aircrew training as Radio Observer/Operator (Air)’ (Memoirs refer). Night Fighter Oxby was posted to Prestwick for a six week course on the workings of early A.I. equipment, June 1941; he gained 18 hours flying time in Blenheims carrying A.I., and in July he was posted as Temporary Sergeant to 54 O.T.U., Church Fenton; at the latter he was ‘paired up’ with an Australian pilot called mervyn Shipard - they were to fly together for the next two years, forming one of the R.A.F.’s most successful night fighter crews; they first went up together on exercises, 2.8.1941, and were sent for operational training to 1451 Flight (Experimental Night Fighter Unit), hunsden, 20.8.1941; however, they were almost immediately posted to 68 (Night Fighter) Squadron (Beaufighters), high Ercall; Shipard and Oxby flew their first operational patrol together, 30.9.1941, ‘at the outset, there was a considerable amount we didn’t know about night fighting. The essential problem to begin with, was how to find the enemy. Then, it became how to bring him down without yourself being caught unawares. It wasn’t as if we could learn from more experienced night fighter pilots or navigators. This is because there simply weren’t any night fighter crews before us from whom we might learn anything


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July 19, 01 - London useful. We were amongst the first to attempt using radar (A.I.) to locate and destroy the enemy at night. The equipment we used was reliable - we could always rely on it to break down, or short circuit just at the most inconvenient moment, or generally behave almost uncooperatively as the enemy. Equipment going ‘u/s’ was a major headache. Early radar equipment was temperamental, delicate, and prone to both breakdown and interference. We learned how to operate those ‘magic boxes’ the hard way mostly, in the air’ (Ibid). At this stage of the War the dangers and lottery like nature of night fighting were particularly pronounced, ‘it proved that whoever saw who first would usually be the victor - providing the enemy could be identified as such without undue delay. On a dark night, it was sometimes not possible to see the detail of another aircraft of medium size until within perhaps 300-400 yards. Often, the darkness would make the visual of an aircraft (whether friend or foe) appear only as an undefined and featureless thing, too vague to identify with certainty as anything other than a twin, or four-engined aircraft. So to be certain of the prey, a night fighter pilot might be forced to approach within a hundred yards of a potential enemy before it took on a recognisable shape. Whether friend or foe either would be very sensitive to a night fighter’s approach from the rear, and the risks associated with a stealthy approach to identify a bogey, i.e. the possibility of being fired upon by the tail gunner of a Lancaster, or a Liberator - were considerable. If spotted we could certainly rely on a warm reception.’ (Ibid) Back Seat Driver Throughout October 1941 Shipard and Oxby continued to carry out their night time patrols from Shropshire, ‘flying conditions were often appalling. I well remember flying in freezing fog, when it was cold and wet. The Blenheim in particular was a notoriously cold aircraft with woefully inadequate heating particularly at altitude, and many crews suffered from numbing of the extremities. Some were unlucky enough to lose fingers to frostbite. I lost part of the tip of my finger to frostbite in a draughty Blenheim... Part of the reason for sustaining the injury was that in order to use a small screwdriver to adjust a tiny screw that diminished the size of the A.I. mk III direct pulse which, in turn, provided a better minimum range of target to about 300 feet. It was simply not possible to make these type of fine tuning adjustments whilst wearing gloves. I didn’t really think things were much improved in the Beaufighter either, certainly not for the radar operator shivering in the back. The driver... could at least now feel the benefit of having a blast of hot air blown between his legs, but otherwise it was still a cold, and draughty aeroplane.’ (Ibid). After being plagued by a number of technical difficulties Shipard and Oxby’s first victory was to finally arrive, 1.11.1941, ‘Operational Patrol - One hE III Destroyed (Angels 13)’ (Log Book refers); they had been sent out to intercept 10 German aircraft tasked with bombing Liverpool docks - Oxby offers the following on how his pilot flew in such situations, ‘Ship was an exponent of the “shit or bust” principle. I well recall him swearing aloud at E/A as he lined up his cannon. “The bastard” he would mutter aloud. Then, once he had carefully taken aim - he would open up with everything he had - four thundering cannon accompanied by six machine guns... In delivering a fatal blow, Ship often got in so close behind the enemy, that on several occasions we flew straight into debris and parts flying off the unfortunate E/A.’ having been scrambled from R.A.F. Valley, ‘that night, Ship had already been at readiness sat in the cockpit of the Beau whilst I was in the small tent at the end of the runway awaiting Binwood’s call to scramble. When it finally came, we had been airborne in about two minutes flat. I noted take off time as 20.24 hours, and duly entered it on the aircraft log sheet... We were over the Lleyn peninsula now, and out there somewhere in the darkness was a raider, and probably more than just one. Suddenly we were receiving more vectors from Binwood. Flt/Lt Kemp had taken over “Razzle 44, course one zero, zero please, at Angels eleven.” At last, as we climbed to altitude again our customer finally appeared on my A.I. scope. “Contact! Ship, I’ve got him, he’s about two miles ahead.” The atmosphere was getting tense, and as I took over... I warned Ship to watch his airspeed as we were closing on the bogey quite quickly. There was always the danger of overshooting, and that was the last thing we wanted. If we were spotted by the E/A, then we would lose the element of surprise, and

‘Oxo and Ship’

our prey would dive away into the darkness. Our best chance of success would be to creep up undetected until the last minute. And so it turned out. The approach was nearly complete, and I carefully advised ‘Ship, he should be just ahead and above.’ merv scanned the night sky, but couldn’t see him. I brought us in closer, with Ship ready to use flap and lower u/c to slow our airspeed if need be. By now, the A.I. showed the target about 8,000 feet ahead. Ship still couldn’t see him. We closed some more coming in dead astern. At 1,000 feet Ship finally spotted the silhouette of a heinkel III darkened against the moonlit sky... Ship moved us to 400 yards behind, off to one side and slightly below, hoping all the while we wouldn’t be spotted by the ventral gunner... Ship called me to take a look-see. “Ok Doug, you can come up now for a look. What do you make of it?” I clambered up toward Ship and peered out over his shoulder. We had to be careful, our aircraft recognition skills in those days were not exactly the best. Anyway, on this occasion there could be no mistake, there were the tell-tale elliptical wings and tail-plane, and now we could see the big German crosses on the undersides of the wings... We agreed this was a heinkel he III, and I confirmed to Ship that the guns were ready to fire. Ship adjusted the altitude of the Beaufighter, and as we moved into position from behind and below, the heinkel gradually sank into his gunsight. Opening fire from just 300 yards, Ship used 62 cannon shells in one short two-second burst, which crashed through the raider. As the aircraft shuddered and lurched momentarily from the devastating blow, debris from the heinkel flew off everywhere. We watched fascinated, and as if in slowmotion the thing virtually disintegrated mid-air.’ The pair carried on flying operational patrols throughout December, including 15.12.1941, ‘G.C.I. Co-op (Dobee) - Contact held for 40 mins with Evasive Action’ (Log Book refers); on the 27th they were informed that their tour had expired and that they were due to be posted to No. 1 F.T.U., honeybourne, ‘at this stage, neither Ship nor I felt that we had completed a proper tour of operations... nor did we feel we needed to ‘rest’... so in typical Aussy style Ship approached

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria max Aitken, the Squadron Commander, for a ‘quiet word.’ “Is there any way we can avoid being sent off as bloody instructors?” Ship asked... he [Aitken] thought about this problem for a few moments, before suggesting, “Well, you could always volunteer to go overseas, I know they want new crews in the middle East”... Ship said “What do you think, Doug, shall we go?”... I replied with “Let’s do it.” Malta with the ‘89th Nocturnal Pursuit Outfit’ Oxby and Shipard were to join 89 Squadron at Abu Sueir, Egypt; having attended ‘Ferry School’ at Kemble they collected their brand new Beaufighter, 11.2.1942; they took off in the unarmed aircraft, 17.2.1942, for their run from Portreath to Gibraltar, and then via malta to Egypt; Oxby received a ‘warm’ welcome to the area, 24.2.1942, ‘Gibraltar to malta. Chased by two CR 42s off Lampedusa’ (Log Book refers); having arrived in Egypt they did not get off to an auspicious start, as Oxby was hospitalised in Cairo, suffering from pleurisy from February to April; after a period of convalescent leave in Palestine Oxby returned to the squadron, who were tasked with the night defence of Northern Egypt, and flew in a number of operational patrols, April-may 1942. Desert life did not seem to agree with the pairing and in June 1942, ‘89’s CO George Stainsforth called for volunteers for a detachment to operate from malta, which was now under heavy daily bombardment from combined German Luftwaffe forces and the Italian Regia Aeronautica. We were glad to be out of his hair - and thought we might stand a better chance of seeing some action over malta. We had been in the Western Desert for four months, and virtually nothing had happened in terms of enemy activity. Our move to malta coincided with Rommel’s North African campaign of June 1942, and we arrived on malta on the 22nd of the month... Our skills were about to be put to the test.’ In the two months prior to Oxby and Shipard’s arrival on malta, twice the tonnage of bombs were dropped on Valetta and the surrounding area than during the entire 12 months of the London Blitz; they were to be based with six other crews from the squadron at Takali airfield, ‘we were shown to our five-star billeting on malta. It was a bombedout block of apartments, without either windows or doors... I recall the building overlooked Sliema Bay, which in peacetime had been a desirable location. But now it was right under the flight path of the Luftwaffe’s bombers on approach to Valetta and malta’s Grand harbour. They would come across with a tedious frequency, at least a couple of times a day, sometimes more than that. As we operated at night and most enemy attacks came during daylight hours, sleep was impossible. It made us quite vindictive, and I’m certain it added pepper to Ship’s attitude toward the enemy in the air.’ At Takali the Detachment split into sections working a roster of two nights on followed by two nights off, ‘even when we were off duty there was little respite. At night, we would lie on the hard concrete, wrapped up in our blankets whilst the enemy would fly over us. The thud, thud of the Bofors guns would begin and the screaming bombs would be followed by several huge crashes that made the whole place shudder... I’d never been bombed before... Now we had to get used to the sirens, the anti-aircraft guns, the drone of aircraft throughout the day, and the bombs dropping all around us... I’d wanted action, and now I was seeing it in spades.’ The end of June brought a change in tactics from the Luftwaffe, with bombing raids taking place at night rather than during the day, this in turn brought the night fighters to the fore; Oxby and Shipard carried out their first operational patrol from Takali, 3.7.1942; four days later they secured their first victory over malta, ‘Operational Patrol - One Contact (A.15). One Ju 88 Destroyed (A.20)’ (Log Book refers). The difficult conditions were added to by the increasing unreliability of equipment, this is reflected by several entries in Oxby’s Log for ‘Weapon Bent’ or ‘Weapon U/S’; Oxby, and the other Navigators, experienced considerable difficulty with enemy radio interference affecting the mk IV A.I.; on the 12th July Oxby and Shipard realised that a large slice of luck was also required to survive in this theatre, ‘we took off at dusk around 18.45 having hopped back into our usual aircraft X7642. We were to check the aircraft on another night flying test, and on this occasion Ship took off with another air raid in progress. Just before we rotated off the ground, the port-tyre was punctured, possibly by a bomb or shrapnel fragment. It didn’t affect us whilst we were airborne, so we carried on to complete the NFT, but on landing the damaged tyre was torn off at speed, which caused

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the aircraft to swing heavily to port side. With both wings suddenly ripped away, the fuselage promptly rolled over on its back, and continued rolling 400 yards down the runway with Ship and I both still strapped inside the disintegrating aeroplane. We had seen many aircraft crash like this before, and some would end up exploding into flames. But we were lucky. There was no explosion, or fire, and despite the violent landing we scrambled out of the wreckage quite shaken, but otherwise unscathed. Undaunted, we tempted fate again by flying the following evening. This time back in Beaufighter X7748. Once again she rewarded us by refusing to co-operate, and all her guns remained stubbornly quiet in the air-firing test. Ship was disgusted as he walked away from it, “What a bloody useless crate.” he muttered.’ On the 15th July they were scrambled to intercept two contacts, only to experience problems with the A.I. again; on the 19th, however, it was all systems go, ‘finally, on the 19th July we flew in Beaufighter X7702 and encountered no problems with our NFT. The guns appeared to be working too, which we considered a bonus. On the patrol that followed, we took off at 21.00 and encountered two contacts one after another. The first we initially identified as a FW 200 at Angels 16. We destroyed it after following him down to Angels 13. Ship reported seeing a parachute open as one of the crew managed to escape the stricken aircraft. Our FW200 actually turned out to be another JU88. The second contact later the same evening was detected at 14,000 feet. After a lengthy chase we managed to obtain a visual but once he’d twigged we were sat on his tail, we lost him in the darkness through his very effective evasive action.’ Mid-Air Maintenance The night fighters were working with cutting edge technology, however, as with many things that are new and relatively untested they can be prone to being temperamental; if the A.I. malfunctioned and the guns jammed whilst in the air, there was very little Oxby and Shipard could do other than return to base; fortunately Oxby proved to be a dab-hand with a screwdriver, ‘it seemed to us at the time, that our night fighter aircraft and flight systems were plagued by technical faults affecting us far more than the day fighters. however, I do recall one occasion where we were able to fix the problem in the air. We had been scrambled in the early hours (01.10hours) of 21/22nd July, and we took off in Beaufighter X7695. Soon afterwards, to our dismay I had to report to Ship that the A.I. was unserviceable. But I had taken to carrying a torch and a small screwdriver for just such an eventuality, and as GCI Control had instructed us to circle to the south of the island until the raid was over, I thought we had nothing to lose if I took the back off the A.I. set and took a look-see. having located the problem, I switched it on again to find somewhat to my surprise that the bloody thing worked. By now GCI had vectored us within range of the raiders, and we were ready. Almost immediately we established a contact at 18,000 feet, and I directed Ship to a position close in just below and behind him. Once again it was a JU 88, and Ship opened fire to shoot it down. Two parachutes were seen on this occasion. When Ship related the incident privately to the CO the following day, it was suggested that I should be nominated for the Distinguished Flying medal. This was something about which I remained ignorant, until the DFm was actually confirmed some months later. Boy was that a surprise!’ Targets of Opportunity July was rounded off by a ‘Dogfight By moonlight’ against an Italian JU 87; despite damaging the enemy aircraft it managed to limp home to Sicily; August heralded the delivery of a batch of new Beaufighters, equipped with the latest mk VIII A.I.; the latter reduced the Axis radio jamming to virtually non-existent; at the end of August and into early September night bombing raids on malta were reduced in frequency and intensity; this in turn meant a change in operations for Oxby’s ‘C’ Flight freeing them up to fly intruder sorties over Sicily, 2.9.1942, ‘Intruder Raid on Southern Sicily. A.A. Fire at Licate and Comiso “Strafed” Army Camp at Pozzallo’ (Log Book refers); for these raids the detachment used Beaufighters not fitted with A.I. aircraft fitted with A.I. were forbidden from flying over enemy occupied territory due to anxiety that one might have crashed relatively intact, thus revealing the secrets of the advanced radar equipment to the enemy; Oxby and Shipard carried on flying the night patrols over malta, but the intruder raids carried out in tandem


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Oxby (right) alongside Ju.88 which he and Shipard shot down near Tobruk, December 1942 were to prove just as perilous, ‘Intruder Patrol Sicily - Visited Castelvetrano, masala & Trapani. Flickovers by Searchlights. “Strafed” Wharf & Dropped 2x250lbs bombs at Porto Empedocile. Considerable light AA Fire, & Slight Inaccurate heavy AA’ (Log Book refers); Oxby’s memoirs offer more insight, ‘As usual, the couple of lines hastily scribbled into my log book, hardly describe what really happened! I recall suitable targets were a little scarce that evening, so we looked for alternatives, which we cheerfully considered to be ‘targets of opportunity’. One such “alternative target” was a neat line of E-Boats moored along a quayside at Porto Empedocile. It was a bright moonlit night. We could see behind the seaport was a protective line of cliffs in a heavily-fortified semi-circle, that looked to be bristling with flak batteries. We discussed the plan quickly as we circled round. Our only way to hit the E-boats was from the seaward. We agreed to fly in from the north - at sea level, firing our four cannon and six machine guns to cover our approach, before swiftly dropping our bombs and escaping by completing a hard, and fast turn to starboard (thus avoiding the cliffs) before heading south and back to base. Well, it sounded good. Sort of. Privately, I wondered about those guns on the cliffs. We approached at full bore, barely skipping over the waves at sea-level, and Ship opened fire with his cannon and dropped the bombs moments later. As we began the turn, we were horrified to see our fire immediately answered by a thick hail of tracer from 40mm guns coming up from both E-boats and harbour. Added to this, was a lethal mix of heavy A.A. and Bofors fire directed downwards to meet us from the cliff-tops. I was paralysed, absolutely frightened stupid. All I could think was “Shit. We’re dead men”. Ship saw the early part of this exchange, but his mind was totally occupied in avoiding the cliffs and maintaining low level without hitting the water in steep turn. how we were not hit as we exposed our belly and undersides to the enemy in that steeply banked turn I’ll never know. I was now facing aft - watching helplessly as the tracer slowly approached, before suddenly accelerating to either whip savagely past us, or crash into the sea alongside us. It wasn’t over. The line of AA exploding in the sea behind us crept relentlessly closer to our tail as we made our escape. These split seconds ticked past, so slowly. Suddenly everything went quiet, and the firing stopped. We had escaped unscathed. I was able to breathe.’ October 1942 - A Purple Patch In this month there was limited flying due to fuel shortages on malta, however, the night fighters were kept constantly busy; the second week of October heralded the final big push by Axis forces to neutralise maltese air defences; as a consequence of this Oxby was on operational scramble virtually every night between the 11th-18th October; on the 12th Oxby and Shipard bagged 3 victories in 24 hours, having been scrambled on 3 separate occasions in 2 different planes, ‘we were scrambled at a quarter past midnight in Beaufighter

V8219 to meet a bogey contact at 18,000 feet. We obtained visual at 5,000 feet and shot at a hE III at 00.45, probably killing the unfortunate rear gunner outright. As we did not actually witness the heinkel’s subsequent crash, we were only able to claim a hE III as ‘probably destroyed’. We were next scrambled at 0235, again in Beaufighter X8219 and quickly obtained another contact on the enemy this time at 20,000 feet with a subsequent visual at 21,000. We made no mistakes on this occasion, and were able to claim a heinkel hE III ‘definitely destroyed’... The following evening (still the 12th October) we were scrambled at 21.25, this time in X7840 to meet a head-on contact at 18,000 on a hE III which was probably on approach to Sicily. After a chase we produced a visual at 12,000 feet, and once again a heinkel III was destroyed.’ Three days later Oxby and Shipard claimed another hE III destroyed, as the following extract from Six Aces relates, ‘Ship and marshal were on duty. and scrambled after a fast raider, who beat them back to Sicily, Because the radar aboard was still secret, Ship gave up the chase, and noticed there was a problem with the starboard engine: the instruments showed no oil pressure and the temperature was “off the clock”. he turned back for malta, and when Control called to report another bandit, Ship replied he was on one engine. They were at 15,000 feet. Suddenly Oxo called that he had a contact, “coming straight for you, about 4,000 feet below!” Ship waited for Oxby to call the moment to turn after the enemy, then rolled the black Beaufighter onto its back, both engines throttled back, and saw the German below as they swept down onto its tail. The big fighter accelerated quickly and Oxo called that they were closing too fast, so Ship dropped wheels and flaps and came “screaming into this chap”. Oxby, watching from his rear canopy, saw they were only 30 yards behind the heinkel. “When I was almost on top of him he started to climb”, Shipard continued. “That’s all I wanted; I pulled back on the stick and opened fire. he blew up and we flew through the rubbish, all over the aeroplane. I opened up the other engine, Oxo yelled out that we were on fire, but it was German petrol.” On the 18th October 1942 Oxby flew in his final interception sortie from malta, ‘in just over a hundred flights from the island, Ship and I had destroyed six German bombers together, and we had one probable too. Our aircraft had frequently been a cause for concern, with unserviceable equipment causing us to lose quite a few opportunities. I think we were probably both sick to the stomach of the enforced diet of bully beef and mcConchie pie, but otherwise it had been a busy life.’ The Western Desert and North Africa Oxby left malta to rejoin the Squadron in Egypt, 22.10.1942; he was briefly detached to Palestine before being sent to Bu Amud, 4.12.19142; the latter was a temporary airfield established for the

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria defence of Tobruk, ‘we flew our first operational scramble since leaving malta on the 12th December. Our aircraft was a Beaufighter VI coded X8009, neatly painted by Egyptian groundcrew with ‘Slippery Ship’ on her nose. We decided to take a freelance. We managed to catch two JU88s that evening, both of which were destroyed. There might have been a third victory, first detected behind them, but the radar contact was broken as we whipped around to get on the German’s tail.’ The rest of December was spent engaged in Convoy Patrols, interspersed with an eventful Christmas Day, ‘At around 10pm, with everything quiet, it was decided that Jerry was probably celebrating a quiet Christmas - so why shouldn’t we do the same. We all adjourned to the huge marquis, which we had been using as the Officers mess. By midnight, there were quite a few drunken antics. Unwisely, I had consumed an excess of rum, and thus fortified - decided to get a better view of the proceedings from a higher vantage point. The tent pole, about 30 feet in height, appeared to suit and I shinned up it easily. But getting down was to prove rather more challenging. I got scared, and was stuck - and by now everyone was laughing from below. The proceedings continued apace before my predicament was relieved by an Australian ‘hatchet man’ - actually a hurricane pilot called ‘Rus’, who, instead of calling the fire brigade, thoughtfully chopped down the tent pole - whilst completely ignoring my whimpering and pleas for safe deliverance. I needn’t have worried. The marquis gradually subsided and I was brought safely to earth with the Squadron’s cheers of derision ringing loudly in my ears.’ After the high-jinx of the festive period Oxby and Shipard were back in the action during the 1st week of January, even if their equipment was against them once again; “Slippery Ship” had been undergoing running repairs, which involved the removal, stripping, cleaning and replacement of the 20mm cannons, ‘the job was very nearly complete, and all that remained was for the guns to be harmonised with the sights, so that they would accurately hit their target. Just then a sandstorm blew up, and the ground crew promptly put the dust covers back on the aircraft to protect it from the flying dust. Predictably, we were scrambled. shortly after this to intercept a Luftwaffe attack. We had no idea the guns were inaccurately aligned, but this was to have serious consequences when Ship went to fire on the enemy in action - so that we were only able to claim for two aircraft damaged, instead of entering a claim for two E/A destroyed. We approached to within visual range of a hE III, but as Ship fired on it, to our dismay, we could see the tracer flying off everywhere into the darkness - with only a few observed on the raider’s starboard wingtip. Thoroughly alarmed, and startled into action - the German seized his opportunity to escape and dived away. Bugger... After a short interval. we managed to obtain a further contact. now well aware of the off-set guns, Ship decided to aim at the port wingtip this time, with the idea of hitting the fuselage. Well predictably our cannon fire hit the target precisely where it had been aimed - the port wingtip - and in an instant our quarry was away. We had two opportunities, Ship was fuming!’ To top off a frustrating night Shipard landed the aircraft heavily causing extensive damage to the airframe and essentially writing off another aircraft. Redemption came the following night, 8.1.1943, ‘Scramble - Two contacts 1 JU88 Destroyed. 1 hE III Destroyed. 4 P.O.W.’ (Log Book refers); they had scrambled in a temporary aircraft, ‘at 18.23 we intercepted and destroyed a JU88 north of Tobruk, the pilot being Obw. Isachsen, Knight’s Cross hold of I/KLG 1, who was taken POW. Within ten minutes, we were vectored toward another intruder, this time a heinkel III, which we also destroyed. Three further POWs were taken.’ Shipard was made OC Bu Amud Detachment, and the pair received “Slippery Ship II” on the 13th January; they broke her duck on the 16th destroying two JU88’s in the space of 15 minutes; the following month Oxby was commissioned in the field and received a Bar to his D.F.m., ‘Ship also received the D.F.C., and a week later the Bar was announced. By now, we had 13 enemy aircraft confirmed destroyed, one probable, and two damaged.’ They moved with the Squadron, firstly to Got Bersis, and then to Castel Benito on the 22nd February; throughout march they were involved in numerous dusk and dawn patrols, 2.3.1943, ‘Patrol (Dusk) - Sighted Two JU88’s in formation E. of Tripoli: Fired Two Bursts at Nearer One: JU88 Prob Dest.’ (Log Book refers); after the

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latter engagement they limped home on one engine having got a machine gun bullet through one of the cylinders, ‘interestingly enough, throughout the course of the war, this was the only occasion the enemy had ever managed to inflict damage on us! Ship was more than a little irritated by this development.’ The total surrender of Axis forces in Africa in June 1943 brought to a close nearly two years of non-stop operational flying for Oxby and Shipard; they flew their final patrol with 89 Squadron on the 18th June, and four days later embarked on a flight back to the UK for a ‘rest’. End of a Partnership Oxby returned to the UK in July 1943, and ‘Ship was sent to the Beaufighter O.T.U. in Scotland, and I was sent to the Operational Training Unit (62 O.T.U.) at Ouston, near Newcastle-upon-Tyne, where I arrived at the beginning of August, 1943. I remained stationed there until 5th march 1944, except for two short absences. The first was two weeks leave in Torquay, Devonshire following my marriage to Jean Little on 5th November 1943. Ship was the ‘best man’ and the wedding took place in Cardiff. It was to be the last time I was to see Ship until I visited Australia in 1959.’ After a stretch of instructional duties Oxby was posted to 219 (Night Fighter) Squadron (mosquitoes), Woodvale, Lancashire, march 1944; he was paired with Squadron Leader merrifield, one of the Flight Commanders; after several weeks of converting to mosquitoes and learning to use the newly acquired mk X A.I. the squadron moved to honingley; after carrying out its’ first night exercises the squadron was declared operational, 18.4.1944, and moved to Colerne, near Bath; under the control of No. 10 Group Oxby’s new squadron were responsible for the protection of South-West England; the following month the squadron relocated to Bradwell Bay, near Southend, and in ‘late June... we began chasing ‘Divers’ (V1s) over the English Channel. We shot down two of these original ‘Cruise missiles’ on June 20th.’ After D-Day the squadron’s role became patrolling the Normandy beach-heads, and with the establishment of solid beach-heads, they were tasked with night patrols for the air defence over allied invading forces; in September 1944 merrifield was posted to the command of a Squadron in India; Oxby and merrifield never achieved the success that the former realised with Shipard; Oxby found his approach a little too conservative in comparison to the ‘daring’ Australian. Out With the Old, In With the New - Three Stukas in a Matter of Minutes Oxby’s new pilot was 219 Squadron’s CO - Wing Commander Peter Green, ‘Peter was an exacting and precise CO, who maintained distance from his subordinates, and expected Squadron members to respect his authority. his technical abilities as a pilot and tactician however, were beyond question.’ 219 Squadron, now flying from hunsdon, had the responsibility for patrolling the Allied lines over Belgium and the southern Netherlands; it was not long before the new crew had its first success together, 22/23.9.1944, ‘Patrol - 1 mE 110 Destroyed N.E. of Cologne’ (Log Book refers); having secured a prized German night fighter for a victory, ‘the night of 2/3rd October was very memorable indeed, as we managed to bring down three Stukas in quick succession that were preparing to bomb the bridges over the Waal at Nijmegen... When 4-5 miles east of Nijmegan... Climbed hard and two contacts appeared. We took the starboard one which was dropping ‘Window’... Peter identified the aircraft as a JU87, and I confirmed this with the aid of nightglasses. The E/A was carrying bombs... Peter fired on them from slightly below, and our hail of fire produced many strikes on the fuselage and wings. The enemy aircraft appeared to stagger before turning to port, and Peter fired a further burst... which produced immediate results, as the aircraft disintegrated mid-air.’ A few minutes later, ‘At about 2,000 feet we obtained a visual on a JU87 about 10 degrees above us... firing a burst from 150 yards below and with the mosquito very near stalling point, several strikes were observed on the E/A.’ The JU87 took violent evasive action and dived away managing to open up a gap of 1.5 miles, ‘We turned toward him and closed the gap quickly as Peter figured he would dive for the ground any time now. We obtained a visual on him at 2,000 feet, about 10 degrees below, and we closed again to 150 yards before opening up on him again... many strikes


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Oxby and Peter Green, together with their mosquito ground crew were seen this time... This was the end, and the E/A burst into flames and turned onto his back, before plunging vertically toward the ground, where the wreck exploded and continued to burn fiercely... We saw some intense flak near Nijmegen, and decided to go and investigate. As we pointed the nose of the mosquito toward it, I kept searching with the A.I. We soon picked up a stream of ‘Window’, as before and afterwards, obtained a contact at the head of the stream about two miles ahead. The flak was quite intense, and we were very nearly forced to break it off, but fortunately the enemy aircraft turned to starboard. We closed in to 2-3,000 feet, and obtained a visual on an aircraft now well above us. Peter put flaps down as before and closed steeply and slowly. We had a good visual on yet another JU87 with bombs still aboard. Peter didn’t waste any time, and immediately fired on him with a slight deflection just as he entered a turn. The German flew straight into it. Strikes were observed on the enemy, and he dived straight down to escape us... Peter fired another burst... and the aircraft blew instantaneously.’ The squadron moved from hunsdon to Amiens Glisy, Northern France, 10.10.1944; they now served as part of 85 Group of 2nd Tactical Air Force; Oxby was awarded the D.F.C., 6.11.1944, and continued to enjoy success in the lead up to Christmas, 22.12.1944, ‘Patrol - 1 JU88 Destroyed. A.I. Went U/S, Stb. Engine Failed, So Returned on One’; the engine trouble was not to stop them repeating the process the following night, this time shooting down a JU188; the ‘Christmas overtime continued, with a considerable amount of trade. Several combats produced results for 219. Amongst others, on the night of 26/27 December 1944 Peter and I brought down another Junkers 87, despite persistent anti-aircraft fire throughout the engagement. This continued for some time afterwards despite our firing off the colours of the day, which should have identified our mosquito to the gunners as a “Friendly Aircraft.” It was a fun time we were having dodging the flak from both sides. I often felt the need for a beer.’ The start of 1945 brought an increasing number of ‘freelancing’ flights for Oxby and Green, which culminated in victories on 1.2.1945, ‘Patrol - 1 JU88 Destroyed S.E. of Gladback’ and 24.2.1945, ‘Patrol - 1 Ju87 Destroyed, S.E. of Julich’; the evening of the 28th February marked Oxby and Green’s last flight together, within days Green was killed during a test flight. One of the mosquitoes known as A-Able had been reported as suffering from an intermittent ‘tail-flutter’; two pilots had reported the aircraft as unsafe and recommended that it should be condemned; Peter Green, as CO, disagreed that the aircraft should be condemned and as such decided to test the aircraft himself, ‘the popular CO had died with the aircraft, which had crashed in Amiens Cemetery. he had suffered severe whiplash by the impact, which had broken his neck. When I heard the news, I was really quite numb... for me as Peter’s

navigator, the tragedy was a particularly hard one to take. he had died only a few short months before hostilities finally ended. Worse still, for sixty years afterwards, I was to remain convinced that because I had escaped the accident, and was not there to assist the CO whilst flying at low altitude - Peter may have hurriedly feathered the wrong engine, leaving himself with no room to recover... I left 219 Squadron shortly afterwards, to return to the UK as a navigator instructor. I think maybe somebody on the squadron wanted to remove me from the focus of a deep sadness. I’ll never know really, but whoever it was, it was probably obvious to him that I had been badly affected by Peter’s death.’ A Trip to the Palace Oxby was posted to No. 62 O.T.U. and, ‘in march 1945, I was awarded the D.S.O. It came as a surprise really, to hear my tally was the highest of the War amongst night fighter nav/rads. Later, in September 1945 I was invited to Buckingham Palace to receive all four decorations personally from his majesty King George VI. he greeted me with a question “Where did you get this lot?” as he jangled a bright row of gongs under my nose. I replied “The DFm in malta, the Bar in North Africa, the DFC over the beach-heads, and the D.S.O. in England, your majesty”... he then asked, in a stern and challenging tone “And why haven’t you been here before?” I was temporarily lost for words. I didn’t know what to say, then I stuttered, “Well, I haven’t been invited, Your majesty.” There was a pause as he pondered my reply. Finally he grinned, and said “Then you must come to my garden parties to make up for lost time.” he was as good as his word. I subsequently received three invitations to garden parties at Buckingham Palace, and thoroughly enjoyed every one.’ Oxby chose to stay in the R.A.F. after the war and received a permanent commission, ‘one of his final postings, in 1962 was to Ottawa as Deputy Air Advisor and Senior Liaison Officer... with the BhC in Ottawa. In 1966, he was BmEWS Computer/Radar Specialist at hQ Strike Command. But Canada had made a big impression, and Doug tendered for voluntary retirement on 11.3.1969 aged 48. he emigrated to settled in Toronto, Ontario soon after his retirement from the RAF, and then spent some fifteen years working for the Canadian ministry of health, as their Director of Personnel.’ Oxby retired from the R.A.F. with the rank of Wing Commander, during his war service, ‘in just over three years of operational flying, Doug Oxby produced thirty-six visual contacts on enemy aircraft, which resulted in twenty-six interceptions. Of these combats, twentytwo enemy aircraft were destroyed, two were probably destroyed and three more were damaged.’

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

6 A Great War 1917 D.S.O. Group of Five to LieutenantColonel F.W.M. Drew, South Lancashire Regiment, Late Royal Garrison Regiment, Who Commanded the 1/10th and 1/9th Battalions, Liverpool Regiment During the Great War a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar, pin removed from top riband bar, central medallions re-tightened b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902, last clasp a tailor’s copy (Lieut. F.W.m. Drew, Royal Irish Regt.), officially impressed, unit unofficially engraved c) 1914-15 Star (Capt: F.W.m. Drew. S.Lan: R.) d) British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lt. Col. F.W.m. Drew), nearly very fine (5) £800-1,000 D.S.O. London Gazette 26.11.1917 maj. (A./Lt.-Col.) Francis William massy Drew, S. Lan. R. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. he commanded his battalion in the attack with great gallantry, and took command of the whole of the left sector during the consolidation of the position. he showed great ability and untiring energy in the difficult work of reorganising different units and allotting them sections of the defence.’ m.I.D. London Gazette 4.1.1917 Drew, Capt. (temp. maj.) F. W. m., South Lancashire Regiment. m.I.D. London Gazette 21.12.1917 Drew, maj. (actg. Lt.-Col.) F. W. m.. D.S.O., South Lancashire Regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel Francis William Massy Drew, D.S.O., born November 1881; served with the militia from September 1901; served in South Africa during operations in the Cape Colony, January to may 1902 (medal with two clasps); Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Regiment, 22.11.1902; Lieutenant, 30.5.1904; transferred to the South Lancashire Regiment, 8.7.1905; employed with the West Africa Frontier Force, march 1908 to October 1909; Appointed Adjutant, South Lancashire Regiment, 24.9.1910; promoted Captain, 27.3.1914; served during the Great War on the Western Front from February 1915; appointed Commanding Officer and acting LieutenantColonel, 1/10th Battalion, Liverpool Regiment (Territorial Force), 9.9.1916; and 1/9th Battalion, Liverpool Regiment (Territorial Force), 24.2.1917; promoted major, South Lancashire Regiment, 18.1.1917; Appointed Adjutant, 1.10.1919.

