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Reclaiming Advent • Richard D’Souza: A Sense of Wonder • Homemade Holiday Gifts • In Giving We Receive • Leading & Loving: Senior High Leadership winter <¤+¬


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IN EVERY ISSUE 3 Editor’s Letter

4 Scripture Connection

5 Read, Watch, Listen

6 Ref lections on Faith

7 J O I N U S I N C E L E B R AT I O N

S I L E N T N IG H T, H O LY N IG H T D ECE M B E R 2 4

D ECE M B E R 2 5

CH R I S T M A S E V E

CH R I S T M A S DAY

Children’s Worship 30 minutes, no communion 11:00 a.m.

Worship with Holy Communion 11:00 a.m.

Worship with Holy Communion 2:00 p.m. & 4:00 p.m. Candlelight Worship with Holy Communion 5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:00 p.m. & 11:00 p.m.

Meditation

31 Out & About

32 Modern Day Pilgrims

34 Giving Thanks

35 Calendar of Events

36 Familiar Faces


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F E AT U R E A R T I C L E S

P R E P A R AT I O N

C E L E B R AT I O N

R E V E L AT I O N

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Live and Move and Breathe

Leading & Loving

Chalking the Door

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Devoted Living: Abiding in Generosity

At Peace in the Moment

A Sense of Wonder: An Interview with Richard Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Souza

11 Reclaiming Advent

20 Holy and Anointed

28 Twenty Miles Out on a Frozen Lake


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Volume 1, Issue 2, Winter 2018 Published by St. Philip the Deacon Lutheran Church 17205 County Road 6 Plymouth, MN 55447 (763) 475-7100 editor in chief

Tim Westermeyer m a n ag i n g e d i t o r

Amanda Berger design

Malley Design

Public conversations where faith comes to life.

s ta f f w r i t e r s

Cheryl Mathison, Kate Sterner contributions

Cindy Carlson, Mark Schmid website

www.spdlc.org/inspire email editorial

Join us for a series

aberger@spdlc.org

of talks about being

o n t h e c ov e r

and belief. The Faith & Life Lectures are open and welcoming public forums where members of the Twin Cities community can hear nationally known speakers ref lect on how Christian faith intersects with different dimensions of everyday life. We invite you to join us for the 2019 series of lectures. RICHARD Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;SOUZ A

February 7, 2019 TSH OXENREIDER

March 21, 2019 TOM LEHMAN

TBD May/June 2019 All lectures begin at 7:00 p.m. Free and open to the public. www.faith-and-life.org

Photo by Aaron Burden, pg. 18 Š2018 St. Philip the Deacon Lutheran Church. All rights reserved.

submissions

Do you have an idea for a story or love to write? Contact our managing editor with your submission, but please keep in mind the following guidelines: (A) Your article may be edited for length and content. (B) Articles must fit in the larger themes of our publication and reflect the mission of St. Philip the Deacon. (C) All submissions will be reviewed by our editorial staff to determine the suitability for our publication. While we would love to include all submissions, space and cost limit our ability to do that. Submissions will not be returned.


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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s our editorial team sat down to brainstorm ideas for our Winter issue, my only real guideline was that while the magazine would land in SPD homes in the beginning of December, I wanted it to have staying power beyond the Christmas holiday season and f low into the New Year. Within minutes, the team had come up with these three words:

“Inner stillness is the key to outer strength.” JARED BROCK

Preparation, Celebration, Revelation. These words perfectly capture the movement from Advent, through Christmas and into Epiphany, but could also embrace the movement from an old year into a new. I love the idea of moving from a place of hectic preparation into a season of restful recognition of Immanuel, God with us. In my own home, I can definitely see us using the tips for reclaiming Advent (pg. 11) and my daughter and I had a lovely afternoon making gifts with essential oils (pg. 21). I am a yoga devotee and thoroughly enjoyed practicing with the chair yogis (pg. 8 ). Anything that helps me to slow down and be more mindful of the beauty of this season, instead of racing through it, is a blessing. “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you.” —John 14:27

Jesus took time for rest, for prayer, for genuine connection with other people, and encourages his followers to do the same. I believe Jesus was an advocate for paying attention to the life we’ve been given and to where God shows up in our midst. Label this conscious quietness what you will—mindfulness, presence, stillness or awareness—all call us to dwell in the moment. In our Peace issue, I invite you into a renewed sense of presence and to look at ways in which we make space in body, mind, and spirit for God to have His way with us. Pax Christi,


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SPD BOO K CLU B Our book club meets on the 3rd Tuesday of each month for a staff-led discussion of a book featuring topics of faith. All are welcome— whether you finished the book or not!

PSALMS FOR THE SEASONS As poetry, Psalms invite a slower pace and call for thoughtful ref lection making them perfect for this season of waiting and contemplation. This reading plan focuses on the Psalms to guide your journey through the seasons of Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany. Read the same psalm daily for the entire week. Allow the suggested verse to become a refrain throughout your day. Allow these words to work upon your spirit and listen for what God is revealing to you.

DECEMBER

No Meeting A D V E N T: D E C E M B E R

JA NUA RY 15

The Blue Zones of Happiness by Dan Buettner. Discussion led by Susan Path.

2 PSALM 33 vs. 20: Our soul waits for the Lord. 9 PSALM 85 vs. 8: For he will speak peace to his people, to his faithful, to those who turn to him in their hearts. 16 PSALM 107 vs. 6: Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them from their distress. 23 PSALM 89 vs. 2: I declare that your steadfast love is established forever; your faithfulness is as firm as the heavens. CHRISTMAS: DECEMBER

24 PSALM 96 vs. 11: Let the heavens be glad and let the earth rejoice.

FEBRUA RY 19

Wonder by R.J. Palacio. Discussion led by Rachel El Hilali.

25 PSALM 97 vs. 1: The Lord is King! Let the earth rejoice. 30 PSALM 98 vs. 4: Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth; break forth into joyous song and sing praises. E P I P H A N Y: J A N U A R Y

6 PSALM 72 vs. 18: Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, who alone does wondrous things. 13 PSALM 29 vs. 11: May the Lord give strength to his people! May the Lord bless his people with peace! 20 PSALM 46 vs. 11: The Lord of hosts is with us. 27 PSALM 107 vs. 1: O give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.