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7 x7 A Great War ‘Convoy Duties’ O.B.E. Group of Five to Commander M.A. Blomfield, Royal Navy a) The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (hallmarks for London 1918) b) 1914-15 Star (Lt. Commr. m.A. Blomfield. R.N.) c) British War and Victory medals (Commr. m.A. Blomfield. R.N.) d) Coronation 1911, good very fine (5) £160-200 O.B.E. London Gazette 27.5.1919 Lieutenant-Commander (Acting Commander) myles Aldington Blomfield, R.N. ‘For valuable services as Commodore of Convoys.’ Commander Myles Aldington Blomfield, O.B.E., R.N., Commissioned midshipman, 30.10.1900; promoted Sub Lieutenant, 30.12.1903; Lieutenant, 30.6.1906; LieutenantCommander, 30.6.1914; served during the Great War in h.m.S. Shearwater, a 6 gun screw sloop, off the coast of North America; Commander, 30.6.1919.

x8 A Second War ‘Military Division’ M.B.E. Group of Six to Squadron Leader T. Roberts, Royal Air Force a) The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, military Division, member’s (m.B.E.) breast Badge, silver b) 1939-1945 Star c) Africa Star d) Defence and War medals e) Royal Air Force Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (332986. F/Sgt. T. Roberts. R.A.F.), edge bruise to last, good very fine or better (6) £120-150 m.B.E. London Gazette 13.6.1946 Acting Squadron Leader Thomas Roberts (43741), Royal Air Force. Squadron Leader Thomas Roberts, M.B.E., Commissioned Flying Officer, 4.5.1940; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1.3.1942; retired with the rank of Squadron Leader, 29.1.1950.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 9 A Poignant Family Group: Four: Lieutenant-Commander H.W. Couch, Royal Navy, Killed in Action At The Battle of Coronel, 1.11.1914 1914-15 Star (Eng. Lt. Commr. h.W. Couch, R.N.); British War and Victory medals (Eng. Lt. Cr. h.W. Couch. R.N.); Italy, Kingdom, messina Earthquake medal 1908, silver, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine, with the recipient’s Great War Bronze memorial Plaque (herbert William Couch) and related Buckingham Palace enclosure The Second War 1940 ‘Dunkirk Evacuation’ D.S.C. Group of Four to Lieutenant-Commander R.J.H. Couch, Royal Navy; Killed in Action When His Ship H.M.S. Esk Hit An Enemy Mine Off the Dutch Coast, 1.9.1940, As He Attempted to Rescue His Brother-in-Law a) Distinguished Service Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1940’, silver (hallmarks for London 1940), in Garrard, London, case of issue b) 1939-1945 Star c) Atlantic Star d) War medal, with m.I.D. Oak Leaf, about extremely fine, with the following certificates: - mentioned in Despatches Certificate, named to Lieut-Commander Richard John hullis Couch, R.N. h.m.S. Esk, and dated 23.12.1939 - Royal Life Saving Society Certificate, named to Richard J.h. Couch, R.N. Coll, and dated July 1923 Three: Lieutenant-Commander D.W. Deane, Royal Navy; Killed in Action Off the Dutch Coast, 31.8.1940 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; War medal, with m.I.D. Oak Leaf, extremely fine, with the following related items: - memorial Scroll, named to Lieutenant-Commander D.W. Deane Royal Navy - Named Admiralty enclosure slip - Various letters relating to the recipient’s death - Portrait photograph of the recipient - Two photographs of h.m.S. Express, one taken before she struck a mine and one after (lot) £1,400-1,800 Lieutenant-Commander Herbert William Couch, born 1879; Commissioned Assistant Engineer, 1.7.1902; promoted Engineer Lieutenant, 1.8.1905; served in h.m.S. Euryalus from 10.9.1907, and present during the rescue operations at messina, December 1908; served during the Great War in h.m.S. Good Hope; killed in action at the Battle of Coronel, 1.11.1914, when the Good Hope was sunk by the German cruisers Scharnhorst and Gniesenau with the loss of all hands, and is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval memorial. herbert William Couch married miss Edith Cecile King at Portsmouth, 18.12.1906, and had a son, Richard John hullis Couch, and a daughter, Cecile mary Couch. D.S.C. London Gazette 16.8.1940 Lieutenant-Commander Richard John hullis Couch, Royal Navy, h.m.S. Esk ‘For good service in the withdrawal of the Allied Armies from the beaches at Dunkirk.’ m.I.D. London Gazette 23.12.1939 Lieutenant-Commander Richard John hullis Couch, R.N., h.m.S. Esk ‘For successful actions against enemy submarines.’

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Lieutenant-Commander D.W. Deane

Lieutenant-Commander Richard John Hullis Couch, D.S.C., born Portsmouth, 16.11.1907, the son of Lieutenant-Commander h.W. Couch; appointed midshipman, Royal Navy, 15.9.1925; served with the mediterranean Fleet in h.m.S. Malaya; Commissioned SubLieutenant, 12.6.1929, and served in h.m.S. London; promoted 16.2.1931; appointed First Lieutenant, h.m.S. Walpole, 15.12.1936; appointed Commanding Officer of h.m.S. Esk, 14.2.1938; promoted Lieutenant-Commander, 16.2.1939. The Esk was employed in evacuating the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk, and between 29.53.6.1940 evacuated 3,904 troops, including over 1,000 French troops rescued from the TSS Scotia, which was sinking after German air attacks. For his leadership and good services Couch was awarded the D.S.C., but tragically never lived to wear it. he was killed in action, 1.9.1940, when the Esk struck an enemy mine in the North Sea off the Dutch coast, and is commemorated alongside his father on the Portsmouth Naval memorial. m.I.D. London Gazette 16.8.1940 Lieutenant-Commander Denis Worth Deane, Royal Navy, h.m.S. Express ‘For good service in the withdrawal of the Allied Armies from the beaches at Dunkirk.’ Lieutenant-Commander Denis Worth Deane, married miss Cecile mary Couch, the daughter of LieutenantCommander h.W. Couch, and the sister of LieutenantCommander R.J.h. Couch; Commissioned Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Navy, 30.5.1924; promoted Lieutenant, 30.7.1926; Lieutenant-Commander, 30.7.1934; transferred to h.m.S.


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h.m.S. Express, before she struck a mine Express at the outbreak of the Second World War- ‘The Express was a “happy ship”, due chiefly to two men. One was our C.O., Captain Bickford; the other was your son [Lieutenant-Commander Deane]. he had, more than any other officer I have known, what Kipling called “the common touch.” he achieved easily and naturally what many people do not even attempt, and what many more fail miserably to do, and that was, off duty, to raise all his subordinates to his own rank, not to lower himself to theirs.’ (Letter to the recipient’s father from Lieutenant Colin Aldridge, dated 13.2.1945 refers). The Express was one of several dozen destroyers ordered to help evacuate the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk, and was one of the first to arrive and begin taking troops off the beaches. She was the last ship to leave Dunkirk with troops before the evacuation ended, 4.6.1940, and over the course of the evacuation brought out 2,795 troops. he was killed in action, 31.8.1940, when the Express struck a mine in the North Sea off the Dutch coast; his body was taken back to port, and he is buried in hull Northern Cemetery, Yorkshire. The Texel Disaster On the night of 31.8.1940, the 20th Destroyer Flotilla, comprising h.m.S. Esk, Express, Icarus, Intrepid, and Ivanhoe, under the overall command of LieutenantCommander Couch, sailed from Immingham to lay an offensive minefield off the Dutch coast at Texel: ‘Whilst proceeding to carry out their orders signals were received informing them that enemy surface forces were in the vicinity and ordering them to proceed at once and attack. The

operation was therefore cancelled and the force turned at once and started to close the enemy at high speed. Deane was on the Bridge and so was the Captain, and he was heard to report to the Captain that the ship was correctly starting direct for the enemy. About half an hour later this force ran slap into an enemy minefield and the Express, which was leading, struck a mine just forward of the fore-Bridge, and therefore very close to where Deane was standing. Both he and the Captain were killed instantaneously.’ (Letter to the recipient’s father from Lieutenant h. Price, dated 15.9.1944 refers). ‘The ship struck a mine at 10 minutes to midnight on the 31st August. This caused the fore magazine to explode, and the blast from the explosion passed across the Bridge. Lieutenant-Commander Deane was on the starboard side, probably in the direct path of the blast. his body was removed from this position a short time after the explosion occurred and bore no apparent injuries. medical opinion was that he had died instantaneously from the effects of the blast.’ (Letter from the Admiralty refers). Total casualties on the Express were 4 Officers and 55 men killed, and a further 30 wounded. Following the explosion, Lieutenant-Commander Couch moved his ship, the Esk, to assist the Express, but the Esk also hit a mine. Some 15 minutes later, there was another explosion amidships which caused the Esk to break in two, and she quickly sank, killing all 127 Officers and men on board, save for one man. The Ivanhoe then attempted to transfer the wounded from the Express but she also hit a mine and was badly damaged, the explosion killing a further 53 men and wounding the majority of the crew.

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x10 The Second War ‘Persian Gulf’ D.S.C. Pair to Captain R.E.T. Tunbridge, Royal Naval Reserve a) Distinguished Service Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1942’, and additionally privately engraved in large serif capitals ‘Captain R.E.T. Tunbridge D.S.C., R.D., R.N.R.’, silver (hallmarks for London 1942), in Garrard, London, case of issue b) Royal Naval Reserve Decoration, G.V.R., silver (hallmarks for London 1918) and silver-gilt, about extremely fine (2) £700-900 D.S.C. London Gazette 10.3.1942 Captain (then Commander) Robert Ernest Tuearsley Tunbridge, R.D., R.N.R., h.m.S. Shoreham ‘For courage, enterprise and devotion to duty in operations in the Persian Gulf.’ R.D. London Gazette 23.3.1928 Lieut.-Comdr. R. E. T. Tunbridge. Captain Robert Ernest Tuearsley Tunbridge, D.S.C., R.D., Commissioned midshipman, Royal Naval Reserve, 1.10.1911; promoted Lieutenant, 2.4.1918; LieutenantCommander, 2.4.1926; Commander, 3.7.1934; served during the Second World War (D.S.C.; mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 2.1.1945 ‘For gallantry, enterprise and undaunted devotion to duty in hazardous operations’); promoted Captain, 31.12.1941.

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11 The Great War M.C. Group of Seven to Captain T.A. Tutin, London Regiment, Late Coldstream Guards, Wounded at Gallipoli, 24.8.1915 a) military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Belmont, modder River, Driefontein, Transvaal (7170 Co: Sejt. T.A. Tutin, Cldstm: Gds:) c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (7170 Clr:- Serjt: T.A. Tutin. Coldstream Guards.) d) 1914-15 Star (Q,m, & Lieut: T.A. Tutin. 11/Lond: R.) e) British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves (Q.m. & Capt. T.A. Tutin.) f) Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (7170 Q.m.Sjt. T.A. Tutin. Cldstm. Gds.), top lugs removed on QSA and KSA, very fine or better (7) £800-1,200 m.C. London Gazette 1.1.1919 Qr.-mr. and Capt. Thomas Appleby Tutin, 1/11th Bn., Lond. R. m.I.D. London Gazette 6.7.1917 Tutin, Qrmr. and hon. Lt. T.A., London Regiment, Infantry (Territorial Force). Captain Thomas Appleby Tutin, M.C.; born Radford, Nottingham, January 1867; enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards, may 1887; advanced Colour Sergeant, march 1895; served with the Regiment in South Africa from October 1899 to June 1900; posted to the 3rd Battalion, June 1900; reverted to the 2nd Battalion, August 1901, and served with them again in South Africa from August 1901 to October 1902 (mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 10.10.1901); promoted Quarter master Sergeant, 1.8.1903; Awarded L.S.& G.C. medal, 1907 (Army Order 242), with a Gratuity of £5; Commissioned Lieutenant and Quarter master, 11th Battalion, London Regiment (Territorial Force), 7.2.1912; served with the Regiment during the Great War in the Balkan Theatre from 9.8.1915; wounded (shrapnel wound to left forearm) at Gallipoli, 24.8.1915; appointed Camp Quarter master at General hQ, middle East Force, 17.11.1915; served with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 3.1.1916-16.7.1919; promoted Captain, 1.7.1917; posted to 1st (Garrison) Battalion, King’s (Liverpool Regiment), 3.1.1918; posted to the 1/11th London Regiment, 28.2.1918; retired, 24.7.1921. Captain Tutin died, 27.9.1922.


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12 12 The Great War M.C. Group of Three to Lieutenant S.F. Peshall [C.B.E.], King’s Royal Rifle Corps, Later High Sheriff of Leicestershire a) military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) British War and Victory medals (Lieut. S.F. Peshall.), lacquered, extremely fine, with the recipient’s related miniature awards, including a Civil Division C.B.E. (3) £500-600 C.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1951 Samuel Frederick Peshall, Esq., m.C., Chairman, North midlands Regional Board for Industry. m.C. London Gazette 11.12.1916 Temp. 2nd Lt. Samuel Frederick Peshall, K.R.R.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry in action. he led a small bombing party against the enemy and drove them back at a critical time. Later, he barricaded the trench and held it against repeated attacks. he was wounded.’ Lieutenant Samuel Frederick Peshall, C.B.E., M.C., born Oldberrow, Warwickshire, November 1882, the son of the Rev. S. Peshall; educated at Rossall and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, 24.12.1915, and served during the Great War (wounded); relinquished his Commission with the rank of Lieutenant, 25.1.1918; in civilian life work for Corah and Sons, Leicester; appointed President of the National Federation of hosiery manufacturers, 1943; President, Leicester Chamber of Commerce, 1945; Appointed high Sheriff of Leicestershire, 1945; served as Chairman of the Regional Board for Industry in North midlands, 1945-63, and appointed a Commander of the most Excellent Order of the British Empire for his services to Industry, 1951; died 25.8.1977. Lieutenant Peshall was a keen footballer throughout his life, and regularly played for the Coronthians Football Club.

Lieutenant S.F. Peshall

For the medals awarded to Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander J.C.E. Peshall, the nephew of Lieutenant Peshall, see Lot 92.

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13 A Superb Second War 1945 ‘Immediate’ Italian Theatre M.C. Group of Six to Jemadar Amir Shah, 12th Frontier Force Regiment, Indian Army, For His ‘Magnificent Leadership and Contempt For Danger in the Decisive Defeat of a Bold and Well Organised Enemy Raid’ a) military Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1945’ b) India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (9742 Sep. Amir Shah, 1-12 F.F.R.) c) 1939-1945 Star d) Italy Star e) Defence and War medals, generally very fine or better (6) £700-900 m.C. London Gazette 5.7.1945 Jemadar Amir Shah (47732 IO), 12th Frontier Force Regiment, Indian Army ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy.’ The recommendation, dated 31.3.1945, states: ‘On 24 march 1945, Jemadar Amir Shah’s platoon was holding a position on the east floodbank of the river Senio near Bagnacavallo, with section posts on the bank and in houses just behind. The enemy held positions on the west floodbank, and also had further positions on the same floodbank which enabled him to cover the platoon from both flanks. The platoon was harassed continually by mortars, grenades, and snipers. At 09:00 hours, supported by mortars, medium guns, and rockets on neighbouring localities, and by Spandaus from the flanks, the enemy launched a sudden raid. Rushing to the top of the bank, preceded by a shower of high explosives and smoke grenades, and firing Bazookas, the enemy demolished two posts, killing two men and wounding a third. Jemadar Amir Shah, disregarding the hail of bullets and grenades, ran forward to the threatened section and with a Thompson sub-machine gun and grenades killed two enemy and forced the remainder to withdraw. he then ran from post to post encouraging his men and hurling grenades until the attack had been completely smashed. Seven enemy were killed on the bank and other casualties were certainly inflicted but covering fire from the far bank prevented a detailed count. The magnificent leadership and contempt for danger of this V.C.O. were the major factors in the decisive defeat of this bold and well organised enemy raid.’ Two Jemadar Amir Shah’s appear in the Indian Army List for the 12th Frontier Force Regiment, October 1945; no Regimental number is given for either man; 9742 Sepoy Amir Shah enlisted in the 12th Frontier Force Regiment, 27.10.1929, and was Commissioned Jemadar, 26.2.1944.

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14 A Remarkable Great War ‘1916’ D.F.C. Group of Four to Short Seaplane Pilot, Flight Lieutenant, Later Squadron Leader, G.H. Reid, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, Who Flying in an Abortive Raid on the Zeppelin Sheds in Schleswig-Holstein, Tried to Effect an Audacious Air to Sea Rescue of a Stranded Sopwith Pilot; Having Landed in the North Sea, Reid Attempted to Fix the Sopwith But to No Avail; He Then Proceeded to Take Off Once More, But This Time With the Sopwith Pilot Strapped On To a Strut! Blinded By a Snowstorm Reid Tried to Navigate His Way Back to the Aircraft Carrier Vindex, From Which He Had Originally Taken Off; Suffering From Engine Trouble He Was Forced to Land, ‘Finding It Was Irreparable Most Pilots Would Have Lost Heart, But Not So Flight Lieutenant Reid. He Brought Into Action The Starboard Bank of Cylinders and Proceeded to Taxi the Short at About 4 Knots.’ Reid Set Off Once Again for the Vindex, But ‘After Three Hours of RoughRiding the Waves in the Open Sea, A Motor-Boat Filled With Soldiers Was Seen Approaching Them, and From the Skies Two Seaplanes Suddenly Swooped Down and Landed Alongside... They Were Germans’; Reid’s Refusal to Admit Defeat Carried on into Captivity, During Which He Tried to Escape Several Times Including Jumping From a Fast Moving Train. A Brilliant Inventor He Created Several Flying Aides, Some of Which Were Still in Mainstream Use Nearly 40 Years After Their Invention a) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., reverse contemporarily engraved in sans-serif capitals ‘Captain George h. Reid. march 1916’ b) 1914-15 Star (Flt. S. Lt. G.h. Reid. R.N.A.S.) c) British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. G.h. Reid R.A.F.), nearly extremely fine, mounted as originally worn, with the following original documents: - Telegram from Buckingham Palace requesting recipient’s presence for D.F.C. investiture - Admiralty letter informing mrs. Reid that the recipient had been taken prisoner of war, dated 16.4.1916 - Letter to the recipient from King George V, on Buckingham Palace paper, dated 1918, and signed ‘George R.I.’ - Notification from ministry of Pensions, Officers Branch, of award of disability pension, dated 29.8.1928 - Letter to the recipient from the Rt. hon. Winston Churchill on 10, Downing Street, writing paper, undated, signed ‘Winston S. Churchill’ - Small scrap book filled with newspaper cuttings relating to recipient’s war time service and subsequent post war career - Six photographic images of recipient (lot) £4,000-5,000 D.F.C. London Gazette 8.2.1919 Capt. George hancock Reid, Sea Patrol (North Sea) ‘As pilot of a Short seaplane he was engaged on a raid on Zeppelin sheds in Schleswig-holstein on 25th march, 1916, in which he displayed great courage, ability and resource under the most trying circumstances, which included prolonged flying in a snowstorm and immersion for over three hours in the sea.’

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Squadron Leader G.h. Reid

Squadron Leader George Hancock Reid, D.F.C. (1889-1969); served in the London University O.T.C., 19101913; commissioned Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, 19.11.1914; initial postings included to R.N.A.S. Chingford, Yarmouth and Calshot; appointed Senior Seaplane Pilot, to h.m.S. Vindex (aircraft carrier), 25.8.1915; Flight Lieutenant, 1.1.1916, and ‘was the principal actor in one of the most thrilling dramas of the air during the early part of the War. At day-break, on the 25th march, 1916, flying a Short seaplane, he was one of five pilots who set off from the Vindex, aircraft carrier, to bomb an airship base believed to be at Tonden on the Schleswig coast. On their way to the objective they had to fly through a snowstorm which became thicker and thicker as time went on. Only two of those machines returned to the parent ship. Flight Lieutenant Reid was one of the unlucky ones, but the story of his failure to return will rank as one of the most thrilling experiences which befell these early Naval Air Service pilots. While groping his way back to the Vindex his observer, Chief Petty Officer mullins, spotted a Sopwith seaplane, the pilot waving frantically, resting on the water in shore, not far from hoyer. Not hesitating, Flight Lieutenant Reid throttled back his engine and landed alongside the disabled Sopwith. Being a skilful mechanic, Flight Lieutenant Reid did his best to get the engine of the Sopwith going. While he did so an incredible situation arose, for a number of Germans stood near by on the shore shouting encouragement. They thought they were encouraging their own airmen! After a while, German soldiers were to be seen approaching in the distance, so the Short, with Flight Lieutenant hay - the pilot of the Sopwith - strapped on to a strut, took off to the accompaniment of cheers from the encouraging civilians. Flight Lieutenant Reid and his comrades waved a fond farewell to them. heroically the old Short, with its additional burden on board, staggered through the snowstorm, and the hopes of the airmen ran high for a safe return to the Vindex. It was not to be, however, for after a while disaster came their way when flying in the vicinity of the island of Sylt. One of the magnetos, which worked one bank of cylinders, ceased to function and Flight Lieutenant Reid was forced to land. After examining the magneto and finding it was irreparable most pilots would have lost heart, but not so Flight Lieutenant Reid. he brought into action the starboard bank of cylinders and proceeded to taxi the Short at about four knots in the direction of where he thought the Vindex would be found. Such a gallant effort to get back to his base did not deserve what Fate had in store for him and his comrades. After three hours of rough-riding the waves in the open sea, a motor-boat filled with soldiers was seen approaching them, and from the skies two seaplanes suddenly swooped down and landed alongside the Short. They were Germans - both in the seacraft as well as the aircraft. And so ended the War career of three gallant British airmen and the end of a very thrilling adventure.

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Squadron Leader G.h. Reid at Buckingham Palace after receiving his D.F.C.

On his way to prison camp, Flight Lieutenant Reid gave his escort the slip and jumped off a fast moving train. Unfortunately he broke his leg in his attempt to escape and was later captured, being made a prisoner for the rest of the War, in spite of other attempts to escape.’ (An Air Fighter’s Scrapbook, Squadron Leader Ira Jones, D.S.O., m.C., D.F.C., refers); Reid was reported to be a Prisoner of War at Osnabruck, Germany, 15.4.1916; Reid was mentioned in Reports for valuable services whilst in captivity, and noted accordingly in the Official Records of the Air ministry (London Gazette 16.12.1919); after the War Reid continued in service, stationed at Biggin hill, before turning his mind to invention, ‘he was interested in the problem of flying in fog, as a result of his wartime experiences, and invented the Reid Turn and Bank Indicator, a device which enabled a pilot to fix his position in the fog’. Up to that time, this had not been possible and the device, in improved form, is still standard equipment on all aircraft [1969]. In 1925, he designed and patented a Time Reaction apparatus, a machine which made possible the selection and grading of the abilities of a prospective pilot. This was very advanced for its time, and made considerable headway in the training of personnel. In 1935, he opened a training school for pilots in the midlands [Desford Airfield] and a large number of pilots were trained before and during the war. his firm, Reid and Sigrist, continued development of the Turn and Bank Indicator during this time. he was also associated with Sir Archibald mcIndoe in the rehabilitation of burnt pilots during the war. One of his more recent ventures was the development and manufacture of a precision camera which was widely used in industry. he had a natural flair for invention, due partly to an early engineering interest and a distinguished academic career at the Imperial College of Science. he was a Whitworth Exhibitioner’; (Obituary refers); in later life he resided in Jersey, where he owned a yacht and also raced thoroughbreds.

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15 A Scarce Order of St. John Territorial Force Group of Ten to Colonel R.R. Sleman, Royal Army Medical Corps, Late City of London Imperial Volunteers a) The most Venerable Order of St. John, Officer’s breast Badge, silver b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond hill (Sgn: Capt. R.R. Sleman. C.I.V.) c) British War and Victory medals (Col. R.R. Sleman.) d) Territorial Force War medal (Lt. Col. R.R. Sleman R.A.m.C.) e) Coronation 1911 f) Volunteer Officer’s Decoration, E.VII.R., silver (hallmarks for London 1904) and silver-gilt, with integral top riband bar g) Territorial Decoration, G.V.R., silver (hallmarks for London 1919) and silver-gilt, with integral top riband bar h) Order of the League of mercy, member’s Badge, silver-gilt and enamel i) Serbia, Kingdom, Order of the White Eagle, 2nd type, Officer’s breast Badge, with Swords, 68mm x 36mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine or better, mounted court style as originally worn £1,200-1,600 Officer, Order of St. John London Gazette 21.10.1927 Colonel Richard Reginald Sleman, m.D. V.D. London Gazette 4.4.1905 Surgeon-major and honorary Surgeon-Lieutenant-Colonel (honorary Captain in the Army) Richard Reginald Sleman, 20th middlesex (Artists’) Volunteer Rifle Corps, London District. T.D. London Gazette 4.11.1919 Lieut.-Colonel Richard R. Sleman m.D., V.D., Royal Army medical Corps. Order of the League of mercy London Gazette 3.1.1919 Lt.-Colonel R. R. Sleman, R.A.m.C., S. Paddington, Vice-President Serbia, Order of the White Eagle, Officer (with Swords) London Gazette 15.2.1917 Lieutenant-Colonel Richard Reginald Sleman, m.D., Royal Army medical Corps ‘For distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign.’ Colonel Richard Reginald Sleman, V.D., T.D., M.D., Commissioned Acting Surgeon, 20th middlesex (Artists’) Rifles, Volunteer Corps, September 1890; Surgeon, with the rank of Captain, November 1890; served during the Boer War with the City of London Imperial Volunteers as medical Officer in the Orange Free State in may 1900, including the action at Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, may and June 1900, including the actions near Johannesburg and Diamond hill, 11-12.6.1900; and operations in the Transvaal west of Pretoria, August 1900 (mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 10.9.1901); promoted Surgeon-major, 22.11.1902; SurgeonLieutenant-Colonel, 1st London Field Ambulance, 1.4.1908; Appointed Deputy Director of medical Services at malta, 15.5.1915; Appointed Assistant Director of medical Services, London Division, 17.9.1916; served with the Royal Army medical Corps during the Great War in France from 20.1.1917; retired, with the rank of Colonel, 30.9.1921.

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17 16 A Scarce I.D.S.M. Pair to Risaldar-Major Karm Singh, Bahadar, 13th Duke of Connaught’s Lancers, and Aide-de-Camp to H.E. The Viceroy a) Indian Distinguished Service medal, E.VII.R. (Ressaidar Karm Singh 13th. Duke of C. Lcrs.), lacking top riband bar b) Delhi Durbar 1911, left obverse side of I.D.S.M. and obverse suspension claw worn smooth, therefore fine, scarce (2) £400-500 I.D.S.m. Gazette of India 28.6.1907 Ressaidar Karm Singh, 13th Duke of Connaught’s Lancers (Watson’s horse). Risaldar-Major Karm Singh, I.D.S.M., enlisted in the 13th Duke Of Connaught’s Lancers, may 1884; advanced Jemadar, may 1899; promoted Ressaidar, 26.10.1903; awarded the Indian Distinguished Service medal in the first ever list of recipients; promoted Risaldar, 1.12.1907; Risaldar-major, 1.2.1912; received the Order of British India Second Class with the title Bahadar, 10.3.1917; appointed honorary Aide-de-Camp to h.E. The Viceroy, 1.12.1917.

17 The Second War Anti-Aircraft Gunner’s 1940 ‘Narvik’ D.S.M. Group of Six to Chief Petty Officer E.S.A. Buzzo, Royal Navy a) Distinguished Service medal, G.VI.R. (JX.130870 E.S.A. Buzzo. P.O. h.m.S. Fame.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Atlantic Star d) War medal e) Naval Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R. (JX.130870 E.S.A. Buzzo. C.P.O. h.m.S. Drake), ship officially corrected f) Greece, Kingdom, medal of military merit, Fourth Class, bronze, reverse privately engraved ‘Able Seaman Edward S.A. Buzzo’, good very fine, together with the following related items: - Greece, Kingdom, Red Cross medal, silvered bronze and enamel, reverse dated 1932 - The recipient’s riband bars, showing entitlement to

the France and Germany Bar - h.m.S. Resolution Prize medal, bronze, the reverse engraved ‘med B.S. Regatta 1931 Young Sea Whalers 2nd’, in fitted case - h.m.S. Resolution Prize medal, silvered, the obverse engraved ‘Young Seamans Whaler Winners 1st B.S.’, the reverse engraved ‘1932. E. Buzzo.’, in fitted case - The recipient’s Certificate of Service - The recipient’s Recommendations for Advancement and Conduct Record Sheet - The recipient’s Certificate for the Educational Test, Part 1, dated 5.3.1929 - The recipient’s Trade and Interim Certificates of Discharge, dated 8.7.1957 - Board of Admiralty Letter of Thanks, dated 5.6.1957 - Newspaper cutting announcing the award of the recipient’s D.S.m. - The recipient’s ration books - Various group photographs featuring the recipient (6) £1,400-1,800 D.S.m. London Gazette 26.9.1940 Petty Officer Edward Sidney Augustus Buzzo, D/JX.130870, h.m.S. Fame ‘For services in and near Narvik.’ JX.130870 Chief Petty Officer Edward Sidney Augustus Buzzo, D.S.M., born East Stonehouse, Devon, 9.7.1912; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class serving in h.m.S. Impregnable, 12.9.1927; Ordinary Seaman, h.m.S. Adventure, 9.7.1930; promoted Able Seaman, serving in h.m.S. Resolution, 8.10.1931; awarded the Greek medal of military merit (medal of military Valour), along with a number of other ratings, 5.9.1933, for their work in rescuing victims of the earthquake in Greece, and also received the hellenic Red Cross Commemorative medal; advanced Petty Officer, 15.4.1939, and served during the Second World War in h.m.S. Fame; awarded the Distinguished Service medal ‘For coolness and devotion to duty during enemy bombing attacks whilst serving as an anti-aircraft gunner during the Battle of Narvik, April 1940. he operated his machine-gun in the face of continuous attacks.’ (Newspaper cutting refers). Promoted Chief Petty Officer, 18.11.1944; awarded L.S.& G.C. medal, together with a gratuity of £20, 9.7.1945; discharged 8.7.1957.

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18 The Second War D.S.M. Group of Four to Convoy Yeoman of Signals E. Whitehead, Royal Navy a) Distinguished Service medal, G.VI.R. (T/Con. Y.S. E. Whitehead, C/JX.185543), in case of issue b) 1939-1945 Star c) Atlantic Star, with France and Germany Bar d) War medal, extremely fine, together with the following related documents: - Named Buckingham Palace Enclosure for the D.S.m. - Admiralty Enclosure for the Campaign Awards - Letter to the recipient from the honours and Awards Branch of the Admiralty regarding the award of the D.S.m., dated 12.1.1946 - Naval Gratuity Certificate awarding the recipient a Gratuity of £20 in respect of his D.S.m., dated 15.4.1946 - Portrait photograph of the recipient (4) £700-900 D.S.m. London Gazette 11.12.1945 Temporary Convoy Yeoman of Signals Edward Whitehead, C/JX. 185543 ‘For distinguished service during the War in Europe.’ C/JX 185543 Convoy Yeoman of Signals Edward Whitehead, D.S.M., served during the Second World War in h.m.S. Eaglet.

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x19 The Great War M.M. Group of Four to Private W. Halbert, 14th Canadian Infantry a) military medal, G.V.R. (63432 Pte. W. halbert. 14/Can: Inf:) b) 1914-15 Star (63432 Pte. W. halbert. 14/Can: Inf:) c) British War and Victory medals (63432 Pte. W. halbert. 14-Can. Inf.), worn, nearly very fine (4) ÂŁ300-350 m.m. London Gazette 18.7.1917 63432 Pte. W. halbert, Inf., Canadian Forces. 63432 Private Walter Halbert, M.M., born Barrie, Ontario, October 1879; enlisted in the 14th Canadian Infantry, 19.1.1915.

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20 A Second War 1945 ‘North West Europe’ M.M. Group of Five to Trooper P.H. Bennett, Reconnaissance Corps a) military medal, G.VI.R. (4078849 Tpr. P.h. Bennett. Recce. Corps.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) France and Germany Star d) War medal e) Efficiency medal, G.VI.R. with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (4078849 Tpr. P h Bennett. Recce Regt.), last partially officially corrected, generally very fine (5) £1,000-1,300 m.m. London Gazette 12.7.1945 4078849 Trooper Percival harold Bennett, Reconnaissance Corps, Royal Armoured Corps (Abergavenny). The Recommendation, dated 11.4.1945, states: ‘During the advance to Ochtrup on 2nd April 1945, the leading Armoured Car Troop was held up by two S.P. Guns. The Assault Troop was ordered up and the section of this troop in which Trooper Bennett was serving advance to the right of the road. heavy mortar and shell fire came down on this Troop and the section also came under spandau fire from a house about 100 yards away to the right. Trooper Bennett and another soldier, on their own initiative, ran across the open to this house and were under fire while doing so. The Troop with the remainder of Trooper Bennett’s section was then forced to withdraw. After 3 hours had elapsed, Trooper Bennett and the other soldier rejoined their Troop bringing with them 16 prisoners.’ 4078849 Trooper Percival Harold Bennett, M.M. served during the Second World War with the 53rd Reconnaissance Regiment, as part of the 53rd (Welsh) Division, 12 Corps advance into the Rhineland.

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21 An R.V.M. Group of Six to Carpenter’s Mate T. Rockey, Royal Navy, Awarded the R.V.M. For Service at H.M. Queen Victoria’s Funeral a) Royal Victorian medal, V.R., silver (Presented to T. Rockey. C.mte. by h.m. The King Feb.1.1901), engraved in large sans-serif capitals b) Jubilee 1897, bronze (Presented to T. Rockey. C.mte. by h.m. Queen Victoria), engraved in large sans-serif capitals c) Coronation 1902, bronze, reverse engraved ‘Presented by The King to T. Rockey C.m.’ in sansserif capitals d) Egypt 1882-89, undated, no clasp (T. Rockey, Car. Crew, h.m.S. Orontes.) e) Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (T. Rockey, Shipwt., h.m.Y. Victoria & Albert.) f) Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, and pitting to L.S.&G.C., nearly very fine or better (6) £350-450 Carpenter’s Mate Thomas Rockey, R.V.M., born holesworthy, Devon, December 1854; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Carpenter’s Crew, seriving in h.m.S. Indus, February 1880; transferred to h.m.S. Orontes, September 1883; promoted Shipwright, January 1886; transferred to the Royal Yacht h.m.Y. Victoria and Albert, march 1886; promoted Carpenter’s mate, November 1896; awarded the Royal Victorian medal in silver for service at h.m. Queen Victoria’s funeral, February 1901. In 1902, when Rockey was awarded the last of his medals, the order of wear stated that these medals should be worn in this order.