“The extraordinary thing that is about to happen is matched only by the extraordinary moment right before it happens. Advent is the name of that moment.” FREDERICK BUECHNER


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Read STOP, LOOK, BRE ATHE, CRE ATE

Faith & Life RICHARD D’SOUZ A — FEBRUA RY 7 7: 0 0 P. M . —

Join us as Fr. Richard D’Souza, an astronomer at the Vatican Observatory, explores how our fascination with the heavens across the ages relates to our own search for transcendence, and how the study of the cosmos can be an act of worship. D’Souza recently made headlines when his team at the University of Michigan discovered the long-lost sibling to our Milky Way Galaxy, M32p. As always, the Faith & Life Lecture Series is free and open to the public. All are welcome! For more information visit faith-and-life.org

This beautifully designed book by Wendy Ann Greenhalgh is begging to be made a part of your New Year’s resolutions! Urging you to pause, notice and breathe, this book is created to bring more mindfulness into your daily life and inspire you to get creative. It’s a guide for anyone looking to slow down and pay attention.

Watch JOY EU X N O E L (2005, PG-13) During the trench warfare of World War I, during the weeks leading up to Christmas, numerous sections on the Western front arranged a ceasefire, and even enjoyed the company of those considered the enemy. This Oscar-nominated movie based on the story of the 1914 unofficial Christmas truce will give you goosebumps and haunt you through the holiday season. Told in English, French and German (with subtitles), you’ll be moved by the way that the soldiers unite through faith and the power of music.

Listen H AV E YO U R S E L F AN OK CH R I S T M A S The OK Factor, a Minneapolis-based cello and violin duo, presents a refreshing change from your typical Christmas album. You’ll recognize traditional holiday tunes interwoven with original music, and it feels both new and nostalgic at the same time. Favorite track? “Go Tell It.”


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or this issue focused on “Peace: Be Still,” I’m reminded of a couple of reflections from wellknown Christians over the past few centuries.

The first comes from Blaise Pascal, who lived in the 1600s in France. “All of humanity’s problems,” Pascal wrote, “stem from our inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” The other comes from my old favorite C.S. Lewis, who in 1945 told a group of students at Oxford that “We live in a world starved for solitude, silence, and privacy, and therefore starved for meditation and true friendship.” One among many of the causes for this, he said, was the increasingly popular technology of “the wireless.” Can you imagine either Pascal or Lewis being dropped into our world, and the shock and despair they would feel at the explosion of ways we have created to distract ourselves in the early 21st century? It’s not just the “wireless” anymore—or whatever was distracting people in mid-17th century France—but TV and internet and mobile phones with alerts designed to interrupt us and distract us so we pay attention to a constant stream of “urgent” news or texts or social media updates. In our world today, it is almost impossible to avoid this cacophony of noise in our daily lives, which is why trips to the mountains or the woods—where we are forced to be “off the grid”—can be so refreshing and bracing and healing. “Be still and know that I AM,” God reminds us in Psalm 46. In this Psalm, we are encouraged to “Be Still,” but also reassured that God will be our refuge, our strength and our help in times of trouble. Given the nonstop noise that surrounds us in our world today, I wonder if we might acknowledge in our prayer life that one of our “troubles” today is this unceasing and unrelenting noise. It is troublesome for any number of reasons, but maybe most importantly, it is troublesome because it so easily and so comprehensively drowns out the voice of God. Remember, the God we worship isn’t prone to shouting. Instead, as a well-known hymn reminds us, our God comes to us “as one unknown, a breath unseen, unheard,” making himself present to us “when souls in silence lie.” Or, as Elijah experienced, God reveals himself in “a still small voice,” or “a whisper,” or “the sound of sheer silence.” This season, may we find ways to still ourselves long enough to experience this silence—and to once again hear this voice that calls us home. Grace—and yes—Peace,


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M E D I TAT I O N

“Peace: it does not mean a place where there is no noise, trouble or hard work. It means to be in the midst of those things and still be calm in your heart.” UNKNOWN AUTHOR


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hen Susan Path joined the SPD staff as parish nurse in 2015, she was committed to holistically serving the body, mind and spirit of our members. So, when JoAnn Nelson approached her about starting a yoga class, it was an easy “yes.” “I attended a chair yoga class at another church. It was a good class, but I missed seeing people from my own church community. I approached Susan [Path] about starting a class at St. Philip, and she did,” said Nelson. Yoga is offered at many local fitness centers and yoga studios, so why practice at SPD? “I love that it takes place in our church,” said Beth Willis. “There is a spiritual element to our practice that I find comforting. It’s the right length of time and I always leave feeling refreshed and more balanced.” Regular attender, Astrid Berg, agreed, “It’s one of the few times in my week where I’m not multi tasking. For some reason, when I come here, I can shut off the busy part of my brain and just be present.” The class opens with a few minutes of deep breathing and a prayer or devotion. Then the class proceeds into movement that

invites better posture, f lexibility, balance and awareness. “I’m in my mid-80s,” said Nelson. “Trying to stay physically f lexible and mentally alert and positive takes a little work. Yoga gave me contact with others and good, safe ways to keep active physically and socially.” Despite the ease the chair provides, practicing chair yoga still requires all the focus and control of regular yoga. What it does is provide support for those who, because of physical limitations, may find a class at a gym or studio to be out of reach. Willis commented, “Some people are threatened by the thought of yoga; they may think it’s too hard, or worry that they’ll have to tie themselves into pretzel knots, or that they won’t be ‘good’ at it. There is nothing threatening, I would tell them; it’s simple, and the instructor always shows us different ways to do specific poses. It’s about breathing, stretching, relaxing, and feeling good—and everyone is welcome!” Chair yoga classes are $4 and meet at SPD in the Center for Faith and Life on Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. A special thank you to the chair yogis pictured: Beth Willis, JoAnn Nelson, Gail Speckman, Nancy Tank, Astrid Berg and instructor Sarah Sheeham.

YOGA AS A FAITH PRACTICE Yoga is over 5,000 years old and is not a religion, but rather a tool that can be used to improve physical, mental and spiritual health. Asanas, or postures, are the physical act of yoga (you know, the bendy stuff) which were created in order for practitioners to be able to still their bodies through stretching and attention to breath for the benefit of being able to meditate longer. At the start of a yoga practice, you may choose to set an intention or dedication. Yoga enhances our spiritual practice when dedicated to Jesus and when used with the intention of time spent on the yoga mat being an act of prayer and worship.


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t feels like every time you turn around people are asking for money. The PTA, high school sports teams, a friend’s favorite charity, and yes, even on Sunday mornings, that golden offering plate at church. All of these worthy causes want your financial resources.