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22 A ‘Military Division’ B.E.M. Group of Five to Corporal S.G. Graham, Royal Ulster Rifles a) British Empire medal, military Division, E.II.R. (19043956 Cpl. Stephen G. Graham, R.U.R.) b) Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (19043956 Rfn. S.G. Graham, R.U.R.) c) United Nations medal for Korea d) General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Cyprus (19043956 Cpl. S.G. Graham. R.U.R.) e) General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Borneo (19043956 Cpl. S.G. Graham. B.E.m. R.U.R.), light contact marks throughout, very fine, with recipient’s Regular Army Certificate of Service (5) £500-700 B.E.m. London Gazette 1.1.1963 19043956 Cpl S.G. Graham, 1st Bn, The Royal Ulster Rifles. The Recommendation, dated 4.6.1962, states: ‘Throughout the period that this Battalion has been in Germany the devotion to duty of this NCO has been outstanding. In July 1960 when the Battalion received its Saracen Armoured Personnel Carriers, Corporal Graham was the first to be trained as a driver operator, after which he became one of the NCO’s entrusted with the training of the drivers, and reserve drivers, for the Battalion’s 95 APC’s. his devotion to duty during this period was out of the ordinary, and due largely to his own efforts, working to all hours, the large number of drivers required for the Battalion’s new role were successfully trained. Since that period, Cpl Graham has been instrumental not only in helping to keep the Battalion’s large complement of Saracens on the road, but in maintaining the supply of skilled and efficient drivers that resulted in the recent successful completion of the War Office Trials of this Unit as a Battalion with integrated APC’s. In December 1961, Cpl Graham with six drivers attended a course at FVRDE, Chobham in driving and maintaining the new tracked APC, the FV 432. he then returned to Iserlohn and took over one of the five FV 432’s with which this Battalion was carrying out another War Office Trial. The early part of these trials was carried out in the field, in below zero conditions of great discomfort. Cpl. Graham worked all hours of the day and night, far beyond the normal requirements of duty, not only to carry out his own part of the trials, but to help keep on the road the other vehicles issued to the Battalion. During recent amphibious trials, this NCO showed great skill, coolness and presence of mind in negotiating strong currents and effecting successful initial crossings of the River Weser. Throughout both War Office Trials, i.e. those of an Infantry Battalion with Integrated APC’s, and those of the FV 432, this NCO’s cheerfulness under adverse conditions, skill, and devotion to duty far beyond the normal requirements, have been an inspiration to All Ranks of this Battalion, and played a major part in the successful outcome of both Trials, with their resultant effect on the future of Infantry.’ 19043956 Corporal Stephen Geoffrey Graham, B.E.M, born 1929; enlisted Royal Ulster Rifles, 21.4.1947; discharged 12.6.1968, after 21 years and 54 days with the Colours.

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MEDALS TO THE HAMILTON, COX AND CLIBBORN FAMILIES

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23 Three: Surgeon-General J.B. Hamilton, Army Medical Staff Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, Suakin 1885 (Surgn. maj: J.B. hamilton, m.D., med: Staff.); Jubilee 1897, silver; Khedive’s Star 1884-6, pitting to first from Star, otherwise good very fine, together with the following related shooting medals: - Three Rifle Association of Northern India Prize medals, 55mm, silver-gilt, the obverse featuring a tiger above the date 1863, the reverse engraved ‘J.B. hamilton m.D. D.16 R.A. Champion 1870’; ‘Surgn. major J.B. hamilton. Champion. 1876’; and ‘Surgn. major J.B. hamilton. Champion. 1881’ respectively - Five National Rifle Association Prize medals, 48mm, silver, the obverse featuring an Archer from 1300, and a Rifleman from 1860, all unnamed - Rifle Association of Northern India Prize medal, 55mm, bronze, the obverse featuring a tiger above the date 1863, unnamed - Three Rifle Association of Western India Prize medals, 37mm, silver (2); bronze, the obverse featuring a lion sitting under a tree, all unnamed - Two Bombay Presidency Central Rifle meeting Prize medals, 39mm, silver, the obverse featuring Queen Victoria - Two Irish Rifle Association Shields, gilt, with collectively five riband bars dated ‘1874’, ‘Irish Challenge Shield 1875’, ‘1875’, ‘1883’, and ‘1884’ respectively - Northern India Rifle Association Champion Badge, engraved ‘Won by J.B. hamilton, Esqr., m.D.’, with two riband Bars, dated ‘1870’ and ‘1876’ (lot) £400-500 Surgeon-General John Butler Hamilton, born Dublin, January 1838; Served as Assistant Surgeon, 3rd West India Regiment, in the Bahamas, Barbados, and Jamaica 1860-62; married miss Annie mcPherson, march 1861; served in Bengal from 1864; Appointed Surgeon, April 1873; promoted Surgeon-major, April 1875; served during the Sudanese Campaign in 1885, and present at Suakin, march to may 1885; promoted Brigade Surgeon, march 1886; Appointed honorary Surgeon to h.E. the Viceroy of India, November 1888; promoted Surgeon-Colonel 1891; Surgeon-major-General, 1895; and Surgeon-General on retirement, October 1898. Surgeon-General hamilton and his wife had a son, and two daughters, Annie Leonie and Louisa Belle. he died at home in London, 26.10.1902.

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24 24 The Boer War D.S.O. Group of Three to Lieutenant-Colonel E.H. Cox, Royal Fusiliers a) Distinguished Service Order, V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal (major E.h. Cox. 2/Rl. Fus.) c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (major E.h. Cox. D.S.O. Rl. Fusrs.), lacquered, extremely fine, mounted Cavalry style as worn, and housed in a Spink, London, leather fitted case, the lid embossed ‘E.h.C.’ £2,000-2,400 D.S.O. London Gazette 31.10.1902 Edward henry Cox, major, Royal Fusiliers ‘In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Henry Cox, D.S.O., born may 1863, the elder son of Arthur Zachariah Cox, Esq., of harwood hall, Essex, and the brother of major-General Sir Percy Zachariah Cox, G.C.m.G., G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I.; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Fusiliers, November 1884; served as Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of Bombay, January 1892 to February 1895; promoted Captain, march 1892; served during the Boer War, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso, 15.12.1899; took part in the operations on Tugela heights, 14-27.2.1900, and the action at Pieter’s hill; served in Natal, march to June 1900, and in the Transvaal, July to November 1900, and was present at the actions at Frederickstad, 17-25.10.1900; later served in the Cape Colony, and present at the action at Ruidam, and during the operations in the Transvaal and the Orange River Colony, November 1900 to may 1902; Promoted major, 3.2.1900; mentioned in Lord Roberts’ Despatch, (London Gazette 10.9.1901); and awarded the D.S.O.; advanced Lieutenant-Colonel, 3.5.1907; retired, 23.8.1911.

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25 Six: Major-General Sir. P.Z. Cox, [G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I.], Indian Political Department, Chief Political Officer, Indian Expeditionary Force 1914-18, Late Scottish Rifles 1914-15 Star (Lt. Col. Sir P.Z. Cox); British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves (maj. Gen. Sir P.Z. Cox.); Delhi Durbar 1903, silver, with integral top riband buckle; Delhi Durbar 1911, silver; Jubilee 1935, about extremely fine £400-500 G.C.m.G. London Gazette 31.12.1921 major-General Sir Percy Zachariah Cox, G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I., K.C.m.G., high Commissioner and Commander-in-Chief for Iraq. K.C.m.G. London Gazette 1.1.1920 major-General Sir Percy Zachariah Cox, G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I., his majesty’s Representative at Tehran. G.C.I.E. London Gazette 25.8.1917 Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Percy Zachariah Cox, K.C.S.I., K.C.I.E., Indian Army ‘in recognition of meritorious services in connection with the War.’ K.C.I.E. London Gazette 12.12.1911 Lieutenant-Colonel Percy Zachariah Cox, C.S.I., C.I.E., Indian Army, Political Resident in the Persian Gulf. C.I.E. London Gazette 26.6.1902 major Percy Zachariah Cox, Indian Staff Corps. K.C.S.I. London Gazette 29.10.1915 Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Percy Zachariah Cox, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. ‘In recognition of services as Officer in charge of the British political interests in the Persian Gulf region in connection with the military operations in mesopotamia.’ C.S.I. London Gazette 25.6.1909 major Percy Zachariah Cox, C.I.E., Political Resident in the Persian Gulf. Major-General Sir Percy Zachariah Cox, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I., born November 1864, the younger son of Arthur Zachariah Cox, Esq., of harwood hall, Essex, and the brother of Lieutenant-Colonel Edward henry Cox, D.S.O.; educated at harrow and the Royal military College, Sandhurst; Commissioned Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Scottish Rifles (Cameronians), February 1884; joined the Indian Staff Corps, 1889; married miss Louisa Belle hamilton, the daughter of Surgeon-General J.B. hamilton, at Lucknow, November 1889; transferred to the Indian Political Department, 1890; Appointed Vice-Consul, Zaila, Somali Coast, 1893; Berbera, 1894; Consul and Political Agent, muscat, 1899; Consul-General, Bushire, 1904; Political Resident, Persian Gulf, 1909, and appointed a Companion of the most Exalted Order of the Star of India and a Knight Commander of the most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire; advanced Lieutenant-Colonel, 6.2.1910; Appointed Secretary, Foreign Department, Government of India, 1914; Chief Political Officer, Indian Expeditionary Force, 1914-18 (Advanced Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire and Eleven Times mentioned in Despatches (London Gazettes 5.4.1916- four times; 10.5.1916; 19.10.1916; 14.11.1916; 10.7.1916; 10.1.1918; 12.3.1918; and 27.8.1918)); Appointed Acting British minister to Persia, 1918, and appointed a Knight Commander of the most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George; high Commissioner in mesopotamia, 1920, and advanced a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St. michael and St. George; served as British Plenipotentiary for the negotiations with Turkey regarding the Turko-Iraq Frontier, 1924. major-General Sir Percy Cox died, 20.2.1937.

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27 26 The 1923 ‘Iraq’ D.B.E. Group of Three Attributed to Lady Cox a) The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Civil Division, Dame Commander’s (D.B.E.) set of Insignia, Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, on Lady’s bow riband; Star, silver and enamel, in Garrard, London, case of issue b) Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, on Lady’s bow riband c) British Red Cross Society medal for War Service 1914-18, with top riband bar, extremely fine, mounted as worn (4) £700-900 D.B.E. London Gazette 2.6.1923 Belle, Lady Cox, O.B.E. ‘For services in Iraq.’ O.B.E. London Gazette 18.11.1918 Belle, Lady Cox ‘For services in connection with the War.’ Louisa Belle, Lady Cox, D.B.E., born 1866, the daughter of Surgeon-General J.B. hamilton; married Percy Zachariah Cox at Lucknow, November 1889.

27 The C.I.E. Attributed to Lieutenant-Colonel J. Clibborn, Indian Army The most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) neck Badge, gold and enamel, the reverse engraved ‘Lt. Col: John Clibborn. 1901.’, converted for neck-wear, extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue, together with the following related documents: - Bestowal Document for the C.I.E., named to Lieutenant-Colonel John Clibborn, and dated 9.11.1901, together with Central Chancery enclosure, dated 12.5.1904 - Telegram to the recipient from the personal secretary to the Viceroy congratulating him upon the award of the C.I.E., dated Simla, 12.11.1901 £400-500 C.I.E. London Gazette 9.11.1901 Lieutenant-Colonel John Clibborn, Indian Staff Corps. Lieutenant-Colonel John Clibborn, C.I.E., born December 1847; educated at Trinity College, Dublin; Commissioned Ensign, 62nd (Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot, July 1869; promoted Lieutenant, October 1871; transferred to the Bengal Staff Corps, with the rank of Lieutenant, June 1874; promoted Captain, July 1881; married miss Annie Leonie hamilton, the daughter of Surgeon-General J.B. hamilton, November 1881; promoted major, July 1889; Appointed Principal of Thomason College of Engineering, Roorkee, India, 1892; retired from the Indian Staff Corps, December 1902, and appointed President of the Committee of Industrial Education, India. Lieutenant-Colonel Clibborn and his wife had two sons, major Cuthbert John hamilton Clibborn, Royal horse Artillery, who was killed in action at Armentieres, 14.12.1915; and Captain Cecil hamilton Clibborn, 92nd Punjabis, who died of wounds received in action in mesopotamia, 7.4.1916; and two daughters.

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28 Great War Bronze memorial Plaque (Cecil Hamilton Clibborn), good very fine £50-70 Captain Cecil Hamilton Clibborn, born Aligarh, Agra Division, India, February 1886, the son of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Clibborn, C.I.E. and the grandson of Surgeon-General J.B. hamilton; educated at St. Columba’s College, Dublin, and Royal military Academy, Sandhurst; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery, 27.7.1905; promoted Lieutenant, 27.7.1908; transferred 92nd Punjabis, Indian Army, 1909; promoted Captain, 27.7.1914; served during the Great War and died of wounds received in action at mesopotamia, 7.4.1916, and is commemorated on the Basra memorial, Iraq.

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BRITISH ORDERS AND SINGLE AWARDS

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29 The Royal Victorian Order, Knight Grand Cross (G.C.V.O.) sash Badge, 72mm, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘131’, extremely fine, with full sash riband £600-800

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30 The Royal Victorian Order, Knight Grand Cross (G.C.V.O.) Star, 89mm, silver and enamel, with gold retaining pin, reverse officially numbered ‘149’, enamel damage to one arm of cross, good very fine £400-600 31 The most honourable Order of the Bath, military Division, Knight Commander’s (K.C.B.) Star, 75mm, silver and enamel, with gold retaining pin, minor blue enamel damage, good very fine £450-550

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32 The Royal Guelphic Order, Civil Division, Knight Commander’s (K.C.h.) set of Insignia, by Salter, Widdowson & Tate, London, neck Badge, 88mm including crown suspension x 60mm, gold and enamel; Star, 81mm, silver and enamel, the reverse engraved ‘Salter, Widdowson & Tate, Goldsmiths & Jewellers, No.73, Strand, London’, with gold retaining pin, minor green enamel damage to wreath on Star, otherwise nearly extremely fine, in case of issue (2) £2,000-2,500 The inscription on the reverse of the Star dates the insignia from between 1831 and 1833.

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33 The most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George, Knight Commander’s (K.C.m.G.) set of Insignia, 83mm including crown suspension x 63mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to dragon on reverse central medallion; Star, 81mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue (2) £1,000-1,200

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34 The most honourable Order of the Bath, military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) breast Badge, gold (hallmarks for London 1828) and enamel, with integral gold riband buckle, minor enamel damage to lower arm of cross, otherwise good very fine, in fitted Garrard, London, case of issue £1,400-1,800 35 The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silvergilt and enamel, extremely fine, with full and miniature width neck ribands, in Garrard, London, case of issue £200-240

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36 Royal Red Cross, G.V.R., First Class (R.R.C.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with bow riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue £160-200 37 military Cross, G.V.R., extremely fine, in case of issue £400-450 38 military Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1945’, extremely fine, in Royal Mint case of issue £450-550 39 military Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1946’, extremely fine, in Royal Mint case of issue £450-550 40 Kaisar-i-hind, G.V.R., 2nd type, Second Class, silver, with integral top riband bar, good very fine £150-200

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41 Distinguished Conduct medal, G.V.R. (18556 Pte. T. Thompson. 10/W. York: R.), nearly extremely fine £450-550 D.C.m. London Gazette 15.11.1918 18556 Pte. T. Thompson, W. York. R. (Leeds) ‘For conspicuous gallantry in action. When an enemy machine gun was firing at point-blank range, he stood and fired at the gunners, killing the man on the gun; he then rushed forward and bayoneted another man who was bringing the gun into action again, thus allowing the advance to continue. Later he went into the enemy’s positions, and returned with an officer and six other prisoners. Throughout the operations he showed splendid courage, and captured at least twenty-five prisoners and two machine guns.’

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43

x43 The Great War M.M. and Bar to Corporal H. Finnemore, Canadian Engineers military medal, G.V.R., with Second Award Bar (502421 Cpl. h. Finnemore. Can: E.), nearly very fine £600-800 m.m. London Gazette 11.2.1919 502421 Cpl. Finnemore, h., 9th Bn., Can. E., Canadian Contingent m.m. Second Award Bar London Gazette 23.7.1919 502421 Cpl. h. Finnemore, m.m., 9th Bn., Can. E. 502421 Corporal Harry Finnemore, M.M., born Cornwall, march 1887; emigrated to Toronto, Ontario; enlisted in the Canadian Engineers, 22.1.1916, and served during the Great War on the Western Front to 30.3.1919.

18556 Private Tom Thompson, D.C.M., served with the 10th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment duringthe Great War on the Western Front from 13.7.1915.

44 military medal, G.V.R. (66436 Gnr: W. Woolgar. ‘U’ By: R.H.A.), nearly very fine £120-160

x42 Distinguished Service medal, G.V.R. (D. Mc.Kenzie, Greasr. (M.M.) H.M.S. Princess Margaret. 19156.), lacquered, good very fine £500-700

m.m. London Gazette 27.10.1916 66436 Gunner W. Woolgar, R.h.A. 66436 Gunner William Woolgar, M.M., served with the Royal horse Artillery on the Western Front from 15.8.1914.

D.S.m. London Gazette 25.10.1916 Greaser Duncan mcKenzie, mercantile Rating. The award of the Distinguished Service medal was in recognition of good services and devotion to duty whilst serving in the minelayer h.m.S. Princess Margaret. In December 1914 the Princess Margaret was taken up from merchant Service and converted to a minelayer, with a mine carrying capacity of 500 mines. She was one of the largest minelayers used by the Royal Navy.

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45 Pair: Petty Officer William Hawkins, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (Wm. hawkins.); China 1842 (William hawkins, Petty Officer, h.m.S. Clio.), good very fine £1,800-2,200 William hawkins served as Ordinary Seaman in h.m.S. Dartmouth during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eighty-one men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever to put to sea again.’ Petty Officer William Hawkins, enlisted in the Royal Navy serving in h.m.S. Bulwark, June 1824; transferred to h.m.S. Dartmouth, April 1827; advanced Able Seaman, march 1828; transferred to h.m.S. Clio with the rate of Petty Officer, July 1839; discharged, June 1848.

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46 Three: Quarter Master H. Stroud, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (henry Stroud.); Baltic 1854-55, unnamed as issued; Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., wide suspension (henry Stroud. Qr. mastr. h.m.S. Penelope. 22 Ys.), light contact marks throughout, therefore very fine (3) £1,000-1,400 henry Stroud served as Boy in h.m.S. Dartmouth during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eighty-one men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever to put to sea again.’ Stroud was awarded his L.S.&G.C., 22.3.1854 PROVENANCE:

Glendining, September 1948 Sotheby, OmRS Sale, October 1978

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47 Pair: Second Lieutenant W.A.G Wright, Royal Marines Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (W.A.G. Wright, 2nd Lieut. R.m.); St. Jean d’Acre 1840, silver, pierced for ring suspension, as issued, contact marks to first, therefore nearly very fine or better (2) £1,000-1,400 Second Lieutenant William A.G. Wright, Royal marines served in h.m.S. Vanguard during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

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49

48 Pair: R. Bunning, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Robt. Bunning.); St. Jean D’Acre 1840, copper, pierced for ring suspension, as issued, light scratches, otherwise good very fine (2) £550-650

49 Pair: W. Ginman, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (William Ginman.); Baltic 1854-55, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, good very fine (2) £500-600

Robert Bunning served as Private, Royal marines in h.m.S. Bellerophon during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

William Ginman served as Able Seaman in h.m.S. Powerful during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, July 1974, when listed as a pair.

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53

50 Pair: Armourer Sergeant A. Hare, 28th Foot Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol (2554. Armr. Serjt. Arthur. hare. 28th. Regt.), regimentally impressed; Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (2554. Armr. Serjt. A. hare. 28th. Regt.), contemporarily impressed in large serif capitals, with contemporary Crimea-style suspension, first with collector’s stamp on edge, nearly very fine (2) £300-350

52 Pair: Drummer Richard Tweedley, 78th Highlanders India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (Drumr. R. Tweedly, 78th. highlanders); Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Drumr. R. Tweedley, 78th. highlanders), good very fine (2) £600-800

2554 Armourer Sergeant Arthur Hare, born Dublin, 1822; enlisted in the 28th (North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, July 1844; awarded L.S.& G.C. medal with a Gratuity of £15; discharged July 1767 after 23 years and 19 days with the Colours.

51 Pair: Private W. Wilkinson, 82nd Foot Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (No. 3432 Wilm. Wilkinson. 82nd. Regt. P.W.V.), regimentally impressed; Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (No. 3432. W. Wilkinson. 82nd.), contemporarily engraved in large serif capitals, pierced as issued, nearly very fine (2) £120-150

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2079 Drummer Richard Tweedley, died 13.7.1857

53 Pair: Chief Boatman in Charge A. Pain, Royal Navy Indian mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Relief of Lucknow, Lucknow (Albert Paine, Ord. Shannon.); Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Albert Pain. Chf. Boatn. h.m. Coast Guard), good very fine (2) £800-1,000 Chief Boatman in Charge Albert Pain, born Dorset, July 1840; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, serving in h.m.S. Victoria & Albert, October 1852; transferred to h.m.S. Shannon, October 1856; promoted Ordinary Seaman, awarded L.S.& G.C. medal, march 1879; advanced to his final rank of Chief Boatman in Charge, h.m. Coast Guard, stationed at Shannon, June 1886; retired, July 1895.


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55

54 Pair: Private M. Thatcher, Rifle Brigade Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (1024 mark. Thatcher. 3rd. Bn. Rifle Bde.), number additionally engraved; India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Northwest Frontier (1024 Pte. m. Thatcher. 3 Bn. Rif. Bde.), very fine (2) £400-450

55 Pair: Sapper N. Paterson, Royal Engineers Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Sapper. N. Paterson. 11th. Compy. Ryl. Engrs.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (2707. Sapper N. Paterson, Rl. Engrs.), very fine or better (2) £340-380

1024 Private Mark Thatcher, born Thorpe, Chertsey, Surrey, 1836; enlisted in the 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade, December 1855; served with the expedition to the Northwest Frontier under Colonel A.F. macdonell, C.B., December 1863 to January 1864; discharged may 1866, after 10 years and 150 days with the Colours.

2707 Sapper Neil Paterson, born Glasgow, June 1837; enlisted Private, Royal Sappers and miners, December 1854; Sapper, Royal Engineers, June 1855; served with the Engineers in India for two years and 195 days; awarded L.S. & G.C., 1876; discharged, June 1876, after 21 years and 15 days’ service.

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56 Three: Sergeant Major J. Allen, 80th Foot. Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Drumr. John Allen, 80th. Regt.); India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Bhootan (4202. Corpl. J. Allen h.m’s. 80th. Regt.); South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1878 (4202. Sergt. maj. J. Allen. 80th. Foot), nearly very fine or better (3) £700-800

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57 Three: Sergeant Major J. Norman, Royal Horse Artillery Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Bombr. Jesse Norman, Rl. h. Art.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (930 Serjt. majr. J. Norman Rdg. Est. R.A.); meritorious Service medal, E.VII.R. (Serjt: maj: J. Norman. R.A.), contact marks to first, file marks to last, generally very fine or better (3) £380-420 930 Sergeant Major Jesse Norman, born Taunton, Somerset, 1836; enlisted in the Royal horse Artillery, November 1856; served with the Artillery in India, December 1857 to September 1861; promoted Bombardier, April 1859; advanced Battery Sergeant major, may 1867; transferred to the Riding Establishment, Royal Artillery, may 1873; promoted Sergeant major, June 1873; awarded L.S. & G.C., January 1876; discharged, November 1886, after 30 years and 5 days’ service.

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59

58 Pair: Private E. Bradley, 80th Foot Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Edwd. Bradley, 80th. Regt.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (3508 Pte. E Bradley 80th Foot), nearly very fine or better (2) ÂŁ240-280

59 Pair: Colour Sergeant L.A.E. Prim, 87th Foot Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (2654 Cr. Sergt. Lewis A E Prim 87th. Regt.), a slightly later issue; Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (2654 Color Sergt. Louis Prim 87th. Regt.), nearly very fine or better (2) ÂŁ220-260

3508 Private Edward Bradley, born mildenhall, Suffolk, 1833; enlisted Private, 80th (Staffordshire Volunteers) Regiment of Foot, January 1855; served with the Regiment in India for four years, and took part in the Bhootan Campaign, December 1864 to February 1866 (medal and clasp); discharged, August 1875, after 20 years and 214 days with the Colours.

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2654 Colour Sergeant Louis E.A. Prim, born Kilkenny, Ireland, march 1832; enlisted in the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot, January 1849; promoted Corporal, may 1851; advanced Colour Sergeant, February 1857; awarded L.S. & G.C., march 1871; discharged, march 1871, after 21 years and 18 days with the Colours.


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60 Pair: Private C. Cochrane, 72nd Foot Afghanistan 1878-80, three clasps, Charasia, Kabul, Kandahar (58-B/65, Pte. C. Cochrane, 72nd. highrs.); Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880 (58B/65 Private. C. Cochrane 72nd. highlanders), light pitting, good very fine (2) ÂŁ500-600

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61 Five: Chief Engine Room Artificer 1st Class G. Hatch, Royal Navy Egypt and Sudan 1882-89, undated reverse, one clasp, Suakin 1885 (G. hatch, E.R.A. 4 Cl. h.m.S. Condor); Queenís South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Defence of Ladysmith (122691 Ch: E:R:A: G. hatch, h.m.S. Powerful), officially re-impressed naming; Coronation 1902, bronze; Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., narrow suspension (George hatch, Ch. E.R.A. 2nd Cl., h.m.S. Nile), officially re-impressed; Khediveís Star 1884-6, last with bruised arm point, contact marks and minor edge bruising elsewhere, generally very fine or better and a rare combination of awards and clasps (5) £1,200-1,400 122691 Chief Engine Room Artificer 1st Class George Hatch, born Landport, hampshire, 1861; joined Royal Navy as an Acting Engine Room Artificer, 1883; subsequently witnessed active service out in Egypt, being landed from h.m.S. Condor on secondment to the Naval Brigade during the Suakin operations of 1885, and again in South Africa in the Boer War, when he was landed from the Powerful and served in the Naval Brigade at the defence of Ladysmith; advanced to Chief Engine Room Artificer ‘in recognition of his services in South Africa’ (service record refers); awarded L.S. & G.C. medal, January 1894, and added the Coronation 1902 medal to his honours and Awards for his services in the royal yacht Victoria & Albert; ‘Pensioned Ashore’, April 1905. PROVENANCE:

Oliver Stirling Lee Collection, December 2004

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62 Pair: Sapper Narayanasami, Queen’s Own Madras Sappers and Miners India General Service 1854-95, four clasps, Burma 1885-7, Burma 1887-89, Chin-Lushai 1889-90, Waziristan 1894-5 (1221 Sapper Narrainsamy [sic], No. 4 Coy. Q.O. Sappers & miners.); India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (1221 Sapper Narayanasami. Q.O. madras S.& m.), very fine (2) £300-400 PROVENANCE:

Spink, April 2000

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63 Five: Private L. Hayward, Seaforth Highlanders India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (3634 Pte. L. haywood [sic] 2d. Bn. Seaforth highlrs.); Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (3634. Pte. L. hayward. 1/Sea. hrs.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (3634 Pte. L. hayward, 2: Sea: highrs:); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3634 Pte. L. hayward. Seaforth highrs:); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, two clasps, The Atbara, Khartoum (3634 Pte. L. hayward 1st. Sea. highrs.), edge bruise to first, good very fine (5) £450-550

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64 Pair: Private J. Dovey, 21st Lancers Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (4005: Pte. J. Dovey. 21/L’crs.); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (4005 Pte. J. Dovey 21st. Lcrs.), last with top retaining rod, nearly very fine (2) £1,800-2,200 4005 Private Job Dovey, born Worcester; enlisted 21st Lancers, 1896; served in Captain W.m. Doyne’s ‘C’ Squadron, 21st Lancers, as part of the Charge at Omdurman, 2.9.1898; transferred 16th Lancers, 2.3.1901, and served with the Regiment during the Second Boer War, march 1901-may 1902 (entitled to Q.S.A.); he was severely wounded in B’n Clanwilliam and Calvina District, 23.12.1901; on the latter date the regiment suffered 1 officer and 3 men killed, and 13 wounded; discharged medically unfit, 9.12.1902.

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65 Pair: Sergeant F.W. Slade, Royal Engineers India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (22793 1st Corpl. F.W. Slade. R.E.); Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (Sergt. F.W. Slade. mily: Works Services.), good very fine, mounted for display (2) £180-220

66 Pair: Lance Corporal G. Morgan, Royal Army Medical Corps Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (8625 L.Cpl. G. morgan, R.A.m.C.), rank officially corrected; King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (8625 Pte. G. morgan. R.A.m.C.), top lugs removed on last, good very fine (2) £110-130

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67 Three: Trooper W. McCormick, South African Constabulary Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (2041 Tpr: W. mc.Cormick. S.A.C.); South Africa Police Good Service medal, 1st type (No 2585 (F) 1/C Constable. W. mc.Cormick); South African medal for War Service, good very fine (3) £120-150

68 Pair: Private G. Greenwood, Scottish Rifles Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (6294 Pte. G. Greenwood, Scottish Rifles.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (6294 Pte. G. Greenwood. Scot: Rifles.), good very fine (2) £100-140

69 Pair: Private R. Eshelby, West Riding Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg (2518 Pte. R. Eshelby, W. Riding Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2518 Pte. A. Eshelby. W. Riding Regt.), good very fine (2) £100-140

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 70 Pair: Private H. Fraser, Inniskilling Dragoons Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Belfast (3347 Pte. h. Fraser. 6th. Dragoons.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3347 Pte. h. Fraser. Innis: Drgns:), contact marks, nearly very fine (2) £140-180 3347 Private Harry Fraser, born Canterbury, Kent, 1873; enlisted in the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons, April 1893.

71 Pair: F. Legge, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State (3905 Pte. F. Legge, Derby: Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3905Pte. F. Legge. Notts: & Derby: Regt.), nearly extremely fine (2) £90-110

x72 Four: Shipwright 2nd Class H.H.C. Challenger, Royal Navy Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (h.h.C. Challenger, Ldg: Car: Cr: h.m.S. Doris); 1914-15 Star (341635. h.h.C. Challenger, Shpt. 2., R.N.); British War and Victory medals (341635 h.h.C. Challenger. Shpt. 2 R.N.), nearly very fine or better (4) £150-200 341635 Shipwright 2nd Class H.H.C. Challenger, enlisted in the Royal Navy, July 1897; served in h.m.S. Doris during the Boer War; discharged, 21.11.1919.

x73 Four: Corporal T. Stower, Highland Light Infantry, Late Gloucestershire Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Natal, Orange Free State, Transvaal (4225 Pte. T. Stower, Glouc: Regt.); 1914-15 Star (1811 L.Cpl. T. Stower. high: L.I.); British War and Victory medals (1811 Cpl. T. Stower. h.L.I.), generally very fine or better (4) £120-150 4225 Corporal Thomas John Stower, born Clifton, Gloucestershire, 1875; enlisted in the Gloucestershire Regiment, November 1893, having previously served in the 3rd militia Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment; served with the 1st Battalion in South Africa, September 1899 to August 1900; according to the latest published transcript of the casualty roll a ‘4226 Private T. Stowers, 1st Glosters’, is listed as missing in action at Farquhar’s Farm, 30.10.1899, ‘A disastrous day for the Battalion’, and subsequently releasedhowever, no man with this number or exact spelling of surname appears on the Regimental medal Roll; discharged, November 1905, after 13 years with the Colours; re-enlisted as 1811 Private in the highland Light Infantry, and served with them during the Great War.

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70 74 Pair: Private W. Wellasbury, Liverpool Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal (4399 Pte. W. Wellasbury, Liverpool Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (4339 Pte. A. Wellesbury [sic]. Liverpool Regt.), light contact marks, nearly very fine (2) £100-140

75 Pair: Private W.H. Miller, Devonshire Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Tugela heights, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal (4974 Pte. W.h. miller, Devon: Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (4974 Pte. W. miller. Devon: Regt.), edge bruising, nearly very fine £80-120


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76 x76 Four: Captain E.M. Moyes, 76th Punjabis, Late Northumberland Yeomanry and Northern Cyclist Battalion 1914 Star, with Bar (515 Pte. E.m. moyes. North’d Yeo.); British War and Victory medals (Capt. E.m. moyes.); India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (Capt. E.m. mayes [sic], 1/76/Pjbs.), nearly very fine, together with an Army Temperance Association: India, 1 Year medal, silver (5) £200-240 Captain Eric Milne Moyes, served with the Northumberland Yeomanry during the Great War on the Western Front from 5.10.1914; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Northern Cyclist Battalion, 27.1.1915; promoted Lieutenant, 27.10.1916; advanced Captain, Scottish Rifles; transferred to the Indian Army, 25.3.1918; and served with the 76th Punjabis.

x77 Three: Private F.S. Payne, 2nd Dragoons 1914 Star, with Bar (4595 Pte. F.S. Payne. 2/Dns.); British War and Victory medals (GS-12332 Pte. F.S. Payne. 2-Dns.), very fine (3) £80-100 GS-12332 Private Frederick S. Payne served with the 2nd Dragoons during the Great War on the Western Front from 16.9.1914.

78 Three: Sergeant F. Hyde, Royal Air Force, Late Cheshire Regiment 1914 Star (1831 Pte. F. hyde. 6/Ches: R.); British War and Victory medals (6445. Sgt. F. hyde. R.A.F.), good very fine (3) £70-90 6445 Flight Sergeant Frederick Hyde, served with 48 Squadron, Royal Air Force during the Second World War; died 26.9.1941 aged 50, and is buried in St. michael’s Churchyard, halton, Buckinghamshire.

x79 Five: Captain A.M. Arklie, Canadian Army Medical Corps 1914-15 Star (71450 C.Q.m.Sjt. A.m. Arklie. 27Can. Inf.); British War and Victory medals (Capt. A.m. Arklie); Defence medal, British issue; Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service medal, G.V.R. (Capt. (Qr. mr.) A.m. Arklie No. 21. Cav. Fld. Amb. C.A.m.C.), surname and rank partially officially corrected on last, good very fine (5) £120-150 Captain Andrew Melville Arklie, born Forfar, Scotland, may 1891; emigrated to Stony mountain, manitoba; enlisted in the 27th Canadian Infantry, 26.10.1914; served during the Great War (wounded); Captain, 26.4.1919.

his medal Index Card states ‘Ineligible for clasp to 1914 Star’, but subsequently notes that this was issued to him in 1920.