DE VOTED LIVING : ABIDING IN GENEROSIT Y

With so many places in which to invest your hard-earned money, how do you decide? And why give it to the church? B E C A U S E J E S U S S AY S S O

In Luke 21:1-4, we hear Jesus praise the generosity of a poor widow, while all around her those with plenty are giving just a small offering. The widow gives all she has, trusting in God’s goodness. Generosity is an act of faith. It is believing that God will provide. “Beyond that, let’s not forget that everything we have belongs to God,” said Pastor Cheryl Mathison. “The question is not: How much should I give my church? The question is: How much of what God has given me do I keep for myself? We are blessed to be a blessing.” D O I T FO R YO U R K I D S

BY AMANDA BERGER

Do you want your children to understand money and generosity? Then you have to model it. Let them see you give—both of your finances and in acts of service. Our kids are always watching us and learning from us what it means to be people of God in this world. They take their cues from us in everything from what to eat to when cell phone use is appropriate to the words we use. It only follows that children would see the ways in which we save, spend and give of our money as well. FO R YO U R O W N H E A R T

A tithe is defined as giving 10% of your income back to the church and its ministry. In his book, Real Faith for Real Life, Michael Foss describes it this way: “When the followers of Jesus become miserly, we turn from the best of ourselves. We have not been created simply to watch out for our own needs. When we claim God’s gifts and hoard them for ourselves, we deny the destiny God has planted within us.” Tithes keep us from making idols of our blessings and teach us to depend on God’s generosity.

“For it is in giving that we receive.” S T. F R A N C I S O F A S S I S I

Ideally, tithing is 10% of your income. There are debates as to whether this means gross income or take-home pay, and that debate actually invites the evasion of true generosity. Are you holding back out of fear? Giving should feel like a sacrifice and an act of faith. So, do what pushes your boundaries a little, what invites you to take a step of faith. You may not be able to jump to 10% (or more!) right away, but taking steps to get there is important for our hearts. You may be surprised to find that it doesn’t hurt as much as you thought it would, or invites you to take a closer look at the way in which you steward the rest of your life. The most common side effect of generosity is joy.


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RECL AIMING A DV ENT BY C H E R Y L M AT H I S O N

While the calendar year begins in January, Advent is the church’s New Year. We begin with four weeks devoted to quiet waiting as we anticipate the miracle of God coming to us in Christ Jesus. While the rest of the world rushes about, Advent invites us to be still. If you have trouble slowing down, here are five simple ways to reclaim the season of Advent in your home this year:

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Go ahead: put the tree up right after Thanksgiving. Let the lights be a gentle reminder of the light of Christ. But, resist the urge to put packages beneath it until Christmas. During Advent, pile books there instead and take time each night to read Adventthemed stories and don’t forget your Bible! Check out Luci Shaw’s Accompanied by Angels: Poems of the Incarnation.

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Setting up the Nativity scene in stages is a fun way to journey through Advent. Instead of putting all the pieces out at once, use them to tell the story, piece by piece, over the four weeks. Begin with Mary and Joseph on their way to Bethlehem placed some distance away from the manger, perhaps across the room. Add additional pieces weekly, and don’t forget to move Mary and Joseph a little closer each day. Wait to add the baby Jesus until Christmas. AND, if you can, keep the Nativity out through Epiphany and on January 6 add the Magi.

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Add Advent music to your playlist during December. Include songs like: “Wake, Awake, for Night is Flying,” “Holy Is His Name,” “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel,” and “Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus.” Or check out the “Simple Advent” playlist on Spotify.

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The traditional color for the season of Advent is a deep blue, like the night sky. Use blue napkins and blue placemats at mealtime as a gentle reminder of the season and as an invitation to slow down and not rush through the meal. Linger at the table a bit longer than usual. Enjoy conversation with your companions or, when dining alone, use the quiet to consider the gifts of this season of waiting.

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If you send out Christmas cards, as you sign and address each one, take an extra moment to offer a prayer of peace for the recipient. Alternatively, as you receive greetings in the mail, take time to pray for the sender.


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eople talk about youth being the “church of the future.” At St. Philip the Deacon, youth are the church right now. They teach Faith Creek, lead confirmation small groups, engage in peer ministry within the senior high ministry, and serve as readers, ushers and choir members during worship. However, while our young people were always willing to help, they weren’t always as prepared to tackle the demands of ministry as they could be.

LEADING & LOVING BY AMANDA BERGER

“Don’t let anyone look down on you because you are young, but set an example for the believers in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith and in purity.” 1 TIMOTHY 4:12

In talking with Justin Daleiden, Director of Senior High Ministry, he said, “I would walk into a Faith Creek classroom on a Sunday morning and ask how it was going. So often, the high schooler leading the class would whisper, ‘I don’t know what I’m doing!’ It made me realize that maybe we weren’t doing our best as a church to equip them for these roles.” Daleiden saw the potential for more leadership training, and put together a workshop to help them. In late August, Daleiden invited all those high school age youth to a day-long workshop helping them to identify and grow in their leadership skills. “I look at leadership and service as a calling for [the youth]. They have different gifts from our adults and we NEED them. We don’t just need their ability to fill a volunteer spot or be a warm body; they are gifted individuals and have a calling to share their faith.” While some of the time at the training focused on how to lead in those volunteer settings, another big element of the day was training for peer ministry. “They are participants in the body of Christ; they can welcome, they can listen, they can care about and they can serve their peers with God in mind,” said Daleiden. “Peer ministry isn’t a new concept for us at SPD, but it’s been a while since we’ve emphasized it. The value of peer ministry goes beyond our walls—it’s the ability to encourage and support their peers when maybe they wouldn’t have before.” In response to the large number of youth who lead in other ministries (around 50!), Daleiden knew that this was a growing edge at SPD.


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Olivia Panning, senior at Wayzata High School


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When you consider how busy most high schoolers are, it’s amazing that they jump at the chance to give so much of their time. Griffin Seppala, a senior at Orono High School, teaches Faith Creek, is a confirmation guide, and also serves as a reader during worship. When asked why he serves, Seppala replied, “I enjoy helping young people understand their faith and answering their questions when I can.” Olivia Panning, a senior at Wayzata High School, answered similarly, “I chose to serve at church to help connect more with God and deepen my faith. Sometimes in our busy lives we lose sight of our faith because we’re concentrating on other things, but by making it a part of my schedule it lets me take time to be at church and become closer with the people there and with God.” Panning serves as a confirmation guide and on the Youth Leadership Team. “I’ve seen myself grow from someone that was really shy and scared to speak up into someone that will put themselves out there,” says Wayzata Senior Haley Swenson. “I’m not afraid anymore to answer questions, say prayers in front of a large group, or talk about important topics to me in front of my peers and people that are younger than I am.” Daleiden is especially excited about the Youth Leadership Team. “It’s new this year. It’s a way to help high schoolers to take ownership in their own ministry. They help to plan events. The team shows up early, serves food, welcomes people, checks them in, they’re the front lines when it comes to our high school events.” Is he seeing any changes yet? “I think there are changes coming,” Daleiden laughs. “Recognizing our youth as leaders is very important. The idea that we are going to empower and equip them to lead, not only for ministry here but also with their peers, is going to have a big effect on our church, and our community as a whole.”


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oes the promise of the New Year fill you with a sense of hope that this year will be different? The top three New Year’s Resolutions each year are: Exercise more. Lose weight. Eat healthy. Some people mark the New Year by selecting a word to live by. People choose a word that becomes sort of a compass for guiding decisions and directing actions. Balance. Focus. Breathe. These are examples of words people frequently select. If this is your New Year’s practice, good for you and we wish you the best of luck. If you’ve long given up on goal-setting style resolutions, we invite you to consider instead a simple and ancient New Year’s tradition. On the Day of Epiphany, January 6, you can Chalk your Door and ask God’s blessing on your home and its inhabitants. The practice of Chalking the Door is an ancient one, with roots going all the way back to the Old Testament story of the people of Israel marking their door frames with the blood of the lamb as a sign of protection on the night of the Passover. You can read about that in Exodus 12. Chalking the Door is simple to do and a great way to dedicate the year to God and ask God’s blessing on your home as well as the people who live there and visit. It is also a fun way to involve the whole family in a beautiful new tradition. All you need is a piece of chalk.

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On, or near to, the Day of Epiphany, write the following with chalk on the door frame of the door you use most to come and go from your home: 20 + C + M + B + 19. The 20 and 19 make the year 2019. The + signs represent the cross. The letters have two meanings. They stand for the Latin phrase Christus Mansionem Benedicat which means: May Christ bless the house. The three letters also represent the initials of the traditional names for the Magi—Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar—who came to visit Jesus in his first home. After the door is marked, offer a short prayer like this: Lord God of heaven and earth, you revealed your only begotten Son to every nation by the guidance of a star. Bless this house and all who live here and all who visit. May we be blessed with health, kindness of heart, gentleness and faithfulness. Fill us with the light of Christ, that our love for each other may go out to all. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen. And close with a blessing like this: Dwell here in peace. Christ is with you. Thanks be to God. Throughout the year as you come and go, you pass beneath this reminder of God’s blessing on you and all those who enter the doors of your home.


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AT P E A C E IN THE MOMENT BY AMANDA BERGER


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HYGGE /hue • gah/ noun A Danish term for taking pleasure in the simple, cozy things in life and for surrounding yourself with good company. adjective: hyggeligt

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inter in Minnesota is not for the faint of heart. With icy roads, blustery winds and piles of the f luffy white stuff, it’s easy to retreat into our homes and say, “See you next spring!” Our Scandinavian friends and ancestors would argue that really, “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes!” and instead would invite us to embrace the season.

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Embracing hygge doesn’t have to be extravagant or costly. Hygge is something that you feel. Here are some easy ways to make your home more hyggeligt!

Hygge is a Danish word that is used to describe a general sense of well-being garnered from the simple things in life: good food, a comfortable and cozy home, a sense of warmth and connection with loved ones and friends.

Surround yourself with only things that you love. Decluttering may be a part of this process, but it’s also about loving what you see in your everyday life.

While hygge can be applied year-round, it’s excellent for making it through the short days and dark nights of winter. It’s also helpful for battling the winter blues, offering a sense of light and hope in the darkness. In a world that often feels full of whining, complaining, and negativity, embracing hygge is the pursuit of positivity, gratitude and presence.

Soft light—whether candles, fairy lights, or dimmers, soft, warm light encourages relaxation.

“Hygge was never meant to be translated— it was meant to be felt.” T O V E M A R E N S TA K K E S TA D

Think all things warm: mugs of cocoa, mulled wine, cookies right out of the oven, fragrances of cinnamon, nutmeg, or cardamom, hearty soups, crusty, artisan bread. Get outside—no matter what the weather. A snowy hike, fresh air and reveling in nature inspire connection to the outdoor world and help us to feel grounded. Light a fire in the fireplace, invite some friends for a potluck, linger around the table with good conversation or a game night. Get comfy. A soft, snuggly blanket, cozy socks, loose fitting relaxed clothes all encourage us to let our guard down and be present.


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JOY IN YOUR PRESENCE Hygge is rooted in being present. Here are five ways to engage faithfully with hygge in your home and in relationships.

GATHER “They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts.” ac t s 2 : 4 6

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Fellowship isn’t just for Sunday mornings and at church. True and lasting relationships are formed around the table, in meals shared with family and friends. Inviting others into your home is a radical act of hospitality and one that Jesus lived by—the feeding of the 5,000, Zacchaeus, the Last Supper. The food and the table setting don’t have to be fancy. A big pot of soup, fresh-baked bread, warm beverages, and a satisfying dessert will lead to full bellies and full hearts as people linger around the table sharing stories and laughter. Meals are not the only source of hygge either. Denmark (where the idea of hygge comes from) consistently ranks in the top 3 of the world’s happiest countries. One of the key

factors of happiness is feeling connected. The Danes often do this through joining civic groups and recreational activities like community or church choirs, soccer clubs, cooking groups, book clubs or other recreational groups.

BE PRESENT “So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God.” i sa i a h 4 1 :10

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It is human nature to constantly relive the past or to be anxious about the future. The trouble is that dwelling in past problems or worrying incessantly about the future keep us from being fully present now. When our head isn’t where our bodies are, there becomes a disconnect between our experiences, our emotions and our memories. We miss building relationships now when we are reliving the past and wishing for do-overs. We don’t absorb the

bounty and deliciousness of the meal in front of us if we are already wondering what’s for breakfast tomorrow. We overlook the security and the abundance of our lives right now if we can only think about the “What if ’s?” of tomorrow. In Jesus’ own words, “Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.” (Matt. 6:34)

REST “Yes, my soul, find rest in God; my hope comes from him.” p sa lm 6 2 : 5

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God needed a day off, a day of Sabbath and rest. Who are we to think that we don’t? Our modern world has convinced us that the measure of our self-worth is our busy-ness. How often have you asked someone “How are you?” and they reply, “Busy!” instead of giving a real answer. Our God calls us


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to rest, and elements of hygge can help us to get into the resting zone. Once you’ve lit some candles, put on your comfy pants, and made a mug of cocoa, it’s much harder to rush off to the next thing. Instead, it’s the perfect opportunity to snuggle into your favorite chair to read a book or simply watch the snow fall outside the window. Better yet? Go to bed early and allow your body the sleep it needs.

if it plugs in, it’s not hygge. With their constant alerts, notifications, and feeling of urgency our devices do not encourage us to slow down and be still. So, challenge yourself to switch off once in a while.