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x80 Five: Staff Sergeant J.N. Stuckbery, Royal Engineers, Late Royal Berkshire Regiment 1914-15 Star (11713 Pte. J.N. Stuckbery. R. Berks. R.); British War and Victory medals (11713 Sjt. J.N. Stuckbery. R. Berks. R.); meritorious Service medal, G.V.R., 1st ‘Field marshal’s bust’ type (100609 Sjt. A.C.Q.m.Sjt.- J.N. Stuckbery. Lab: C.); Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (1862626 S. Sjt. J.N. Stuchbery [sic]. R.E.), worn, good fine and better (5) £100-140 m.S.m. London Gazette 3.6.1919 100609 Sjt. (A./Coy./Q.m.Sjt.) Stuckbery, J.N., 168th Coy., Labour Corps (maidenhead) ‘In recognition of valuable service rendered with the Armies in France and Flanders.’ 1862626 Staff Sergeant John N. Stuckbery, served with the Royal Berkshire Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front from 29.11.1914.

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81 A Great War ‘H.M.S. Jupiter’ Russian Medal for Zeal Group of Five to Seaman J.T. Edwards, Royal Naval Reserve 1914-15 Star (C.3303. J.T. Edwards. Smn. R.N.R.); British War and Victory medals (3303C. J.T. Edwards. Smn. R.N.R.); Royal Naval Reserve Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (C.3303. J.T. Edwards, Sea. R.N.R.); Russia, Imperial, medal for Zeal, small silver medal (C.3303. J.T. Edwards. Sea. R.N.R. h.m.S. Jupiter), mounted from a silver straight bar suspender, generally very fine, together with a photographic image of the recipient (5) £500-600 C.3303 Seaman James Thomas Edwards, born 1878; served with the Royal Naval Reserve in the Aberystwyth District; awarded the Russian medal for Zeal for service in the White Sea in h.m.S. Jupiter, when she became the first ship to break through the winter ice and reach Archangel in the early months of 1915, freeing en route a number of vessels stuck in the ice, many of them laden with highly important war materials, occasionally by using explosive charges.


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July 19, 01 - London 82 Family Group: Three: Private F. Lomax, Lancashire Fusiliers 1914-15 Star (1178 Pte. F. Lomax. Lan. Fus.); British War and Victory medals (1178 Pte. F. Lomax. Lan. Fus.), nearly extremely fine, with two named card boxes of issue; the recipient’s two identity tags; Great War Silver War Badge, the reverse numbered ‘B120780’; two silver penknives; and various riband bars and cap badges Four: Corporal J. Lomax, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Star; Burma Star; Defence and War medals, extremely fine, in named card box of issue addressed to 88 Parkhills Road, Bury, Lancs., with Air Council enclosure; the recipient’s two identity tags; various riband bars, cap badges, and buttons, and the following related documents &c.: - The recipient’s Royal Air Force Service and Release Book - The recipient’s two Second World War photo albums, whilst the recipient was in India, featuring amongst other places Bombay, Calcutta, Chittagong, Belgaum, and the Nilgiri hills - A large archive of letters, telegrams, passes, and tickets from the recipient’s time in India Pair: Private W.H. Burns, Royal Army Medical Corps 1914-15 Star (386, Pte. W.h. Burns, R.A.m.C.); Victory medal (386 Pte. W.h. Burns. R.A.m.C.), very fine (9) £200-300 1759171 Corporal Jack Lomax, born 10.8.1923, the son of Private F. Lomax, Lancashire Fusiliers; enlisted in the Royal Air Force, 30.12.1941, and served during the Second World War in India from 6.12.1942 until the end of the War.

x83 Three: Surgeon Commander F.H. Holl, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (Surg. F.h. holl. R.N.); British War and Victory medals (Surg. Lt. Cr. F.h. holl. R.N.), good very fine Naval Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (L.C. Penrose, Ch. Sto., H.M.S. Leander.), lacquered, nearly extremely fine (4) £100-140 Surgeon Commander Francis H. Holl, Commissioned Surgeon, Royal Navy, 19.11.1907; advanced Surgeon Commander, 19.11.1919. 145984 Chief Stoker Louis C. Penrose, joined the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class serving in h.m.S. Indus, January 1890; awarded L.S. & G.C., 18.1.1905, whilst serving in h.m.S. Leander.

Corporal J. Lomax

x84 Pair: Corporal A.C. Mutch, Gordon Highlanders 1914-15 Star (2191. Pte. A.C. mutch. Gord. highrs.); Victory medal (2191 A. Cpl. A.C. mutch. Gordons.), very fine mercantile marine War medal (Roderick Ross), good very fine Second World War medals (6) 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence medal, Canadian issue; War medal, Canadian issue; Canadian Volunteer Service medal; Australia Service medal (NX14501 A. Martin), traces of adhesive, nearly very fine or better, together with a C.m.E.F. ‘Assault at Arms’ October 1943 silver prize medal United Nations medal for Korea, good very fine United Nations medal for Cyprus, good very fine Imperial Service medal (2), G.V.R., 2nd ‘Coronation robes’ type (Fred Travell.); E.II.R. (James Arthur Hagan), good very fine, both in boxes of issue Efficiency medal, G.VI.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (2079381. Pte. D.W. Laburn. A.C.C.), nearly very fine Special Constabulary Long Service, G.V.R. (George W. Fox.), good very fine (16) £150-180

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88 x85 Pair: Lance Corporal J.J. Glendinning, New Zealand Expeditionary Force 1914-15 Star (11/804A L/Cpl. J.J. Glendinning. N.Z.E.F.); Victory medal (11/804A L/Cpl. J.J. Glendinning. N.Z.E.F.), good very fine Pair: F.N. Baxter, Australian Forces War medal; Australia Service medal, both officially impressed ‘V11040 F.N. Baxter’, good very fine Canadian memorial Cross, E.II.R. (227 Pte. R. Maxted), with silver brooch suspension bar, a later issue, good very fine British Red Cross Society Badge, gilt and enamel, unnamed, with ‘Radiographer’ riband bar, enamel damage to bar, otherwise very fine (6) £80-120

British War medal (6) (830316 Gnr. P. Robinson. R.A.; 241939 Pte. G.I. Lloyd. Suff. R.; 12531 Pte. W. Miner. S.Staff. R.; 20040 Sjt. W.J. Verrender. Worc. R.; 59054 Pte. F. Reid. Midd’x R.; 37513 Pte. F.J. Raisey. R.Berks. R.), generally very fine or better mercantile marine War medal (Francis G. Jones), good fine Victory medal (3894 Cpl. A.H. Shenning. 17-Lrs.), good fine Second World War medals (8) 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Pacific Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence medal; War medal (QX24454 E.C.V. Vincent), traces of verdigris, good fine and better (21) £160-180

11/804A Lance Corporal James Jackson Glendinning, born Girvan, Scotland, August 1887; emigrated to Whangamomona, New Zealand; enlisted in the Auckland mounted Rifles Regiment, 17.12.1914; served during the Great War with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in the Gallipoli theatre of War from 16.8.1915, whilst attached to the machine gun section, Wellington mounted Rifles; transferred to the newly-formed New Zealand mounted machine Gun Squadron, 12.7.1916; wounded during the Battle of Romani, Sinai Peninsula, 5.8.1916; promoted Lance Corporal, August 1917; killed in action during the advance on El Arish, 14.11.1917, and is buried in Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel.

x87 Four: Battery Quarter Master Sergeant W.G.S. Armond, Royal Field Artillery British War and Victory medals (464 B.Q.m.Sjt. W.G.S. Armond. R.A.); Territorial Force War medal (464 Sjt. W.G.S. Armond. R.A.); Territorial Force Efficiency medal, G.V.R. (850664 B.Q.m: Sjt. W.G. Armond. R.F.A.), good very fine (4) £160-200

227 Private Richard Maxted, born Walthamstow, London, march 1880; enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment; emigrated to Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, 13.1.1915.

86 Pair: George A. Harper, Mercantile Marine British War medal (George A. harper); mercantile marine War medal (George A. harper), nearly very fine Pair: Corporal K.J. Hinde, Royal Engineers British War and Victory medals (249 Cpl. K.J. hinde. R.E.), nearly very fine 1914-15 Star (2.Lieut. C.R. Hartley. D. of Lan. O.Y.), very fine www.spink.com

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464 Battery Quarter Master Sergeant William G.S. Armond, awarded Territorial Force Efficiency medal in Army Order 275, 1919.

88 Three: Captain R.C.E. Barclay, Pembroke Yeomanry British War and Victory medals (Capt. R.C.E. Barclay); Territorial Force War medal (Lieut. R.C.E. Barclay Pembroke Yeo.), some letters double-struck on last, good very fine or better, with (3) associated miniature awards, riband bar and silver tobacco case (hallmarks for Birmingham 1926), with the initials ‘R.C.E.B.’ engraved on lid (lot) £350-450


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Warrant Officer Class I h.A. Davies

89 A Second War ‘Prisoner of War’ Group of Eight to Warrant Officer Class I H.A. Davies, Royal Army Service Corps, Later Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War medals; General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., three clasps, malaya, Cyprus, Near East, subsequent clasps loose on riband (61173 W.O. Cl.2. h.A. Davies. R.E.m.E.); Army Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (T/61173 W.O. Cl.2. h.A. Davies. R.A.S.C.), nearly extremely fine, mounted in a glazed display frame, together with the following related items all separately and severally framed: - The recipient’s International Prisoner of War commemorative medal - The recipient’s Y.m.C.A. Sports badge, gilt and enamel, rare, with related newspaper cutting - Warrant appointing hugh Alexander Davies a Warrant Officer in the Regular Forces, dated 1.4.1952 - Stalag IV Prisoner of War Camp group photograph, June 1944 - Portrait photograph of the recipient - Pre-Unit Training Grade Course No. 10 group photograph, march 1952 - 52 Company, Royal Army Service Corps group photograph - headquarters 3rd Commando Brigade Clerical Staff group photograph, June 1957 - Two R.E.m.E. cap badges - Four family photographs and two newspaper cuttings (lot) £700-800

61173 Warrant Officer Class I Hugh Alexander Davies, served during the Second World War with the Royal Army Service Corps in North Africa; taken Prisoner of War at Tobruk and held at Stalag IV-B; whilst a Prisoner of War he was awarded the Y.m.C.A. Sports medal. The citation reads: ‘Whilst a Prisoner of War in Italy he gave instructions in tumbling and acrobats in order to keep himself fit. On arrival at Stalag IV-B, finding at the time there was not the opportunity to continue until recently, he took up wrestling. he has taken the keenest interest ever since and is capable of giving instruction which he does daily.’ After the War Davies was promoted to Warrant Officer and transferred to the Royal Electrical and mechanical Engineers, serving with them in malaya, Cyprus, and the Near East. Note: Owing to the large and bulky nature of this lot it is unsuitable for postage and we would recommend collection.

The recipient’s Y.m.C.A. Sports badge

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Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander J.C.E. Peshall

92

x90 Three: Private H. Kriel, South African Forces 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star, with 8th Army Bar; Africa Service medal, all officially named ‘m16108 h. Kriel’, nearly very fine Pair: Private F.E. Taylor, Australian Forces Defence medal; Australia Service medal, both officially named ‘412210 F E Taylor’, lacquered, very fine Pair: Private J.H.T. Dimmock, South African Forces War medal; Africa Service medal, both officially named ‘173110 J.h.T. Dimmock’, very fine Second World War medals (14), Atlantic Star (2); Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar; Pacific Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence medal, Canadian issue; War medal, Canadian issue; Canadian Volunteer Service medal (2), one with maple leaf Bar; Australia Service medal (SX11768 J.R. Smith); India Service medal; South African medal for War Service, generally very fine or better (20) £160-200

91 Three: Major W.W. Shepherdson, Royal Engineers, Late West Yorkshire Regiment Defence and War medals; General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Near East (major W.W. Shepherdson. R.E.), light scratch marks overall, therefore very fine or better, mounted as originally worn (3) £120-160

SX11768 Private John Richard Smith, born moonta mines, South Australia; served with the 2/48th Battalion, Australian Infantry during the Second World War; died 24.10.1942, and is buried in El Alamein War Cemetery, Egypt.

Major W.W. Shepherdson, commissioned Second Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment, 3.10.1942; Temporary Captain 1.4.1945; Captain, Royal Engineers, 17.6.1949; major 1.4.1955.

92 Pair: Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander J.C.E. Peshall, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve War medal; Naval General Service 1915-62, one clasp, Palestine 1945-48 (Surg. Lt. J.C.E. Peshall. R.N.V.R.), good very fine (2) £100-140 Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander J.C.E. Peshall, Commissioned Surgeon Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 11.5.1945; promoted Surgeon LieutenantCommander, 11.5.1953. Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander Peshall was a keen rugby player throughout his life, and represented England in a Wartime international. For the medals awarded to Lieutenant S.F. Peshall, the uncle of Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander Peshall, see Lot 12.

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98

99

93 Three: Sapper J.D. Colquhoun, Royal Engineers Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (22774111 Spr. J.D. Colquhoun. R.E.); United Nations medal for Korea; Africa General Service 1902-56, E.II.R., one clasp, Kenya (22774111 Spr. J.D. Colquhoun. R.E.), minor edge nicks, generally good very fine (3) £180-220

x97 Pair: Private C.R. Thelan, Australian Forces Vietnam 1964-73 (A225957 Thelan C.R.); Vietnam, Republic, South Vietnam Campaign medal, with 1960 Bar, gilt and enamel, good very fine (2) £180-220

94 Pair: Private T.E. Adams, Royal Norfolk Regiment Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (22586751 Pte. T.E. Adams. R.Norfolk); United Nations medal for Korea, surname officially corrected, nearly very fine (2) £120-140 95 Pair: Rifleman A. Lindsay, Royal Ulster Rifles Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (22285917 Rfn. A. Lindsay. R.U.R.); United Nations medal for Korea, pawn broker’s mark toΩobverse field, very fine (2) £140-180 x96 Pair: Lance Bombardier M. Kereama Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (206789 L Bdr m. Kereama); United Nations medal for Korea (206789 L Bdr m. Kereama), contemporarily impressed in sans serif capitals, very fine or better (2) £180-220

x98 Pair: Lance Bombardier P.R. Reid, Royal Artillery General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24311452 LBdr P R Reid RA); South Atlantic 1982, with rosette (24311452 LBdr P R Reid RA), nearly extremely fine (2) £450-550 99 Pair: Corporal G. Evans, Welsh Guards General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24414715 Gdsm. G. Evans WG); South Atlantic 1982, with rosette (24414715 Cpl. G Evans WG), very fine, mounted court-style as originally worn (2) £800-1,000 x100 Pair: Signalman K.G. Liston, Royal Signals Gulf 1990-91, one clasp, 16 Jan to 28 Feb 1991 (24865003 Sig K G Liston R Signals); Saudi Arabia, Kingdom, medal for the Liberation of Kuwait 1991, gilt and silvered, good very fine (2) £160-200

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MEDALS TO THE FERRIOR FAMILY

101

101 The Superb Waterloo Medal to Major & Lieutenant-Colonel S. Ferrior, 1st Life Guards, Who ‘Is Said to Have Lead His Regiment to the Charge No Less Than 11 Times, And Most of the Charges Were Not Made Till After His Head Had Been Laid Open By the Cut of a Sabre and His Body Was Pierced With a Lance’; He Was Killed in Action, Whilst in Command of His Regiment, 18.6.1815 Waterloo 1815 (major & Lt.-Col. S. Ferrior, 1st Reg. Life Guards.), good very fine, with contemporary silver eyelet and ring suspension, only one asterisk remains in the preparatory area for the silver suspension £14,000-18,000 Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Ferrior (1772-1815), born Pennar, Pembroke, Wales; son of Jenkin Ferrior, mayor of Pembroke, and a Surgeon by profession; Commissioned Cornet, 1st Life Guards, 1797; Captain 1814, and advanced major and Lieutenant-Colonel the following year; in a letter, now held by Southampton University, to his eldest brother Benjamin, whilst stationed at Ninove, Flanders, 7.6.1815, he wrote: ‘We marched as I expected, a few days after I wrote my last letter, we embarked at Ramsgate and landed at Ostend on the 3rd may, without any casualty of consequence, we continued our march to a village three miles this side of Ghent.... We remained there seven or eight days and then came here which is the head quarters of the Cavalry. Lt. General the Earl of Uxbridge who commands the Cavalry is quartered at a convent adjoining the town, which before the French Revolution was a most magnificent place but now in a state of decay, Bonaparte having taken away all the fine pictures, destroyed the furniture and sold the large territories attached to this convent but the church is still very fine. The best of the Cavalry are in Cantonments in the surrounding villages, the King’s German Legion Cavalry more in advance, I mean the French Frontier - the First Life Guards is brigaded with the 2nd Life Guards the blues, and First Dragoon Guards in all ten squadrons, all in most excellent condition and fine order and allowed to be as fine a body of Cavalry as was ever seen and I think that my Regt is not the worst among them. Lord Edward Somerset Commands the Brigade as Lord Wellington is at Brussels..... We are at present all quiet, we have no news and we look at the London papers to see how the world is going on. We believe and I am of that opinion that as the Russians come up and join us, no time will be lost in commencing hostilities, a part of them, we hear, are now on the Rhine. It cannot therefore be long before we begin. When we were at the village near Ghent, I waited on the Equerry of the King of France, who at present resides there to request the honour of presenting the officers of the Regt and to try to know what day and hour his majesty would be pleased to appoint to receive them. his Equerry after seeing his majesty informed me on the next day at half past

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July 19, 01 - London 12 - when we were all assembled and were presented to his majesty - when he said to us all in very good English “I see you all with much pleasure and great confidence” - his court was not very splendid and he appeared much with the gout rather fat and unwieldy and with some difficulty got to the carriage which was waiting - we have been favoured three times since our arrival here, the first time, the 1st and 2nd Regiments of Life Guards & Blues & being the senior officer I had the command of the 3 Regiments in the field - Lord Uxbridge inspected us minutely and was pleased to express his entire approbation’s of the appearance and movements of the Regiments - our second review was of the whole heavy Cavalry, Lord Uxbridge wishing to pay a compliment to The Prince Of Orange - the Prince accompanied by many foreigners of distinction favoured us and was much gratified by the appearance. Our Third Review was however superlatively grand by Field marshal his Grace The Duke of Wellington accompanied by the Prince of Orange, by old Blucher, The Duke of Brunswick, by marmont & by foreigners of different nations of high distinction - We were drawn up in three lines, The hussars in the first line, The heavy Cavalry in the second & the Light Dragoons in the third line, The Artillery at different points of the line, in all 46 Squadrons, 9 Troops of horse Artillery, about 6,000 men - The First Regt had the honour of giving the Guard of honour of one Troop with its officers to Lord Wellington on the ground, a Squadron received him at the convent Lord Uxbridge’s Quarters, when a Grand Dinner was prepared, for the Prince, General Officers and heads of Departments & Officers Commanding Regiments. It was very brilliant & Lord Wellington did me the high honour to come up to me and address me by saying that my regiment was in very fine order.’ At Waterloo the 1st Life Guards formed up as part of Somerset’s household Brigade - the latter also consisting of two squadrons of the 2nd Life Guards, two squadrons of the Royal horse Guards and four squadrons of the 1st (King’s) Dragoon Guards; Ferrior commanded the 2 squadrons of 1st Life Guards present, with a combined strength of 228 men; he led them when Uxbridge ordered his heavy Cavalry, the household Brigade and the Union Brigade, forward to combat D’Erlon’s four divisions of infantry with cavalry support, ‘having issued his orders for the charge, Uxbridge took up a position just to the west of the main Brussels road and just in front of the left-hand squadron of the household Brigade, that of the 1st Life Guards. Somerset’s field trumpeter, the 16 year-old John Edwards, then sounded the charge and the household Brigade trotted forward. The household Brigade quickly gained the top of the ridge and charged down the slope to meet Dubois’ cuirassiers who were just to the west of La haye Sainte. The 1st Life Guards were on the right of the line with the King’s Dragoon Guards in the centre. On the left came the 2nd Life Guards with the horse Guards in reserve. The heavy British cavalry came thundering down the slope and crashed into the ranks of Dubois’ men, apparently sending them flying in all directions.....Lieutenant Waymouth, of the 2nd Life Guards....wrote that the household Brigade and the cuirassiers, ‘came to the shock like two walls, in the most perfect manner’, and added, ‘having once penetrated their line, we rode over everything opposed to us.’... The household Brigade sent the French flying in all directions, the majority of them having to hack their way out and flee south along the main road as far as a cutting a few hundred yards south of La haye Sainte where, through sheer weight of numbers, they became jammed in and found themselves at the mercy of the Life Guards and King’s Dragoon Guards who set about their business with a deadly efficiency, cutting and hacking in all directions. The British themselves did not get off lightly, however, as a regiment of French chasseurs came to the top of the cutting and fired down into their tightly packed ranks, killing and wounding scores of them.’ (Galloping At Everything, The British Cavalry in the Peninsular War and Waterloo 10-1, I. Fletcher refers) Flushed with their success and oblivious of orders to halt, the two cavalry brigades continued their charge forward to wreak havoc, ‘the regiments of the household Brigade had been enjoying themselves at the grand battery, cutting down the gunners.... however, these too quickly became exhausted by their efforts and, when Travers’ cuirassiers counter-attacked, they were in no condition to offer serious resistance. The household Brigade also suffered heavy losses from the fire of Reille’s divisions which lined the track from hougoumont to La Belle Alliance, just beyond the grand battery’ (Ibid); fortunately the Royal horse Guards, who had remained in reserve, intervened in time to aid the retreat of Somerset’s Brigade. Ferrior led the remnants of his regiment back from this charge to continue the fight, and is said to have led his regiment to the charge no less than eleven times, “And most of the charges were not made till after his head had been laid open by the cut of a sabre and his body was pierced with a lance.” (Waterloo Roll Call, Dalton refers). Lieutenant-Colonel Ferrior, eventually succumbed to the brutality of the battle, and was killed in action, 18.6.1815; the 1st Life Guards suffered 2 officers killed, 4 wounded, 24 other ranks killed and 49 wounded; Ferrior is commemorated on a family memorial in St. mary’s Church, Tenby.

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102

102 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Ava (Colonel. C. Ferrior, 43rd N.I.), officially impressed, Royal mint, rank erased, and contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £1,400-1,800 Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Ferrior (1782-1863), died at Tenby, Pembrokeshire and is commemorated in St. mary’s Church, Tenby, where the memorial reads that ‘during a period of 28 years in India he distinguished himself as a most efficient and zealous officer. he served under the Duke of Wellington throughout the maharatta War and Commanded his Regiment 43rd hmIS from the commencement to the termination of the Burmese War. he was the youngest brother of Colonel Samuel Ferrior who gallantly fell at Waterloo while charging at the head of his regiment 1st Life Guards.’

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SINGLE CAMPAIGN MEDALS

103

103 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, 14 march 1795 (Thos. Dick, Midshipman.), tiny collectors’ number stamped on backstrap of clasp, very fine £3,000-3,500 Thomas Dick served as midshipman in h.m.S. Bedford as part of Admiral hotham’s successful action with the French Fleet off Genoa, 14.3.1795, when two enemy ships of the line were captured. Captain Thomas Dick, R.N., joined the Royal Navy, 1793, and was posted for service as midshipman in h.m.S. L’Aigle (Captain J. N. Inglefield) later the same year; assisted at the reduction of Corsica, before removing to h.m.S. Bedford (Captains R. mann and D. Gould), June 1794; served with the latter in hotham’s actions of the 14th march and 13th July, 1795; served in h.m.S. Windsor Castle (Rear-Admiral R. mann), September 1795-December 1796; subsequent service included in h.m. Ships Nassau and Monarch (flag-ships in the North Sea of ViceAdmiral R. Onslow); promoted Lieutenant, h.m.S. Nemesis, march 1799, before serving in h.m.S. Melopomene (Captain Sir C. hamilton) at the capture of the island of Goree, 5.4.1800; while serving ‘on the African station, he assumed command, on the night of 3. Jan.1801, of five boats, manned with 87 volunteers, for the purpose of surprising a corvette of 18 guns, and an armed schooner, anchored within the bar off Senegal. After a desperate struggle of 20 minutes, in which 11 men were killed, 18 wounded, and two boats sunk, Lieut. Dick and his party gallantly carried the corvette, Le Senegal, which they eventually destroyed under a heavy fire of grape and musketry from the batteries.’ (O’Byrne refers); Dick was commended for his service to the Admiralty (London Gazette 7.3.1801); he continued to serve under Sir Charles hamilton in the Illustrious, Temeraire and the Tonnant, on the Channel and Cadiz stations until July 1810; promoted Commander, October 1810; appointed to h.m.S. Thisbe (bearing the flag of Sir Charles hamilton and later the hon. A.K. Legge); in the River Thames; Captain 1814; retired 1846. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, June 1904 Christie, November 1988

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104

104 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Camperdown (John Terry, Carpenter.), good very fine ÂŁ2,400-2,800 John Terry served as Carpenter in h.m.S. Lancaster for the defeat of the Dutch fleet by the British Naval squadrons under Admiral Duncan, including the capture of nine ships of the line and two frigates off the Dutch coast, 11.10.1797. Two Large Naval Gold medals and fourteen Small Naval Gold medals were awarded for Camperdown.

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105

105 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Egypt (J. Lamont, Midshipman.), minor edge bruising, therefore very fine £3,500-4,000 James Lamont served as midshipman in h.m.S. Hebe in co-operation with the Army on and off the coast of Egypt, 1801. Commander James Lamont, R.N., joined the Royal Navy, 1798, and was appointed as First Class Volunteer, h.m.S. Repulse (Captain J. Alms); served in h.m.S. Queen Charlotte, before being appointed to h.m.S. Charon (Captain J. mackellar); served with the latter at the evacuation of the helder; appointed midshipman, h.m.S. Hebe (Captains W. Birchall and G. Reynolds), January 1800; after accompanying the expedition to Egypt he served in h.m.S. Clyde (flag-ship of Sir J.B. Warren), for over two years before serving as master’s mate in h.m. ships the Mediator and the Renommee, on the Channel station; appointed Sub-Lieutenant of the Staunch gun-brig, August 1805; confirmed Lieutenant of the Moselle in the following October; in ‘1808 it was mr. Lamont’s lot to be very severely wounded while boarding an enemy’s vessel in the Gulf of mexico, for which he received a gratuity of 80l.11s.6d. he was obliged in consequence to invalid in June of that year.’ (O’Byrne refers); retired Commander 1838. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, January 1906

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106

106 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Egypt (George Beithie.), minor edge nicks, therefore very fine ÂŁ1,200-1,600 George Beithie served as Landsman in h.m.S. Delft in co-operation with the Army on and off the coast of Egypt, 1801. PROVENANCE:

Spink, February 1946 and January 1972

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107 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Copenhagen 1801 (J.W. Watling, Lieut. R.N.), minor contact marks, otherwise good very fine £3,400-3,800 John Wyatt Watling served as midshipman in h.m.S. Veteran as part of Nelson’s attack on Copenhagen, 2.4.1801. Captain John Wyatt Watling, R.N., born Leominster, herefordshire, 1789; a descendant of Sir Thomas Wyatt, who was beheaded during the reign of Queen mary, for leading “Wyatt’s Rebellion”; having served in the merchant-service he joined the Royal Navy, 1801; served as Ordinary Seaman, h.m.S. Veteran (Captain A.C. Dickson), and ‘sailed shortly afterwards with the expedition against Copenhagen. On the memorable 2nd of April, having rendezvoused in the launch on board the Elephant, bearing Lord Nelson’s flag, he successfully employed in rendering assistance to the Bellona and Russel, both of which ships had grounded, also in towing the disabled Monarch out of the action, and in taking possession of several of the prizes’ (O’Byrne refers); he continued to serve in the Veteran as midshipman until July 1802; he removed to the Acasta, before service in the Goliath (Captain C. Brisbane), 1803-1805; in the ‘boats of the Goliath he aided, in the early part of 1804, in cutting out a French brig from under the protection of a national cutter of 10 guns, and of the powerful batteries at Sable d’Olonne; an affair in which the British sustained a loss of several men killed and wounded’ (Ibid); served in the Iris and the Virginie (both under Captain E. Brace), 1805-1808, and ‘while belonging to the Virginie, which ship was stationed chiefly on the coast of Ireland, mr. Watling contributed to the capture, 19 may 1808, of the Dutch frigate Guelderland, of 36 guns and 253 men, after an obstinate conflict of an hour and a half attended with a loss to the latter of 25 killed and 50 wounded, and her opponent of only 1 killed and 2 wounded’ (Ibid); appointed Acting Lieutenant, h.m.S Hero, 1808, before being confirmed Lieutenant later that year; appointed to h.m.S. Sirius (Captain S. Pym), October 1808, and ‘proceeding in her to the Cape station mr. Watling was afforded an opportunity, 21 Sept. 1809, of assisting at the capture of the town of St. Paul’s in the Ile de Bourbon; on which occasion the Sirius stood into the harbour, anchored within half-musket shot of La Caroline French frigate, two prize-Indiamen, and a brig-of-war, and opened so heavy a fire that in 20 minutes the whole of them struck their colours. In June 1810, we find mr. Watling commanding the pinnace, in company with the other boats of the Sirius under Lieut. Wm. Norman, and displaying conduct that did him great credit, in a successful attack made upon a deeply laden threemasted schooner, which the enemy had run aground in a creek near Port Louis, within 200 yards of the shore, and under the protection of about 300 troops and several strong batteries. In face of all the opposition that could be made the vessel was boarded and burnt; and this with no greater loss to the British than was experienced by the pinnace, namely, 1 seaman killed and a midshipman severely wounded’ (Ibid); the following month plans for the capture of the Ille de Bourbon were put into action and ‘mr. Watling was intrusted with the duty of superintending the debarkation of the whole of the troops, in number 950, who, under Lieut.-Colonel Frazier, were destined to accomplish that enterprise; and in such

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Chads, to the attack of Isle de la Passe, the key to Grand Port, in the Isle of France; the batteries at which place being stormed and carried, after a desperate resistance on the part of a very numerous garrison, the commandant surrendered at discretion. In the midst of the conflict Lieut. Norman was killed, and mr. Watling (who with Lieut. Chads was warmly recommended for his conduct to the Commander-in-Chief, London Gazette 1811, p261), succeeded in consequence to the command of the party landed from the Sirius. As described by Captain Pym, his conduct throughout the whole of this important service was truly gallant. Immediately subsequent to the capture of Isle de la Passe we find him entering, in command of the boats, the port of Sud-Est for the purpose of attacking a ship of 18 guns and 60 men, bound to madagascar for slaves; but the latter, on approach of the British, cut her cable and ran on a coral-reef, under the protection of the land-batteries, where, the enemy not being able to get her afloat, she was ultimately broken up. On 31 Aug. 1810, having followed into Riviere Norie a large ship (which proved to be the Windham, an Indiaman recently taken by the French, mounting 30 guns and manned with the same number of hands), mr. Watling, with but two boats, containing between them a midshipman, mr. John Andrews, and 9 men, armed with no other weapons of offence than the stretchers, succeeded in obtaining possession of her, although exposed to a severe fire from the batteries on shore. Towards the close of Aug. he was engaged, in company with the 36-gun frigates, Neireide, Iphigenia, and Magicienne, in a series of gallant but untoward operations which terminated in the self-destruction, at the entrance of Port SudEst, of the Sirius and Magicienne, the capture of the Neireide, and the surrender, to a powerful French squadron, of the Iphigenia. During their progress he was employed in a boat in conveying to the different ships the instructions of Capt. Pym, the senior officer; and when it became necessary to destroy the Sirius to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy, he nearly lost his life through his intrepidity in going below, after she had been abandoned, and opening the magazine doors, in order that the flames which had been kindled might the more readily communicate to it and accomplish the object in view [London Gazette 1810, p1978]. As soon as the frigate had been blown up he volunteered to convey Capt. Pym’s despatches in an open boat to the Ile de Bourbon, a distance of 140 miles; on his arrival there he was presented by Governor Farquhar with the sum of 200l., and sent with Egremont, a prize schooner fitted for the purpose, to madras, with intelligence of the disasters which had occurred. After enduring many hardships he reached madras, where, in acknowledgement of the services he had rendered to the East India Company, he had the gratification of receiving from the Governor-General in Council a further sum of 200l. In the following October he was made the bearer of a strong letter of recommendation from Lieutenant-General hewett to Lieutenant-General Abercromby and ordered with despatches to the island of Rodrigues; but by the time that he gained that destination the fatigue he had undergone had so reduced his health that he was under the necessity of being sent to the sick quarters at Bourbon. The Commander-in-Chief, Vice-Admiral Bertie, on this occasion publicly expressed to him, on the quarterdeck of his flag-ship the Africane, the regret he felt at the circumstance, especially as it would deprive the expedition then about to sail to the Isle of France of the intimate knowledge he possessed of the coast; he assured him, however, that on the reduction of the colony he would promote him, for his meritorious conduct, to the command of a ship. While at Bourbon mr. Watling was appointed by Governor Farquhar, in consideration of his former exertions, Captain of the port. On afterwards repairing to the mauritius, to the government of which island his Excellency on its conquest had been removed, he was placed by him in command of the Wellesley, a large American prize-schooner, for the purpose of conveying home important despatches to the Secretary of State for the Colonies and to the hon. Court of Directors. Prior to his departure for England he had the good fortune, in a 4-oared gig, to rescue from apparently inevitable destruction the wife of a major in the Army and 15 other persons, who had been wrecked on a coral-reef near Port Louis in a vessel over which the waves at the time were dashing with awful fury. The devoted heroism he displayed in achieving this act of humanity was witnessed by thousands of persons from the shore, and the effect of drawing a glowing eulogium from the Governor’ (O’Byrne refers); having returned to the UK, he was appointed to the Aquilon (Captain W. Bowles), North Sea station, December 1811; subsequent service included in h.m. Ships Minden, Lion and Astraea on the Cape of Good hope, until he advanced to the rank of Commander, December 1813; served in h.m.S. Julia, from September 1814; in the latter he was employed off St. helena for the security of Napoleon Bonaparte until April 1816; due to poor health he was obliged to invalid; served as Inspecting-Commander, Coast Guard, 18241827; promoted Captain, and placed on half-pay, July 1830; O’Byrne gives the following final details, ‘Capt. Watling was wounded, during the war, in the right hand; so severely indeed that the two fore-fingers have been rendered stiff in the joint. he is at present a Justice of the Peace for cos. Denbigh and Caernarvon; and a Deputy-Lieutenant for the latter.’ PROVENANCE:

Lovell Collection, November 1977 Spink 1979

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108 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Trafalgar (John Roberts.), pawn broker’s marks to edge at 11 o’clock, contact marks, very fine £3,000-3,500 Two men of this name served at the battle of Trafalgar, 21.10.1805, and were entitled to a single clasp Trafalgar medal: one as a Quarter Gunner on h.m.S. Temeraire and the other with an unknown rating on h.m.S. Defiance; twelve other men with this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants List, including 1 two-clasp award, and six single clasp awards for Syria. The medal appears entirely as issued, and one of this name with Trafalgar clasp, appeared at Glendining, August 1941.