SWITCH OFF

1 th e s sa lon i a n s 5:1 6 - 1 8

“Be still and know that I am God.” p sa lm 4 6 :10

4.

It seems counterintuitive, but many of us recognize that our technological devices are not helping us to really connect with other people. The root of hygge is all about connection: to self, to family, to friends, to community. While fairy lights and watching a favorite movie can qualify as hyggeligt, a good rule of thumb is that

CONTENTMENT “Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.”

5.

Being grateful and embracing the simple things that we often take for granted is a big part of hygge. You can’t buy hygge (although the number of books on hygge or Pinterest boards may make you feel otherwise). Start with what you have. Invite people into your home even if it isn’t perfect. Keep food simple (no gourmet chef skills needed!). Or, suggest time outside walking dogs, ice skating or sledding. It is enough and your guests will be so honored to be invited.

You’ll be amazed at how by slowing down you will notice how much you do have instead of worrying over what you don’t have. Now, think about incorporating those feelings into your prayer life. How different is it to end the day in prayers of thankfulness than those of desperation and fear? Hygge isn’t in the Bible, and there isn’t really a Hebrew or Greek word that conveys this concept. But hygge does embrace many words that are found in the Bible: hospitality, sharing, Sabbath, gratitude, and peace. Hygge is all about living in the moment, relishing the small blessings of the everyday, and encourages us to see God’s goodness right where we are.


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“You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.” PSALM 23:5


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St. Philip the Deacon

WORDS & PHOTOS BY AMANDA BERGER

HOLY & ANOINTED SOOTHING GIFTS F E AT U R I N G ESSENTIAL OILS


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MAKING SCENTS When choosing essential oils, you want to be sure to choose high quality oils from trusted vendors. Look for oils that are 100% pure and undiluted. That being said there are tons of brands and even more scents to choose from. Here are some of our favorite combinations: CL E A R H E A D & CO N CE N T R AT IO N

Peppermint & Eucalyptus R E L A X AT IO N & STRESS RELIEF

Lavender, Lemon & Peppermint CA L M I N G

Peppermint & Orange UPLIF TING & CH R I S T M A S

Orange, Cinnamon & Spruce E N E RG I Z I N G

Orange, Lemon & Grapefruit Any of these scents can be used on their own, but these blends are also nice. Simply divide the number of essential oils indicated in a recipe between the two or three different scents.

USEFUL SUPPLIES

CAUTIONS

DIY projects often need many specialized supplies. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve chosen our projects below so that you can make several items using many of the same supplies. We also recommend choosing just two or three essential oil scents that complement each other which you can use in multiple projects.

With any product that you use in your home or on your skin, you should exercise caution when using essential oils. Do some research into what is safe for you to use, especially around children or if you are pregnant. We also recommend additional research if you have pets, as there are many essential oils that can be dangerous for them.

Supplies sourced from BulkApothecary.com and Amazon.com.

A great resource for essential oils is a free online course from the New York Institute of Aromatic Studies. Find the e-course at https://courses.aromaticstudies.com/introduction-to-aromatherapy/


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St. Philip the Deacon

JAR CANDLE

HANDMADE SOAP

SALT SCRUB

Makes one 8 oz. or two 4 oz. candles

INGREDIENTS

This luxurious exfoliating scrub is a wonderful gift! Enough to fill two 8 oz. jars.

INGREDIENTS

Large mouth quart-sized mason jar (clean; used to melt the wax) A jar or jars for your candle 2 cups soy wax f lakes (“golden wax”) 100 drops essential oil 2 candle wicks with metal base clothes pins DIRECTIONS

Fill a large saucepan with 1 inch of water. Put the wax f lakes into the large mason jar. Next, set the large mason jar into the saucepan. Over medium heat, bring to a boil. When it reaches a boil, reduce heat until to a simmer. Once the wax has melted a little bit, dip the metal base of the wick into the melted wax. Center the wick in the bottom of each jar and hold in place until the wax sets and the wick is adhered to the jar. Fasten the clothespin to the wick, across the mouth of the jar to help it stay upright. Add essential oils to the jar, swirling a little to combine. Meanwhile, as the wax melts, swirl the large jar occasionally to help the wax melt. Once the wax is completely melted, remove from heat and allow it to cool a bit. Pour a little bit of wax into the candle jar and allow it to set for a few minutes. Then, fill the remainder of your jar with wax. (We found that if you add all the wax at one time, the wick comes loose and floats out of place.) Allow to sit for 24 hours before using.

1 lb. Goat’s Milk SFIC (all natural) Glycerin Melt & Pour Soap Base* 52 drops of essential oil ¼ of a block melt and pour soap color block (optional) 8 silicone soap molds

INGREDIENTS

3 cups fine sea salt 6 oz. sweet almond oil 30 drops essential oil

DIRECTIONS

DIRECTIONS

First, place all of your molds on a tray or cookie sheet lined with wax paper. For this recipe you will want to “make” a double boiler. Using a medium saucepan, bring 2 inches of water to a boil. On top of the saucepan, place a medium glass bowl. Heat the water until it boils steadily. While waiting for the water to boil, cut the soap base into smaller pieces (a pastry scraper works well). Place the soap base, along with the piece of color block into the glass bowl and stir occasionally until melted. Once it is completely melted, remove from heat and stir in your essential oils. Pour into the silicone molds. Allow to cool overnight before removing the soap from the molds.

In a glass bowl, mix the sea salt and sweet almond oil until the sea salt is coated completely. Next, add the essential oils and mix thoroughly. Store in glass jars, stirring before use as oils will settle. Use within 3 months.

ROOM SPRAY

For gifting, wrap the soap in white tissue paper and place in a pretty box or bag.

75 drops of essential oils .5 oz. of witch hazel .5 oz. distilled water pinch of sea salt

Used to freshen up a room or for a quick mood lift try making this quick and easy room spray. This makes a 1 oz. bottle of room spray. INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Combine all ingredients and pour into a spray bottle.


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“ON A PR ACTICAL LEVEL , I H AV E N E V E R F O U N D A SERIOUS TENSION BETWEEN FAITH AND SCIE NCE .” RICHARD D’SOUZA, S.J.


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St. Philip the Deacon

A SENSE OF WONDER AN INTERVIEW WITH RICHARD Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;SOUZA BY TIM WESTERMEYER


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TW: Can you say something about your background? Where you grew up? RD: I had the advantage of growing up in multiple cultures. My initial school years were spent in the Muslim dominated Middle East. After the first Gulf War in 1990, we moved back to my home town in Goa, India, where Catholicism and Hinduism peacefully coexisted for four centuries. Later on as a Jesuit (see sidebar, “Who are the Jesuits?”), I was exposed to different cultures in India—by studying with other Jesuits from various parts of India, as well as being sent to work with different cultures in various parts of India. My doctoral studies in Germany opened me up to European culture. How did you get interested in astronomy? I was initially interested in physics and how things work. After the encouragement of my Jesuit superiors, I gradually shifted over to astronomy, and found that I could apply the physics I had learned and loved to understand the cosmos. Similar question, and maybe related—how did you become interested in the priesthood generally and the Society of Jesus specifically? Although I was exposed to different cultures, I grew up in a strong Catholic environment. My first encounter with the Society of Jesus was at a Jesuit High School. It was there that I became fascinated with their history and the society, and I decided to become a Jesuit after I finished with my high school. Initially, I was more enamored by the Society of Jesus than the priesthood. The priesthood became a means to work effectively for God’s kingdom. You’re currently doing some post-doc work at the University of Michigan. What are you working on there? After my doctoral studies in Munich, Germany, I felt the need of an exposure to a different environment where I could develop my own independent research projects. I chose the University of Michigan because I was interested in working with a particular mentor, Prof. Eric Bell.

The experience here at the University of Michigan has been wonderful. I work on understanding galaxy evolution through the ways galaxies merge over cosmic time. Your bio says that you work on “galaxy formation and evolution,” and that you are “particularly interested in studying the stellar halos of galaxies to infer their merger histories.” Can you translate that into plain English, and say a word about why it matters? One of the central themes in the sciences is the questions of our origins. Astronomy has tried to trace back our origins over the last 13.7 billion years—from the initial Big Bang right till the present day. With the help of a number of space missions in the last few years, we have been able to listen to the radio waves which were emitted after the Big Bang; we now understand well the first few seconds of the Universe. On the other hand, a lot of the current excitement in research is focused on understanding how the present-day planets form, and which of these planets can support life. My research focuses on the middle unknown

stretch—where we study how galaxies form and evolve over time. In a sense, I am attempting to be a galactic archeologist—trying to unravel the merging history of a particular galaxy. By understanding how galaxies evolve over time, we have a better sense of how our own Milky Way Galaxy formed, and how it provided our Sun and its solar system the right conditions to support life. One of the themes of past speakers in the Faith & Life Series has been that there is not— despite conventional cultural wisdom—a “conflict” between science and faith. As a priest and a scientist, you obviously model in your own life the coherence of these two ways of knowing. Can you talk about how you think about the relationship between faith and science, and how they are, perhaps, deeply related at some level? Both science and faith are outcomes of our human search for transcendence, to go beyond ourselves and to know the world. They ref lect two very different


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St. Philip the Deacon

ways of understanding the world. They have different worldviews, and they talk about different aspects of the same reality, reflecting how we experience it. They not only encompass different philosophies, but also have different languages. One requires both to describe the breadth of human experience.

the diverse cultures in India, Europe and the United States.

You work at the Vatican Observatory. What is the Vatican Observatory and what does an astronomer like you do there? Yes, I work for the Vatican Observatory. After my postdoc at the University of Michigan, I will Humans not only “ S T U DY I N G T H E continue to be a need to satisfy staff member at their curiosity G A L A X I E S A L W AY S the Vatican Obserabout the world, vatory. The Vatican but also need GIVES ME A SENSE Observatory is a “meaning” to go national research forward in life. OF WONDER .” instit ution After all, we are supported by the mea ning-seek ing Holy See. Its purpose is best described Pope animals. Meaning gives us hope to go Leo XIII at its re-founding in 1891: “that forward. Without meaning, we give up, we everyone might see clearly that the Church die. Now, while science helps us to describe and her Pastors are not opposed to true and understand reality, it cannot provide and solid science...but that they embrace it, us meaning: it takes a detached-objective encourage it, and promote it.” It has about 13 view of things. Religion, on the other members who are either [brothers or sisters hand, incorporates the subject, and can in religious orders] or priests. Their main provide us that meaning. Religion not task is to do active research in science, as only asks the deep questions: Where do well as engage in outreach. They work in a we come from and where are we going, but diverse number of fields from theoretical it also asks questions which give meaning: studies of gravity to galaxies, stars, planets why are we here, and what is the purpose and meteorites. We work in two geographof our lives? Without answers to these ical locations. The main office is in Rome, questions, the human beings will fail to while we have another office in Tucson, make progress amidst the travails of life. Arizona, where we also have a large 1.8 meter telescope on Mount Graham, which On a practical level, I have never found we use for research. a serious tension between my faith and science. I try to live both of them out Are there interesting historical scientific seamlessly—analogous to how I switch documents or tools there? Something else easily between cultures, be they religious that a visitor might not expect to find if they cultures I was exposed to growing up, or visited? my frequent travels which take me across

The Vatican Observatory hosts a good library, with a number of historical journals and manuscripts dating to the 17th century. We also have a number of historical domes and telescopes in Rome— which still work and are used for outreach purposes. We also have a large meteorite collection, one of the best in the world, which is used for active research. The theme of this issue of the magazine is “Peace.” Are there ways that studying the galaxies inspires a sense of peace for you? If not, what word would you use? Studying the galaxies always gives me a sense of wonder. As I contemplate the vastness of the Universe and the sizes of galaxies, I am often reminded of not only how tiny we are, but also of our ability for transcendence—to be able to understand all these things. These feelings lead me to a deep sense of peace. We’re looking forward to hosting you later this year for the Faith & Life Series. What should someone who is thinking about coming to that event expect to hear? In my talk, I will talk about how Astronomy is really the most transcendental of all the sciences, earning its honor as the queen of the sciences. I will attempt to place the present research in astronomy among the deeper questions of humanity: Where do we come from? And where are we going? I will go on to show how science and faith can go hand in hand, yet we still need to develop a language and a philosophy to be able to talk to each other. Finally, I will talk about how the Vatican Observatory does its part in bridging this gap.

WHO ARE THE JESUITS? The Society of Jesus is a religious order of men within the Catholic Church, founded by Ignatius of Loyola in the 16th century. Its members are commonly known as Jesuits. Although the Jesuits are traditionally famous for their intellectual pursuits, schools, universities and missionary work, they engage in all activities at the service of God’s kingdom. The special charism of the Jesuits is the discernment of

Spirits. Ignatius of Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises is a short manual to direct a person through a silent 30-day retreat, with the purpose of searching for God’s will in one’s life. Ignatius of Loyola’s motto for the Jesuits was “to find God in all things.” From their beginnings, Jesuits have studied the heavens and the natural world in the hope of better understanding God’s creation—thereby giving praise and glory to God.