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109 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Basque Roads 1809 (Jos. Jordon.), minor edge bruising, very fine £1,800-2,200 Joseph Jordon (listed as ‘Jordan’ on Admiralty Claimant’s List) served as Private, Royal marines, in h.m.S. Redpole during Lord Cochrane’s successful destruction of a number of French ships, including four ships of the line, in the Basque Roads, off St. Nazaire, 11-12.4.1809. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, may 1909

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110 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, 27 July Boat Service 1809 (R.B. Cotgrave, Midshipman.), nearly extremely fine, with original riband and contemporary silver riband buckle with gold retaining pin £10,000-12,000 Rowland B. Cotgrave served as midshipman in h.m.S. Pincher as part of Captain Lord George Stuart’s squadron operating near the mouth of the Elbe in July 1809. French troops based in hanover were regularly making incursions into the Cuxhaven area, and Stuart was instructed to eradicate this problem. As a consequence of this he landed from the boats of his squadron a detachment of seamen and marines to intercept the marauding Frenchmen. What ensued was a seek and destroy ‘Commando’ style raid deep into enemy territory, ‘the British discovered a large body of Frenchmen and pursued them to the town of Gessendorf near Cuxhaven where they made a stand. Captain William Goat of h.m.S. Mosquito with his detachment moved towards the town while another party led by Captain Pettet of h.m.S. Briseis attacked and took a gun battery of four 12-pounders in the flank, and the remainder of the British party under Commander George Edward Watts of h.m.S. Ephira attacked the battery from the front. On the approach of Captain Goat’s men, the enemy swiftly evacuated Gessendorf and the defenders of the battery, being attacked from two points, abandoned their position and retired. The battery was destroyed and the detachment returned to its ship without loss after a march of over 28 miles into enemy territory.’ (British Battles and Medals, refers). Approximately 10 clasps issued for this action Lieutenant Rowland Burdon Cotgrave, R.N., born 1798; joined the Royal Navy march 1808, and was appointed as midshipman to the Pincher gun-brig (commanded by Lieutenant S. Burgess, his brother-in-law); after assisting in the taking of the batteries of Cuxhaven and Gessendorf, July 1809, he entered the the Royal Naval College at Portsmouth, October 1812; proceeded to the West Indies in h.m.S. Tigris (Captain R. henderson), September 1815; between December 1817-June 1822 he served as Admiralty midshipman in h.m.S. Antelope (Rear-Admiral J. harvey), in a similar capacity in h.m.S.s Helicon, Iphigenia and Impregnable the latter being the flag ship of Sir Alexander Cochrane; he was actively employed in the suppression of smuggling and slavery on the home and African stations; after being appointed to h.m.S. Bann (Captain C. Phillips), he was promoted Lieutenant 1822; Cotgrave held the command of the tender San Raphael before returning to England in march 1823; after service in h.m.S. Rattlesnake, he removed to the Ramillies (Captains W. mcCulloch and h. Pigot), march 1824; from December 1825 he was employed in cruizing for protection of the Revenue, with the Antelope cutter under his orders as a tender to the Ramillies; served with the Coast Guard, 1836-1842.

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111 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Guadaloupe (Geo. Elrington, Lieut. R.N.), light contact marks, therefore very fine ÂŁ1,200-1,600 George Elrington served as Lieutenant in h.m.S. Thetis for the combined naval and military operations commanded by Vice Admiral the honourable Sir Alexander Cochrane and Lieutenant General Sir George Beckwith which culminated in the capture of the French-held Island of Guadaloupe, January-February 1810. Commander George Elrington, R.N., joined the Royal Navy, 1798, and was appointed First Class Volunteer in h.m.S. Triumph (Captain W. Essington); served as midshipman in h.m.S. Temeraire (flag-ship of Rear-Admiral J.h. Whitshed), from July 1799; subsequent service included in the Maidstone, Monarch, Unicorn, Ethalion and Impetueux, before being appointed Lieutenant, h.m.S. Kite (Captain E. James), August 1806; served in the Goliath for the expedition to Copenhagen, August 1807; appointed to the Thetis, and served for nearly five years with her in the West Indies; his final appointment was to h.m.S. Vanguard (prison ship), before going on half Pay in 1813; retired Commander, 1844. PROVENANCE:

Spink, November 1977

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112 Naval General Service 17993-1840, one clasp, Anholt 27 march 1811 (William Withersby.), light scratches, good very fine, with contemporary ornate silver top riband buckle £3,500-4,000 William Withersby (listed as ‘William Weatherly’ on Greenwich hospital Roll) served as a Private in the Royal marines during the defence of the island of Anholt in the Kattegart, 27.3.1811. A force of 381 Royal marines and Royal marine Artillery, under the overall command of Captain James Wilkes maurice, R.N., stood against an invading Danish flotilla of 12 gunboats, 12 transports with 1,000 troops and about 1,000 seamen. Approximately 38 clasps issued for this action. PROVENANCE:

Cheylesmore Collection, July 1930 Glendining, may 1965 J.B. hayward 1978

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113 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Java (William P. Manley.), light contact marks, otherwise good very fine ÂŁ1,000-1,400 William Pain manley served as Able Seaman in h.m.S. Nisus during the assistance given by the Navy in the capture of the island of Java, July-18th September 1811. William Pain manley served in the Royal Navy for extended periods between18031840, serving a total of 23 years and 233 days; service included in h.m.S. Nisus, 1810-1814, he attained the rate of Quarter master.

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114 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Northumberland 22 may 1812 (Samuel Goldsmith.), edge bruise, very fine ÂŁ3,000-3,500 Samuel Goldsmith served as Boy 3rd Class in h.m.S. Northumberland, which combined with h.m.S. Growler for the destruction of two French 40 gun frigates and a 16 gun Brig, off the Ile de Groix, Lorient, 22.5.1812. After a long chase and action, which included engaging at least three enemy shore batteries, the three Frenchmen were driven upon a line of rocks, and although under the guns of a shore battery, Northumberland and Growler went in close and pulverised the enemy ships with broadside after broadside at virtually point blank range; one ship blew up and the other was destroyed by fire. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, march 1923 Spink 1983

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115 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, St. Sebastian (Daniel Stringer.), edge bruising, therefore very fine £1,400-1,800 Daniel Stringer served as Ordinary Seaman in h.m.S. Surveillante, which assisted in the capture of St. Sebastian when some ship’s boats were employed in the inner blockade, 8.9.1813.

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116 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Algiers (J.S.W. Johnson, Lieut. R.N.), good very fine £1,800-2,200 John Samuel Willes Johnson served as Lieutenant in h.m.S. Queen Charlotte (Lord Exmouth’s flagship) when the combined English and Dutch fleets attacked the heavily fortified town of Algiers, 27.8.1816. British casualties amounted to 128 killed, 690 wounded; the Dutch suffered 13 killed and 52 wounded. The Impregnable, Leander, Superb, Granicus and Glasgow had their masts and yards greatly damaged. Captain John Samuel Willes Johnson, R.N., born South Stoke, near Bath, 1793; nephew of the Admiral Sir Davidge Gould, G.C.B.; joined the Royal Navy as First Class Volunteer, 1807, and was appointed to h.m.S. Vestal (Captain E.L. Graham), ‘in Nov. 1809, being then a master’s mate, he was placed in charge of the Fortitude, a re-captured English merchantman, and sent, with the intelligence of the Vestal having fallen in with an enemy’s squadron, to Lisbon and Cadiz; on his passage whither, although without a gun on board, he succeeded by a bold ruse-de-guerre in inducing an enemy’s armed vessel, by whom he must have been otherwise inevitably taken, to sheer off. After delivering his despatches to the flag-officer in the Tagus, mr. Johnson proceeded to England.... In Aug. 1810 he rejoined Capt. Graham in the Pallas, then on the eve of her departure for the coast of Nroway, where, it appears, he assisted at the capture of four Danish privateers, and of several sail of merchantmen, one of the former of which he was ordered to conduct to Leith roads’ (O’Byrne refers); he removed with his Captain firstly into h.m.S. Southampton and then the Alcemene; whilst serving with the latter in the Adriatic he took part in several boat affairs, ‘on one of those occasions, 22 may, 1812, a Franco-Venetian trabacolo, of 4 guns and 30 men, was captured near the island of Lessina, after a sanguinary conflict in which most of the enemy’s crew were killed and all the remainder wounded; while on the part of the British 4 were slain and 22 wounded, 1 of the former and 3 of the latter in the boat commanded by mr. Johnson, whose conduct was officially mentioned in the highest terms of commendation’ (Ibid); appointed to the Pylades, December 1813, and transferred as ActingLieutenant to h.m.S. Caledonia (flag-ship of Lord Exmouth), after the surrender of Genoa, April 1814; continued to serve under Lord Exmouth in h.m. Ships Boyne and Queen Charlotte, until October 1816; after an interval of half-pay he was nominated Flag-Lieutenant to Lord Exmouth, h.m.S Impregnable, at Portsmouth, September 1817; he remained in this appointment until promoted Commander, February 1821; served in h.m. Coast Guard, from 1835, before being appointed to the command of the Wolverene, fitting for China, where he arrived to witness some of the closing operations of the war; Captain 1846; published A Journal of Tour through parts of France, Italy and Switzerland, in the years 1-. PROVENANCE:

J.B. hayward, June 1975

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117 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Algiers (Joseph Torsell.), very fine ÂŁ800-1,200 Joseph Torsell served as Ordinary Seaman in h.m.S. Severn when the combined English and Dutch fleets attacked the heavily fortified town of Algiers, 27.8.1816. British casualties amounted to 128 killed, 690 wounded; the Dutch suffered 13 killed and 52 wounded. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, June 1906

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118 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (D. Morton, Chaplain.), nearly extremely fine £1,200-1,600 David morton served as Chaplain in h.m.S. Asia during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eighty-one men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever to put to sea again.’

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119 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (Andrew Smith, Asst. Surgn.), edge bruising, very fine £1,200-1,600 Andrew Smith served as Assistant Surgeon in h.m.S. Dartmouth during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eighty-one men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever to put to sea again.’ PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, march 1982

120 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (William Davis.), pawn broker’s mark to obverse field, suspension re-affixed, edge bruising, nearly very fine £200-300 A total of nine men with the name of William Davis appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, of which two are single clasp awards for Navarino.

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121 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (J.F. Guyon, Lieut. R.N.), edge bruising, nearly very fine £800-1,000 John Frederick Guyon served as Lieutenant in h.m.S. Cyclops during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. Lieutenant John Frederick Guyon, R.N., born 1807; joined the Royal Navy as First Class Volunteer, February 1823; appointed to h.m.S. Tribune (Captain G.h. Guion), ‘in the boats of which frigate he served at the capture of several piratical vessels in the Grecian Archipelago’ (O’Byrne refers); subsequent service included in the Gloucester and the Ganges, before returning to England having passed his examination, September 1829; rejoined the Ganges as mate the following year; he spent the following seven years mainly on the mediterranean station, serving with the Malabar and the Canopus; Lieutenant June 1838; served with the Barham (Captain A.L. Corry), prior to being appointed to the steamer Cyclops (Captain h.T. Austin); in the latter ‘he participated in the capture of the castle of Gebail, the town of Sidon, and other places on the coast of Syria’ (Ibid); his final appointment was to the Hastings, before being placed on half-pay, February 1842. PROVENANCE:

Spink, April 1979

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123

122 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Geo. Richards, Chaplain.), very fine £800-1,000

123 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (R.C. Nutt, Surgn.), edge bruising, therefore very fine £800-1,000

George Richards served as Chaplain in h.m.S. Vanguard during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

Richard C. Nutt served as Surgeon in h.m.S. Gorgon during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, January 1971 (latest published transcription of roll gives the above medal being sold ‘in pair’, on reviewing the relevant catalogue it would appear that this is in error)

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125

124 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Wm. Breadstrey.), very fine £400-500

125 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Henry Camplin.), good very fine £400-500

William Breadstrey (Greenwich hospital roll gives ‘Breadstery’) served as Able Seaman in h.m.S. Daphne during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

henry Camplin served as Sailmaker’s crew in h.m.S. Cambridge during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, October 1912

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127

126 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Henry Dall.), very fine ÂŁ400-500

127 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (James Nimmo.), good very fine ÂŁ400-500

henry Dall served as Boy in h.m.S. Cyclops during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

James Nimmo served as Quarter master in h.m.S. Pique during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

PROVENANCE:

Spink, July 1973

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128 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, 1 June 1794, 23rd June 1795 (John Henderson, Secretary.), polished, therefore nearly very fine, Scarce £4,500-5,500 John henderson served as Secretary in h.m.S. Royal George for the fleet action that became known as ‘The Glorious First of June’. A total of seven Large Naval Gold medals and 15 Small Naval Gold medals were awarded for this action; he served in the same capacity and in the same vessel (Admiral Bridport’s flag-ship) at the defeat of the French fleet and capture of three ships of the line by Admiral Bridport off the Isle de Groix, Brittany, 23.6.1795. PROVENANCE:

Spink, July 1975

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129 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Centaur 26 Augt 1808, Basque Roads 1809 (1809. Surgeon. W.St. George Davies, Asst. Surgn. 1808.), dates and ‘Surgeon’ additionally contemporarily engraved, minor edge nicks, nearly extremely fine, a unique combination of clasps £5,500-6,500 William St. George Davies served as Assistant Surgeon in h.m.S. Centaur during the pursuit of the Russian fleet of 24 ships and the capture of the 74 gun Sevolod by h.m. Ships Centaur (flag of Sir Samuel hood, Captain W.h. Webley) and Implacable (Captain T.B. martin) off hango head, south coast of Finland. During this spirited action, in which the Sevolod was captured, escaped and captured once more resulting in her being set on fire and completely destroyed, the Russians lost over 300 men killed and wounded, whilst the British losses were a combined total of 62 killed or wounded; he served as Surgeon in h.m.S. Dotterel during Lord Cochrane’s successful destruction of a number of French ships, including four ships of the line, in the Basque Roads, off St. Nazaire, 11-12.4.1809. Approximately 41 ‘Centaur 26 Augt. 1808’ clasps issued for this action.

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130 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Navarino, Syria (George Keemer.), minor edge nicks, good very fine £1,200-1,600 George Keemer served as Able Seaman in h.m.S. Rose during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eighty-one men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever to put to sea again’; he served as Captain of the Forecastle, h.m.S. Phoenix during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, may 1911

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132

131 military General Service 1793-1814, two clasps, Vittoria, Toulouse (D. Harris, Gunner, R.H. Arty.), good very fine £500-600

132 military General Service 1793-1814, three clasps, Badajoz, Vittoria, Pyrenees (Gilbert Baxter, 6th. Bn. R. Arty.), heavy edge bruising and contact marks, nearly very fine £600-700

Gunner David Harris, born Tonbridge, Kent; enlisted in the Royal horse Artillery, march 1797; discharged, march 1815, after 18 years and 15 days’ service. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, July 1940.

Gunner and Driver Gilbert Baxter, born Stirling, 1783; enlisted in 6th Battalion, Royal Artillery, June 1803; discharged, November 1827, after 24 years and 244 days’ service. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, October 1903.

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134

133 military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Corunna, Salamanca, Pyrenees, Orthes (Peter Gray, 42nd. Foot.), nearly extremely fine £1,000-1,200

134 military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Vimiera, Corunna, Salamanca, Pyrenees, Toulouse (John Smith, 36th. Foot), edge bruising, very fine £1,200-1,600

Private Peter Gray served with the 42nd Foot (Royal highlanders) in Captain John Campbell’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815.

Private John Smith, born Leigh, Lancashire; enlisted in the 36th (herefordshire) Regiment of Foot, October 1799; discharged April 1822 on account of ‘being worn out wounds received in the left thigh at Buenos Ayres [sic] on the 5th July 1807 - at Salamanca in the left foot on the 22nd July 1812’ (Service Papers refer)

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, July 1940.

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136

135 military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Talavera, Albuhera, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Toulouse (H. Bushel, 66th Foot.), good very fine £1,200-1,600

136 military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nive, Orthes, Toulouse (Thos. Renwick, 95th Foot, Rifles), contact marks, minor edge bruise, very fine £1,400-1,800

Corporal Henry Bushell, born Farnham, Surrey; enlisted in the 66th (Berkshire) Regiment of Foot, march 1803; discharged, July 1816, after 19 years and 146 days with the Colours.

Private Thomas Renwick, born Glasgow, Scotland; enlisted in the 95th Foot, August 1811; discharged October 1816, ‘in consequence of the loss of the left hand occasioned by the bursting of a fowling piece in Dublin’ (Service Papers refer), Kilmainham In-Pensioner. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, may 1902 Glendining, July 1927.

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138

137 military General Service 1793-1814, six clasps, Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Toulouse (Josh. Heeles, 95th Foot), naming rubbed, worn, good fine £1,200-1,600

138 military General Service 1793-1814, eight clasps, Fuentes D’Onor, Badajoz, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nive, Orthes, Toulouse (William Chalmers, 94th. Foot.), solder repair to suspension claw, third clasp facing sprung on left hand side, edge bruising, otherwise nearly very fine £1,400-1,800 PROVENANCE:

Glendining, march 1932. Glendining, June 1941.

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139 x139 honourable East India Company’s medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, silver, Royal mint, edge bruising, good very fine £400-500

140 140 honourable East India Company’s medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, bronze, Royal mint, a superb original striking, extremely fine and almost proof £180-220

141 141 honourable East India Company’s medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, bronze, Royal mint, very fine £150-200 www.spink.com

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142

143

142 Waterloo 1815 (Richard Starkey, 1st Reg. Dragoon Guards.), nearly very fine, with original steel clip and contemporary steel ring suspension £1,600-1,800

143 Waterloo 1815 (Charles Smart, 11th Reg. Light Dragoons.), with later silver ring and split ring suspension, nearly very fine £1,400-1,600

Private Richard Starkey, born Worksop, Nottinghamshire; enlisted 1st King’s Dragoon Guards, July 1801; served with the regiment during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; discharged October 1819; Kilmainham In-Pensioner.

Private Charles Smart, born Axminster, Devon, September 1794; enlisted in the 11th Light Dragoons, September 1810; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula, 1811-12, and in Captain John Jenkin’s Troop during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; discharged on account of a badly fractured leg caused by his horse falling with him in France, February 1819, after 8 years and 160 days with the Colours.

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144

145

144 Cabul 1842 (Pt. Dennis Conroy, XIII P.A.L.I.), edge marks, nearly very fine, with original steel clip and straight bar suspension £450-500 Private Denis Conroy, born Tipperary, Ireland; enlisted 13th Foot, 1835, and ‘is in possession of three medals viz. For the storming of Ghuznee, general action at Jellalabad and recapture of Cabool’ (Service Papers refer); Corporal 1846; discharged 1856, after 21 years and 82 days service with the Colours.

x145 Candahar Ghuznee Cabul 1842 (Private David Booker, Her Majesty’s 40th. Foot), engraved in running script, heavy contact marks partially obscuring unit, therefore good fine, with later silver swivel suspension £400-500

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146

147

146 China 1842 (Francis Bailey, Royal Marines.), good very fine £450-500 Marine Francis Bailey, born Beaminster, Dorset, 1817; enlisted in the Royal marines, February 1841; discharged due to rheumatism of the ankle, march 1846.

147 China 1842 (J. Dawson, Petty Offr, H.E.I.C.S. Queen), minor edge bruising, very fine, with silver riband bar inscribed ‘China 1857’ £400-450


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149

148 Sutlej 1845-46, for moodkee, two clasps, Ferozeshuhur, Sobraon (John Simpson 9th. Regt.), good very fine £500-600

153

154

152 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Chilianwala, Goojerat (Geo. Lowe, 29th. Foot.), solder repair to first clasp facing, minor edge bruising, very fine £400-450

Two men with the name John Simpson appear on the medal Roll for the 9th (East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot, one of whom was wounded at Ferozeshuhur, 21.12.1845.

149 Sutlej 1845-46, for Ferozeshuhur, one clasp, Sobraon (James Walter 29th. Regt.), minor edge nick, good very fine £380-420

150 Punjab 1848-49, one clasp, Chilianwala (Richd. Beech, 29th. Foot.), nearly very fine £300-340

151 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, mooltan, Goojerat (Fredk. Bassett, 32nd. Foot.), heavy contact marks, fine £250-300

153 South Africa 1834-53 (E. Trattle. A.B.), light contact marks, good very fine £280-320

154 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Northwest Frontier (2180 Pte. James Quigley 61st. Foot.), nearly extremely fine £180-220

155 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Northwest Frontier (1828 Pte. T. Harris, 3 Bn. Rif. Bde.), nearly extremely fine £180-220

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157

163

156 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Pegu (Wm. Morris. Musicn. “Spartan”), light contact marks, good very fine £200-240

161 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, hazara 1888 (945 Pte. J. Ingle 1st. Bn. Suff. R.), nearly very fine £140-160

x157 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (M. Ganley, 64th. Foot.), good very fine £340-380

162 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, hazara 1888 (1608 Sergt. J. Nolan 2d. Bn. R.Ir.R.), edge bruising, very fine £140-180

158 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (Private. Balmetur Gunmetur. 4th. Regt. N.I.), nearly very fine £200-240 159 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Bhootan (Sepoy Uttur Singh 32d. Regt. N.I.), suspension claw tightened, traces of brooch mounting to backstrap of clasp, very fine £80-120 160 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1887-89 (135 Pte. A. Halliday. 2nd. Bn. Norf. R.), pawn broker’s mark to rim, suspension pin loose, nearly very fine £100-130

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163 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, ChinLushai 1889-90 (911 Pte. A.W. Tomkins 1st. Bn. Ches. R.), very fine £180-220 164 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, ChinLushai 1889-90 (928 Pte. A. Oliver 1st. Bn. K.O. Sco. Bord.), edge bruise, nearly very fine £180-220


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x165 India General Service 1854-95, bronze issue, one clasp, Waziristan 1894-5 (Syce Din Muhammad 3rd Punjab Cavalry), rank partially officially corrected, nearly very fine £100-140 166 India General Service 1854-95, four clasps, Burma 1889-92, Chin Lushai 1889-90, Burma 1887-89, Burma 1885-7, clasps mounted in this order (818 Sapper Gungathrum No.1 Coy. “Q.O.” Sappers & Miners.), suspension claw tightened, nearly very fine £100-140 167 Baltic 1854-55 (T. Collins Sergt. R.M.L.I.), the surname and unit contemporarily engraved in large serif capitals, the rank contemporarily engraved in running script, edge bruising, very fine £120-160 168 Baltic 1854-55, unnamed as issued, contact marks, nearly very fine, with contemporary decorative top silver riband bar £80-120

173

169 Baltic 1854-55, unnamed as issued, good very fine £100-140 170 Baltic 1854-55, unnamed as issued, suspension pin loose, nearly very fine £80-100 171 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol, unnamed as issued, contact marks, nearly very fine, with contemporary top silver riband bar engraved ‘Crimea’ £100-140 172 Crimea 1854-56, two clasps, Alma, Sebastopol (W. Sedgwick. 55th. Regt.), officially impressed, edge nicks, nearly very fine £100-140 173 Crimea 1854-56, two clasps, Alma, Sebastopol (Capt. H.F. Barclay, 63rd Foot), officially impressed, good very fine £500-600 Captain Henry Ferguson Barclay, commissioned Ensign 63rd Foot, 1845; advanced Captain 1853.

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175

174 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol (W. Eaton. 17th. Lancers.), officially impressed, unofficial rivets between clasps and traces of solder to clasp carriage, nearly extremely fine £800-1,200

175 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol (Private John Panton. 1st. R. Brigade), contemporarily engraved in large serif capitals, unofficial rivets between third and fourth clasps, minor edge bruising, good very fine £300-340

900 Private William Eaton, enlisted in the 17th Lancers, 1846; served with the Regiment in the Crimea, and was present with the Regiment on the occasion of the Charge of the Light Brigade, 25.10.1854; sent to Scutari, 13.12.1854; died at Scutari, 20.1.1855. Although Private Eaton’s name does appear on the list of confirmed ‘Chargers’, this does not preclude him from having taken part in the Charge of the Light Brigade. most members of the Light Brigade entitled to the Balaklava clasp, in the absence of any evidence or status details to the contrary, took part in the Charge. Verified on muster Roll. PROVENANCE:

J.B. hayward, December 1969.

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176 Turkish Crimea (2), British die, unnamed as issued, with later swivel bar suspension; Sardinian die, unnamed as issued, with contemporary I.G.S. style bar suspension and top silver riband bar, nearly very fine or better (2) £70-90


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178

179

177 Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Hy. Taylor, A.B. Pearl.), very fine £500-550 Petty Officer First Class Henry Taylor, born Brighton, Sussex, on Christmas Day 1835; entered the Royal Navy as a Boy First Class serving in h.m.S. Victory, may 1853; transferred for continuous service to h.m.S. London with the rate of Ordinary Seaman, October 1853; transferred to h.m.S. Pearl, January 1856; promoted Able Seaman, June 1856; advanced Petty Officer First Class, September 1859; discharged, July 1864.

178 Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Gunnr. Wm. Bond, 13th. Bn. R. Art.), edge bruising, good very fine £140-180

179 Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Shekh Sillar 26th. Regiment N.I.), suspension post crudely re-affixed, minor edge bruising, nearly very fine £100-140

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180

181

182

180 Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Hy. B. Simson. Civil Service), nearly extremely fine £300-350 Mr. Henry Bruce Simson, arrived in Bengal as a writer, march 1852; served as Assistant magistrate and Collector, Tirhoot, 1855; transferred to monghyr, 1857, and Bhaugulpore, 1858; awarded the Indian mutiny medal for actions against the mutineers of the 11th Irregular Cavalry; advanced Sessions Judge of Jessore and Backergunge, 1874; resigned, 1878.

181 Indian mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (E.C. Nunn.), minor scratch marks to reverse, good very fine £200-300 Mr. E.C. Nunn employed as an uncovenanted Civil Servant with the Customs Patrol in Agra, and was still serving in Agra in 1865.

182 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (E, Fox. 61st. Regt.), light contact marks, very fine £300-350 2148 Private Elijah Fox, born Eckington, Derbyshire; enlisted in the 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot, march 1842; transferred to the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, July 1844; served with the Regiment in the Second Sikh War, and present at the Battles of Chilianwala 13.1.1849, and Goojerat, 21.2.1849 (medal and two clasps); and during the Indian mutiny; discharged, April 1863, after 21 years and 25 days with the Colours.

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184

185

183 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (C, Harkin. 61st. Regt.), very fine £300-350 1197 Private Charles Harkin, born Glasgow, 1820; enlisted in the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, July 1839; served with the Regiment in the Second Sikh War, and present at the battle of Goojerat, 21.2.1849 (medal and clasp); discharged, October 1860, after 21 years and 42 days with the Colours, of which 13 years and 8 months were spent in India.

184 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (Paymaster David F. Chambers, 75th. Regt.), suspension re-affixed, nearly extremely fine £400-500 Major David Francis Chambers, Commissioned Ensign, 75th (Stirlingshire) Regiment of Foot, January 1840; promoted Lieutenant, may 1842; Appointed Paymaster, January 1849; served during the Indian mutiny from the outbreak, 12.5.1857, including the battle of Budleekaserai, and the siege, storm, and capture of Delhi; wounded before Delhi, 8.6.1857; promoted major, January 1860.

185 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Relief of Lucknow (Jerh. Thomas, 1st. Bn. 23rd. R.W. Fusrs.), pawn broker’s mark to reverse, very fine £260-300

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187

188

186 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Chas. Tupper, A.B. Shannon.), very fine £600-700 Able Seaman Charles Tupper, born Sussex, march 1835; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Ordinary Seaman 2nd Class, September 1854.

187 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (John Woodhead, A.B. Shannon.), good very fine £600-700 Chief Gunner’s Mate John Woodhead, born June 1833; enlisted in the Royal Navy as Boy 1st Class, serving in h.m.S. Excellent, may 1851; transferred as Ordinary Seaman to h.m.S. Algiers, may 1854; promoted Able Seaman, February 1856; transferred to h.m.S. Shannon, September 1856; promoted Leading Seaman, June 1858; Gunner’s mate, July 1859; Chief Gunner’s mate, January 1864; discharged, July 1869.

188 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (R. Allen, 2nd. Dragn. Gds.), contact marks, nearly very fine £280-320

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190

191

189 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (H. Williams, 34th. Regt.), minor edge nicks, very fine £250-300

190 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (R. Tyler, 38th. Regt.), worn, nearly very fine £200-240 4502 Private Robert Tyler, born Lincoln, January 1838; enlisted in the 38th (Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot, September 1855; awarded L.S. & G.C., December 1876; discharged, February 1877, after 21 years and 17 days with the Colours.

191 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Colr. Sergt. Thos. Donolon. 97th. Regt.), minor edge nick, extremely fine £280-320 1082 Colour Sergeant Thomas Donolon, died 12.5.1858.

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192

193

194

192 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Wm. Cook. 2nd. Bn. Rifle Bde.), nearly extremely fine £260-300

x193 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (No. 2070 Private William Creighton, 2nd. Bengal Fusrs.), officially impressed as issued to the Indian Army, file marks to retaining rod rivets, nearly very fine £140-180

194 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Rev. H, Smith, D,D, Chaplain,), extremely fine £380-420 The Reverend Henry Smith, D.D., Appointed Assistant Chaplain, Bengal Ecclesiastical Establishment, 1848.

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196

197

195 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Majr. H H A Wood Staff of C.I & Rajpootana Field Force), suspension re-affixed, nearly very fine £340-380 Major Henry Hastings Affleck Wood, arrived in India, 1843; promoted Captain, January 1854; appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant General, 4th Native Infantry, Poona division, September 1856, promoted major, July 1858.

196 Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Asst. Surgn. G.A Burn. 5th. Infy. Hd. Cont.), suspension claw re-affixed, light pitting, very fine £300-340 Assistant-Surgeon G.A. Burn, Appointed Surgeon, 5th Infantry hyderabad Contingent, April 1857; present at the action against the rebel forces under Tantia Topee at Koonch, 7.5.1858 (mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 17.9.1858); and in the operations before Calpee, 15-22.5.1858 (mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 5.10.1858).

197 Indian mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Delhi, Lucknow (Gunner. Saml. Yeates. 3rd. Tp. 3rd. Bde. H.A.), good very fine £400-450

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200

198 Indian mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Relief of Lucknow, Lucknow (J. Sanger, 90th. Lt. Infy.), suspension slightly loose, good very fine £400-450

199 China 1857-60, no clasp, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, very fine £80-100

21 Private James Sanger, born Salisbury, Wiltshire, 1837; enlisted as 3673 Private, 73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot, may 1855; transferred to the 90th (Perthshire Light Infantry) Regiment, February 1857; served with the Regiment in India and present at the Relief of Lucknow; discharged, may 1866, after 11 years with the Colours, of which 7 years and 11 months were spent in India; recalled to the Army reserve, August 1868; finally discharged, December 1881.

200 China 1857-60, one clasp, Taku Forts 1860 (Jas. Harrop. 31st. Regt.), minor edge bruise, good very fine £160-200

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201 New Zealand 1845-66, reverse dated 1864-1866 (497. John Scandritt, 68th. Lt. Infty.), traces of lacquer, good very fine £340-380

202 Canada General Service 1866-70, one clasp, Fenian Raid 1870 (Pte. J. Eroc, Missisquoi. H.G.), nearly extremely fine £200-240

203 Abyssinia 1867-68 (3391. W. Mc.Dermott. H.M. 45th. Regt.), good very fine £220-260

202

203

204 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (T. Morton. Sailmrs. Mate. H.M.S. Bittern. 73-74.), good very fine £160-200 Approximately 90 no clasp medals awarded to h.m.S. Bittern.

205 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (J. Agate, Dom: 1Cl. H.M.S. Victor Eml. 73-74), minor edge bruising, good very fine £160-200

206 South Africa 1877-79, no clasp (29/581. Pte. W. Smith. 58th. Foot.), minor edge bruise, nearly very fine £200-240

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215

207 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (1332. Corpl. E. Constantine. 3/60th. Foot.), minor edge bruise, very fine £350-400

213 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Kandahar (2474. Driv: M. Rodgers. C. Batt: 2nd. Bde. R.A.), very fine £160-200

208 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (2319. Pte. A. Cooper. 91st. Foot.), pawn broker’s mark to obverse field, minor edge bruise, very fine £340-380

x214 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Kandahar (Sepoy Deokissoon Sing 2nd. Rgt. N.I., scratch marks to obverse field, edge bruise, otherwise nearly very fine £90-120

209 Afghanistan 1878-80, no clasp (823. Pte. J. Dolan. 2/8th. Regt.), minor edge bruise, very fine £80-120

215 Afghanistan 1878-80, two clasps, Charasia, Kabul (96. Pte. J. Allen. 67. Ft.), light contact marks, good very fine £240-280

210 Afghanistan 1878-80, no clasp (1270. Lce. Corpl. D. Shaw. 2/15th. Foot.), very fine £80-120 211 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Peiwar Kotal (Sepoy Akbar Alli 5th. Punjab Infy.), minor edge bruising, suspension post loose, nearly very fine £90-130 212 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Ahmed Khel (125. Pte. G. Kirk. 59th. Foot.), edge bruise, very fine £160-200

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x216 Egypt 1882-89, dated, no clasp (Private S... Khan, 29th Regt... N.I.), heavy contact marks and pitting, good fine £50-70 217 Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Tel-el-Kebir (1436 Pte. C. Cochrane. 1/R. Hrs.), pitting, therefore nearly very fine £140-180


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228

218 Egypt 1882-89, dated, two clasps, Tel-el-Kebir, Suakin 1885 (1778. Corpl. Sadlr. F. Finlay... Co. C. & T.C.), heavy pitting, therefore good fine £120-150 219 Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, The Nile 188485 (955. Bandn. A. Butt. 2/D of Corn: L.I.), light pitting, very fine £140-180 220 Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, The Nile 188485 (1733, Corpl. W.H. Smith, 11th. Husrs.), rank unofficially corrected, nearly very fine £100-140 221 Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, Suakin 1885 (4 Pte. W. Spain, 2/E. Surr: R.), light pitting, nearly very fine £140-180 x222 Khedive’s Star 1882, good very fine £50-70 223 Khedive’s Star 1882, good very fine £50-70

229

225 Khedive’s Star 1884, good very fine £50-70 226 Khedive’s Star 1884-6, reverse impressed ‘20H 1948’, light contact marks, good very fine £50-70 227 East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, Benin 1897 (H. Ashford, S.B. Att., H.M.S. St. George.), good very fine £140-180 Henry Ashford born Devon, 1873; joined Royal Navy as Sick Berth Attendant, 1895; service included in haslar hospital, Plymouth hospital and in h.m.S. St. George, the latter between January-march 1897; ‘Shore Expired - June 1907’ (Service Papers refer).