TWENTY MILES OUT ON A FROZEN LAKE


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St. Philip the Deacon

BY K AT E S T E R N E R

M

ark Baadsgaard is hooked on St. Philip the Deacon’s annual ice fishing trip. “The conversations, the good food, the worship by candlelight, the opportunity to be still and at peace with nature, the chance to enjoy other people having the time of their lives; all these things make these trips so amazing. Catching fish, the thing I love to do, becomes a bonus.” At last year’s retreat, Baadsgaard recalls feeling the peaceful presence of God in the fellowship of a shared experience. “I believe there are times when you get so connected and tuned in to God’s creation, and you appreciate it so much that he’s there with you sharing the experience,” said Baadsgaard. “I didn’t question it. I just thanked God for his presence among us, and for joining us together in that moment—and they were long moments, completely undisturbed, perfect moments, broken only by the words ‘I got one!’” AN ADVENTURE...

Carl Tuura has been a regular participant in the winter retreat. “The ice fishing trip really is different from the summer trip,” said Tuura. “In the summer you’re out on a boat, using the depth finder, moving around, watching the waves, looking for the fish. But in ice fishing, it’s quiet. You have to be patient. You have to wait. And wait. And wait for the fish to come to you. There’s a sermon in there somewhere.” It’s not just being surrounded by nature that forces one to slow down. It’s what happens when people do this together, the times of joking around, the serious stories, and sometimes just the silence and calm. “It’s an adventure,” said Tuura. “It’s adventure and a shared journey. It changes your perspective, gets you outside of yourself and into a fellowship of really great people.” ...AND A PRIVILEGE

Roger Elias has been a group leader since the retreat’s inception.

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30

“When Pastor Mark asked me to help establish this retreat five years ago, I wasn’t sure I wanted to do it. I told him I didn’t really like the typical ice fishing trip, with all the rowdy drinking and partying most guys tend to do. [Pastor] Mark said his fishing trips weren’t like that. I was in,” recalls Elias. The trip is kept simple, with easy breakfasts, sandwiches for lunches, and a meal served by the resort. There’s also time set aside for worship, ref lection, rest and, of course, fellowship. “We get goofy, too,” Elias adds; “you’d be amazed at how much good-natured ribbing goes on between ice houses.” Everyone is welcome; men and women, young people and elders, experienced fishers and novices. And if cost is an issue, scholarships are available to help reduce the cost. “The most important thing is the fellowship, the contemplation, watching people relax and learn and enjoy themselves,” Elias said. “It’s a privilege to share things I love to do. It’s a way to serve my neighbor, and serving my neighbor is serving God’s purpose.” Registration is open for the 2019 Ice Fishing Retreat, which will be January 24-27 at Wheelers Point Resort, in Baudette, Minnesota, on Lake of the Woods. Register online at spdlc.org/register. Registration closes January 13, 2019.

PHOTOS

Craig Kamman (page 28). Jacob Frickstad, Craig Stoermer, Brett Swenson (page 29, top). Caravan across the lake (page 29, middle). George Johnson (page 29, bottom). 2018 Retreat Group (page 30).

DEPTH FINDER The ice fishing retreat is a part of the SPD Outdoors ministry which Pastor Mark Schmid expanded when he joined the SPD staff in 2014. “I have long believed that profound and powerful things happen in God’s creation, in the wilderness,” said Schmid. “SPD Outdoors helps people experience God’s love and grace through activities and events in the beautiful tapestry of God’s creation.” When asked “Why ice fishing?” Schmid replied, “There’s something about ice fishing that is especially conducive to building relationships. You’re four people in an ice house for eight hours, and you’re 10 – 20 miles from land . . . so you fish, you talk, you eat and repeat. It is no wonder that many of those who fish, understand that it’s much more than that, it’s therapy and food for the soul.” Many people who have participated in one of the retreats have developed new and lasting friendships, some end up going fishing together outside of the retreats. The excitement and enthusiasm of the participants creates a contagious energy, in many cases, for the community at large.


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St. Philip the Deacon

1.

OUT & ABOUT

2.

5.

3.

4.

The annual Blessing of the Animals is a chance to meet and greet some of the members of our SPD family who don’t regularly attend worship on Sunday mornings. About 25 dogs and one brave cat made for a “paw”-some September afternoon. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Linda Picek, Bailey and Pastor Cheryl Mathison Mya Otto with Rosie (Owner: Paula Kyllo) Kay Ruff and Jacob Pastor Valerie Strand Patterson Pastor Tim Westermeyer blesses Blu “Braun” (Owner: Julie Braun)


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THE LAND OF FIRE & ICE


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St. Philip the Deacon

WORDS BY AMANDA BERGER PHOTOS BY MARK & AMANDA BERGER

I

approach travel with a sense of “God, what do you have in store for me here?” I know there will be experiences that change what I thought I knew about the world.

When you first step foot on Icelandic soil, it feels like another planet. With quiet volcanos haunting the horizon and geothermal steam rising from vents in the ground, it is like no other place on earth. The drama of the landscape highlighted even more by the fact that most of the island is uninhabitable. When my husband, Mark, and I visited in September, we had the chance to hike a glacier, get up close with icebergs, visit countless waterfalls and stand in the gap between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. Surprisingly, it wasn’t in the awe-inspiring landscape or the warm and welcoming Icelanders that sparked the God moment

33

for me in this trip, but rather learning about Iceland’s conversion to Christianity. Prior to 1000 AD, most Icelanders were pagan, worshiping the ancient Norse gods. Unlike many other countries, Iceland wasn’t converted by missionaries sharing the good news of Jesus Christ, but was commanded to Catholic Christianity by the Norwegian king. Five hundred years later, Icelanders were once again forced by their king to convert to Protestantism following the Reformation. Today, while 70% of Icelanders are official members of the Lutheran church, many of them worship only at Christmas and follow a much more agnostic path. It made me think about how different it is to have freedom in faith, ushered into belief by your family and by the beautiful truth of God’s story, rather than someone telling you what you have to believe. That kind of realization is what changes travel into pilgrimage. If you have the chance to visit Iceland, go. See the puffins and the Northern lights, soak in the geothermal pools and enjoy the amazing hospitality. See the people, hear their stories, and honor their perseverance. See the fingerprints of the Creator God all around.