228 British South Africa Company’s medal 1890-97, for Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (Troopr. A.E. Taylor. M.R.F.), surname partially officially corrected, good very fine £140-180 229 hong Kong Plague medal 1894 (Private J. Long, S.L.I.), minor edge bruising, very fine £900-1,100

224 Khedive’s Star 1882, suspension bar slightly bent, otherwise nearly extremely fine £50-70

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230

230 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Defence of Chitral 1895 (1014 Sepoy Balu 4th Kashmir Rifles), edge bruising, very fine £500-700 231 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (6050 Pte. C.E. Brening 1st. Bn. K.R. Rifle Corps.), minor edge cut and bruise, scratch marks to obverse field, good very fine £120-140 x232 India General Service 1895-1902, E.VII.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1901-2 (489 Sepoy Kadir Bhob Levy Corps), worn, good fine India General Service 1908-35, E.VII.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1908 (217 Lce Naik Taj din 6th Mule Corps), minor edge bruise, nearly very fine (2) £60-80 x233 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897 (Syce Hidayt 3d. Pjb. Cavy:), nearly very fine £80-100

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234

234 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (5008 Pte. W.R. Bough 2d. Bn. York: Regt.), initials and surname partially officially corrected, good very fine £100-140 235 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (3597 Pte. C. Damms 2d. Bn. K.O. York Lt. Infy.), pawn broker’s mark to obverse field, edge bruise, good very fine £140-180 x236 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (3807 Wd. Servant Rajab A.H. Corps), good very fine £80-100 237 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., three clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897, Tirah 189798 (400 Sepoy Natha Singh Kapurthalala I.S. Infy.), with top retaining rod, very fine £100-140


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238 Ashanti Star 1896, unnamed as issued, good very fine £140-180 239 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (Capt. J.H.L. White. 1/Northd. Fus:), nearly very fine £400-500 Captain Joseph Henry Lachlan White, born January 1859; Commissioned Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers, may 1882; promoted Captain, march 1891; served as Adjutant, Volunteer Battalion, February 1892 to January 1897; retired, February 1899.

x240 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (2), unnamed as issued, one with replacement retaining rod, light contact marks, nearly very fine (2) £120-160

239

241

241 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (3402 Lc. Corpl. F. Knowles 21st. Lrs.), name partially corrected during naming procedure, edge bruising, very fine £400-500 3402 Lance Corporal F. Knowles served in major h. Finn’s ‘A’ Squadron, 21st Lancers, as part of the Charge at Omdurman, 2.9.1898. PROVENANCE:

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242 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £80-100

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 243 The Khedive’s Sudan Medal Attributed to Brigadier-General P.R. Wood, [C.B., C.M.G.], Royal Irish Fusiliers Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Sudan 1899, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine, with the following related material all contained in a metal box bearing a tag inscribed ‘maj. Genl. Wood, 8 Lincoln St., Sloane Square, London SW’: - The recipient’s epaulettes, bearing the rank insignia of a Lieutenant-Colonel - Various Badges, buttons, and rank insignia, including that of a Brigadier-General - Various cloth insignia - Three riband bars - The recipient’s spurs - Three covers, addressed to ‘Capt. P. Wood, Royal Irish Fusiliers, Khartoum, Sudan, Egypt’ with a ‘mafeking’ cancellation; to ‘Capt. P.R. Wood, R.I. Fusiliers, 10th Soudanese Battalion, Cairo, Egypt’ with an ‘Orange River Colony’ cancellation; and to ‘Captain Wood, R.I. Fusiliers, Churchfield Road, Ealing, London, England’ with ‘Bloemfontein’ cancellations respectively - Various Great War period postcards, including one showing the bombed-out centre of Ypres written by the recipient, dated 29.8.1915 - Invitation to a Reception to celebrate the marriage of General and mrs. P.A. Cronje, 5.7.1904 £200-300 C.B. London Gazette 4.6.1917 Lt.-Col. and Bt. Col. (temp. Brig.-Gen.) Philip Richard Wood, C.m.G., R. Ir. Fus. ‘For valuable service rendered in connection with military Operations in the Field.’ C.m.G. London Gazette 23.6.1915 Lieutenant-Colonel Philip Richard Wood, Royal Irish Fusiliers ‘ For service rendered in connection with military Operations in the Field.’ Brigadier-General Philip Richard Wood, C.B., C.M.G., born February 1868; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Irish Fusiliers, February 1887; promoted Lieutenant, April 1889; Captain, may 1897; served with the Egyptian Army 1899-1906, and took part in the Nile Expedition in 1899 (Khedive’s Sudan medal with clasp); promoted major, 14.9.1906; Lieutenant-Colonel, 14.3.1913; served during the Great War in command of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers on the Western Front from 19.12.1914; appointed Brigade Commander, 43rd Infantry Brigade, 3.8.1915; Divisional Commander, 33rd Division, 2.9.1917 (Six times mentioned in Despatches, London Gazettes, 22.6.1915, 1.1.1916, 15.6.1916, 4.1.1917, 15.5.1917, and 11.12.1917; appointed Brevet of Colonel, London Gazette 3.6.1916; C.B., and C.m.G.); transferred to the Reserve with the honorary rank of Brigadier-General, 18.12.1919. Brigadier-General Wood died at home in Guildford, 10.10.1945.

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x244 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, three clasps, Firket, Sudan 1897, hafir, unnamed as issued, very fine £100-140

245 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, no clasp (6847 Pte. E. Stuttard, 1st. Yk: & Lanc: Regt.), very fine £50-70

x246 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, no clasp (1452 Pte. W. Olive, New Zealand M.R.), very fine £100-140 1452 Private William Olive, born Auckland, New Zealand, 1878; enlisted in the 4th New Zealand Contingent, 11.3.1900; embarked for South Africa, 31.3.1900; and served with No. 8 Company, 4th N.Z. Contingent (Rough Riders) for 1 year and 134 days.

247 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, no clasp (24 Tpr: P. Kotze. Hopefield D.M.T.), good very fine £50-70

248 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, no clasp (272 Pte. T. Stevenson. Uitenhage T.G.), toned, good very fine £50-70

249 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (4174 Gnr: H. Burnett. 85th. Bty: R.F.A.), good very fine £70-90 4174 Gunner H. Burnett, taken Prisoner of War at Nylstroom, 8.11.1901.


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250

252

250 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Defence of Kimberley (Pte. W. Twigg. Kimberley Town Gd:), nearly extremely fine £140-180

252 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Defence of Ladysmith (3940 Pte. E. Bradshaw, Manchester Regt.), minor edge bruise, good very fine £160-200

251 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Talana (9477 Pte. W. Pratt. K.R.R.C.), good very fine £100-140 9477 Private W. Pratt, born Portsmouth, hampshire; enlisted King’s Royal Rifle Corps, 1896, and was serving with the 1st Battalion, when he was posted as missing in Action at Farquhar’s Farm, 30.10.1899, and was subsequently taken Prisoner of War: ‘The Battalion was hard pressed, their losses on the 30th October being 3 Officers and 1 man killed, 1 Officer and 32 men wounded, besides about 30 taken prisoner. This party was sent on in advance at the Battle of Lombard’s Kop, but were left behind on the general retirement of the force, no order apparently having been given for them to retire. The party endeavoured to retire, but it was too late; they were surrounded, and after a sharp fight surrendered.’ (British Regiments in South Africa 199-190, J. Stirling, refers).

3940 Private E. Bradshaw, served with the 1st Battalion, manchester Regiment; killed in action at Ladysmith, 6.1.1900: ‘In repelling the great assault on the 6th January at Ladysmith the manchesters played a very important part. The 1st Battalion, under Colonel Curran, along with the 42nd Battery, some of the Naval Brigade, with a 12-pounder and some Natal Volunteers, formed the garrison of Caesar’s Camp. Sir George White expressed the opinion that the enemy got into position close to our defences through deceiving the picquets as to their identity; but precise details could not be got, as nearly all the defenders of the south-east portion of Caesar’s Camp were killed. Thew enemy got possession of that portion, but the defenders clung most gallantly to little sangers and bits of cover here and there. Sundry reinforcements were sent to Colonel Curran, and ultimately, at about 5:30, after 15 hours’ continuous effort on both sides, the Boers were driven entirely off the hill. The losses of the manchesters were very severe- 33 men were killed, and 4 Officers and about 37 men wounded. Four Officers and 14 men of the Battalion were mentioned in Sir George White’s Despatch, 23.3.1900, and Privates R. Scott and J. Pitts were subsequently awarded the Victoria Cross.’ (British Regiments in South Africa 199-190, J. Stirling, refers).

253 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Relief of Kimberley (3975 Pte. A. Powell. 2nd Dragoons), nearly extremely fine £120-160 3975 Private A. Powell, died of disease at Wynberg, 27.6.1900.

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254 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Transvaal (1548 Tpr: J.F.W. Hall. Imp: Lt. Horse), good very fine £60-80 255 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Rhodesia (11132 Pte. D. Finnegan, 60th. Coy. 17th. Imp: Yeo:), good very fine £200-240 11132 Private D. Finnegan served with the 60th Company (North Irish horse (Belfast)), 17th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War.

256 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Elandslaagte (3816 Pte. J. Moran. Manchester: Regt.), nearly extremely fine £300-350 3816 Private J. Moran (latest published transcription of casualty roll gives recipient’s initial as ‘W’), served with the 1st Battalion, manchester Regiment; wounded at Elandslaagte, 21.10.1899: ‘The Battalion was moved up to Ladysmith, and was present with General French at the Battle of Elandslaagte on the 20th October. In that battle the Battalion did very well. Their losses were 11 men killed, and 5 Officers and 26 men wounded.’ (British Regiments in South Africa 199-190, J. Stirling, refers).

256

257

257 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Relief of Ladysmith (1204 Pte. A.E. Yates, 1st. Yk: & Lanc: Regt.), good very fine £120-160 1204 Private Albert Edward Yates, born Sheffield, Yorkshire; enlisted York and Lancaster Regiment, 1885; served with the 1st Battalion during the Second Boer War, and was wounded at Natal, 22.2.1900; discharged 12.6.1902.

258 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902 (5746 Pte. D. Taylor. Worc: Regt.), minor edge bruise, very fine £60-80 259 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902 (1718 Tpr: A.G. Sweetnam. Nesbitt’s H.), surname partially officially corrected, good very fine King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2069 Tpr. C. Harrold. Jo’burg M.R.), very fine (2) £80-100 260 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Talana, Relief of Ladysmith (5668 Sgt. W. Taylor, Rl. Dublin Fus:), edge bruise, nearly very fine £80-100 5668 Sergeant W. Taylor, served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers; killed in action 19.1.1901 (medal roll refers).

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July 19, 01 - London 266 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1901 (7915 Shg: Sth: B. Dodd. R.F.A.), officially re-impressed, good very fine £50-70 267 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902 (5972 Pte. M. Clarke. Rifle Brigade.), very fine £70-90 268 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Rhodesia, Orange Free State, Transvaal (15404 Tpr: B.H. Biddulph, 75th. Coy. 18th. Imp: Yeo:), nearly very fine £240-280

268

261 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Tugela heights, Relief of Ladysmith (7290 Pte. G. Nelms. R.A.M.C.), very fine £60-80 262 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Transvaal, South Africa 1902 (6436 Pte. A. Eaton. N. Staff: Regt.), nearly very fine £50-70 263 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (8337 Pte. A. Newton. Vol: Coy. R. War: Regt.), good very fine £70-90 264 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (9581 Corpl: F. Turner, Roberts Horse), nearly very fine £70-90 265 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg (3067. Pte. E. Horton, North Staff: Regt.), edge bruise, very fine £70-90

269 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1902 (6308 Pte. R. Peach. K.O. York: L.I.), very fine £80-100 270 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Transvaal (3126, Pte. F. Waldren, Glouc: Rgt.), good very fine £80-100 271 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond hill, Belfast (52712 Dvr. P.H. Ambrose, T. Bty., R.H.A.), good very fine £90-110 272 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Natal, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Transvaal (2784 Pte. E. Davis, Glouc: Regt.), nearly extremely fine £90-110 273 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Transvaal, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (7207 Pte. P. Papworth. Vol: Coy. Manch: Regt:), unofficial rivets between first and second clasps, edge bruise, very fine £80-100 274 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (1173 Pte. J. Mc.Gee. S. Lanc: Regt.), very fine £100-140

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 275 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, eight clasps, Belmont, modder River, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond hill, Belfast, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (9695 Pte. J. Toner, Cldstm: Gds:), good very fine £300-400 276 King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2) (3795 Pte. P. Rickhuss, Rl: Scots.; 2677 Pte. J.F. Marshall. York: & Lanc: Regt.), generally very fine or better (2) £60-80 277 King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2) (6278 Pte. J. Wells. Durham L.I.; 1596 Tpr: R. Lewis. Johannesburg M.R.), suspension loose on first, top lugs removed from last, nearly very fine and better (2) £60-80 278 Kimberley Star 1899-1900, hallmarks for Birmingham 1900, with top silver riband bar engraved ‘A. Law’, good very fine £100-120 279 China 1900, no clasp (F. Moseley, A.B., H.M.S. Undaunted.), minor edge bruise, good very fine £140-160 280 Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., one clasp, Somaliland 1902-04 (5008 Pte. R. Bough. Yorks: Regt.), nearly extremely fine £100-140 x281 India General Service 1908-35, E.VII.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1908 (5921 Pte. H. Trickett 1st. W.Y. Regt), nearly extremely fine £80-100 x282 India General Service 1908-35, E.VII.R., bronze issue, one clasp, North West Frontier 1908 (Bearer Fariz Ali 1st. Rl. M. Fus:), edge bruising, nearly very fine £80-100 x283 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Abor 1911-12 (4282 Sepoy Waryam Singh 32nd Sikh Pioneers.), attempt to erase rank, very fine £140-180 x284 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Abor 1911-12 (Tempy Bearer Bootan ...Corps), good fine, scarce £160-200

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x285 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp (2), Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (94391 Pte. E. French, M.G.C.); North West Frontier 1930-31 (3239687 Sgln. J. Jones. R. Signals.), edge bruise to latter, good very fine (2) £100-140 x286 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R. (3), one clasp (2), mahsud 1919-20 (1858 Sepoy Sher Mohd. 55 Coke’s Rfls.); Waziristan 1921-24 (2646 Rfmn. Bindhoj Gurung, 1-5 R.G.R.); three clasps, Waziristan 1921-24, mohmand 1933, North West Frontier 1935 (4952 Sep. Abdul Rahman, 4-10 Baluch R.), nearly very fine or better (3) £80-100 x287 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1919-21 (6078360 Pte. H. Leahy. Queens.), good very fine £70-90


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July 19, 01 - London 288 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp (2), Waziristan 1919-21 (6406 Carp. Salman. 4 W.B.); North West Frontier 1930-31 (3593808 Pte. E E Benstead. Bord. R.), good very fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (1080 Sepoy Haji Gul, 2 Rd. Constn, Bn,), minor edge nicks, good very fine (3) £70-90 289 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Burma 1930-32 (759552 Pte. F. Jones. Oxf. & Bucks L.I.), nearly extremely fine £60-80 x290 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Burma 1930-32 (3521417 Pte. A. Armstrong, Manch. R.), partially officially corrected, nearly extremely fine £60-80 291 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Burma 1930-32 (3522195 Pte. F. O’Connor. Manch. R.), edge bruise, very fine £60-80 x292 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R. (3), one clasp (2), Burma 1930-32 (Pte. Follr. Fazal, I.S.C.); North West Frontier 1935 (TD-170224 Driver Gul Sher, 37 A.T. Coy.), prefix to number officially corrected; two clasps, North West Frontier 1930-31, mohmand 1933 (11071 Sep. Niaz Gul, F.C.), second clasp unofficially affixed on last, generally nearly very fine (3) £60-80 x293 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., three clasps (2), Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24 (4398 Sepoy Sardar Ali, 1/69/Pjbs.); Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, mahsud 1919-20, Waziristan 1919-21 (3 Havr. Wazir Khan. S.W. Militia), unofficial rivets and additional retaining rods between clasps, first good fine, second good very fine (2) £60-80 x294 Khedive’s Sudan 1910-22, 2nd type, no clasp, unnamed as issued, small area of erasure, edge bruise, nearly very fine £80-100 295 1914 Star, with later slide Bar (11338 Pte. R. Barnes. R. Ir: Fus.), back slide bar on Bar broken, nearly very fine £60-80

x296 1914 Star (7223 Pte. R. Riding. Ches: R.), nearly very fine 1914-15 Star (8323 Pte. A.R. Pearson. Bedf. R.), nearly very fine mercantile marine War medal (2) (E.N. Krohn.; David W. Mitchell), good very fine Victory medal (18808 Pte. J.N. Jamieson. N.Z.E.F.; Dvr. J. O’Brien S.A.S.C.), good very fine (6) £70-90 x297 British War medal (1060 Buglr. Karim Bux, Alwar I.S. Infy.), edge bruising, nearly very fine General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., one clasp, Iraq (4018 Sepoy Sher Ali. 106-Pioneers.), suspension reaffixed, nearly very fine India General Service 1936-39, two clasps, North West Frontier 1936-37, North West Frontier 1937-39 (1012 Naik Haider Khan, Tochi Scouts.), second clasp unofficially affixed, minor edge bruise, very fine Second World War medals (2), Defence medal; India Service medal, nearly very fine (5) £60-80 x298 Canadian memorial Cross, G.V.R. (2) (Lieut. D.S. Gwyn. M.C.; 907433 Pte. J.C. Anderson), first suspended on an ornate silver chain, good very fine (2) £180-220 m.C. London Gazette 24.8.1918 Lt. Donald Stodart Gwyn, Dgns., Canadian Force ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a raid on the enemy’s trenches. he led his men with great energy and determination, and by his fearless leadership overcame the enemy’s resistance. he set a splendid example to all ranks.’ Lieutenant Donald Stodart Gwyn, M.C., born Quebec, October 1896; educated at Bishops College, Lennoxville, and the Royal military College, Kingston, Ontario; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Dragoons, 25.6.1915; served with the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force on the Western Front from 1917, and awarded the military Cross for an action south east of haricourt on the night of the 12-13.2.1918 (letter from the Royal military College Club of Canada refers); severely wounded, 23.3.1918, he went on leave to Ireland; returning to England on board the S.S. Leinster he was killed when the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat, 10.10.1918, with the loss of over 400 lives; his body was subsequently recovered and hi is buried in Grangegorman military Cemetery, Dublin. 907433 Private John Calder Anderson, born Carrickmaerness, Co. monaghan, Ireland, December 1881; enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, 18.3.1916, and served during the great War with the 195th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment); died, 3.3.1920, and is buried in Regina Cemetery, Saskatchewan, Canada.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria x299 Canadian memorial Cross, G.V.R. (2) (419045 Pte. W. Crawford; 43632 Pte. R.S. Salmon), very fine (2) £200-240 419045 Private William Crawford, born manchester, December 1880; served for 12 years with the highland Light Infantry; emigrated to Portland, maine, and enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, 21.5.1915; served during the Great War on the Western Front with the 42nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment); died, 12.8.1918, and is commemorated on the Vimy memorial, France. 436632 Sergeant Robert Swaine Salmon, born London, September 1883; emigrated to Wellington, Vancouver, and enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, 28.1.1915; served during the Great War on the Western Front with the 49th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment); died, 2.6.1916, and is commemorated on the Ypres (menin Gate) memorial, Belgium.

x300 Canadian memorial Cross, G.V.R. (2) (63755 Spr F. Roberts; 138946 Pte. D. Regan), very fine or better (2) £160-200 63755 Private Frederick Roberts, born Brighton, Sussex, July 1882; emigrated to montreal, Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, 2.11.1914; served during the Great War on the Western Front with the 14th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment); died, 9.4.1917, and is buried in Nine Elms military Cemetery, France. 138946 Private Daniel Joseph Regan, born Daniel Looney, in Toronto, Ontario, November 1886; enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, 21.8.1915; served during the Great War on the Western Front with the 3rd Battalion, Canadian Pioneers; died, 3.10.1916, and is buried in Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

301 Naval General Service 1915-62, G.V.R., one clasp, Persian Gulf 1909-1914 (191477. H.J. Seymour, P.O. H.M.S. Miner.), good very fine £80-100 x302 General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., one clasp (2), S. Persia (2466 Sowar Wais Muhd Khan. 15-Lancers); Kurdistan (1060 Pte. Hari Temkar 128 Pioneers.), very fine or better (2) £60-80 303 General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., one clasp, Iraq (89240 Pte. J. Fish. Manch. R.), edge nicks, very fine £60-80 x304 General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., one clasp, N.W. Persia (5329956 Pte. W.H. Buckner. R. Berks. R.), edge bruise, good very fine £60-80

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305 General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., one clasp, N.W. Persia (5329247 Pte. H.L. Townsend. R. Berks. R.), edge bruise, suspension slightly loose, good very fine £70-90 x306 General Service 1918-62 (3), G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine 1945-48 (19117170 Pte. R. Perrie. K.O.S.B.); E.II.R., one clasp (2), Cyprus (S/22722164 S.Sgt. R. Hughes. R.A.S.C.), unit partially officially corrected; Arabian Peninsula (23686105 Fus. J.T. Grimley, R.H.F.), second initial officially corrected on last, generally good very fine (3) £80-120 x307 General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp (2), Palestine 1945-48 (AS.17891 L/Cpl. T. Letjama. A.P.C.); malaya (1877650 Spr. W.C. Stirling. R.E.), very fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1937-39 (14627 Sep. Allah Ditta, 5-13 F.F. Rif.), nearly very fine (3) £80-100


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July 19, 01 - London x308 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, malaya (PK000193 Hg. Zainal Abidin B. Wahab Malaya HG.), nearly extremely fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp (2), North West Frontier 1936-37 (10583 Sepoy Surkharu Khan, 2-8 Punjab R.); North West Frontier 1937-39 (8621 Nk. Hazara Singh, 1-12 F.F.R.), number partially officially correct on latter, very fine General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, malay Peninsula (7003 PC. Othman Bin Hitam, A.D.P.), good very fine (4) £90-120 x309 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Near East (23250884 Pte. B. Gater. W. Yorks.), contact marks, nearly very fine General Service 1962-2007, one clasp (2), Borneo (21132996 Sgt. Chambersing Gurung. 1/2 GR.); South Arabia (23987196 Pte. D.L. Cooper, RAOC.), nearly very fine or better (3) £100-140 x310 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Brunei (1330854 Cpl. S.B. Wood. R.A.F.), minor contact marks, very fine £140-180 x311 General Service 1918-62, G.V.R., two clasps, Iraq, N.W. Persia (7041321 Pte. J. Slattery. R. Ir. Fus.), nearly extremely fine £100-140 x312 Air Crew Europe Star, very fine £120-150 313 War medal (25), generally very fine or better (25) £80-120 314 War medal (25), generally very fine or better (25) £80-120

316

x316 Southern Rhodesia War Service medal, unnamed as issued, good very fine £160-200 x317 General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24351979 Gdsm. J.N.R. Gray Coldm. Gds.), nearly very fine, mounted court style as worn £50-70 x318 General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Dhofar (P8076867 SAC D W Roberts RAF), extremely fine £120-150 x319 General Service 1962-2007, two clasps, Radfan, South Arabia (23672882 Sgt. D. White. RASC.), good very fine £100-140

x315 Canadian memorial Cross (2), G.V.R. (B.72598 Sgt. A.C. Wyatt); G.VI.R. (F.S. Air Bomber J.R. Jones R137406), very fine (2) £160-200 B/72598 Sergeant Alastair Wyatt, born 3.5.1908, a native of Schomberg, Ontario; served during the Second World War with the Canadian Provost Corps; died, 11.10.1941, and is buried in Brokwood military Cemetery, Surrey. R/137406 Flight Sergeant James Rundle Jones, born 5.1.1921, a native of harrow, Ontario; served during the Second World War with the Royal Canadian Air Force; lost without trace during an operation over Berlin whilst serving with 100 Squadron (Lancasters), 24.12.1943, and is commemorated with the rest of his crew on the Runnymede memorial.

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MISCELLANEOUS

320

321

320 Arctic 1818-55, unnamed as issued, good very fine £380-420

321 Jersey humane Society Silver medal, obverse featuring the escutcheon of Jersey above a naked mariner astride a ship’s spar in heavy seas waving for assistance, reverse inscribed ‘June 26th Presented to H. Morris for Courage and Humanity 1895’, with contemporary silver swivel bar suspension, good very fine, rare £400-500 The Jersey humane Society was founded in 1865, and awards of the medal continue to the present day. Approximately 2 Gold medals, 52 Silver medals, and 104 Bronze medals were awarded during the period 1865-1995.

322 A Selection of British Red Cross Society and Related Medals a) Voluntary medical Service medal (Elizabeth Harper.) b) British Red Cross Society medal for War Service (2) c) British Red Cross Society medals for Proficiency in Red Cross Nursing (3) (0908 Isabel D Marsden; 04003 F.M. Harris.; 17927 I.J. Squire), all with

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integral top riband bar, with ‘1916’ and ‘1917’; ‘1927’ and ‘1933’; and ‘1939’ date bars respectively, first in named card box of issue d) British Red Cross Society medals for Proficiency in Red Cross First Aid (2) (07588 E. Harper.; 23597 T.J. Squire), both with integral top riband bar, with ‘1933’ and ‘1934’; and ‘1938’ date bars respectively e) British Red Cross Society medal for Proficiency in Anti-Gas Training (6117 I.J. Squire), with integral top riband bar f) British Red Cross Society merit medal (5627 I.J. Squire) g) British Red Cross Society Service lapel Badge, reverse numbered ‘13081’ h) British Red Cross Society 3 Years’ Service Badge, reverse numbered ‘12730’, with top riband bar i) British Red Cross Society 10 Years’ Service lapel Badge (3683 I. Marsden.) j) British Red Cross Society County of Devon lapel Badges (2) (34699 J. Squire; 013291 Margaret A. Keary) k) British Red Cross Society Count of Devon 6 Years’ Service lapel Badge l) British Red Cross Society medal for Proficiency in Red Cross Work m) Royal College of Nursing Cape Badge, reverse numbered ‘8699’, silver, bronze, gilt, and enamel, generally good very fine (lot) £30-50


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323 323 Ceylon Planters Rifle Corps Challenge Cup An attractive silver presentation trophy, 250mm high including plinth, silver (hallmarks for Sheffield 1900), engraved ‘C.P.R.C. Laxapana Range Challenge Cup, Presented by Geo. Greig Esq., Won by Vol. h. Gordon Cuff 1905’, the wooden plinth bearing two silver shields, these engraved ‘Vol C.E.J. Davis, 200 Yds. 23, 500 [Yds.] 21, 800 [Yds.] 17, 1903’ and ‘Vol h. Gordon Cuff, 200 Yds. 29, 500 [Yds.] 20, 800 [Yds.] 32, 1904’ respectively £200-300

324 An Unusual Collection of Sand-Cast Medals A set of 16 uniface sand-castings, featuring the military medal; Waterloo 1815, reverse engraved ‘Luke Brown 2nd. Battn. 30th. Foot.’; India General Service 1854-95; Crimea 1854-56; South Africa 1877; Egypt 1882-89, dated; India General Service 18951902, V.R.; Queen’s Sudan 1896-98; Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902; India General Service 1908-35; Khedive’s Sudan 1910-22, 1st type; mercantile marine War medal; General Service 1918-62; Army Long Service & G.C.; Territorial Efficiency medal; Royal Naval Reserve Long Service & G.C., all complete with suspension claw or clip, the reverse design depicted in each case except for the Waterloo and Khedive’s Sudan medals, generally very fine (16) £80-100 Private Luke Brown served with the 30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot in Captain James Skerrow’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815.

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FOREIGN ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS 325 Austria, Empire, Order of Franz Joseph, Civil Division, Knight’s breast Badge, by Vinc Mayers Sohne, Vienna, 57mm including crown suspension x 31mm, gold and enamel, maker’s name on suspension ring, extremely fine Austria, Empire, Red Cross Decoration, Commander’s neck Badge, 57mm x 47mm, silver and enamel, with War Decoration wreath, silver marks to suspension ring, minor enamel damage to wreath, good very fine Austria, Empire, military Cross of merit, Third Class breast Badge, 31mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with wreath, very fine, with gilt crossed swords on riband (3) £300-400 x326 Austria, Empire, Teutonic Order, ‘marian’ Decoration, Knight’s breast Badge, 42mm x 35mm, silver and enamel, 1871 on reverse, traces of verdigris to reverse central medallion, good very fine £70-90 327 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 62mm including crown suspension x 41mm, silver and enamel, French motto, minor damage to points, nearly very fine Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold II, military Division, Officer’s breast Badge, 61mm including crown suspension x 41mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to motto, nearly very fine, with rosette on riband Belgium, Kingdom, military Decoration, gilt, nearly extremely fine Belgium, Kingdom, Escaper’s Cross, bronze, nearly extremely fine Belgium, Kingdom, maritime medal 1939-45, bronze, nearly extremely fine, with crossed anchors on riband France, Republic, Legion of honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 55mm including wreath suspension x 42mm, silver and enamel, minor enamel damage, very fine France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, bronze (2), reverse dated 1914-1917, with bronze palme, two gilt, and one silver star on riband; reverse dated 1939, nearly very fine France, Second Empire, Austro-Sardinian War medal 1859, silver, reverse additionally engraved ‘CP’, very fine France, Republic, Franco-Prussian War medal 1870-71, bronze, very fine France, Republic, Dardanelles medal 1915, bronze, nearly very fine France, Republic, morocco medal, silver, with maroc bar, good very fine France, Republic, Colonial medal, silvered, nearly extremely fine France, Republic, medal for Escaped Prisoners, bronze, extremely fine (14) £180-220 328 Belgium, Kingdom, medal for the 75th Anniversary of the Postal Service 1924, nearly very fine France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, bronze, reverse inscribed ‘Theatres d’Operations Exterieurs’, nearly very fine France, Republic, Combatant’s Cross, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, medal for Escaped Prisoners, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, medal for those Deported for Acts of Resistance, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, Franco-Prussian War medal 1870-71, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, Tonkin medal 1883-85, Naval type, silver, good very fine France, Republic, Dardanelles medal 1915, bronze, good very fine France, Republic, Verdun medal 1916, bronze, with silvered ‘Verdun’ bar, nearly very fine France, Republic, Levant medal 1922, bronze, very fine France, Republic, Colonial medal, silvered, good very fine France, Republic, Silver medal from the ministry of Work and Social Security, reverse impressed ‘J. Rimasson 1955’, silvered, good very fine (12) £120-150 The Belgian Postal Service medal was instituted by Royal Warrant 2.5.1924 to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of Belgium’s first postage-stamp (1.7.1849), and the 50th Anniversary of Belgium’s participation in the foundation of the World Postal Service (9.10.1874). It was awarded to those who had completed 25 years’ service in the Belgian Postal Service, as well as various Civil Servants and other members of the Administration.

329 Bulgaria, Kingdom, military Order of Bravery, Third Class breast Badge, Great War issue, 61mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silver-gilt and enamel, ‘1915’ on obverse central medallion, good very fine £80-120

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330 Bulgaria, Kingdom, Order of National merit, military Division, Grand Officer’s Star, with War Decoration wreath, 96mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, good very fine £300-350

330

x331 Bulgaria, Kingdom, Order of National merit, Civil Division, Grand Officer’s Star, by Schwerdtner, Vienna, 97mm, silver and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, good very fine £250-300

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334

332 Cambodia, French Colonial, Order of Cambodia, Officer’s breast Badge, 76mm including crown suspension x 47mm, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine Somaliland, French Colonial, Order of Nichan El-Anouar, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 47mm, silver, silvergilt, and enamel, minor enamel chip, good very fine Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the Crown of Thai, Officer’s breast Badge, 43mm including suspension x 28mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, with rosette on riband (3) £140-180

x333 France, Kingdom, house of Bourbon 1589-1792, Order of St. Louis, an early Louis XVI period Chevalier’s breast Badge, 40mm x 37mm, gold and enamel, no balls to points of cross, minor enamel damage to one point of cross and reverse motto, otherwise good very fine, rare £600-800 PROVENANCE:

Jeffrey R. Jacob Collection, 1985.

x334 France, First Empire 1804-14, Legion of honour, ‘3rd type’ 1806-08 Knight’s breast Badge, original central medallions replaced with Second Restoration 1815-30 medallions; 54mm including crown suspension x 38mm, silver, gold, and enamel, hallmarked on suspension ring, good very fine £450-550 First Empire Legion of honour badges were often converted by the recipient to conform with changes in the monarchy and consequent changes in the Legion of honour regulations. PROVENANCE:

Sydney B. Vernon Collection, 1984.

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336

335

x335 France, Kingdom, Second Restoration 1815-30, Legion of honour, Commander’s neck Badge, 81mm including crown suspension x 54mm, gold and enamel, hallmarked on crown, extremely fine, with neck riband £1,500-2,000 PROVENANCE:

Sydney B. Vernon Collection, 1986.

x336 France, Kingdom, Second Restoration 1815-30, Legion of honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 65mm including crown suspension x 45mm, silver, gold, and enamel, hallmarked on obverse tassel, minor enamel damage to one point of arm, otherwise good very fine £350-450 PROVENANCE:

Jeffrey R. Jacob Collection, 1984.

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x337 France, Kingdom, Second Restoration 1815-30, Legion of honour, a reduced-size Chevalier’s breast Badge, 42mm x 26mm, silver, gold, and enamel, hallmarked on suspension ring, good very fine £140-180

339

PROVENANCE:

Spink, February 1985.

x338 France, Third Republic, Legion of honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 58mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, silver and enamel, enamel damage in parts, nearly very fine Tunisia, Kingdom, Order of Nichan Iftikah, 2nd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 67mm including bow suspension x 49mm, silver and enamel, good fine (2) £80-100

339 Germany, Anhalt, house Order of Albert the Bear, Commanderís neck Badge, with swords, 52mm x 40mm, silver-gilt, nearly extremely fine £500-600

340 Germany, Bavaria, Order of the Bavarian Crown, Commander’s neck Badge, 80mm including crown suspension x 52mm, silver-gilt and enamel, silver marks on suspension ring, nearly extremely fine £1,200-1,500

340 www.spink.com

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341

342

344

341 Germany, Brunswick, Order of henry the Lion, military Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 59mm x 40mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to reverse central medallion, nearly extremely fine £200-300 342 Germany, Lippe, Order of the Cross of honour, 2nd type, Officer’s breast Badge, 45mm, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine £300-400 343 Germany, Lippe, Order of Leopold, 4th type, Third Class pin-back Badge, 70mm including crown x 48mm, silver and enamel, swallow at centre, enamel damage to one arm of cross, otherwise good very fine £350-450 344 Germany, Prussia, Order of the Red Eagle, Knight’s breast Badge, with swords, 38mm, silver, gold, and enamel, extremely fine £200-240 345 Germany, Prussia, Order of the Red Eagle, Knight’s breast Badge, 38mm, silver and enamel, nearly extremely fine Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, Second Class breast Badge, silver and iron centre, nearly extremely fine, together with a uniface engraved casting designed to represent an Iron Cross Germany, Prussia, Cross of honour for the Great War, Combatants type with swords, bronze, very fine Germany, Prussia, Commemorative medal for the Franco-Prussian War, gilt, suspension ring re-affixed, nearly very fine (5) £90-120

343 346 Germany, Prussia, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 43mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine £80-120 x347 Germany, Prussia, Johanniter Order, Commander’s neck Badge, 57mm, gilt and enamel, very fine, with neck riband £200-240

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349

348 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1914, Second Class breast Badge (2), silver and iron centre, nearly very fine Germany, Prussia, Cross of honour for the Great War, Combatants type with swords, bronze, very fine Germany, Prussia, Commemorative medal for the Franco-Prussian War, gilt, nearly extremely fine (4) £50-70

349 Germany, Wurttemberg, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 37mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine £300-400 350 Greece, Kingdom, Order of the Phoenix, 1st type, Knight’s breast Badge, 37mm, silver-gilt and enamel, ‘ETTA’ in arms of cross, nearly extremely fine, in Huguenin Frères, Le Locle, case of issue Romania, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, 1st type, military Division, Officer’s breast Badge, 40mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly very fine, with rosette on riband (2) £80-100

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351

351 Ireland, Free State, General Service medal 1917-21, no clasp, bronze, unnamed as issued, with integral top riband bar, good very fine Ireland, Republic, Survivors medal 1971, bronze gilt, unnamed as issued, with integral top riband bar, good very fine (2) £450-500 The Survivors medal was issued in 1971 to recipients of the General Service medal 1917-21 who were still alive to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the creation of the Irish Free State.

352 Italy, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Officer’s breast Badge, 37mm, gold and enamel, good very fine, with rosette on riband Italy, Kingdom, Order of St. maurice and St. Lazarus, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silver-gilt, gold, and enamel Malta, Order of malta, a Reduced-sized Knight of Justice’s breast Badge, 44mm including crown suspension x 25mm, gold and enamel, lacking trophy of arms suspension, good very fine Vatican, holy See, Order of St. Gregory, Knight’s breast Badge, 53mm including wreath suspension x 36mm, silver-gilt and enamel, enamel damage to reverse central medallion, very fine (4) £160-200


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355 353 Italy, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, by Cravanzola, Rome, 38mm, gold and enamel, maker’s name on base of cross, extremely fine £40-50 354 Italy, Kingdom, United Italy medal 1848-1922, bronze, nearly very fine Italy, Kingdom, Great War Campaign medal 1915-18 (2), no bar; four bars, 1915, 1916, 1917, and 1918, nearly very fine Italy, Kingdom, Libyan Campaign medal, silvered, very fine Italy, Kingdom, Volunteers medal, bronze (3), nearly very fine Italy, Kingdom, Spanish Civil War Cross 1936, bronze, good very fine Italy, Kingdom, Spanish Civil War Volunteers medal, bronze, good very fine Italy, Kingdom, Spanish Civil War Victory medal 1936, bronze, good very fine Italy, Republic, Albanian Campaign medal 1939, V.E.III.R. coinage bust on obverse, bronze, nearly very fine Italy, Kingdom, North Africa Campaign medal, bronze, good very fine Italy, Republic, War medal 1940-43, bronze, good very fine Italy, Republic, War medal 1943-45, bronze, good very fine Italy, Republic, Liberation of Rome Commemorative medal, bronze, good very fine (15) £70-90

x355 An Interesting ‘Fraternal’ Italian and Papal Group of Eight a) Fraternal Centenary medal 1952, gilt and enamel b) Italy, Republic, Order of merit, Officer’s breast Badge, 60mm including tower suspension x 44mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband c) Vatican, holy See, Order of the holy Sepulchre, military Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 80mm including trophy of arms suspension x 38mm, silver-gilt and enamel d) Pilgrims Jerusalem Cross Leo XVIII, silver-gilt e) Lateran Cross, 2nd type, silver gilt f) 1941-45 memorial Cross, gilt and enamel g) medal for the Inauguration of President Peron of Argentina 1973, silver-gilt h) Sovereign military Order of malta Commemorative medal, Rome 1975, silvered, generally nearly extremely fine, mounted court style as worn, with a set of seven semi-related miniature awards, both groups contained in fitted Spink, London, cases (8) £250-350

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria x358 Malta, Cross of merit of the Order of malta, Civil Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 68mm including shield suspension x 41mm, silver-gilt and enamel, 1916 reverse, good very fine, with neck riband Malta, Cross of merit of the Order of malta, Civil Division, Gold merit Cross, 41mm, silver-gilt, 1916 reverse, very fine Malta, Cross of merit of the Order of malta, Civil Division, Silver merit Cross, 41mm, silver, 1916 reverse, very fine (3) £100-130 x359 Montenegro, Principality, Order of Danilo, 1st type, Knight’s breast Badge, 43mm x 38mm, silver, gold, and enamel, red enamel flaking to central medallions, otherwise very fine Montenegro, Kingdom, Order of Danilo, 3rd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 59mm including crown suspension x 39mm, silver-gilt and enamel, traces of verdigris to reverse of crown, nearly very fine (2) £180-220 360 Montenegro, Kingdom, Order of Danilo, 3rd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, minor damage to lower arm of cross, good very fine £160-200

360 356 Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Sixth Class breast Badge, 67mm including paulownia flowers x 45mm, silver and enamel, with red cabochon in centre, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly, in rio-nuro lacquer box of issue, with lapel rosette Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Fourth Class breast Badge, 43mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, minor damage to sacred beads, therefore nearly very fine (2) £120-160

361 Netherlands, Kingdom, Order of Orange-Nassau, Grand Cross Star, by van Wielik, La Haye, 85mm, silver, gold, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse and silver marks on pin, extremely fine Netherlands, Kingdom, Bronze Cross 1940, nearly extremely fine Netherlands, Kingdom, Cross for merit, bronze, good very fine (3) £300-400

357 Japan, Empire, 1904-05 War medal, bronze, with Bar, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly, in box of issue Japan, Empire, 1914-15 War medal, blackened bronze, with Bar, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, 1931-34 Incident War medal, bronze, with Bar, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, China Incident War medal, bronze, with Bar (2), good very fine, one with full hook and eye assembly in case of issue Japan, manchukuo, Border Incident War medal, bronze, with Bar, very fine (6) £100-120 361 www.spink.com

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364

x362 Norway, Kingdom, medal for heroic Deeds, 29mm, silver, with later ring suspension, edge bruise, nearly very fine £50-70 363 Persia, Empire, Order of the Lion and the Sun, Fourth Class breast Badge, 75mm including suspension x 69mm, silver and enamel, minor green enamel damage, very fine £80-120 364 Portugal, Kingdom, Order of Christ, Commander’s Star, by Hemmerle, Munich, 73mm, silver, gold, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, retaining pin mounted horizontally, nearly extremely fine £240-280

365

x365 Romania, Kingdom, Order of the Star, 1st type, military Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 101mm including crown and crossed swords suspension x 62mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, with neck riband £250-300

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368

x366 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Anne, Second Class neck Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 43mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s mark and court stamp on reverse, 1865-96 assay office mark and gold mark on suspension ring, good very fine £800-1,200 x367 Russia, Imperial, medal for Zeal, Alexander III, small silver medal, good very fine Russia, Imperial, medal for the Pacification of hungary and Transylvania, silver, nearly very fine Russia, Imperial, Commemorative medal for the 100th Anniversary of the War of 1812, bronze, very fine, together with a gilt and enamel badge inscribed ‘Y.C.C. 1914’ (3) £200-300 368 Russia, Imperial, medal for Bravery, Fourth Class, Nicholas II, silver, reverse officially numbered ‘1029043’, and privately named (Capt. F.J. Lumley R.F.A.), nearly very fine £100-140 x369 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the October Revolution, breast Badge, with riband suspension, silver, gold, and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘4572’, nearly extremely fine £350-400 x370 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the Red Banner, 4th type breast Badge, with riband suspension, ‘CCCP’ obverse, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘434631’, nearly extremely fine £300-400 www.spink.com

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372

x371 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Suvorov, Third Class, 3rd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘2324’, lacking reverse screw plate, nearly extremely fine £3,000-4,000 x372 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Second Class, 1st type, 2nd variation breast Badge, with screwback suspension, gold and silver, reverse officially numbered ‘429’, good very fine, scarce £4,000-6,000 x373 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Third Class, 2nd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver, reverse officially numbered ‘2714’, lacking reverse screw plate, very fine and a very low serial number for this type £3,000-4,000

373

x374 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Alexander Nevsky, 2nd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver, gold, and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘4912’, lacking reverse screw plate, nearly extremely fine and a very low serial number for this type £1,400-1,800 x375 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the Patriotic War, First Class, 3rd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘841584’, lacking reverse screw plate, nearly extremely fine £30-50 x376 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the Red Banner of Labour, 5th type breast Badge, with riband suspension, silver, silvergilt, and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘210408’, good very fine £60-80

374

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x377 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the Red Star, 2nd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘2921676’, lacking reverse screw plate, nearly extremely fine £60-80 x378 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the Badge of honour, 4th type breast Badge, with riband suspension, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘582012’, good very fine £60-80 x379 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Labour Glory, Third Class, 2nd type breast Badge, with riband suspension, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘60019’, nearly extremely fine £60-80

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380 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 2nd type, Grand Officer’s Star, by Schied, Vienna, 84mm, silver, silvergilt, and enamel, Bishop with red robes, maker’s name and silver marks on pin, nearly extremely fine Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 2nd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 62mm including crown suspension x 39mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Bishop with red robes, damage to points of cross, very fine (2) £240-280 x381 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 1st type, Commander’s neck Badge, by Rothe, Vienna, 78mm including crown suspension x 50mm, silver-gilt and enamel, m.I.O. cipher on reverse, Bishop with red robes, silver marks and maker’s mark on obverse and on suspension ring, eagles in one arm of cross detached and replaced back to front, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with neck riband £200-250


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382

x382 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 3rd type, Commander’s neck Badge, 86mm including crown suspension x 52mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Bishop with green robes, minor damage to one tip of cross, very fine, with neck riband £200-240 x383 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 3rd type, Commander’s neck Badge, 86mm including crown suspension x 52mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Bishop with green robes, minor enamel damage to obverse central motto, nearly very fine £180-220

x384 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 3rd type, Officer’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 42mm, gilt and enamel, Bishop with green robes, nearly very fine Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 3rd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 42mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Bishop with green robes, damage to one tip of cross, minor enamel damage, very fine (2) £120-150 x385 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 3rd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 66mm including crown suspension x 41mm, silver and enamel, Bishop with green robes, minor enamel damage to motto and damage to tips of cross, very fine £50-70

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria x386 Serbia, Principality, Order of Takova, m.III.O., Commander’s neck Badge, 70mm including crown suspension x 42mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, good very fine £200-250

x387 Serbia, Principality, Order of Takova, m.III.O., Knight’s breast Badge, 41mm x 36mm, gilt, traces of verdigris, otherwise very fine Serbia, Kingdom, milosh Obilich medal for Bravery, First Class, silver-gilt, very fine Serbia, Kingdom, Commemorative medal for the Election of King Peter I 1903, gilt, nearly very fine (3) £100-140

x388 Serbia, Kingdom, Soldiers’ Order of the Star of Karageorge with Swords, Silver Cross, 61mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silvered-bronze and gilt, reverse dated 1914-18, good very fine £120-150 389 x389 Serbia, Kingdom, Queen Natalie’s Decoration, First Class, 58mm including crown suspension x 34mm, silver-gilt, Cyrillic initial ‘h’ in centre, gilding rubbed in places, very fine £250-300

390 Spain, Kingdom, Order of Charles III, Knight’s breast Badge, 61mm including wreath suspension x 40mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine £80-100

391 Spain, Kingdom, Order of Isabella the Catholic, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including wreath suspension x 41mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine £80-120

392 Spain, Kingdom, Order of military merit, Knight Grand Cross Star, 80mm, silver, silver-gilt, and red enamel, undated, nearly extremely fine Spain, Kingdom, Order of military merit, Knight’s (non-Combatant) breast Badge, 42mm including crown suspension x 36mm, gilt and white enamel, undated, very fine, with top gilt riband bar Spain, Kingdom, Order of military merit, an early Knight’s breast Badge, 44mm including crown suspension x 29mm, silver, undated, very fine Spain, Kingdom, Order of Naval merit, Knight’s (non-Combatant) breast Badge, 58mm including crown suspension x 34mm, gilt and white enamel, undated, nearly extremely fine, with top gilt riband bar Spain, Kingdom, Order of St. hermengild, Knight’s breast Badge, 55mm including crown suspension x 38mm, gilt and enamel, good very fine, with top gilt riband bar (5) £240-280

393 Sweden, Kingdom, Order of Vasa, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including crown suspension x 39mm, silver and enamel, damage to tips of cross, very fine £100-140

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394 Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the White Elephant, Grand Officer’s set of Insignia, neck Badge, 89mm including suspension x 50mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension; Star, 79mm, silver, silvergilt, and enamel, silver mark on reverse and maker’s name on retaining pin, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the White Elephant, Commander’s neck Badge, 89mm including suspension x 50mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension, extremely fine, with neck riband Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the White Elephant, Officer’s breast Badge, 60mm including suspension x 35mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension, nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the White Elephant, Knight’s breast Badge (2), 60mm including suspension x 35mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension, nearly extremely fine (6) £400-500

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

395

395 Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Grand Officer’s set of Insignia, neck Badge, 82mm including suspension x 54mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension; Star, 78mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, maker’s name on retaining pin, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Commander’s neck Badge, 82mm including suspension x 54mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension, extremely fine, with neck riband Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Officer’s breast Badge (2), 54mm including suspension x 32mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension, nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband Thailand, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 54mm including suspension x 32mm, silver, silvergilt and enamel, maker’s name on reverse of suspension, nearly extremely fine (6) £400-500

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397

x396 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of medjidieh, Third Class breast Badge, 73mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 56mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver marks on reverse, good very fine, with neck riband £200-240 397 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Fourth Class breast Badge, 79mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 64mm, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with rosette on riband £240-280 398 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Gallipoli Star 1915, silver and enamel, reverse stamped ‘B.B.& Co.’, good very fine £70-90 399 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Gallipoli Star 1915, silver and enamel, reverse stamped ‘B.B.& Co.’, good very fine £70-90

400 United States of America, Purple heart, unnamed, gilt and enamel, good very fine, with enamelled lapel riband bar, in box of issue United States of America, Army Good Conduct medal, unnamed, bronze, good very fine United States of America, China Relief Expedition medal 1900-01, Army type, bronze, nearly extremely fine United States of America, China Service medal 1937-39, bronze, nearly extremely fine United States of America, European, African, middle Eastern Campaign medal 1941-45, bronze, very fine United States of America, American Defense Service medal 1939-41, bronze, nearly very fine United States of America, Army of Occupation medal 1945, one bar, Germany, bronze, nearly extremely fine United States of America, World War II Victory medal 1941-45, bronze, nearly extremely fine United Nations medal for Korea (2), South Korean type; Thai type, good very fine, scarce (10) £80-100

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401

401 Venezuela, Republic, Order of Simon Bolivar, Grand Officer’s Star, 78mm x 70mm, silver and enamel, silver mark on retaining pin, good very fine £160-200 x402 Yugoslavia, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Commander’s neck Badge, 73mm including wreath suspension x 55mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to two arms of cross on reverse, therefore good very fine, with neck riband Yugoslavia, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 57mm including wreath suspension x 44mm, silver and enamel, reverse central medallion slightly loose, good very fine (2) £120-150 403 Allied Victory medal (11), Belgium; Czechoslovakia; France (2); Greece; Italy (2); Japan; Portugal; Romania; United States of America, one clasp, Offensive Sector, generally very fine (11) £80-120

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404 miniature Awards: A Large Quantity of miscellaneous World Orders, Decorations and medals Austria, Empire (5), including a Gold medal for Bravery; Austria, Republic (2), including a medal for the Defenders of the Tyrol 1914-18; Belgium, Kingdom (2), including a War medal 1914-18; France, Republic (3), including a Combatant’s Cross; Hungary, Regency (2), including a World War Commemorative medal 1914-18; India, Republic (51), including two Indian Independence medals; Iraq, Kingdom, Active Service medal, no clasp; Montenegro, Kingdom, Order of Danilo, Knight’s breast Badge, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel; Norway, Kingdom, King haakon VII Freedom Cross, gilt and enamel; Poland, Republic (4), including an Order of Poland Restored, Knight’s breast Badge, with swords, silver, bronze, and enamel; Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Gallipoli Star 1915, silver and enamel; United States of America (2), including a National Defense medal; United Nations (4), including a United Nations Emergency Force medal, generally nearly very fine or better (lot) £50-70


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MINIATURE AWARDS

405

405 miniature Awards: The K.C.M.G., C.I.E., O.B.E. Group of Nine Attributed to Lieutenant-Colonel Sir B.R. Reilly, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Aden The most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George, Knight Commander’s (K.C.m.G.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; The most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) Badge; The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) Badge, silver-gilt; 1914-15 Star; British War and Victory medals; Delhi Durbar 1911; Jubilee 1935; Coronation 1937, nearly very fine or better, mounted as originally worn (9) £150-200 K.C.m.G. London Gazette 4.6.1934 Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Rawdon Reilly, C.I.E., O.B.E., Chief Commissioner, Resident, and Commander-in-Chief, Aden. C.I.E. London Gazette 1.1.1926 major Bernard Rawdon Reilly, O.B.E., Indian Army, First Assistant Resident at Aden. O.B.E. London Gazette 18.11.1918 major Bernard Rawdon Reilly, Indian Political Department ‘For distinguished service in connection with military operations in Aden.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Rawdon Reilly, K.C.M.G., C.I.E., O.B.E., (1882-1966), Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Indian Army, 3.4.1903; promoted Lieutenant, 3.5.1904; joined the Bombay Political Department, 1908; Captain, 18.1.1911; major, 18.1.1917; Appointed Assistant Resident of Aden, 1925; Resident, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, march 1931; Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Aden, 1.4.1937.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

406

406 miniature Awards: An Unattributed C.B., C.m.G., C.B.E. Group of Twelve The most honourable Order of the Bath, military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; The most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.m.G.) Badge, gold and enamel; The most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, on 2nd type riband; Queen’s South Africa 18991902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902; 1914 Star, with Bar; British War and Victory medals, m.I.D. Oak Leaves; India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., 1st ‘Kaisar-i-hind’ type, one clasp, Burma 1930-32, clasp loose on riband; Jubilee 1935; Coronation 1937; France, 3rd Republic, Legion of honour, Chevalier’s Badge, silver and enamel; Italy, Kingdom, medal for merit in Public Service, V.E.III.R., silver, good very fine or better, mounted as worn (12) £150-200

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407

407 miniature Awards: The C.B., C.M.G. Group of Nine Attributed to Major-General S. MacDonald, Royal Army Medical Corps The most honourable Order of the Bath, military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; The most Distinguished Order of St. michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.m.G.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; India General Service 18951902, V.R., one clasp, Tirah 1897-8; Queen’s South Africa 18991902, two clasps, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902; 1914 Star; British War and Victory medals; Coronation 1911; France, Republic, Croix de Guerre 1914-1916, with bronze palm on riband, good very fine, mounted as originally worn (9) £200-250 C.B. London Gazette 3.6.1918 Col. Stuart macdonald, C.m.G., m.B., Army med. Serv. ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with military Operations in France and Flanders C.m.G. London Gazette 14.1.1916 Colonel Stuart macdonald, m.B., Army medical Service ‘For services rendered in connection with military Operations in the Field.’ France, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 2.6.1917 Colonel Stuart macdonald, C.m.G., Army medical Service ‘For distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign.’ Major-General Stuart MacDonald, C.B., C.M.G., (1861-1939), born Elgin; educated at Aberdeen University; appointed Surgeon, Army medical Service, February 1887; served on the North West Frontier between 189798 when he was variously attached to the Turak and Tirah Expeditionary Forces; advanced major, February 1899, and served in South Africa; served with the medical Corps on the Western Front from 9.8.1914, and was Commanding Officer of No.1 General hospital between October 1914 and April 1916; Appointed Deputy Director of medical Services, November 1916 (five times mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 17.2.1915, 1.1.1916, 4.1.1917, 24.12.1917, and 25.5.1918). Appointed hon. Physician to h.m. the King, 1919, and was placed on the retired list with the rank of major-General, 1920. PROVENANCE:

Spink, 11.5.2001 (when sold alongside the full-size group)

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

409

408 miniature Awards: An Unattributed Group of Eight Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal; King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps; Tibet 1903-04, one clasp, Gyantse; India General Service 1895-1902, E.VII.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1901-02; British War and Victory medals; Defence medal; Royal Observer Corps medal, G.VI.R., generally good very fine or better, the last only occurring as a miniature award, mounted in this order as worn (8) £60-80 The Royal Observer Corps medal was instituted in January 1950, but the first full-size medals were not awarded until 1953. A full-size obverse die with the effigy of King George VI was prepared, but no medals were struck from it, and all full-size medals bear the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II.

409 miniature Award: Indian mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (Armourer Sergt. Hutchins 5th. Dragoon Guards), engraved in sans-serif capitals, good very fine £50-70

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CORONATION, JUBILEE, LONG SERVICE AND EFFICIENCY DECORATIONS AND MEDALS 410 Imperial Service medal (6), G.V.R. (4), ‘Star’ type (John J. Harbour); ‘Circular’ type (3), 1st ‘coinage head’ type (John Arthur Hickey Shepherd.), in case of issue; 2nd ‘Coronation robes’ type (2) (William Henry Manton.; Effie Constance Allen.); G.VI.R. (Manvers Pierrepont de Medewe), partially officially corrected, in Royal Mint case of issue; E.II.R. (John French Harris), in Royal Mint case of issue, generally good very fine or better, with Central Chancery Bestowal Document, named to manvers Pierrepont de medewe, Esq., and dated 28.9.1951, in a glazed display frame (6) £80-120 Imperial Service medal London Gazette 23.5.1933 manton, William henry, Sorting Clerk and Telegraphist, Birmingham. Imperial Service medal London Gazette 15.3.1935 Allen, Effie Constance, Sorting Clerk and Telegraphist, Birmingham.

411 Jubilee (metropolitan Police) 1887, with 1897 Bar (P.C. Wm. Hart N. Divn.), traces of verdigris, nearly very fine Coronation (metropolitan Police) 1902, bronze (P.C. T. Briggs. A Div.), nearly very fine Coronation (metropolitan Police) 1911 (P.C.. G. Cunningham.), good very fine Coronation (County & Borough Police) 1911 (W.H. Smith. Chief Constable Burnley.), good very fine Special Constabulary Long Service, G.V.R. (Frederick A. Witherdon), nearly very fine Association of Professional Fire Brigade Officers Long Service medal (Chief Officer W.H. Smith. 1920), good very fine (6) £100-120

412 Coronation 1902, silver, unnamed as issued, nearly very fine, together with a bronze Coronation medallion featuring Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, in embossed red leather case of issue Coronation 1911 (2), unnamed as issued, very fine or better Jubilee 1935, unnamed as issued, good very fine Coronation 1937, unnamed as issued, good very fine Coronation 1953, unnamed as issued, good very fine Imperial Service medal, G.V.R. (2), 1st ‘Star’ type (Brigham Manicom); 2nd ‘coinage head’ type (Theodore Williams.), nearly extremely fine, the latter in case of issue (9) £140-180

413

413 Visit to Ireland 1903 (D.I. T.A. Howe. R.I.C.), with integral top riband bar, nearly very fine £80-100 414 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Garrison Sergt. Major P Molloy Genl. Staff), minor edge bruise, very fine £70-90 415 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (19580 Cy: S: Maj: C.H. Davis. R.A.), about extremely fine £80-100 416 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (5352. Gunner J. Miles. Cst. Bde. R.A.), edge bruise, nearly very fine £60-80 417 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (8th. Bde. 637. Pte. T. Fitzgerald, 51st. Foot), edge bruise, very fine £70-90 637 Private Thomas Fitzgerald, born Tralee, Kerry; enlisted 40th Foot, 1860; served in the 15th and 105th Foot, prior to transferring to the 51st Foot, 1876; discharged 1880, after 19 years and 291 days service.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

425

426

418 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (1428. Pte. W. Parker, 3rd. Rifle Bde.), good very fine £70-90

423 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C. (3), V.R. (2) (Pte. A. Cluett. 1st. V.B. Dorset. Regt.); unnamed as issued; E.VII.R. (514 Pte. T. Watkins. 3/V.B. Welsh Regt.), edge bruise to first, generally very fine or better (3) £120-160

419 Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (2) (23337 F. of W. Q.M.S. S.T. Jefferies. R.E.; 10471 S.Q.M.Sjt: C. Rowley. A.S.C.), good very fine or better (2) £60-80 420 Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Jn Harvey Chf Qr Mr H.M.S. Dasher), one letter of surname officially corrected, good very fine £80-120 Chief Quarter Master John Harvey, born Gorey, Jersey, February 1851; volunteered for service in the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in h.m.S. Dasher, August 1865; transferred to h.m.S. Liverpool, April 1869; promoted Ordinary Seaman, July 1869; transferred to h.m.S. Dido, December 1870; promoted Able Seaman, January 1873; transferred to h.m.S. Nymphe, November 1875; promoted Leading Seaman, July 1877; Petty Officer, October 1877.

421 Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Noah Collins, Act. Ch. Stoker, H.M.S. Inflexible.), good very fine £70-90 422 Colonial Police Forces Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R. (Hd. Cont. Nash Kenya Police.), nearly extremely fine £50-70

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424 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (Pte. D.A. Wylie, Cal. Sco., A.F.I.), good very fine, scarce to unit £80-120 425 militia Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (2190 Gnr: D. Finnegan. Cork R.G.A. Mil.), nearly very fine £350-400 52190 Gunner D. Finnegan, awarded militia L.S. & G.C. by Army Order February 1905. 8 medals awarded to the Cork Royal Garrison Artillery militia.

426 militia Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (44 Sjt. J. Hill. R.E. Mil.), very fine, unique to unit £300-400 44 Sergeant J. Hill, served with the medway Royal Engineers Submarine miners; awarded militia L.S. & G.C., July 1905. 8 medals awarded to the Royal Engineers Submarine miners (4 for Plymouth R.E. S.m., 2 for milford haven R.E. S.m., 1 for harwich R.E. S.m., and 1 for medway R.E. S.m.)


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427

428

427 militia Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (58 Pte. T.O. Lyte. 3/R.M. of the I. of Jersey.), nearly extremely fine £350-400

430 Territorial Force Efficiency medal, E.VII.R. (173 Pte. J. Piggott. H.A.C. Inf:), edge bruise, very fine £100-140

58 Private T.O. Lyte, awarded militia L.S. & G.C. by Army Order February 1907. 28 medals awarded to the 3rd or South Battalion, Royal Jersey Light Infantry.

428 Imperial Yeomanry Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (168 Sjt: C.S. James. Sussex I.Y.), nearly extremely fine, with top silver bar engraved ‘1880-1905’ £300-350 168 Sergeant C.S. James, awarded Imperial Yeomanry L.S. & G.C. by Army Order 27, February 1905. 14 medals awarded to the Sussex Imperial Yeomanry.

x429 Efficiency Decoration, G.V.R., with top ‘Canada’ riband bar, silver and silver-gilt, reverse impressed ‘Lt. Col. M.J. Wilson’, very fine £80-100

173 Private J. Piggott, awarded Territorial Force Efficiency medal by Army Order 7, January 1909. Approximately 47 medals awarded to the honourable Artillery Company Infantry, 1909-14.

431 Territorial Force Efficiency medal, G.V.R. (590026 Sjt: C. Walker. 18/Lond: R.), good very fine Efficiency medal, G.V.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (4604903 Pte. N. Taylor. 7-D.W.R.), very fine Royal Naval Reserve Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (D.1297 W. Pike, Sean., R.N.R.), good very fine Royal Fleet Reserve Long Service & G.C. (2), G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (SS.111207 PO.B.7208 H.J. Taylor. Sto.1 R.F.R.); G.VI.R. (Ch.X.274 (Ch.D.39) R.J. Draper. Mne. R.F.R.), first officially renamed, edge bruising, nearly very fine (5) £70-90

Lieutenant-Colonel Malcolm James Wilson, E.D., born Niagara Falls, Ontario, July 1890; enlisted into the Royal Canadian Army medical Corps, 23.2.1915, and served during the Great War in Canada and Britain with No.2 Casualty Clearing Station; Commissioned Lieutenant, 12.6.1916; promoted Captain, 1.2.1921; LieutenantColonel, 9.1.1933; awarded the Efficiency Decoration whilst serving with 16 Field Ambulance, 1935.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Auction Notes

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You can also bid real time on Spinklive. Just visit www.spink.com to register

Written Bids Form

19 July 2012 • London

This form should be sent or faxed to be received by Spink Commission Bids Office in advance of the sale. References should be supplied in good time to be taken up before the sale. Bids received later than one hour before the start of the sale may not be processed.

69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET Tel: (020) 7563 4020/4005 Fax: (020) 7563 4037

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

©

Sale Title

Date

Code Name

Sale No.

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Thursday 19 July 2012 at 10.00 a.m.

GODLEY

12003

I request Spink, without legal obligations of any kind on its part, to bid on the following Lots up to the price given below. I understand that if my bid is successful the Purchase Price payable will be the sum of the final bid and a premium as a percentage of the final bid (together with any VAT chargeable). The Rate of Premium is 20% of the final hammer price of each lot; VAT is chargeable on the purchase price of daggered (†) and (Ω) lots at the standard rate (currently 20%), and on lots marked (x) at the reduced rate (currently 5% on the hammer and 20% on the premium). VAT on margin Scheme lots is payable at 20% on the premium only. All bids shall be treated as offers made on the Terms and Conditions of Buyers printed in the catalogue. I also understand that Spink provides the service of executing bids on behalf of clients for the convenience of clients and that Spink will not be held responsible for failing to execute bids. If identical commission bids are received for the same Lot, the commission bid received first by Spink will take precedence. Please note that you will not be notified if there are higher written bids received. If you require such notification then this is available on bids made via Spink’s online service.

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN STERLING Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

Client Number (if known): ................................................Name: ..................................................................................... (Invoice name, please print) Address: ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ..................................................................................................................................................Postcode: ................................................... Tel. (home): .................................................................................(Office): ............................................................................................... Fax: ................................................................................................E-mail: ................................................................................................. Signature: ......................................................................................VAT number: ....................................................................................... Please indicate the type of card:

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Payment made by Mastercard or Visa are subject to a 2% surcharge and American Express 4%. Card No: Signature

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Continued...


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Sale No. 100

Date: Thursday 19 July 01

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN STERLING Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

References required for clients not yet known to Spink Bank Name: ..................................................................................................................... Bank Address: ................................................................................................................................. ......................................................................................................................................................... ...................................................................................... Postcode: ................................................ Account Number: ........................................................................................................................... Date: ..............................................................................................................................................