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LIVE THANK YO U Our Sunday 9:45 a.m. worship can be viewed weekly via live stream. Other special services like Christmas, the Rite of Confirmation and our Faith & Life Lecture Series can also be viewed. Access both live streaming and recordings of past events at spdlc.org/sermons.

L

ast year, my son had to work late on Christmas Eve. His plan was to join our family at church for the service, but as fate would have it, he wasn’t able to make it in time. I kept looking toward the entrance for him to walk in, but nothing. At the end of the service, I turned on my phone and had a text from him, saying, “Nice message! I’m watching at home on my laptop. The service is being streamed!” accompanied by a photo of the sanctuary on his laptop computer! Thank you for making it possible for us to worship “together” for the holiday! JANE SUHR

T

he live streaming of your 9:45 a.m. worship service each Sunday is indeed a far-reaching ministry! Our mother lives in southeastern Minnesota and is no longer able to attend church. Her own congregation provides the sermons online, but how much more she enjoys experiencing all of worship with St. Philip’s. The congregational singing, the anthem, liturgy, the Children’s Message, and receiving the bulletin all enhance her spiritual encouragement for the week ahead. Whenever she hasn’t been able to connect with the live streaming, there’s an obvious empty space in her Sunday morning. As a retired ELCA Pastor, I’m so grateful to St. Philip’s for your evangelistic vision and inclusion of those who may not be able to attend worship.

JULIE WILLIAMS & JAN BROSEN

STREAMING


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St. Philip the Deacon

W E D N E S D AY DECEMBER

5 WINTER

H O L I D AY T E A AT T H E ARBORETUM

CALENDAR

Enjoy a leisurely four-course afternoon tea in the Fireplace Room at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. Transportation is included. Register online.

S U N D AY JANUARY F R I D AY, D E C E M B E R 7

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N AT I O N A L L U T H E R A N C H O I R CHRISTMAS CONCERT

Join a group, taking a bus from St. Philip the Deacon to attend National Lutheran Choir Christmas Concert at St. Mary’s Basilica in Minneapolis. Register online.

S L E D D I N G , S K AT I N G A N D SNOW ANGEL S!

S U N D AY, F E B R U A R Y 3 — 1 0 FA M I L I E S M O V I N G F O R W A R D

SPD will serve as host for the Families Moving Forward program, which offers families experiencing homelessness hospitality, emergency shelter and a path to home with support for stability.   ​I n addition to a safe place to sleep and a warm meal, volunteers share kindness and compassion with families experiencing homelessness. Completing the circle of support, the professional staff at Beacon work closely with each family to address their unique barriers to stability so they may leave the shelter program for permanent housing. There are a variety of opportunities to support this ministry.

We will be hosting an outdoor family winter event, which will include sledding, skating and making snow angels. There will be hot chocolate and hot dogs to warm you up. Register online.

T H U R S D AY FEBRUARY

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S U N D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 4

BELL MUSEUM AND

DINNER AND A SHOW

P L A N E TA R I U M

A family evening that has something for all ages! We will begin with dinner in Fellowship Hall, followed with a show of your choice: either a comedy improv show or a Disney-style movie. For the little ones, there will be childcare available during the show. Register online.

Immerse yourself in a journey through space and time in the planetarium at the new Bell Museum on the University of Minnesota St. Paul campus. There will also be an opportunity to explore the natural history exhibits in the museum. Transportation and tour costs are included. Register online.


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FA M I L I A R FA C E S FIVE QUESTIONS WITH R ACHEL ARENDS

1.

Describe when you knew you’d be going into ministry. The church has always been engrained in my life. Ever since I could walk, I have loved helping my dad (a pastor) lock up the church and greet everyone as they come and go. I used to walk home after Sunday morning worship singing along to the bell carillon ringing hymns from the steeple. I have never not known the family that church creates, and I’ve always wanted to have a role in helping others find that family.

2.

What’s one thing that people would be surprised to know about you? I crochet a lot. I make hats, clothing, blankets, stuffed animals and anything else that I think looks fun or interesting.

Rachel’s big smile and warm heart have made her an instant favorite with SPD’s children. As our Director of Early Childhood Ministry, she is creating new opportunities for families with young children to be cared for and connect with one another.

3.

What are three things on your lifetime to-do list? Run a race in each state. Travel as much as possible—top of my list? Ireland & China. Spread God’s love to everyone I meet.

4.

How do you take care of yourself—spiritually, emotionally, and physically—so that you stay healthy in ministry? I am adamant about balance between work, family, friends and alone time. One way I get alone time is by running and training for long races. It gives me time to think, process and be a better person in general. My spiritual life is filled by the people around me and acknowledging God in all the little things.

5.

What are you passionate about right now? My passions are split between making crocheted gifts and mission work. I realize these are two very different things, but they are both on my heart and I am always seeking to do more in each realm. Mission work for me can be right here at St. Philip the Deacon or across the world. It is a blessing to see God’s work in all people whether they are giving or receiving.


MIS

SION MARKET

GIFTS THAT GIVE BACK ETHICALLY SOURCED â&#x20AC;¢ UNIQUE LOCATED IN THE SPD FELLOWSHIP HALL

JA NUA RY 2 2 Restoring Calm to your Brain with psychiatrist Henry Emmons M.D., author of The Chemistry of Calm JA NUA RY 29 SPD Book Club featuring The Blue Zones of Happiness

5 Week Restoration Series

by Dan Buettner. Hosted by Parish Nurse, Susan Path. FEBRUA RY 5 Achieving Restorative Sleep with Birdie Cunningham, a sleep specialist from St. Thomas University. FEBRUA RY 12 Tools for Discovering Your Strengths and Positivity with Kristin Bransford, Ph.d.

RESTORE .ENRICH. STRENGTHEN.CA LM

FEBRUA RY 19 Restorative Workshop Night. Choose from a selection

For more full course descriptions visit

of workshops including everything from yoga to prayer

W W W. S P D LC .O RG/ R E S TO R E

practices to increase your mindfulness and well-being.


17205 County Road 6 Plymouth, MN 55447

“If you seek peace, be still. If you seek wisdom, be silent. If you seek love, be yourself.” BECCA LEE

V I S I T U S O N L I N E AT S P D L C .O R G

Inspire: Peace  

A Quarterly Magazine for the St. Philip the Deacon Community Published by St. Philip the Deacon Lutheran Church, 17205 County Rd. 6, Plymout...

Inspire: Peace  

A Quarterly Magazine for the St. Philip the Deacon Community Published by St. Philip the Deacon Lutheran Church, 17205 County Rd. 6, Plymout...

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