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AUCTION RESULTS Sale:

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Sale No:

12002

Date:

Thursday 19 April 2012

Venue:

London

Spink & Son Ltd 69 Southampton Row Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET Telephone: (020) 7563 4000

The following prices in sterling do not include the buyer’s premium and are rounded to the nearest pound. Lots which did not sell are not shown. Spink & Son are not responsible for typographical errors or omissions. Lot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Price £9,000 £7,000 £4,200 £2,200 £1,900 £3,200 £1,300 £4,800 £11,000 £580 £8,500 £2,100 £1,800 £1,600 £1,600 £1,800 £1,500 £4,200 £1,600 £2,300 £1,500 £1,600 £4,000 £1,600 £1,500 £950 £750 £2,800 £1,400 £1,600 £1,400 £750 £480 £500 £950 £2,800 £300 £550 £300

Lot 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78

Price £230 £3,000 £400 £400 £500 £240 £300 £210 £1,700 £250 £400 £240 £240 £220 £140 £160 £1,000 £350 £240 £120 £210 £280 £200 £400 £160 £140 £320 £140 £240 £180 £1,200 £180 £290 £320 £480 £800 £250 £290 £380

Lot 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117

Price £350 £170 £260 £1,700 £600 £210 £250 £400 £180 £140 £350 £180 £1,300 £380 £350 £450 £210 £100 £260 £130 £130 £280 £190 £1,600 £480 £240 £350 £390 £290 £240 £170 £100 £300 £120 £120 £120 £260 £130 £60

Lot 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156

Price £60 £80 £50 £70 £60 £60 £60 £80 £70 £70 £80 £60 £70 £60 £70 £130 £60 £60 £90 £90 £60 £60 £60 £80 £60 £70 £110 £60 £160 £70 £90 £220 £100 £100 £70 £60 £170 £150 £230

Lot 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196

Price £300 £150 £350 £110 £170 £120 £150 £500 £650 £2,800 £600 £3,000 £70 £80 £500 £120 £280 £160 £80 £90 £140 £80 £230 £650 £80 £60 £650 £70 £70 £80 £130 £120 £500 £250 £900 £260 £380 £120 £110

Lot 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235

Price £100 £100 £70 £170 £140 £140 £300 £80 £110 £80 £140 £160 £150 £90 £90 £160 £70 £580 £180 £320 £250 £80 £150 £70 £130 £110 £80 £200 £160 £100 £160 £130 £80 £80 £80 £300 £650 £240 £480

Lot 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278

Price £350 £350 £110 £210 £100 £120 £130 £150 £580 £130 £130 £80 £170 £580 £90 £170 £140 £260 £140 £350 £80 £90 £140 £120 £140 £100 £180 £160 £1,300 £150 £120 £400 £100 £70 £260 £180 £420 £180 £110


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Lot 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340

Price £120 £100 £60 £80 £320 £110 £950 £290 £180 £110 £70 £220 £120 £380 £180 £170 £160 £170 £120 £290 £230 £290 £150 £380 £260 £240 £270 £110 £350 £150 £380 £130 £110 £140 £250 £600 £1,300 £850 £290 £400 £190 £270 £180 £1,200 £300 £520 £130 £100 £1,700 £320 £300 £170 £700 £450 £400 £260 £130 £100 £10,500 £2,200 £260

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Lot 341 342 343 344 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403

06:24

Price £100 £130 £60 £150 £520 £290 £1,000 £60 £380 £260 £50 £100 £150 £210 £130 £380 £260 £3,500 £1,500 £2,600 £160 £70 £420 £170 £420 £900 £2,000 £5,000 £80 £1,000 £290 £950 £160 £280 £110 £900 £260 £320 £150 £190 £270 £270 £130 £100 £180 £260 £170 £180 £100 £90 £380 £300 £180 £650 £270 £550 £580 £480 £240 £900 £200

Page 168

Lot 404 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467

Price £1,900 £4,500 £60 £220 £270 £220 £130 £1,300 £1,600 £350 £500 £400 £750 £230 £350 £260 £280 £240 £600 £480 £160 £1,100 £120 £300 £170 £190 £130 £650 £2,600 £185,000 £170,000 £7,000 £5,200 £2,000 £4,000 £1,800 £50,000 £4,500 £11,000 £125,000 £3,200 £2,900 £900 £2,200 £220 £250 £150 £120 £550 £3,800 £100 £1,300 £580 £160 £190 £420 £450 £2,100 £2,500 £1,600 £350

Lot 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530

Price £850 £2,200 £200 £550 £480 £400 £320 £350 £270 £300 £170 £170 £750 £110 £230 £320 £350 £320 £190 £110 £200 £900 £210 £240 £550 £1,600 £1,300 £8,500 £480 £2,700 £2,200 £250 £14,500 £2,300 £350 £800 £2,000 £450 £140 £450 £420 £500 £950 £450 £300 £200 £150 £300 £420 £290 £160 £180 £250 £120 £110 £130 £350 £120 £200 £160 £220

Lot 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 589 590 591 592

Price £140 £130 £170 £180 £220 £160 £2,000 £350 £2,500 £700 £450 £150 £90 £180 £2,000 £280 £350 £250 £350 £170 £180 £350 £400 £380 £350 £180 £5,500 £350 £140 £120 £320 £260 £240 £250 £160 £280 £280 £550 £280 £100 £110 £130 £190 £210 £160 £120 £70 £400 £160 £2,200 £160 £190 £120 £110 £160 £150 £150 £150 £210 £120 £150

Lot 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653

Price £170 £140 £110 £90 £120 £110 £120 £160 £140 £250 £150 £150 £150 £350 £450 £240 £160 £120 £130 £90 £150 £580 £240 £180 £110 £120 £80 £90 £300 £90 £90 £70 £90 £200 £280 £380 £90 £210 £190 £220 £130 £130 £150 £210 £130 £110 £110 £140 £190 £110 £100 £120 £90 £130 £100 £130 £110 £60 £80 £130 £140

Lot 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708

Price £220 £90 £90 £160 £80 £110 £270 £600 £580 £650 £650 £600 £400 £650 £380 £380 £140 £400 £230 £170 £150 £80 £100 £110 £110 £110 £90 £100 £90 £320 £400 £170 £160 £110 £120 £280 £190 £290 £90 £380 £90 £280 £100 £200 £350 £240 £100 £120 £290 £350 £210 £230 £320 £210 £90


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Spink “on the go” technology

Spink are pleased to provide our clients with What you can expect from the Spink app: exciting mobile technology which allows you to  Download auction catalogues straight to your take Spink with you no matter where on the globe device, which are then viewable while online or you may be. The Spink iPhone/iPad application, offline. which is available free of charge from the iTunes  Search all available lots in sales. store, is simple to download! Once installed the programme will download the latest auction  View lots individually and zoom in on important item details. catalogue instantly upon opening the application!  Share images, lots or entire auction catalogues We do hope you find these tools useful! Should you with friends via email, Twitter or Facebook. have any further questions or suggestions for how  Email the Spink Concierge directly from your we can improve our technology in an effort to assist device to leave bids or receive a quick reply to any our clients, please contact Berdia Qamarauli, head query you may have. of IT at Spink on bqamarauli@spink.com.

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Since Spink Live was launched on the 11th of July 2006 , thousands of our clients have taken advantage of this revolutionary bidding platform. The system enables you to bid, watch and listen to our auctions online in real time. Another feature to Spink Live is the option to leave proxy bids and let the system bid on behalf for you. To register for Spink Live today simply click on the register and download software link from the home page at www.spink.com and follow a few simple steps to register and install our software. Please note the new version of Spink Live that is compatible with mac’s will be available soon. Step Step Step Step Step

1: 2: 3: 4: 5:

Choose your saleroom location Download and install our software Register for Spink Live Select your saleroom location: New York or London/Singapore/hong Kong Activate user account using your confirmation email from Spink

Once the program is launched you will notice the “View Only” option from the console. This feature allows you to watch the auction live without bidding. For you to be able to participate in the auction, you will be required to login using a login ID and password obtained through the registration process. Every auction catalogue is presented on Spink Live for viewing and is also conveniently located on our home page. In addition to viewing an auction catalogue, clients can leave proxy bids by clicking on the lot image from a catalogue sale. A new window will open and a submit proxy bid option will be available at the top of the page. Then simply click on this button and login with your user ID and password to submit your bids. If you have any additional questions about using this tried and trusted bidding service please contact us today at concierge@spink.com.


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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Auction Notes

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR BUYERS These conditions set out the terms on which we (Spink and Son Limited of 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET (company no. 04369748)) contract with you (Buyer) either as agent on behalf of the Seller or as principal if we are the Seller. You should read these conditions carefully. 1

DEFINITIONS The following definitions in this condition apply in these conditions.

2

3

Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme

means a VAT margin scheme as defined by hm Revenue & Customs;

Buyer’s Premium

means the charge payable by you as a percentage of the hammer Price, at the rates set out in clause 5.1 below;

Certificate of Authenticity

means a certificate issued by an Expert Committee confirming the authenticity of a Lot;

Expert Committee

means a committee of experts to whom a Lot may be sent for an extension in accordance with clause 3.4.3;

Forgery

means a Lot constituting an imitation originally conceived and executed as a whole with a fraudulent intention to deceive as to authorship, origin, age, period, culture or source where the correct description as to such matters is not reflected by the description in the catalogue and which at the date of the auction had a value materially less than it would have had if it had been in accordance with the description in the catalogue. Accordingly, no Lot shall be capable of being a Forgery by reason of any damage and/or restoration work of any kind (including re-enamelling);

Hammer Price

means the amount of the highest bid accepted by the auctioneer in relation to a Lot;

Lot

means any item deposited with us for sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any Lot number in any catalogue;

Reserve

the amount below which we agree with the Seller that the Lot cannot be sold;

Seller

means the owner of the Lot being sold by us;

Spink Group

Spink and Son Limited, our subsidiaries and associated companies.

VAT

value added tax chargeable under VAT and any similar replacement or additional tax; and

VAT Symbols

means the symbols detailing the VAT status of the Lot details of which are set out at the back of the catalogue. the first session of the sale. If accepted by us, such request shall have the same effect as notice of an intention to question the genuineness or description of the Lot for the purposes of clause 5.13 (Refund in the case of Forgery) of these Terms and Conditions and the provisions of clause 5.13 (Refund in the case of Forgery) shall apply accordingly.

SPINK’S ROLE AS AGENT 2.1

All sales undertaken by us either at auction or privately are undertaken either as agent on behalf of the Seller or from time to time, as principal if we are the owner of the Lot. Please note that even if we are acting as agent on behalf of the Seller rather than as principal, we may have a financial interest in the Lot.

2.2

The contract for the sale of the Lot will be between you and the Seller.

3.4.2 Notice of a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity must give the reason why such opinion is required and specify the identity of your proposed expert which will be subject to agreement by us. We reserve the right, at our discretion, to refuse a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity including (without limitation) where the proposed expert is not known to us.

BEFORE THE SALE 3.1

3.2

Examination of goods You are strongly advised to examine personally any goods in which you are interested, before the auction takes place. Condition reports are usually available on request. We provide no guarantee to you other than in relation to Forgeries, as set out in clause 5.13 of these Terms and Conditions.

3.4.3 If we accept a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity we will submit the Lot to the Expert Committee. You acknowledge and accept that the length of time taken by an Expert Committee to reach an opinion will vary depending on the circumstances and in any event is beyond our control.

Catalogue descriptions 3.2.1 Statements by us in the catalogue or condition report, or made orally or in writing elsewhere, regarding the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of any Lot are merely statements of opinion, and are not to be relied on as statements of definitive fact. Catalogue illustrations are for guidance only, and should not be relied on either to determine the tone or colour of any item or to reveal imperfections. Estimates of the selling price should not be relied on as a statement that this price is either the price at which the Lot will sell or its value for any other purpose. 3.2.2 many items are of an age or nature which precludes their being in perfect condition and some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. We provide this information for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. 3.2.3 Other than as set out in clause 5.13, and in the absence of fraud, neither the Seller nor we, nor any of our employees or agents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot nor for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot.

3.3

3.4

Your Responsibility You are responsible for satisfying yourself as to the condition of the goods and the matters referred to in the catalogue description. Extensions – Stamps only 3.4.1 If you wish to obtain an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity on any Lot (other than a mixed Lot or Lot containing undescribed stamps) you must notify us in writing not less than forty-eight hours before the time fixed for the commencement of

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3.4.4 We will not normally accept a request for an extension on account of condition. Any Lot described in the catalogue as having faults or defects may not be returned even if an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity cites other faults or defects not included in the catalogue description, other than in the case of a Forgery. 3.4.5 Should Spink accept a request for an extension under the foregoing provisions of this paragraph, the fact may be stated by the Auctioneer from the rostrum prior to the sale of the Lot. 3.4.6 It should be noted that any stamp accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity is sold on the basis of that Certificate only and not on the basis of any other description or warranty as to authenticity. No request for an extension will be accepted on such a stamp and the return of such a stamp will not be accepted. 4

AT THE SALE 4.1

Refusal of admission Our sales usually take place on our own premises or premises over which we have control for the sale, and we have the right, exercisable at our complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises or attendance at an auction.

4.2

Registration before bidding You must complete and sign a registration form and provide identification before making a bid at auction. Please be aware that we usually require buyers to undergo a credit check. Some lots may be designated, prior to the auction, as “Premium Lots”, which means a deposit may be required before placing a bid on the item for sale. Information will be posted on our website in such an event.


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4.3

Bidding as Principal When making a bid (whether such bids are made in person or by way of telephone bids operated by Spink, commission or online or email bids), you will be deemed to be acting as principal and will be accepting personal liability, unless it has been agreed in writing, at the time of registration, that you are acting as agent on behalf of a third party buyer acceptable to us.

4.4

Commission Bids If you give us instructions to bid on your behalf, by using the form provided in our catalogues or via our website, we shall use reasonable endeavours to do so, provided these instructions are received not later than 24 hours before the auction. If we receive commission bids on a particular Lot for identical amounts, and at auction these bids are the highest bids for the Lot, it will be sold to the person whose bid was received first. Commission bids are undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the sale, and the conduct of the auction may be such that we are unable to bid as requested. Since this is undertaken as a free service to prospective buyers on the terms stated, we cannot accept liability for failure to make a commission bid. You should therefore always attend personally if you wish to be certain of bidding.

4.5

On-line Bidding We offer internet services as a convenience to our clients. We will not be responsible for errors or failures to execute bids placed on the internet, including, without limitation, errors or failures caused by (i) a loss of internet connection by either party for whatever reason; (ii) a breakdown or problems with the online bidding software and/or (iii) a breakdown or problems with your internet connection, computer or system. Execution of on-line internet bids is a free service undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the auction and we do not accept liability for failing to execute an online internet bid or for errors or omissions in connection with this activity.

4.6

Telephone Bids If you make arrangements with us not less than 24 hours before the sale, we shall use reasonable endeavours to contact you to enable you to participate in bidding by telephone, but in no circumstances will we be liable to either the Seller or you as a result of failure to do so.

4.7

Currency Converter At some auctions, a currency converter will be operated, based on the one month forward rates of exchange quoted to us by Barclays Bank Plc or any other appropriate rate determined by us, at opening on the date of the auction. Bidding will take place in a currency determined by us, which is usually sterling for auctions held in London. The currency converter is not always reliable, and errors may occur beyond our control either in the accuracy of the Lot number displayed on the converter, or the foreign currency equivalent of sterling bids. We shall not be liable to you for any loss suffered as a result of you following the currency converter.

4.8

Video images At some auctions there will be a video screen. mistakes may occur in its operation, and we cannot be liable to you regarding either the correspondence of the image to the Lot being sold or the quality of the image as a reproduction of the original.

4.9

Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in the following order although the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments during the course of the auction. The normal bidding increments are: Up to £100 by £5 £100 to £300 by £10 £300 to £600 £320-£350-£380-£400 etc. £600 to £1,000 by £50 £1,000 to £3,000 by £100 £3,000 to £6,000 £3,200-£3,500-£3,800-£4,000 etc. £6,000 to £20,000 by £500 £20,000 and up Auctioneer’s discretion

4.10 Bidding by Spink 4.10.1 We reserve the right to bid on Lots on the Seller’s behalf up to the amount of the Reserve (if any), which will never be above the low estimate printed in the auction catalogue. 4.10.2 The Spink Group reserves the right to bid on and purchase Lots as principal. 4.11 The Auctioneer’s Discretion The auctioneer has the right at his absolute discretion to refuse any bid to advance the bidding in such manner as he may decide to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of error or dispute, to put an item up for bidding again. Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

5

4.12 Successful Bid Subject to the auctioneer’s discretion, the striking of his hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid, provided always that such bid is higher than the Reserve (where applicable), and the conclusion of a contract for sale between you and the Seller. 4.13 After Sale Arrangements If you enter into any private sale agreements for any Lot with the Seller within 60 days of the auction, we, as exclusive agents of the Seller reserve the right to charge you the applicable Buyer’s Premium in accordance with these Terms and Conditions, and the Seller a commission in accordance with the terms of the Seller’s agreement. 4.14 Return of Lot Once your bid has been accepted for a Lot then you are liable to pay for that Lot in accordance with these Terms and Conditions. If there are any problems with a Lot then you must notify us within 7 days of receipt of the Lot, specifying the nature of the problem. We may then request that the Lot is returned to us for inspection. Save as set out in clause 5.13, the cancellation of the sale of any Lot and the refund of the corresponding purchase price is entirely at our sole discretion. We will not normally exercise that discretion if the Lot is not received by us in the same condition that it was in at the auction date. AFTER THE AUCTION 5.1 Buyer’s Premium In addition to the hammer Price, you must pay us the Buyer’s Premium at a rate of 20% of the final hammer Price of each Lot. 5.2 Value Added Tax Other than in respect of Zero-rated Lots (o) (see VAT Symbols for details), VAT is payable on the Buyer’s Premium and on the hammer Price, if the Lot has been marked with a sign to that effect in the catalogue (see VAT Symbols for details). 5.3 VAT Refunds General 5.3.1 As we remain liable to account for VAT on all Lots unless they have been exported outside the EU within 3 months of the date of sale, you will generally be asked to deposit all amounts of VAT invoiced. however, if a Spink nominated shipper is instructed, then any refundable VAT will not be collected. In all other cases credits will be made when proof of export is provided. If you export the Lot yourself you must obtain shipping documents from the Shipping Department for which a charge of £50 will be made. 5.3.2 If you export the Lot you must return the valid proof of export certificate to us within 3 months of the date of sale. If you fail to return the proof of export certificate to us within such period and you have not already accounted to us for the VAT, you will be liable to us for the full amount of the VAT due on such Lot and we shall be entitled to invoice you for this sum. 5.3.3 To apply for a refund of any VAT paid, the proof of export certificate must be sent to our Shipping Department clearly marked ‘VAT Refund’ within 3 months of the date of sale. No payment will be made where the total amount of VAT refundable is less than £50 and Spink will charge £50 for each refund processed. VAT Refunds - Buyers from within the EU 5.3.4 VAT refunds are available on the hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium of Daggered (†) and Investment Gold (g) Lots. You must certify that you are registered for VAT in another EU country and that the Lot is to be removed from the United Kingdom within 3 months of the date of sale. 5.3.5 Where an EU buyer purchases a Lot on which import VAT has been charged, no refund of VAT is available from us. It may be possible to apply directly for a refund on form VAT 65 to hm Revenue & Customs Overeseas Repayment Section, Londonderry. VAT Refunds – Buyers from outside the EU 5.3.6 Where a Lot is included within the Auctioneers’ margin Scheme and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT element included within the Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. 5.3.7 Where the Lot is marked as a Daggered (†) or Investment Gold (g) Lot the VAT charged on the hammer Price may be refunded where evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer. 5.3.8 Where the Lot is marked as an Omega (Ω) Lot or an Import VAT (x) Lot and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT charged on both the hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. Where required, we can advise you on how to export such Lots as a specific form of export evidence is required. Where we advise you on the export of the Lots, please be aware that the ultimate responsibility in respect of obtaining a valid proof of export certificate will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to obtain such certificate.


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Payment 5.4.1 You must provide us with your full name and permanent address and, if so requested, details of the bank from which any payments to us will be made. You must pay the full amount due (comprising the hammer Price, the Buyer’s Premium and any applicable VAT) within seven days after the date of the sale. This applies even if you wish to export the Lot and an export licence is (or may be) required. 5.4.2 You will not acquire title to the Lot until all amounts due have been paid in full. This includes instances where special arrangements were made for release of Lot prior to full settlement. 5.4.3 Payment should be made in sterling by one of the following methods: II(i) Direct bank transfer to our account details of which are set out on the invoice. All bank charges shall be met by you. Please ensure that your client number is noted on the transfer. i(ii) By cheque or bank draft made payable to Spink and Son Ltd and sent to Spink at 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET. Please note that the processing charges for payments made by cheques or bank drafts drawn on a non-U.K bank shall be met by you. Please ensure that the remittance slip printed at the bottom of the invoice is enclosed with your payment. (iii) By Visa or mastercard. A charge of 2% will be applied. Payments exceeding £5,000 can normally only be made by the card holder in person whilst on our premises. 5.4.4 Payments should be made by the registered buyer and not by third parties, unless it has been agreed at the time of registration that you are acting as an agent on behalf of a third party. 5.5 Invoices Invoices may consist of one or more pages and will show: Zero rated Lots (o); no symbol Lots sold under the Auctioneers’ margin Scheme; Lots marked (g) special scheme Investment Gold; Daggered Lots (†), imported Lots marked (x) and (Ω), (e) Lots with Zero rated hammer for EU VAT registered buyers. 5.6 Collection of Purchases 5.6.1 Unless we specifically agree to the contrary, we shall retain items sold until all amounts due to us, or to the Spink Group, have been paid in full. 5.6.2 Unless we notify you to the contrary, items retained by us will be covered in accordance with our policy which is available for inspection at our offices from the date of sale for a period of seven days or until the time of collection, whichever is sooner. After seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is the earlier, the Lot will be entirely at your risk. 5.6.3 Our policy will not cover and we are unable to accept responsibility for damage caused by woodworm, changes in atmospheric conditions or acts of terrorism. 5.7 Notification We are not able to notify successful bidders by telephone. While Invoices are sent out by mail after the auction we do not accept responsibility for notifying you of the result of your bid. You are requested to contact us by telephone or in person as soon as possible after the auction to obtain details of the outcome of your bids to avoid incurring charges for late payment. 5.8 Packing and handling 5.8.1 We shall use all reasonable endeavours to take care when handling and packing a purchased Lot but remind you that after seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is sooner, the Lot is entirely at your risk. Our postage charges are set out at the back of the catalogue. 5.8.2 It is the responsibility of the Buyer to be aware of any Import Duties that may be incurred upon importation to the final destination. Spink will not accept return of any package in order to avoid these duties. The onus is also on the Buyer to be aware of any Customs import restrictions that prohibit the importation of certain collectibles. Spink will not accept return of the Lot(s) under these circumstances. Spink will not accept responsibility for Lot(s) seized or destroyed by Customs. 5.9 Recommended packers and shippers If required our shipping department may arrange shipment as your agent. Although we may suggest carriers if specifically requested, our suggestions are made on the basis of our general experience of such parties in the past and we are not responsible to any person to whom we have made a recommendation for the acts or omissions of the third parties concerned. 5.10 Remedies for non-payment or failure to collect purchases 5.10.1 If you fail to make payment within seven days of your stipulated payment date set out in your invoice, we shall be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: 5.10.1.1 to charge interest at the rate of 2% per month compound interest, calculated on a daily basis, from the date the full amount is due; 5.10.1.2 to set off against any amounts which the Spink Group may owe you in any other transaction the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by you;

Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

5.10.1.3 we may keep hold of all or some of your Lots or other property in the possession of the Spink Group until you have paid all the amounts you owe us or the Spink Group, even if the unpaid amounts do not relate to those Lots or other property. Following fourteen days’ notice to you of the amount outstanding and remaining unpaid, the Spink Group shall have the right to arrange the sale of such Lots or other property. We shall apply the proceeds in discharge of the amount outstanding to us or the Spink Group, and pay any balance to you; 5.10.1.4 where several amounts are owed by you to the Spink Group in respect of different transactions, to apply any amount paid to discharge any amount owed in respect of any particular transaction, whether or not you so direct; 5.10.1.5 to reject at any future auction any bids made by you or on your behalf or obtain a deposit from you before accepting any bids. 5.10.2 If you fail to make payment within thirty-five days, we shall in addition be entitled: 5.10.2.1 to cancel the sale of the Lot or any other item sold to you at the same or any other auction; 5.10.2.2 to arrange a resale of the Lot, publicly or privately, and, if this results in a lower price being obtained, claim the balance from you together with all reasonable costs including a 20% seller’s commission, expenses, damages, legal fees, commissions and premiums of whatever kind associated with both sales or otherwise, incurred in connection with your failure to make payment; or 5.10.2.3 take any other appropriate action as we deem fit. 5.11 Failure to collect Where purchases are not collected within seven days after the sale, whether or not payment has been made, you will be required to pay a storage charge of £2 per item per day plus any additional handling cost that may apply. You will not be entitled to collect the Lot until all outstanding charges are met, together with payment of all other amounts due to us. 5.12 Export Licence 5.12.1 If required we can, at our discretion, advise you on the detailed provisions of the export licensing regulations. Where we advise you in relation to export licensing regulations the ultimate responsibility in respect of any export will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to apply for any necessary licences. 5.12.2 If the Lot is going to be hand carried by you, you may be required to produce a valid export licence to us or sign a waiver document stating that a licence will be applied for. 5.12.3 You should always check whether an export licence is required before exporting. Export licences are usually obtained within two or three weeks but delays can occur. 5.12.4 Unless otherwise agreed by us in writing, the fact that you wish to apply for an export licence does not affect your obligation to make payment within seven days nor our right to charge interest on late payment. 5.12.5 If you request that we apply for an export licence on your behalf, we shall be entitled to recover from you our disbursements and out of pocket expenses in relation to such application, together with any relevant VAT. 5.12.6 We will not be obliged to rescind a sale nor to refund any interest or other expenses incurred by you where payment is made by you despite the fact that an export licence is required. 5.13 Refund in the case of Forgery 5.13.1 A sale will be cancelled, and the amount paid refunded to you if a Lot (other than a miscellaneous item not described in the catalogue) sold by us proves to have been a Forgery. We shall not however be obliged to refund any amounts if either (a) the catalogue description or saleroom notice at the auction date corresponded to the generally accepted opinion of scholars or experts at that time, or fairly indicated that there was a conflict of opinions, or (b) it can be demonstrated that the Lot is a Forgery only by means of either a scientific process not generally accepted for use until after publication of the catalogue or a process which at the date of the auction was unreasonably expensive or impracticable or likely to have caused damage to the Lot. Furthermore, you should note that this refund can be obtained only if the following conditions are met: 5.13.1.1 you must notify us in writing, within seven days of the receipt of the Lot(s), that in your view the Lot concerned is a Forgery; 5.13.1.2 you must then return the item to us within fourteen days from receipt of the Lot(s), in the same condition as at the auction date; and


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5.13.1.3 as soon as possible following return of the Lot, you must produce evidence satisfactory to us that the Lot is a Forgery and that you are able to transfer good title to us, free from any third party claims. 5.13.2 In no circumstances shall we be required to pay you any more than the amount paid by you for the Lot concerned and you shall have no claim for interest. 5.13.3 The benefit of this guarantee is not capable of being transferred, and is solely for the benefit of the person to whom the original invoice was made out by us in respect of the Lot when sold and who, since the sale, has remained the owner of the Lot without disposing of any interest in it to any third party. 5.13.4 We shall be entitled to rely on any scientific or other process to establish that the Lot is not a Forgery, whether or not such process was used or in use at the date of the auction. 6 LIABILITY Nothing in these Terms and Conditions limits or excludes our liability for: 6.1 death or personal injury resulting from negligence; or 6.2 any damage or liability incurred by you as a result of our fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation. 7 COPYRIGHT 7.1 We shall have the right (on a non-exclusive basis) to photograph, video or otherwise produce an image of the Lot. All rights in such an image will belong to us, and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. 7.2 The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material relating to a Lot is and shall remain at all times our property and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. You shall not use or allow anyone else to use such images, illustrations or written material without our prior written consent. 8 VAT You shall give us all relevant information about your VAT status and that of the Lot to ensure that the correct information is printed in the catalogues. Once printed, the information cannot be changed. If we incur any unforeseen cost or expense as a result of the information being incorrect, you will reimburse to us on demand the full amount incurred. 9 NOTICES All notices given under these Terms and Conditions may be served personally, sent by 1st class post, or faxed to the address given to the sender by the other party. Any notice sent by post will be deemed to have been received on the second working day after posting or, if the addressee is overseas, on the fifth working day after posting. Any notice sent by fax or served personally will be deemed to be delivered on the first working day following despatch. 10 ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS The following provisions of this clause 10 shall apply only if you are acting for the purposes of your business. 10.1 Limitation of Liability Subject to clause 6, we shall not be liable, whether in tort (including for negligence) or breach of statutory duty, contract, misrepresentation or otherwise for any: 10.1.1 loss of profits, loss of business, depletion of goodwill and/or similar losses, loss of anticipated savings, loss of goods, loss of contract, loss of use, loss of corruption of data or information; or 10.1.2 any special, indirect, consequential or pure economic loss, costs, damages, charges or expenses. 10.2 Severability If any part of these Terms and Condition is found by any court to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be discounted and the rest of the conditions shall continue to be valid and enforceable to the fullest extent permitted by law. 10.3 Force majeure We shall have no liability to you if we are prevented from, or delayed in performing, our obligations under these Terms and Conditions or from carrying on our business by acts, events, omissions or accidents beyond our reasonable control, including (without limitation) strikes, lock-outs or other industrial disputes (whether involving our workforce or the workforce of any other party), failure of a utility service or transport network, act of God, war, riot, civil commotion, malicious damage, compliance with any law or governmental order, rule, regulation or direction, accident, breakdown of plant or machinery, fire, flood, storm or default of suppliers or subcontractors. 10.4 Waiver 10.4.1 A waiver of any right under these Terms and Conditions is only effective if it is in writing and it applies only to the circumstances for which it is given. No failure or delay by a party in exercising any right or remedy under these Terms and Conditions or by law shall constitute a waiver of that (or any other) right or remedy, nor preclude or restrict its further exercise. No single or partial exercise of such right or remedy shall preclude or restrict the further exercise of that (or any other) right or remedy. 10.4.2 Unless specifically provided otherwise, rights arising under these Terms and Conditions are cumulative and do not exclude rights provided by law. Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

10.5 Law and Jurisdiction 10.5.1 These Terms and Conditions and any dispute or claim arising out of or in connection with them or their subject matter, shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the law of England and Wales. 10.5.2 The parties irrevocably agree that the courts of England and Wales shall have exclusive jurisdiction to settle any dispute or claim that arises out of, or in connection with, Terms and Conditions or their subject matter.

Postal Charges Prices for books (items sent by this method are not covered by insurance) Weight

UK

EU

Rest of the World

Up to 1kg

£8 for any weight

£12

£15

Up to 2kg

£8 for any weight

£18

£25

Prices for all other items including postage and packaging Invoice Value

UK

EU

Rest of the World

Up to £1,500

£10

£15

£20

Above £1,501

£20

£30

£40

Shipments of more than 2kg or volumetric measurement of more than 2kg have to be sent by courier. Certain countries may incur extra charge when courier services are required by our insurance policy. For lots sent by courier please contact Auctionteam@spink.com for calculation of any further relevant cost in addition to the above charges. Value Added Tax (VAT) Charging of (VAT) at Auction The information shown on this page sets out the way in which Spink intends to account for VAT.

i.

Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme 1. Where possible, we will offer Lots for sale under the Auctioneers’ margin Scheme. Such Lots can be identified by the absence of any symbol next to the Lot number in the catalogue and will not be subject to VAT on the hammer Price. 2. Where Lots are sold using the Auctioneers’ margin Scheme to VAT–registered businesses, the VAT included within the Buyers’ Premium is not recoverable as input tax. Upon request on sale day, we will issue invoices that show VAT separately on both the hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium. This will enable VAT-registered businesses to recover the VAT charged as input tax, subject to the normal rules for recovering input tax.

ii.

Zero-Rated Lots Limited Categories of goods, such as books, are Zero-rated (o) for VAT in the United Kingdom. Such Lots are offered under the Auctioneers’ margin Scheme. In these circumstances no VAT element will be included within the Buyer’s Premium.

iii.

Daggered Lots Lots which are Daggered (†) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 20% on both the hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium.

iv.

Starred and Omega Lots Lots which are marked (x) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 5% on the hammer Price and 20% on the Buyer’s Premium which is shown as inclusive of VAT. Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) are subject to VAT at 20% on the hammer Price and on the Buyer’s Premium. Such Lots bear VAT because the Lot is liable for VAT at this rate on importation into the EU.

v.

Investment Gold Lots Lots marked (g) in the catalogue are exempt from VAT on the hammer Price and are subject to VAT at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer.

vi.

Imported Lots Lots which are marked (x) and Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) have VAT charged on the hammer Price and Buyers’ Premium because they have been imported into the United Kingdom from outside the EU. In these cases we have used a temporary importation procedure, which in effect means that the point of importation is deferred until the Lot has been sold. At this point the Buyer is treated as the importer and is liable to pay the import VAT due. We will collect the VAT from you and pay it to hm Customs and Excise on your behalf.


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AUCTION CALENDAR 2012/2013 Group Chairman and CEO Olivier D. Stocker Your Specialists Stamps UK - Tim Hirsch Guy Croton David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Dominic Savastano Tom Smith USA - Chris Anderson George Eveleth Andrew Titley Ed Robinson Rick Penko Europe - Guido Craveri Fernando Martínez China - Anna Lee Johnny Sang Coins UK - Paul Dawson Julie-Morgane Lecoindre Richard Bishop William MacKay Barbara Mears John Pett USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini Normand Pepin China - Mark Li Banknotes, Bonds & Shares UK - Barnaby Faull Mike Veissid Andrew Pattison Tom Badley USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini China - Mark Li Orders, Decorations, Medals & Militaria UK - Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys Books UK - Philip Skingley Alex Smith Autographs USA - Stephen Goldsmith Wines China - Anna Lee Your Europe Team (London - Lugano) Chairman’s Office Dennis Muriu Monica Kruber Directors Tim Hirsch Anthony Spink Auction & Client Management Team Miroslava Adusei-Poku Sandie Maylor Charles Blane Luca Borgo Phillipa Brown Rita Ariete María Martínez Maurizio Schenini Finance Alison Bennet Marco Fiori Mina Bhagat Alison Kinnaird Shyam Padhiar Billy Tumelty IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Attila Gyanyi Liz Cones Curlene Spencer John Winchcombe Bobby McBrierty Tom Robinson Cristina Dugoni Giacomo Canzi Your America Team (New York - Dallas) Chairman Emeritus John Herzog Auction Administration and Marketing & Design Rick Penko Patricia Gardner James McGuire Emily Cowin Clyde Townsend Finance & Administration Sam Qureshi Ingrid Qureshi Ed Robinson Auctioneers Stephen Goldsmith Tracy Shreve Andrew Titley Your Asia Team (Hong Kong - Singapore) Vice Chairman Anna Lee Administration Amy Yung Raymond Tat Gary Tan

Stamps 5 July 11 July 11 July 12/13 July 14 July 18/19 July 25 August 12 September 13 September 23 September Early October 23 October 23 October 24 October 8/9 November 14 November 12 December 12/13 January

The Chartwell Collection - GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs, Stamps and Covers - Part III Rhodesia Double Heads - The Alan Uria Collection Progressive Proofs and Artist’s Essays of Cook Islands, Aitutaki, Penrhyn and Niue The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Chartwell Collection - GB King Edward VIII, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth II Great Britain Stamps Specialised Sale Fine Stamps and Covers of South East Asia The Collector’s Series Sale Victoria Half Lengths - The John Barwis Collection The “Fordwater” Collections of Falkland Islands, Gibraltar and Malta Queensland - The Alan Griffiths Collection The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Chartwell Collection - GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs, Stamps and Covers - Part IV Fine Stamps and Covers of Hong Kong and China

London London London London Hong Kong New York Hong Kong London London Singapore Hong Kong London London London New York London London Hong Kong

Coins 27/28 June 14 July 22/23 August 25 August 26/27 September 13/14 November 4 December 15/16 January

Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals The Collector’s Series Sale

London Hong Kong New York Hong Kong London New York London New York

12025 12032 314 12033 12026 315 12027 316

Banknotes 14 July 22/23 August 25 August 26 September 2 October 2 October 3/4 October 13/14 November 6 December 15/16 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Charity Auction of Bank of England Notes The David Kirch Collection of Bank of England Notes - Part I The David Kirch Collection of English Provincial Banknotes - Part I World Banknotes The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes The Collector’s Series Sale

Hong Kong New York Hong Kong London London London London New York London New York

12032 314 12033 12037 12034 12035 12023 315 12024 316

Medals 19 July 6 September 22 November 25 April 25 July 21 November

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria The Bentley Priory Battle of Britain Trust Appeal Charity Auction Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

London London London London London London

12003 12044 12004 13001 13002 13003

Bonds and Shares 14 July 22/23 August 25 August 13/14 November 28 November 15/16 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World The Collector’s Series Sale

Hong Kong New York Hong Kong New York London New York

12032 314 12033 315 12011 316

Autographs 22/23 August 13/14 November 15/16 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale

New York New York New York

Wines July September November

An Evening of Exceptional Wines An Evening of Exceptional Wines An Evening of Exceptional Wines

Hong Kong Hong Kong Hong Kong

The above sale dates are subject to change

Spink offers the following services Valuations for insurance and probate for individual items or whole collections. Sales on a commission basis either of individual pieces or whole collections.

12015 12038 12040 12016 12032 140 12033 12017 12018 12019 12042 12039 12043 12020 12021

314 315 316


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OR D E R S , D E C OR AT I O N S , C A M PA I G N M E D A L S A N D M I L I TA R I A

19 July 2012 • London

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69 Southampton Row © Copyright 2012

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Bloomsbury www.spink.com

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London WC1B 4ET

19 July 2012 • London

STAMPS COINS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS BOOKS WINES

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria  

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria  

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

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